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  • 1.
    Ahmed, Hanna N.
    et al.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Med & Clin Oncol, Madison, WI USA..
    Levitan, Emily B.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Coffee consumption and risk of heart failure in men: An analysis from the Cohort of Swedish Men2009In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 158, no 4, p. 667-672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background A previous study found that consuming 5 or more cups of coffee per day was associated with increased incidence of heart failure (HF). We sought to evaluate this association in a larger population. Methods We measured coffee consumption using food frequency questionnaires among 37,315 men without history of myocardial infarction, diabetes, or HE They were observed for HF hospitalization or mortality from January 1, 1998, until December 3 1, 2006, using record linkage to the Swedish inpatient and cause of death registries. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, dietary, and demographic factors were used to calculate incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results For 9 years of follow-up, 784 men experienced an HF event. Compared to men who drank! l cup of coffee per day (unadjusted rate 29.9 HF events/ 10,000 person-years), RR were 0.87 (95% CI 0.69-1.11, unadjusted rate 29.2/10,000 person-years) for 2 cups/d, 0.89 (95% CI 0.70-1.14, unadjusted rate 25.1/10,000 person-years) for 3 cups/d, 0.89 (95% CI 0.69-1.15, unadjusted rate 25.0/10,000 person-years) for 4 cups/d, and 0.89 (95% CI 0.69-1.15, unadjusted rate 18.1/10,000 person-years) for >= 5 cups/d (P for trend in RR = .61). Conclusions This study did not support the hypothesis that high coffee consumption is associated with increased rates of HF hospitalization or mortality. (Am Heart J 2009;158:667-72.)

  • 2.
    Dorans, Kirsten S.
    et al.
    Harvard Univ, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Dept Med,Med Sch, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Mostofsky, Elizabeth
    Harvard Univ, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Dept Med,Med Sch, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Levitan, Emily B.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Hakansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Harvard Univ, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Dept Med,Med Sch, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Alcohol and Incident Heart Failure Among Middle-Aged and Elderly Men Cohort of Swedish Men2015In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 422-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Compared with no alcohol consumption, heavy alcohol intake is associated with a higher rate of heart failure (HF) whereas light-to-moderate intake may be associated with a lower rate. However, several prior studies did not exclude former drinkers, who may have changed alcohol consumption in response to diagnosis. This study aimed to investigate the association between alcohol intake and incident HF. Methods and Results We conducted a prospective cohort study of 33 760 men aged 45 to 79 years with no HF, diabetes mellitus, or myocardial infarction at baseline participating in the Cohort of Swedish Men Study. We excluded former drinkers. At baseline, participants completed a food frequency questionnaire and reported other characteristics. HF was defined as hospitalization for or death from HF, ascertained by Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death records from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2011. We constructed Cox proportional hazards models to estimate multivariable-adjusted incidence rate ratios. During follow-up, 2916 men were hospitalized for (n=2139) or died (n=777) of incident HF. There was a U-shaped relationship between total alcohol intake and incident HF (P=0.0004). There was a nadir at light-to-moderate alcohol intake: consuming 7 to <14 standard drinks per week was associated with a 19% lower multivariable-adjusted rate of HF compared with never drinking (incidence rate ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.96). Conclusions In this cohort of Swedish men, there was a U-shaped relationship between alcohol consumption and HF incidence, with a nadir at light-to-moderate intake. Heavy intake did not seem protective.

  • 3.
    Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Dept Human Nutr, Warsaw, Poland..
    Orsini, Nicola
    Levitan, Emily B.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Brzozowska, Anna
    Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Dept Human Nutr, Warsaw, Poland..
    Roszkowski, Wojciech
    Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Dept Human Nutr, Warsaw, Poland..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Div Nutrit Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dietary Calcium and Magnesium Intake and Mortality: A Prospective Study of Men2010In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 171, no 7, p. 801-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors examined the association of dietary calcium and magnesium intake with all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer mortality among 23,366 Swedish men, aged 45-79 years, who did not use dietary supplements. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the multivariate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals of mortality. From baseline 1998 through December 2007, 2,358 deaths from all causes were recorded in the Swedish population registry; through December 2006, 819 CVD and 738 cancer deaths were recorded in the Swedish cause-of-death registry. Dietary calcium was associated with a statistically significant lower rate of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63, 0.88; P-trend < 0.001) and a nonsignificantly lower rate of CVD (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.58, 1.01; P-trend = 0.064) but not cancer mortality (HR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.65, 1.17; P-trend = 0.362) when the highest intake tertile (mean = 1,953 mg/day; standard deviation (SD), 334) was compared with the lowest (990 mg/day; SD, 187). Dietary magnesium intake (means of tertiles ranged from 387 mg/day (SD, 31) to 523 mg/day (SD, 38) was not associated with all-cause, CVD, or cancer mortality. This population-based, prospective study of men with relatively high intakes of dietary calcium and magnesium showed that intake of calcium above that recommended daily may reduce all-cause mortality.

