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  • 1.
    Seamon, David
    et al.
    Kansas State University.
    Lundberg, Adam
    Royal Institute of Art, Stockholm.
    Humanistic Geography2017In: International Encyclopedia of Geography: People, the Earth, Environment and Technology / [ed] D. Richardson, N. Castree, M. F. Goodchild, A. Kobayashi, W. Liu and R. A. Marston, John Wiley & Sons, 2017, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First formalized by geographer Yi‐Fu Tuan in 1976, humanistic geography refers to a wide‐ranging body of research emphasizing the importance of human experience and meaning in understanding people's relationship with places and geographical environments. Recognizing that human involvement with the geographical world is complex and multidimensional, humanistic geographers interpret human action and awareness as they both sustain and are sustained by such geographic phenomena as space, place, home, mobility, landscape, region, nature, and human‐made environments. Humanistic geography was most prominent in the 1970s and 1980s. Over time, it was largely superseded by more focused conceptual approaches, including phenomenological geography, existential geography, feminist geography, poststructural geography, critical geography, and relationalist geography. Today, there is a renewed interest in a humanistic approach to geographical topics, though much of this momentum arises from outside geography via phenomenological research that emphasizes “lived emplacement.”

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