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  • 1.
    Guimaraes, Drielle D.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Fed Paraiba, Ctr Biotechnol, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil.
    Cruz, Josiane C.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Fed Paraiba, Ctr Biotechnol, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil.
    Carvalho-Galvao, Alynne
    Univ Fed Paraiba, Ctr Biotechnol, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil.
    Zhuge, Zhengbing
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marques, Stefanne M.
    Univ Fed Goias, Dept Physiol Sci, Goiania, Go, Brazil.
    Naves, Lara M.
    Univ Fed Goias, Dept Physiol Sci, Goiania, Go, Brazil.
    Persson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Weitzberg, Eddie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Jon O.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Balarini, Camille M.
    Univ Fed Paraiba, Ctr Biotechnol, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil;Univ Fed Paraiba, Hlth Sci Ctr, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil.
    Pedrino, Gustavo R.
    Univ Fed Goias, Dept Physiol Sci, Goiania, Go, Brazil.
    Braga, Valdir A.
    Univ Fed Paraiba, Ctr Biotechnol, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba, Brazil.
    Carlstrom, Mattias
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dietary Nitrate Reduces Blood Pressure in Rats With Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension via Mechanisms That Involve Reduction of Sympathetic Hyperactivity2019In: Hypertension, ISSN 0194-911X, E-ISSN 1524-4563, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 839-848Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several experimental and clinical studies have shown that dietary nitrate supplementation can increase nitric oxide bioavailability. In the oral cavity, commensal bacteria reduce nitrate to nitrite, which is subsequently absorbed into the circulation where reduction to nitric oxide by enzymatic systems occur. Although it is well-known that boosting the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway can improve cardiovascular, renal, and metabolic functions and that sympathoexcitation contributes to the development of the same disorders, the potential effects of dietary nitrate on sympathetic activity remain to be elucidated. In this study, we hypothesized that treatment with inorganic nitrate could prevent the increase in sympathetic nerve activity in an experimental model of Ang II (angiotensin II)-induced hypertension. Multiple in vivo approaches were combined, that is, Wistar rats orally treated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, 0.5 g/L) and implanted with subcutaneous osmotic minipump for continuous delivery of Ang II (120 ng/kg per minute; 14 days). Simultaneously, rats were supplemented with sodium nitrate (10 mmol/L) or placebo (sodium chloride; 10 mmol/L) in the drinking water. Blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity were recorded. In placebo-treated rats, Ang II+ L-NAME treatment-induced arterial hypertension, which was linked with reduced spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity and increased renal sympathetic nerve activity, as well as upregulation of AT 1 Rs (Ang II type-1 receptors) in the rostral ventrolateral medulla. Supplementation with nitrate normalized the expression of AT 1 Rs in rostral ventrolateral medulla and reduced sympathetic nerve activity, which was associated with attenuated development of hypertension. In conclusion, chronic dietary nitrate supplementation blunted the development of hypertension via mechanisms that involve reduction of sympathetic outflow.

  • 2.
    Peleli, Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Flacker, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Pediatric Surgery. Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhuge, Zhengbing
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gomez, Cristina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Physiol Chem 2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wheelock, Craig E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Div Physiol Chem 2, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Persson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlstrom, Mattias
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Renal denervation attenuates hypertension and renal dysfunction in a model of cardiovascular and renal disease, which is associated with reduced NADPH and xanthine oxidase activity2017In: Redox Biology, ISSN 0090-7324, E-ISSN 2213-2317, Vol. 13, p. 522-527Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxidative stress is considered a central pathophysiological event in cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. Early age reduction in renal mass is associated with hypertension and oxidative stress in later life, which is aggravated by increased salt intake. The aim of the present study was to examine if renal sympathetic denervation can exert blood pressure lowering effects in uninephrectomized (UNX) rats (3-week old) fed with high salt (HS, 4%; w/w) diet for 4 weeks. Moreover, we investigated if renal denervation is associated with changes in NADPH and xanthine oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species. Rats with UNX + HS had reduced renal function, elevated systolic and diastolic arterial pressures, which was accompanied by increased heart weight, and cardiac superoxide production compared to sham operated Controls. UNX + HS was also associated with higher expression and activity of NADPH and xanthine oxidase in the kidney. Renal denervation in rats with UNX + HS attenuated the development of hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy, but also improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced proteinuria. Mechanistically, renal de nervation was associated with lower expression and activity of both NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase in the kidney, but also reduced superoxide production in the heart. In conclusion, our study shows for the first time that renal denervation has anti-hypertensive, cardio- and reno-protective effects in the UNX + HS model, which can be associated with decreased NADPH oxidase- and xanthine oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (i.e., superoxide and hydrogen peroxide) in the kidney.

  • 3.
    Yang, Ting
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Nephrol, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Zhang, Xing-Mei
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tarnawski, Laura
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Peleli, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zhuge, Zhengbing
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Terrando, Niccolo
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.;Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Anesthesiol, Durham, NC 27710 USA..
    Harris, Robert A.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Solna, Ctr Mol Med, Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Olofsson, Peder S.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Persson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Jon O.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Weitzberg, Eddie
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Carlström, Mattias
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Nanna Svartz Vag 2, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Dietary nitrate attenuates renal ischemia-reperfusion injuries by modulation of immune responses and reduction of oxidative stress2017In: Redox Biology, ISSN 0090-7324, E-ISSN 2213-2317, Vol. 13, p. 320-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury involves complex pathological processes in which reduction of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability is suggested as a key factor. Inorganic nitrate can form NO in vivo via NO synthase-independent pathways and may thus provide beneficial effects during IR. Herein we evaluated the effects of dietary nitrate supplementation in a renal IR model. Male mice (C57BL/6J) were fed nitrate-supplemented chow (1.0 mmol/kg/day) or standard chow for two weeks prior to 30 min ischemia and during the reperfusion period. Unilateral renal IR caused profound tubular and glomerular damage in the ischemic kidney. Renal function, assessed by plasma creatinine levels, glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow, was also impaired after IR. All these pathologies were significantly improved by nitrate. Mechanistically, nitrate treatment reduced renal superoxide generation, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-12 p70) and macrophage infiltration in the kidney. Moreover, nitrate reduced mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemo attractors, while increasing anti-inflammatory cytokines in the injured kidney. In another cohort of mice, two weeks of nitrate supplementation lowered superoxide generation and IL-6 expression in bone marrow-derived macrophages. Our study demonstrates protective effect of dietary nitrate in renal IR injury that may be mediated via modulation of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. These novel findings suggest that nitrate supplementation deserve further exploration as a potential treatment in patients at high risk of renal IR injury.

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