  • 4.
    Levitan, Emily B.
    et al.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA..
    Ahmed, Hanna N.
    Univ Wisconsin, Dept Med & Clin Oncol, Madison, WI USA..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Coffee Consumption and Incidence of Heart Failure in Women2011In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 4, no 4, p. 414-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Previous studies of the relationship between coffee consumption and incidence of heart failure (HF) have not been consistent, with both potential benefit and potential harm reported. We therefore examined the association between coffee consumption and HF hospitalization or mortality in women. Methods and Results-We conducted a prospective, observational study of 34 551 participants of the Swedish Mammography Cohort who were 48 to 83 years old and did not have HF, diabetes, or myocardial infarction at baseline. Diet was measured using food-frequency questionnaires. Cox models were used to calculate hazard ratios of HF hospitalization or death from HF as the primary cause, as determined through the Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2006. Over 9 years of follow-up, 602 HF events occurred. Women who consumed >= 5 cups of coffee per day did not have higher rates of HF events than those who consumed <5 cups per day (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.72 to 1.20). Compared with women who consumed <= 1 cup of coffee per day, hazard ratios were 1.01, 0.82, 0.94, and 0.87 for women who consumed 2, 3, 4, and >= 5 cups per day, respectively (P for trend =0.23). Further adjustment for self-reported hypertension did not change the results. Conclusions-In this population of middle-aged and older women, we did not find an association between coffee consumption and incidence of HF events. (Circ Heart Fail. 2011; 4: 414-418.)

  • 5.
    Levitan, Emily B.
    et al.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA.;Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dietary glycaemic index, dietary glycaemic load and incidence of myocardial infarction in women2010In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 103, no 7, p. 1049-1055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The association of dietary glycaemic index (Cl) and glycaemic load (GL) with CVD has been examined in several populations with varying results. We tested the hypothesis that women with diets high in Cl or GL would have higher rates of myocardial infarction (MI), and the associations would be stronger in overweight women. We measured dietary GI and GL in 36 234 Swedish Mammography Cohort participants aged 48-83 years using FFQ. Cox models were used to calculate incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95 % CI for hospitalisation or death due to MI assessed using the Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers from 1 January 1998 until 31 December 2006. Over 9 years of follow-up, 1138 women were hospitalised or died clue to a first MI. In multivariable-adjusted models, the RR comparing top to bottom quartile of dietary GI were 1.12 (95% CI 0.92, 1.35, P-trend=0.24), and the RR comparing top to bottom quartile of dietary GL were 1.22 (95 % CI 0.90, 1.65, P-trend=0.23). Among overweight women, the RR comparing top to bottom quartile of dietary GI were 1.20 (95% CI 0.91, 1.58, P-trend=0.22), and the RR comparing top to bottom quartile of dietary GL were 1-45 (95% Cl 0.93, 2.25, P-trend=0.16). There were no statistically significant associations of dietary GI or GL with MI in this population.

  • 6.
    Levitan, Emily B.
    et al.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL 35294 USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hakansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Harvard Univ, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Sch Med, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    alpha-Linolenic acid, linoleic acid and heart failure in women2012In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 108, no 7, p. 1300-1306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    alpha-Linolenic acid (18: 3n-3) intake and linoleic acid (18: 2n-6) intake have been associated with lower rates of CHD, though results have not been consistent. The relationship of these fatty acids with incident heart failure (HF) is not well established. We examined the hypothesis that women with higher intakes of 18: 3n-3 and 18: 2n-6 would have lower rates of HF hospitalisation and mortality. We measured 18 : 3n-3 and 18: 2n-6 intake in 36 234 Swedish Mammography Cohort participants aged 48-83 years using FFQ and followed participants through Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers from 1 January 1998 until 31 December 2006. Cox models were used to calculate incidence rate ratios (RR) and 95% CI. Because of multicollinearity, 18: 3n-3 and 18: 2n-6 were examined separately. Over 9 years, 596 women were hospitalised and fifty-five died due to HF. In models accounting for age and other covariates, the RR for HF comparing the top quintile of 18 : 3n-3 (median 1.50 g/d) with the bottom quintile (median 0.88 g/d) was 0.91 (95% CI 0.71, 1.17, P-trend = 0.41). The RR comparing the top quintile of 18: 2n-6 (median 7.8 g/d) with the bottom quintile (median 4.6 g/d) was 1.14 (95% CI 0.88, 1.46, P-trend = 0.36). We did not find evidence for the interaction of 18: 3n-3 and 18: 2n-6 with each other or with long-chain n-3 fatty acids. In conclusion, these data do not support our hypothesis that 18: 3n-3 and 18: 2n-6 are associated with HF. However, these results may not be generalisable to populations with higher intakes of 18: 3n-3.

  • 7.
    Levitan, Emily B.
    et al.
    Harvard Univ, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Sch Med, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Harvard Univ, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Sch Med, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Fish consumption, marine omega-3 fatty acids, and incidence of heart failure: a population-based prospective study of middle-aged and elderly men2009In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 30, no 12, p. 1495-1500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fatty fish and marine omega-3 fatty acids were associated with lower rates of heart failure (HF) among US elderly, but this has not been confirmed in broader age ranges or other populations where source and type of fish may differ. We therefore conducted a population-based, prospective study of 39 367 middle-aged and older Swedish men. Diet was measured using food-frequency questionnaires. Men were followed for HF through Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers from 1 January 1998 to 31 December 2004. We used proportional hazards models adjusted for age and other covariates to estimate hazard ratios (HR). Compared with no consumption, men who ate fatty fish once per week had an HR of 0.88 (95% CI 0.68-1.13). Hazard ratios for consumption two times per week and >= 3 times per week were 0.99 and 0.97, respectively. Hazard ratios across quintiles of marine omega-3 were 1, 0.94 (95% CI 0.74-1.20), 0.67 (95% CI 0.50-0.90), 0.89 (95% CI 0.68-1.16), 1.00 (95% CI 0.77-1.29). In this population, moderate intake of fatty fish and marine omega-3 fatty acids was associated with lower rates of HF, though the association for fish intake was not statistically significant; higher intake was not associated with additional benefit.

  • 8.
    Levitan, Emily B.
    et al.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Relation of Consistency With the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet and Incidence of Heart Failure in Men Aged 45 to 79 Years2009In: American Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0002-9149, E-ISSN 1879-1913, Vol. 104, no 10, p. 1416-1420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet reduces blood pressure, and consistency with the DASH diet has been associated with lower rates of heart failure (HF) in women. We examined the association between consistency with the DASH diet and rates of HF hospitalization or mortality in 38,987 participants in the Cohort of Swedish Men aged 45 to 79 years. The diet was measured using food-frequency questionnaires, and scores were created to assess the consistency with DASH by ranking the intake of the DASH diet components. Cox models were used to calculate the rate ratios of HF (807 incident cases) determined through the Swedish in-patient and cause-of-death registers from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2006. In multivariate-adjusted analyses, men in the greatest quartile of the DASH component score had a 22% lower rate of HF events than those in the lowest quartile (95% confidence interval 5% to 35%, p for trend = 0.006). In conclusion, greater consistency with the DASH diet was associated with lower rates HF events in men aged 45 to 79 years. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Am J Cardiol 2009;104:1416-1420)

  • 9.
    Levitan, Emily B.
    et al.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Yang, Amy Z.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Adiposity and Incidence of Heart Failure Hospitalization and Mortality A Population-Based Prospective Study2009In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 202-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Obesity is associated with heart failure (HF) incidence. We examined the strength of the association of body mass index (BMI) with HF by age and joint associations of BMI and waist circumference (WC). Methods and Results-Women aged 48 to 83 (n=36 873) and men aged 45 to 79 (n=43 487) self-reported height, weight, and WC. HF hospitalization or death (n=382 women, 718 men) between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2004, was determined through administrative registers. Hazard ratios, from Cox proportional-hazards models, for an interquartile range higher BMI were 1.39 (95% CI, 1.15 to 1.68) at age 60 and 1.13 (95% CI, 1.02 to 1.27) at 75 in women. In men, hazard ratios were 1.54 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.73) at 60 and 1.25 (95% CI, 1.16 to 1.35) at 75. A 10-cm higher WC was associated with 15% (95% CI, 2% to 31%) and 18% (95% CI, 4% to 33%) higher HF rates among women with BMI 25 and 30 kg/m(2), respectively; hazard ratios for 1 kg/m(2) higher BMI were 1.00 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1.04) and 1.01 (95% CI, 0.98 to 1.04) for WC 70 and 100 cm, respectively. In men, a 10-cm higher WC was associated with 16% and 18% higher rates for BMI 25 and 30 kg/m(2), respectively; a 1 kg/m(2) higher BMI was associated with 4% higher HF rates regardless of WC. Conclusions-Strength of the association between BMI and HF events declined with age. In women, higher WC was associated with HF at all levels of BMI. Both BMI and WC were predictors among men. (Circ Heart Fail. 2009;2:202-208.)

