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  • 1.
    Backman, Sofia
    et al.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Div Clin Neurophysiol, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Rosen, Ingmar
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Div Clin Neurophysiol, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Blennow, Mats
    Karolinska Inst, Dept New Born Med, CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Thomas
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Englund, Marita
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Flink, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Hallberg, Boubou
    Karolinska Inst, Dept New Born Med, CLINTEC, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liedholm, Lars-Johan
    Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Umea, Sweden.
    Norman, Elisabeth
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Neonatal Intens Care Unit, Lund, Sweden.
    Sailer, Alexandra
    Umea Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Umea, Sweden.
    Thordstein, Magnus
    Linkoping Univ, Inst Clin & Expt Med, Dept Clin Neurophysiol, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Swedish consensus reached on recording, interpretation and reporting of neonatal continuous simplified electroencephalography that is supported by amplitude-integrated trend analysis2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 10, p. 1702-1709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuous monitoring of electroencephalography (EEG), with a focus on amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), has been used in neonatal intensive care for decades. A number of systems have been suggested for describing and quantifying aEEG patterns. Extensive full-montage EEG monitoring is used in specialised intensive care units. The American Clinical Neurophysiology Society published recommendations for defining and reporting EEG findings in critically ill adults and infants. Swedish neonatologists and clinical neurophysiologists collaborated to optimise simplified neonatal continuous aEEG and EEG recordings based on these American documents. Conclusion: This paper describes the Swedish consensus document produced by those meetings.

  • 2.
    Zamir, Itay
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Tornevi, Andreas
    Umea Univ, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linkoping Univ, Div Pediat, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Engström, Eva
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Boubou
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, CLINTEC Dept Neonatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansen-Pupp, Ingrid
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Pediat, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Elisabeth Stoltz
    Umea Univ, Dept Food & Nutr, Umea, Sweden.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Hyperglycemia in Extremely Preterm Infants Insulin Treatment, Mortality and Nutrient Intakes2018In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 2213-5766, Vol. 200, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To explore the prevalence of hyperglycemia and the associations between nutritional intakes, hyperglycemia, insulin treatment, and mortality in extremely preterm infants. Study design Prospectively collected data from the Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden Study (EXPRESS) was used in this study and included 580 infants born <27 gestational weeks during 2004-2007. Available glucose measurements (n = 9850) as well as insulin treatment and nutritional data were obtained retrospectively from hospital records for the first 28 postnatal days as well as 28- and 70-day mortality data. Results Daily prevalence of hyperglycemia >180 mg/dL (10 mmol/L) of up to 30% was observed during the first 2 postnatal weeks, followed by a slow decrease in its occurrence thereafter. Generalized additive model analysis showed that increasing parenteral carbohydrate supply with 1 g/kg/day was associated with a 1.6% increase in glucose concentration (P < .001). Hyperglycemia was associated with more than double the 28-day mortality risk (P< .01). In a logistic regression model, insulin treatment was associated with lower 28- and 70-day mortality when given to infants with hyperglycemia irrespective of the duration of the hyperglycemic episode (P< .05). Conclusions Hyperglycemia is common in extremely preterm infants throughout the first postnatal month. Glucose infusions seem to have only a minimal impact on glucose concentrations. In the EXPRESS cohort, insulin treatment was associated with lower mortality in infants with hyperglycemia. Current practices of hyperglycemia treatment in extremely preterm infants should be reevaluated and assessed in randomized controlled clinical trials.

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