uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alm Fjellborg, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Uppsala University.
    Housing tenure and residential mobility in Stockholm 1990-20142018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis the links between housing tenure, income and selective, segregation generating, residential mobility are explored. The development of these links is analysed against the background of housing regime changes in Stockholm between 1990 and 2014. Housing policy changes in Sweden, and Stockholm, promote ownership through, for instance, housing tenure conversions and the tax-system. What this development means for residential mobility trends and may mean for ethnic and economic segregation is explored in three articles. Paper 1 contrasts two time periods and provides an analysis of residential mobility and economic sorting. It is shown that the socioeconomic composition of movers is relatively stable over time while the increasingly owner dominated housing market in Stockholm contributes to stronger socio-spatial residential patterns through the strengthened economic sorting of movers across the whole income scale. Paper 2 has a focus on ethnic and socioeconomic differences in out-mobility from poor neighbourhoods. The findings indicate that foreign background residents are dependent upon housing wealth and income to be able to leave poor neighbourhoods when they move, while the Swedish background group has a variety of resources at their disposal when they move. Paper 3 analyses how housing tenure affects moving, and movers' destinations, in neighbourhoods with high concentrations of non-western foreign-born residents in Stockholm. By comparing two cohorts (1993-2000 and 2001-2008) it is analysed how this relationship develops over time. Housing tenure and income do not seem to be pivotal for who moves, but increasingly important for where movers end up. Results display ethnic differences and how the changing housing market in Stockholm reproduces ethnic segregation. Two main conclusions from the thesis are that (i) the changing housing regime in Stockholm produces stronger economic sorting of movers – this has been affected by the geographically, socioeconomically and ethnically uneven gains from the housing market transformations experienced over the last three decades. (ii) The residential mobility patterns and the economic stratification of residential mobility opportunities that the reconfiguration of Stockholm’s housing market gives rise to increases the economic, political and social marginalization of neighbourhoods characterized by low income levels and high shares of foreign-born residents. Combating ethnic segregation is today even more closely related to the socioeconomic differences between the foreign-born and native-born parts of the population.

    List of papers
    1. Residential mobility and spatial sorting in Stockholm 1990-2014: The changing importance of housing tenure and income
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Residential mobility and spatial sorting in Stockholm 1990-2014: The changing importance of housing tenure and income
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper an analysis of residential mobility and sorting by income in Stockholm is carried out. The study contrasts two periods: one (1990-2001) characterised by recovery after the economic crisis in 1991-1992 and one (2002-2014) characterised by large changes to the housing stock composition. With the use of a longitudinal full population data set, it is shown that the socioeconomic composition of movers is relatively stable over time, while the economic sorting of movers increases. People with low income are increasingly likely to move into low-income neighbourhoods, whether they move into the rental or owner segments of the housing market. Those who own their housing unit and mid- to high-income earners increasingly avoid moving to low-income neighbourhoods. The paper concludes that the increasingly owner-dominated housing market in Stockholm contributes to stronger socio-spatial residential patterns through the economic sorting of movers across the whole income scale. 

    Keywords
    Residential mobility, housing tenure, spatial sorting, Stockholm
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Research subject
    Social and Economic Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363443 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2018-10-26
    2. Leaving poor neighbourhoods: the role of income and housing tenure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leaving poor neighbourhoods: the role of income and housing tenure
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, few studies have adopted a particular focus on the role of housing tenure when analysing ethnic and socioeconomic differences in out-mobility from poor neighbourhoods. This study contributes to filling this gap. The paper uses a full population data set covering every individual residing in the capital region of Sweden during the period 2006-2008. The findings indicate that those with foreign background are dependent on housing wealth and higher income to be able to leave poor neighbourhoods when moving, while native Swedes seem to be less constrained by income. The results warrant efforts to broaden mix policy beyond the discussion on housing tenure if policy-makers want to counteract the ethnic and socioeconomic imbalances of residential mobility upholding segregation.

    Keywords
    selective mobility, poor neighbourhoods, segregation, housing tenure, Stockholm
    National Category
    Human Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364228 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2018-10-26
    3. Out-mobility from Stockholm’s foreign-born concentration neighbourhoods – a study of two cohorts
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Out-mobility from Stockholm’s foreign-born concentration neighbourhoods – a study of two cohorts
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the central theme is how housing tenure affects moving from neighbourhoods with high concentrations of non-western foreign-born residents in Stockholm and, by comparing two cohorts (1993-2000 and 2001-2008), how this relationship between housing tenure, ethnic background and residential mobility develops over time. Attention is also given to the sorting of movers. The findings disclose that housing tenure’s effect on moving marginally varies between neighbourhood types, and earlier existing differences between housing tenures are reduced over time. Out-mobility destination data suggest that owning is important, and increasingly important, for moving towards areas with fewer non-western foreign-born residents. The findings show that housing tenure mix as a policy tool to counteract high mobility frequencies in distressed neighbourhoods is losing strength. Results indicate how the increasingly owner-dominated housing market in Stockholm reproduces ethnic segregation through stronger residential sorting by income and housing tenure. 