  • 10.
    Mostofsky, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit,Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Levitan, Emily B.
    Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit,Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit,Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Chocolate Intake and Incidence of Heart Failure A Population-Based Prospective Study of Middle-Aged and Elderly Women2010In: Circulation Heart Failure, ISSN 1941-3289, E-ISSN 1941-3297, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 612-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-Randomized clinical trials have shown that chocolate intake reduces systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and observational studies have found an inverse association between chocolate intake and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between chocolate intake and incidence of heart failure (HF). Methods and Results-We conducted a prospective cohort study of 31 823 women aged 48 to 83 years without baseline diabetes or a history of HF or myocardial infarction who were participants in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. In addition to answering health and lifestyle questions, participants completed a food-frequency questionnaire. Women were followed from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2006, for HF hospitalization or death through the Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death registers. Over 9 years of follow-up, 419 women were hospitalized for incident HF (n=379) or died of HF (n=40). Compared with no regular chocolate intake, the multivariable-adjusted rate ratio of HF was 0.74 (95% CI, 0.58 to 0.95) for women consuming 1 to 3 servings of chocolate per month, 0.68 (95% CI, 0.50 to 0.93) for those consuming 1 to 2 servings per week, 1.09 (95% CI, 0.74 to 1.62) for those consuming 3 to 6 servings per week, and 1.23 (95% CI, 0.73 to 2.08) for those consuming >= 1 servings per day (P=0.0005 for quadratic trend). Conclusions-In this population, moderate habitual chocolate intake was associated with a lower rate of HF hospitalization or death, but the protective association was not observed with intake of >= 1 servings per day. (Circ Heart Fail. 2010;3:612-616.)

  • 11.
    Rautiainen, Susanne
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm 17177, Sweden..
    Akesson, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm 17177, Sweden..
    Levitan, Emily B.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Morgenstern, Ralf
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Biochem Toxicol, Stockholm 17177, Sweden..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm 17177, Sweden..
    Multivitamin use and the risk of myocardial infarction a population-based cohort of Swedish women2010In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 1251-1256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Dietary supplements are widely used in industrialized countries Objective The objective was to examine the association between multivitamin use and myocardial infarction (MI) in a prospective population based cohort of women Design The study included 31 671 women with no history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 2262 women with a history of CVD aged 49-83 y from Sweden Women completed a self administered questionnaire in 1997 regarding dietary supplement use diet and lifestyle factors Multivitamins were estimated to contain nutrients close to recommended daily allowances vitamin A (0 9 mg) vitamin C (60 mg) vitamin D (a mu g) vitamin E (9 mg) thiamine (1 2 mg) riboflavin (1 4 mg) vitamin B-6 (1 8 mg) vitamin B-12 (3 mu g), and folic acid (400 mu g) Results During an average of 10 2 y of follow up 932 MI cases were identified in the CVD free group and 269 cases in the CVD group In the CVD-free group use of multivitamins only, compared with no use of supplements was associated with a multivariable adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 073 (95% CI 057 0 93) The HR for multivitamin use together with other supplements was 0 70 (95% CI 0 57 0 87) The HR for use of supplements other than multivitamins was 093 (95% CI 081 1 08) The use of multivitamins for >= 5 y was associated with an HR of 0 59 (95% CI 044 0 80) In the CVD group use of multivitamins alone or together with other supplements was not associated with MI Conclusions The use of multivitamins was inversely associated with MI especially long term use among women with no CVD Further prospective studies with detailed information on the content of preparations and the duration of use are needed to confirm or refute our findings Am J Clin Nutr 2010 92 1251-6

  • 12.
    Rautiainen, Susanne
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Levitan, Emily B.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fruit and vegetable intake and rate of heart failure: a population-based prospective cohort of women2015In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimsAlthough numerous studies have investigated fruit and vegetable consumption in association with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) such as coronary heart disease and stroke, a limited number of studies have investigated the association with heart failure. The aim of this study was to assess the association between fruit and vegetable intake and the incidence of heart failure among women. Methods and resultsIn September 1997, a total of 34 319 women (aged 49-83 years) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, free of cancer and CVD at baseline, completed a food-frequency questionnaire. Women were followed for incident heart failure (diagnosis as primary or secondary cause) through December 2011 using administrative health registries. Over 12.9years of follow-up (442 348 person-years), we identified 3051 incident cases of heart failure. Total fruit and vegetable consumption was inversely associated with the rate of heart failure {the multivariable-adjusted rate ratio (RR) in the highest quintile compared with the lowest was 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70-0.90]}. Fruit (mutually adjusted for vegetables) were not significantly associated with rate of heart failure (RR 0.94; 95% CI 0.83-1.07), whereas vegetables showed an inverse association (RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.73-0.95). When investigating the shape of association, we found evidence of a non-linear association (P = 0.01), and the lowest rates of heart failure were observed among women consuming 5 servings/day of fruit and vegetables, without further decrease with increasing intake. ConclusionsIn this population-based prospective cohort study of women, higher total consumption of fruit and vegetables was inversely associated with the incidence of heart failure.

  • 13.
    Rautiainen, Susanne
    et al.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.;Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA.;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Levitan, Emily B.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL USA..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Harvard Univ, Sch Med, Boston, MA USA.;Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Total Antioxidant Capacity of Diet and Risk of Heart Failure: A Population-based Prospective Cohort of Women2013In: American Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0002-9343, E-ISSN 1555-7162, Vol. 126, no 6, p. 494-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have investigated the association between individual antioxidants and risk of heart failure. No previous study has investigated the role of all antioxidants present in diet in relation to heart failure. The aim of this study was to assess the association between total antioxidant capacity of diet, which reflects all of the antioxidant compounds in food and the interactions between them, and the incidence of heart failure among middle-aged and elderly women. METHODS: In September 1997, 33,713 women (aged 49-83 years) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort completed a food-frequency questionnaire. Estimates of dietary total antioxidant capacity were based on the Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity assay measurements of foods. Women were followed for incident heart failure (hospitalization or mortality of heart failure as the primary cause) through December 2009 using administrative health registries. Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: During 11.3 years of follow-up (394,059 person-years), we identified 894 incident cases of heart failure. Total antioxidant capacity of diet was inversely associated with heart failure (the multivariable-adjusted relative risk in the highest quintile compared with the lowest was 0.58 [ 95% confidence interval, 0.47-0.72; P for trend <.001]). The crude incidence rate was 18/10,000 person-years in the highest quintile versus 34/10,000 person-years in the lowest quintile. CONCLUSIONS: The total antioxidant capacity of diet, an estimate reflecting all antioxidants in diet, was associated with lower risk of heart failure. These results indicate that a healthful diet high in antioxidants may help prevent heart failure. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Rautiainen, Susanne
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Levitan, Emily B.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL USA.;Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Orsini, Nicola
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Akesson, Agneta
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Morgenstern, Ralf
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Biochem Toxicol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mittleman, Murray A.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Res Unit, Boston, MA 02215 USA..
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Total Antioxidant Capacity from Diet and Risk of Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Cohort of Women2012In: American Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0002-9343, E-ISSN 1555-7162, Vol. 125, no 10, p. 974-980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There are no previous studies investigating the effect of all dietary antioxidants in relation to myocardial infarction. The total antioxidant capacity of diet takes into account all antioxidants and synergistic effects between them. The aim of this study was to examine how total antioxidant capacity of diet and antioxidant-containing foods were associated with incident myocardial infarction among middle-aged and elderly women. METHODS: In the population-based prospective Swedish Mammography Cohort of 49-83-year-old women, 32,561 were cardiovascular disease-free at baseline. Women completed a food-frequency questionnaire, and dietary total antioxidant capacity was calculated using oxygen radical absorbance capacity values. Information on myocardial infarction was identified from the Swedish Hospital Discharge and the Cause of Death registries. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: During the follow-up (September 1997-December 2007), we identified 1114 incident cases of myocardial infarction (321,434 person-years). In multivariable-adjusted analysis, the HR for women comparing the highest quintile of dietary total antioxidant capacity to the lowest was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67-0.97; P for trend = 0.02). Servings of fruit and vegetables and whole grains were nonsignificantly inversely associated with myocardial infarction. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that dietary total antioxidant capacity, based on fruits, vegetables, coffee, and whole grains, is of importance in the prevention of myocardial infarction. (c) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. circle The American Journal of Medicine (2012) 125, 974-980

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