    National Category
    Human Geography
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364255 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2018-10-26
  • 2.
    Alm Fjellborg, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Uppsala University.
    Leaving poor neighbourhoods: the role of income and housing tenureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To date, few studies have adopted a particular focus on the role of housing tenure when analysing ethnic and socioeconomic differences in out-mobility from poor neighbourhoods. This study contributes to filling this gap. The paper uses a full population data set covering every individual residing in the capital region of Sweden during the period 2006-2008. The findings indicate that those with foreign background are dependent on housing wealth and higher income to be able to leave poor neighbourhoods when moving, while native Swedes seem to be less constrained by income. The results warrant efforts to broaden mix policy beyond the discussion on housing tenure if policy-makers want to counteract the ethnic and socioeconomic imbalances of residential mobility upholding segregation.

  • 3.
    Alm Fjellborg, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Uppsala University.
    Out-mobility from Stockholm’s foreign-born concentration neighbourhoods – a study of two cohortsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the central theme is how housing tenure affects moving from neighbourhoods with high concentrations of non-western foreign-born residents in Stockholm and, by comparing two cohorts (1993-2000 and 2001-2008), how this relationship between housing tenure, ethnic background and residential mobility develops over time. Attention is also given to the sorting of movers. The findings disclose that housing tenure’s effect on moving marginally varies between neighbourhood types, and earlier existing differences between housing tenures are reduced over time. Out-mobility destination data suggest that owning is important, and increasingly important, for moving towards areas with fewer non-western foreign-born residents. The findings show that housing tenure mix as a policy tool to counteract high mobility frequencies in distressed neighbourhoods is losing strength. Results indicate how the increasingly owner-dominated housing market in Stockholm reproduces ethnic segregation through stronger residential sorting by income and housing tenure. 

  • 4.
    Alm Fjellborg, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Uppsala University.
    Residential mobility and spatial sorting in Stockholm 1990-2014: The changing importance of housing tenure and incomeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper an analysis of residential mobility and sorting by income in Stockholm is carried out. The study contrasts two periods: one (1990-2001) characterised by recovery after the economic crisis in 1991-1992 and one (2002-2014) characterised by large changes to the housing stock composition. With the use of a longitudinal full population data set, it is shown that the socioeconomic composition of movers is relatively stable over time, while the economic sorting of movers increases. People with low income are increasingly likely to move into low-income neighbourhoods, whether they move into the rental or owner segments of the housing market. Those who own their housing unit and mid- to high-income earners increasingly avoid moving to low-income neighbourhoods. The paper concludes that the increasingly owner-dominated housing market in Stockholm contributes to stronger socio-spatial residential patterns through the economic sorting of movers across the whole income scale. 

  • 5.
    Alm Fjellborg, Andreas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education. Uppsala University.
    Molin, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Vilka typer av uppgifter gynnar elever som följer kursplanen i svenska som andraspråk?: En undersökning med data från de nationella proven i geografi.2018In: Acta Didactica Norge - tidsskrift for fagdidaktisk forsknings- og utviklingsarbeid i Norge, ISSN 1504-9922, E-ISSN 1504-9922, Vol. 12, no 4, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pupils born outside Sweden are likely to accomplish less in comparison to native pupils, primarily as a result of inferior knowledge of the Swedish language. Based on a statistical analysis (Differential item functioning) of questions given at national tests in geography (2014-2017), it was possible to identify questions where pupils following the syllabus of Swedish as a second language attain either considerably better or more inferior results than expected. Earlier research has shown that pupils whose native language is not Swedish find it particularly hard to comprehend geographic concepts, which was confirmed by the present study. This study furthermore revealed that in particular questions containing a limited amount of text concerning geographic concepts resulted in larger differences than expected between native pupils following the syllabus in Swedish and foreign born pupils following the syllabus in Swedish as a second language. These findings could aid teachers and test constructors in their efforts to adjust teaching and tests by not formulating questions that measure irrelevant background factors, which might affect the pupils’ ability to answer questions adequately, based on their level of knowledge.

  • 6.
    Molin, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Alm Fjellborg, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Uppsala University.
    Geographical variations in the relation between final course grades and results on the national tests in social sciences, 2015-20172019In: Educational review (Birmingham), ISSN 0013-1911, E-ISSN 1465-3397, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grade inflation, involving comparisons between public and independent schools, is presently under discussion in Sweden. This paper reports on discrepancies between national test results and the final course grade in social sciences, in year 9. Open data at school level were used in OLS regression analyses to scrutinise systematic differences between independent and public schools and between different geographical units. The geographical analysis was used to highlight systematic geographical inconsistencies between national test results and the final course grade. The main findings of the present study are: 1) The differences in grading between private and public actors are small when considering important background factors like the average educational level of parents, the school’s grade point average (GPA), and which national test in social sciences was carried out at the school. 2) Schools in metropolitan areas are more inclined to give pupils a higher final course grade than their national test result, and it is less likely that schools in metropolitan areas and in municipalities surrounding the metropolitan areas give pupils a final course grade that is lower than their national test result. The regional differences might well affect pupils’ continued studies, and the ambition of providing an equitable school to all children in all parts of Sweden has thus not been successful

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf