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  • 1.
    Babateen, Omar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Jin, Zhe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Bhandage, Amol K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Korol, Sergiy V
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsberg Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Birnir, Bryndis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Etomidate, propofol and diazepam potentiate GABA-evoked GABAA currents in a cell line derived from Human glioblastoma2015In: European Journal of Pharmacology, ISSN 0014-2999, E-ISSN 1879-0712, Vol. 748, p. 101-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GABAA receptors are pentameric chloride ion channels that are opened by GABA. We have screened a cell line derived from human glioblastoma, U3047MG, for expression of GABAA receptor subunit isoforms and formation of functional ion channels. We identified GABAA receptors subunit α2, α3, α5, β1, β2, β3, δ, γ3, π, and θ mRNAs in the U3047MG cell line. Whole-cell GABA-activated currents were recorded and the half-maximal concentration (EC50) for the GABA-activated current was 36μM. The currents were activated by THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) and enhanced by the benzodiazepine diazepam (1μM) and the general anesthetics etomidate and propofol (50μM). In line with the expressed GABAA receptors containing at least the α3β3θ subunits, the receptors were highly sensitive to etomidate (EC50=55nM). Immunocytochemistry identified expression of the α3 and β3 subunit proteins. Our results show that the GABAA receptors in the glial cell line are functional and are modulated by classical GABAA receptor drugs. We propose that the U3047MG cell line may be used as a model system to study GABAA receptors function and pharmacology in glial cells.

  • 2.
    Babateen, Omar M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Jin, Zhe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Bhandage, Amol K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Korol, Sergiy V.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Nilsson, Karin Forsberg
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Birnir, Bryndis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    GABA-A receptor currents in a cell line (U3047MG) derived from a human glioblastoma tumor are enhanced by etomidate, propofol and diazepam2014In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 211, no S696, p. 100-100, article id P74Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Begemann, Martin
    et al.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Rajasekhar, VK
    Fuller, Gregory N
    Holland, Eric C
    Dissecting gliomagemesis using glial-specifictransgenic mouse models2003In: Genomic and Molecular Neuro-Oncology, Jones & Bartlett Publishers, Inc , 2003Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 4.
    Caja, Laia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Tzavlaki, Kalliopi
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Dadras, Mahsa Shahidi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tan, E-Jean
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hatem, Gad
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Maturi, Naga Prathyusha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Morén, Anita
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Wik, Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Watanabe, Yukihide
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Univ Tsukuba, Dept Expt Pathol, Fac Med, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
    Savary, Katia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Reims, UMR CNRS MEDyC 7369, Reims, France.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Moustakas, Aristidis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Snail regulates BMP and TGF beta pathways to control the differentiation status of glioma-initiating cells2018In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 37, no 19, p. 2515-2531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma multiforme is a brain malignancy characterized by high heterogeneity, invasiveness, and resistance to current therapies, attributes related to the occurrence of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) promotes self-renewal and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) induces differentiation of GSCs. BMP7 induces the transcription factor Snail to promote astrocytic differentiation in GSCs and suppress tumor growth in vivo. We demonstrate that Snail represses stemness in GSCs. Snail interacts with SMAD signaling mediators, generates a positive feedback loop of BMP signaling and transcriptionally represses the TGFB1 gene, decreasing TGF beta 1 signaling activity. Exogenous TGF beta 1 counteracts Snail function in vitro, and in vivo promotes proliferation and re-expression of Nestin, confirming the importance of TGFB1 gene repression by Snail. In conclusion, novel insight highlights mechanisms whereby Snail differentially regulates the activity of the opposing BMP and TGF beta pathways, thus promoting an astrocytic fate switch and repressing stemness in GSCs.

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  • 5.
    Cancer, Matko
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Drews, Lisa F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bengtsson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bolin, Sara
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Rosén, Gabriela
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Forsberg Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Weishaupt, Holger
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Johansson, Fredrik K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    BET and Aurora Kinase A inhibitors synergize against MYCN-positive human glioblastoma cells2019In: Cell Death and Disease, ISSN 2041-4889, E-ISSN 2041-4889, Vol. 10, article id 881Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults. Patients usually undergo surgery followed by aggressive radio- and chemotherapy with the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ). Still, median survival is only 12-15 months after diagnosis. Many human cancers including GBMs demonstrate addiction to MYC transcription factor signaling and can become susceptible to inhibition of MYC downstream genes. JQ1 is an effective inhibitor of BET Bromodomains, a class of epigenetic readers regulating expression of downstream MYC targets. Here, we show that BET inhibition decreases viability of patient-derived GBM cell lines. We propose a distinct expression signature of MYCN-elevated GBM cells that correlates with significant sensitivity to BET inhibition. In tumors showing JQ1 sensitivity, we found enrichment of pathways regulating cell cycle, DNA damage response and repair. As DNA repair leads to acquired chemoresistance to TMZ, JQ1 treatment in combination with TMZ synergistically inhibited proliferation of MYCN-elevated cells. Bioinformatic analyses further showed that the expression of MYCN correlates with Aurora Kinase A levels and Aurora Kinase inhibitors indeed showed synergistic efficacy in combination with BET inhibition. Collectively, our data suggest that BET inhibitors could potentiate the efficacy of either TMZ or Aurora Kinase inhibitors in GBM treatment.

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  • 6.
    Ferletta, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Caglayan, Demet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Mokvist, Liza
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Yiwen, Jiang
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Kastemar, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Forced expression of Sox21 inhibits Sox2 and induces apoptosis in human glioma cells2011In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 129, no 1, p. 45-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies support a role for Sox2 to keep stem cells and progenitor cells in an immature and proliferative state. Coexpression of Sox2 and GFAP has been found in regions of the adult brain where neural stem cells are present and in human glioma cells. In our study, we have investigated the roles of Sox2 and its counteracting partner Sox21 in human glioma cells. We show for the first time that Sox21 is expressed in both primary glioblastoma and in human glioma cell lines. We found that coexpression of Sox2, GFAP and Sox21 was mutually exclusive with expression of fibronectin. Our result suggests that glioma consists of at least two different cell populations: Sox2+/GFAP+/Sox21+/FN- and Sox2-/GFAP-/Sox21-/FN1+. Reduction of Sox2 expression by using siRNA against Sox2 or by overexpressing Sox21 using a tetracyclineregulated expression system (Tet-on) caused decreased GFAP expression and a reduction in cell number due to induction of apoptosis. We suggest that Sox21 can negatively regulate Sox2 in glioma. Our findings imply that Sox2 and Sox21 may be interesting targets for the development of novel glioma therapy.

  • 7.
    Ferletta, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Olofsson, Tommie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sox10 Has a Broad Expression Pattern in Gliomas and Enhances Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-B–Induced Gliomagenesis2007In: Molecular Cancer Research, ISSN 1541-7786, E-ISSN 1557-3125, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 891-897Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previously published insertional mutagenesis screen for candidate brain tumor genes in the mouse using a Moloney mouse leukemia virus encoding platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B, the Sox10 gene was tagged in five independent tumors. The proviral integrations suggest an enhancer effect on Sox10. All Moloney murine leukemia virus/PDGFB tumors had a high protein expression of Sox10 independently of malignant grade or tumor type. To investigate the role of Sox10 in gliomagenesis, we used the RCAS/tv-a mouse model in which the expression of retroviral-encoded genes can be directed to glial progenitor cells (Ntv-a mice). Both Ntv-a transgenic mice, wild-type, and Ntv-a p19Arf null mice were injected with RCAS-SOX10 alone or in combination with RCAS-PDGFB. Infection with RCAS-SOX10 alone did not induce any gliomas. Combined infection of RCAS-SOX10 and RCAS-PDGFB in wild-type Ntv-a mice yielded a tumor frequency of 12%, and in Ntv-a Arf−/− mice the tumor frequency was 30%. This indicates that Sox10 alone is not sufficient to induce gliomagenesis but acts synergistically with PDGFB in glioma development. All induced tumors displayed characteristics of PNET-like structures and oligodendroglioma. The tumors had a strong and widely distributed expression of Sox10 and PDGFR-α. We investigated the expression of Sox10 in other human tumors and in a number of gliomas. The Sox10 expression was restricted to gliomas and melanomas. All glioma types expressed Sox10, and tumors of low-grade glioma had a much broader distribution of Sox10 compared with high-grade gliomas.

  • 8.
    Hesselager, Göran
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nister, Monica
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Complementary effects of platelet-derived growth factor autocrine stimulation and p53 or Ink4a-Arf deletion in a mouse glioma model.2003In: Cancer Research, Vol. 63, p. 4305-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Jiang, Yiwen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Marinescu, Voichita Dana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Xie, Yuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Maturi, Naga Prathyusha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Haglund, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Olofsson, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindberg, Nanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olofsson, Tommie
    Natl Board Forens Med, Dept Forens Med, Box 1024, S-75140 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Leijonmarck, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Glioblastoma Cell Malignancy and Drug Sensitivity Are Affected by the Cell of Origin2017In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 977-990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The identity of the glioblastoma (GBM) cell of origin and its contributions to disease progression and treatment response remain largely unknown. We have analyzed how the phenotypic state of the initially transformed cell affects mouse GBM development and essential GBM cell (GC) properties. We find that GBM induced in neural stem-cell-like glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells in the subventricular zone of adult mice shows accelerated tumor development and produces more malignant GCs (mGC1GFAP) that are less resistant to cancer drugs, compared with those originating from more differentiated nestin- (mGC2NES) or 2,'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (mGC3CNP)-expressing cells. Transcriptome analysis of mouse GCs identified a 196 mouse cell origin (MCO) gene signature that was used to partition 61 patient-derived GC lines. Human GC lines that clustered with the mGC1GFAP cells were also significantly more self-renewing, tumorigenic, and sensitive to cancer drugs compared with those that clustered with mouse GCs of more differentiated origin.

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  • 10.
    Jiang, Yiwen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    On the origin of glioma2012In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 117, no 2, p. 113-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioma is the most frequent primary brain tumor of adults that has a presumably glial origin. Although our knowledge regarding molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in gliomagenesis has increased immensely during the past decade, high-grade glioma remains a lethal disease with dismal prognosis. The failure of current therapies has to a large extent been ascribed the functional heterogeneity of glioma cells. One reason for this heterogeneity is most certainly the large number of variations in genetic alterations that can be found in high-grade gliomas. Another factor that may influence glioma heterogeneity could be the cell type from which the glioma is initiated. The cell of origin for glioma is still undefined, and additional knowledge about this issue may prove critical for a more complete understanding of glioma biology. Based on information from patients, developmental biology, and experimental glioma models, the most putative target cells include astrocytes, neural stem cells, and oligodendrocyte precursor cells, which are all discussed in more detail in this article. Animal modeling of glioma suggests that these three cell types have the capability to be the origin of glioma, and we have reason to believe that, depending on the initiating cell type, prognosis and response to therapy may be significantly different. Thus, it is essential to explore further the role of cellular origin in glioma.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Fredrik K.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Brodd, Josefin
    Eklöf, Charlotta
    Ferletta, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Tiger, Carl-Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Identification of candidate cancer-causing genes in mouse brain tumors by retroviral tagging2004In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 101, no 31, p. 11334-11337Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Murine retroviruses may cause malignant tumors in mice by insertional mutagenesis of host genes. The use of retroviral tagging as a means of identifying cancer-causing genes has, however, almost entirely been restricted to hematopoietic tumors. The aim of this study was to develop a system allowing for the retroviral tagging of candidate genes in malignant brain tumors. Mouse gliomas were induced by a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus encoding platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain. The underlying idea was that tumors evolve through a combination of PDGF-mediated autocrine growth stimulation and insertional mutagenesis of genes that cooperate with PDGF in gliomagenesis. Common insertion sites (loci that were tagged in more than one tumor) were identified by cloning and sequencing retroviral flanking segments, followed by blast searches of mouse genome databases. A number of candidate brain tumor loci (Btls) were identified. Several of these Btls correspond to known tumor-causing genes; these findings strongly support the underlying idea of our experimental approach. Other Btls harbor genes with a hitherto unproven role in transformation or oncogenesis. Our findings indicate that retroviral tagging with a growth factor-encoding virus may be a powerful means of identifying candidate tumor-causing genes in nonhematopoietic tumors.

  • 12.
    Kaffes, Ioannis
    et al.
    Emory Univ, Aflac Canc & Blood Disorders Ctr, Childrens Healthcare Atlanta, Dept Pediat,Winship Canc Inst,Sch Med, Atlanta, GA USA;Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, Dept Cellular Neurosci, Helmholtz Assoc, Berlin, Germany.
    Szulzewsky, Frank
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Dept Human Biol, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Chen, Zhihong
    Emory Univ, Aflac Canc & Blood Disorders Ctr, Childrens Healthcare Atlanta, Dept Pediat,Winship Canc Inst,Sch Med, Atlanta, GA USA;Emory Univ, Winship Canc Inst, Discovery & Dev Therapeut Program, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
    Herting, Cameron J.
    Emory Univ, Aflac Canc & Blood Disorders Ctr, Childrens Healthcare Atlanta, Dept Pediat,Winship Canc Inst,Sch Med, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Gabanic, Ben
    Emory Univ, Aflac Canc & Blood Disorders Ctr, Childrens Healthcare Atlanta, Dept Pediat,Winship Canc Inst,Sch Med, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Vega, Jose E. Velazquez
    Emory Univ, Dept Pathol & Lab Med, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
    Shelton, Jennifer
    Emory Univ, Dept Pathol & Lab Med, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
    Switchenko, Jeffrey M.
    Emory Univ, Winship Canc Inst, Dept Biostat & Bioinformat, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
    Ross, James L.
    Emory Univ, Aflac Canc & Blood Disorders Ctr, Childrens Healthcare Atlanta, Dept Pediat,Winship Canc Inst,Sch Med, Atlanta, GA USA.
    McSwain, Leon F.
    Emory Univ, Aflac Canc & Blood Disorders Ctr, Childrens Healthcare Atlanta, Dept Pediat,Winship Canc Inst,Sch Med, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Huse, Jason T.
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Pathol, Houston, TX 77030 USA;Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Translat Mol Pathol, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Forsberg Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Maturi, Naga Prathyusha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cimino, Patrick J.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Dept Human Biol, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Pathol, Seattle, WA USA.
    Holland, Eric C.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Dept Human Biol, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Kettenmann, Helmut
    Max Delbruck Ctr Mol Med, Dept Cellular Neurosci, Helmholtz Assoc, Berlin, Germany.
    Brennan, Cameron W.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Neurosurg, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Brat, Daniel J.
    Northwestern Univ, Dept Pathol, Feinberg Sch Med, Ward Bldg Room 3-140,303 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611 USA.
    Hambardzumyan, Dolores
    Emory Univ, Aflac Canc & Blood Disorders Ctr, Childrens Healthcare Atlanta, Dept Pediat,Winship Canc Inst,Sch Med, Atlanta, GA USA;Emory Univ, Winship Canc Inst, Discovery & Dev Therapeut Program, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
    Human Mesenchymal glioblastomas are characterized by an increased immune cell presence compared to Proneural and Classical tumors2019In: Oncoimmunology, ISSN 2162-4011, E-ISSN 2162-402X, Vol. 8, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in adults, with a median survival of 14.6 months. Recent efforts have focused on identifying clinically relevant subgroups to improve our understanding of pathogenetic mechanisms and patient stratification. Concurrently, the role of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment has received increasing attention, especially T cells and tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). The latter are a mixed population of activated brain-resident microglia and infiltrating monocytes/monocyte-derived macrophages, both of which express ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (IBA1). This study investigated differences in immune cell subpopulations among distinct transcriptional subtypes of GBM. Human GBM samples were molecularly characterized and assigned to Proneural, Mesenchymal or Classical subtypes as defined by NanoString nCounter Technology. Subsequently, we performed and analyzed automated immunohistochemical stainings for TAM as well as specific T cell populations. The Mesenchymal subtype of GBM showed the highest presence of TAM, CD8(+), CD3(+) and FOXP3(+) T cells, as compared to Proneural and Classical subtypes. High expression levels of the TAM-related gene AIF1, which encodes the TAM-specific protein IBA1, correlated with a worse prognosis in Proneural GBM, but conferred a survival benefit in Mesenchymal tumors. We used our data to construct a mathematical model that could reliably identify Mesenchymal GBM with high sensitivity using a combination of the aforementioned cell-specific IHC markers. In conclusion, we demonstrated that molecularly distinct GBM subtypes are characterized by profound differences in the composition of their immune microenvironment, which could potentially help to identify tumors amenable to immunotherapy.

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  • 13. Kitambi, Satish Srinivas
    et al.
    Toledo, Enrique M.
    Usoskin, Dmitry
    Wee, Shimei
    Harisankar, Aditya
    Svensson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Sigmundsson, Kristmundur
    Kalderen, Christina
    Niklasson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kundu, Soumi
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Aranda, Sergi
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Andang, Michael
    Damberg, Peter
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Arenas, Ernest
    Artursson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Walfridsson, Julian
    Nilsson, Karin Forsberg
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Hammarstrom, Lars G. J.
    Ernfors, Patrik
    Vulnerability of Glioblastoma Cells to Catastrophic Vacuolization and Death Induced by a Small Molecule2014In: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172, Vol. 157, no 2, p. 313-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer with marginal life expectancy. Based on the assumption that GBM cells gain functions not necessarily involved in the cancerous process, patient-derived glioblastoma cells (GCs) were screened to identify cellular processes amenable for development of targeted treatments. The quinine-derivative NSC13316 reliably and selectively compromised viability. Synthetic chemical expansion reveals delicate structure-activity relationship and analogs with increased potency, termed Vacquinols. Vacquinols stimulate death by membrane ruffling, cell rounding, massive macropinocytic vacuole accumulation, ATP depletion, and cytoplasmic membrane rupture of GCs. The MAP kinase MKK4, identified by a shRNA screen, represents a critical signaling node. Vacquinol-1 displays excellent in vivo pharmacokinetics and brain exposure, attenuates disease progression, and prolongs survival in a GBM animal model. These results identify a vulnerability to massive vacuolization that can be targeted by small molecules and point to the possible exploitation of this process in the design of anticancer therapies.

  • 14.
    Lindberg, Nanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Jiang, Yiwen
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Xie, Yuan
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Bolouri, Hamid
    Kastemar, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Olofsson, Tommie
    Holland, Eric C.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Oncogenic Signaling Is Dominant to Cell of Origin and Dictates Astrocytic or Oligodendroglial Tumor Development from Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells2014In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 34, no 44, p. 14644-14651Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stem cells, believed to be the cellular origin of glioma, are able to generate gliomas, according to experimental studies. Here we investigated the potential and circumstances of more differentiated cells to generate glioma development. We and others have shown that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) can also be the cell of origin for experimental oligodendroglial tumors. However, the question of whether OPCs have the capacity to initiate astrocytic gliomas remains unanswered. Astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors represent the two most common groups of glioma and have been considered as distinct disease groups with putatively different origins. Here we show that mouse OPCs can give rise to both types of glioma given the right circumstances. We analyzed tumors induced by K-RAS and AKT and compared them to oligodendroglial platelet-derived growth factor B-induced tumors in Ctv-a mice with targeted deletions of Cdkn2a (p16(Ink4a-/-), p19(Arf-/-), Cdkn2a(-/-)). Our results showed that glioma can originate from OPCs through overexpression of K-RAS and AKT when combined with p19(Arf) loss, and these tumors displayed an astrocytic histology and high expression of astrocytic markers. We argue that OPC shave the potential to develop both astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors given loss of p19(Arf), and that oncogenic signaling is dominant to cell of origin in determining glioma phenotype. Our mouse data are supported by the fact that human astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma display a high degree of overlap in global gene expression with no clear distinctions between the two diagnoses.

  • 15.
    Lindberg, Nanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Kastemar, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Olofsson, T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells can act as cell of origin for experimental glioma2009In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 28, no 23, p. 2266-2275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gliomas are primary brain tumors mainly affecting adults. The cellular origin is unknown. The recent identification of tumor-initiating cells in glioma, which share many similarities with normal neural stem cells, has suggested the cell of origin to be a transformed neural stem cell. In previous studies, using the RCAS/tv-a mouse model, platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B)-induced gliomas have been generated from nestin or glial fibrillary acidic protein-expressing cells, markers of neural stem cells. To investigate if committed glial progenitor cells could be the cell of origin for glioma, we generated the Ctv-a mouse where tumor induction would be restricted to myelinating oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) expressing 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase. We showed that PDGF-B transfer to OPCs could induce gliomas with an incidence of 33%. The majority of tumors resembled human WHO grade II oligodendroglioma based on close similarities in histopathology and expression of cellular markers. Thus, with the Ctv-a mouse we have showed that the cell of origin for glioma may be a committed glial progenitor cell.

  • 16.
    Lindberg, Nanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Oligodendroglioma models2013In: Animal Models of Brain Tumors / [ed] Ricardo Martínez Murillo, Alfredo Martínez, Humana Press, 2013, p. 57-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oligodendroglial tumors are primary tumors of the central nervous system that largely affect adults. The cell of origin is undefined, but the tumors display many features reminiscent of oligodendrocytes or oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Here, we briefly recapitulate the history of oligodendroglial tumor research, discuss the current knowledge concerning the biology of oligodendroglial tumors, and thoroughly review the various mouse models that have been used and that are currently in use to study oligodendroglial tumor development.

  • 17.
    Moore, Lynette M
    et al.
    MD Andersen Cancer Center.
    Holmes, Kristen M
    MD Andersen Cancer Center.
    Smith, Sarah M
    MD Andersen Cancer Center.
    Wu, Ying
    MD Andersen Cancer Center.
    Tchougounova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Sawaya, Raymond
    MD Andersen Cancer Center.
    Bruner, Janet M
    MD Andersen Cancer Center.
    Fuller, Gregory N
    MD Andersen Cancer Center.
    Zhang, Wei
    MD Andersen Cancer Center.
    IGFBP2 is a candidate biomarker for Ink4a-Arf status and a therapeutic target for high-grade gliomas2009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 106, no 39, p. 16675-16679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The levels of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) are elevated during progression of many human cancers. By using a glial-specific transgenic mouse system (RCAS/Ntv-a), we reported previously that IGFBP2 is an oncogenic factor for glioma progression in combination with platelet-derived growth factor-beta (PDGFB). Because the INK4a-ARF locus is often deleted in high-grade gliomas (anaplastic oligodendroglioma and glioblastoma), we investigated the effect of the Ink4a-Arf-null background on IGFBP2-mediated progression of PDGFB-initiated oligodendroglioma. We demonstrate here that homozygous deletion of Ink4a-Arf bypasses the requirement of exogenously introduced IGFBP2 for glioma progression. Instead, absence of Ink4a-Arf resulted in elevated endogenous tumor cell IGFBP2. An inverse relationship between p16(INK4a) and IGFBP2 expression was also observed in human glioma tissue samples and in 90 different cancer cell lines by using Western blotting and reverse-phase protein lysate arrays. When endogenous IGFBP2 expression was attenuated by an RCAS vector expressing antisense IGFBP2 in our mouse model, a decreased incidence of anaplastic oligodendroglioma as well as prolonged survival was observed. Thus, p16(INK4a) is a negative regulator of the IGFBP2 oncogene. Loss of Ink4a-Arf results in increased IGFBP2, which contributes to glioma progression, thereby implicating IGFBP2 as a marker and potential therapeutic target for Ink4a-Arf-deleted gliomas.

  • 18.
    Niklasson, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Maddalo, Gianluca
    Sramkova, Zuzana
    Mutlu, Ercan
    Wee, Shimei
    Sekyrova, Petra
    Schmidt, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fritz, Nicolas
    Dehnisch, Ivar
    Kyriatzis, Gregorios
    Krafcikova, Michaela
    Carson, Brittany B
    Feenstra, Jennifer M
    Marinescu, Voichita
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Segerman, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Haraldsson, Martin
    Gustavsson, Anna-Lena
    Hammarström, Lars G J
    Jenmalm Jensen, Annika
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Altelaar, A F Maarten
    Linnarsson, Sten
    Uhlén, Per
    Trantirek, Lukas
    Vincent, C Theresa
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Enger, Per Øyvind
    Andäng, Michael
    Membrane-Depolarizing Channel Blockers Induce Selective Glioma Cell Death by Impairing Nutrient Transport and Unfolded Protein/Amino Acid Responses2017In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 77, no 7, p. 1741-1752Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioma-initiating cells (GIC) are considered the underlying cause of recurrences of aggressive glioblastomas, replenishing the tumor population and undermining the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy. Here we report the discovery that inhibiting T-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) and KCa channels can effectively induce selective cell death of GIC and increase host survival in an orthotopic mouse model of human glioma. At present, the precise cellular pathways affected by the drugs affecting these channels are unknown. However, using cell-based assays and integrated proteomics, phosphoproteomics, and transcriptomics analyses, we identified the downstream signaling events these drugs affect. Changes in plasma membrane depolarization and elevated intracellular Na(+), which compromised Na(+)-dependent nutrient transport, were documented. Deficits in nutrient deficit acted in turn to trigger the unfolded protein response and the amino acid response, leading ultimately to nutrient starvation and GIC cell death. Our results suggest new therapeutic targets to attack aggressive gliomas.

  • 19.
    Nistér, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Glial tumors of the CNS2001In: Glial Cell Development, Oxford University Press , 2001, Vol. 2, p. 437-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Põlajeva, Jelena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sjösten, Anna M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Lager, Nina
    Kastemar, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Waern, Ida
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Pejler, Gunnar
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Tchougounova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Mast Cell Accumulation in Glioblastoma with a Potential Role for Stem Cell Factor and Chemokine CXCL122011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 9, article id e25222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of glioma with high mortality and no cure. Many human cancers maintain a complex inflammatory program triggering rapid recruitment of inflammatory cells, including mast cells (MCs), to the tumor site. However, the potential contribution of MCs in glioma has not been addressed previously. Here we report for the first time that MCs infiltrate KRas+Akt-induced gliomas, using the RCAS/TV-a system, where KRas and Akt are transduced by RCAS into the brains of neonatal Gtv-a- or Ntv-a transgenic mice lacking Ink4a or Arf. The most abundant MC infiltration was observed in high-grade gliomas of Arf-/- mice. MC accumulation could be localized to the vicinity of glioma-associated vessels but also within the tumor mass. Importantly, proliferating MCs were detected, suggesting that the MC accumulation was caused by local expansion of the MC population. In line with these findings, strong expression of stem cell factor (SCF), i.e. the main MC growth factor, was detected, in particular around tumor blood vessels. Further, glioma cells expressed the MC chemotaxin CXCL12 and MCs expressed the corresponding receptor, i.e. CXCR4, suggesting that MCs could be attracted to the tumor through the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis. Supporting a role for MCs in glioma, strong MC infiltration was detected in human glioma, where GBMs contained significantly higher MC numbers than grade II tumors did. Moreover, human GBMs were positive for CXCL12 and the infiltrating MCs were positive for CXCR4. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence for a role for MCs in glioma.

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  • 21.
    Põlajeva, Jelena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Swartling, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Jiang, Yiwen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Singh, Umashankar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Pietras, Kristian
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Roswall, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    miRNA-21 is developmentally regulated in mouse brain and is co-expressed with SOX2 in glioma2012In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 12, p. 378-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and their role during tumor development have been studied in greatdetail during the last decade, albeit their expression pattern and regulation during normaldevelopment are however not so well established. Previous studies have shown that miRNAsare differentially expressed in solid human tumors. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)signaling is known to be involved in normal development of the brain as well as in malignantprimary brain tumors, gliomas, but the complete mechanism is still lacking. We decided toinvestigate the expression of the oncogenic miR-21 during normal mouse development andglioma, focusing on PDGF signaling as a potential regulator of miR-21.

    Methods

    We generated mouse glioma using the RCAS/tv-a system for driving PDGF-BB expression ina cell-specific manner. Expression of miR-21 in mouse cell cultures and mouse brain wereassessed using Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry andWestern blot analysis were used to investigate SOX2 expression. LNA-modified siRNA wasused for irreversible depletion of miR-21. For inhibition of PDGF signaling Gleevec(imatinib mesylate), Rapamycin and U0126, as well as siRNA were used. Statisticalsignificance was calculated using double-sided unpaired Student´s t-test.

    Results

    We identified miR-21 to be highly expressed during embryonic and newborn braindevelopment followed by a gradual decrease until undetectable at postnatal day 7 (P7), thiscorrelated with SOX2 expression. Furthermore, miR-21 and SOX2 showed up-regulation andoverlapping expression pattern in RCAS/tv-a generated mouse brain tumor specimens. Uponirreversible depletion of miR-21 the expression of SOX2 was strongly diminished in bothmouse primary glioma cultures and human glioma cell lines. Interestingly, in normalfibroblasts the expression of miR-21 was induced by PDGF-BB, and inhibition of PDGFsignaling in mouse glioma primary cultures resulted in suppression of miR-21 suggesting thatmiR-21 is indeed regulated by PDGF signaling.

    Conclusions

    Our data show that miR-21 and SOX2 are tightly regulated already during embryogenesisand define a distinct population with putative tumor cell of origin characteristics. We believethat miR-21 is a mediator of PDGF-driven brain tumors, which suggests miR-21 as apromising target for treatment of glioma.

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  • 22.
    Roy, Ananya
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Coum, Antoine
    Marinescu, Voichita D
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Põlajeva, Jelena
    Smits, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Tchougounova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Glioma-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) regulates the recruitment of LRP1 positive mast cells2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 27, p. 23647-23661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a high-grade glioma with a complex microenvironment, including various inflammatory cells and mast cells (MCs) as one of them. Previously we had identified glioma grade-dependent MC recruitment. In the present study we investigated the role of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) in MC recruitment.PAI-1, a primary regulator in the fibrinolytic cascade is capable of forming a complex with fibrinolytic system proteins together with low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We found that neutralizing PAI-1 attenuated infiltration of MCs. To address the potential implication of LRP1 in this process, we used a LRP1 antagonist, receptor-associated protein (RAP), and demonstrated the attenuation of MC migration. Moreover, a positive correlation between the number of MCs and the level of PAI-1 in a large cohort of human glioma samples was observed. Our study demonstrated the expression of LRP1 in human MC line LAD2 and in MCs in human high-grade glioma. The activation of potential PAI-1/LRP1 axis with purified PAI-1 promoted increased phosphorylation of STAT3 and subsequently exocytosis in MCs.These findings indicate the influence of the PAI-1/LRP1 axis on the recruitment of MCs in glioma. The connection between high-grade glioma and MC infiltration could contribute to patient tailored therapy and improve patient stratification in future therapeutic trials.

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  • 23.
    Roy, Ananya
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Libard, Sylwia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Weishaupt, Holger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Gustavsson, Ida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Johansson, Fredrik K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Tchougounova, Elena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Mast Cell Infiltration in Human Brain Metastases Modulates the Microenvironment and Contributes to the Metastatic Potential2017In: Frontiers in Oncology, ISSN 2234-943X, E-ISSN 2234-943X, Vol. 7, article id 115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metastatic brain tumors continue to be a clinical problem, despite new therapeutic advances in cancer treatment. Brain metastases (BMs) are among the most common mass lesions in the brain that are resistant to chemotherapies, have a very poor prognosis, and currently lack any efficient diagnostic tests. Predictions estimate that about 40% of lung and breast cancer patients will develop BM. Despite this, very little is known about the immunological and genetic aberrations that drive tumorigenesis in BM. In this study, we demonstrate the infiltration of mast cells (MCs) in a large cohort of human BM samples with different tissues of origin for primary cancer. We applied patient-derived BM cell models to the study of BM cell-MC interactions. BM cells when cocultured with MCs demonstrate enhanced growth and self-renewal capacity. Gene set enrichment analyses indicate increased expression of signal transduction and transmembrane proteins related genes in the cocultured BM cells. MCs exert their effect by release of mediators such as IL-8, IL-10, matrix metalloprotease 2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, thereby permitting metastasis. In conclusion, we provide evidence for a role of MCs in BM. Our findings indicate MCs' capability of modulating gene expression in BM cells and suggest that MCs can serve as a new target for drug development against metastases in the brain.

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  • 24.
    Savary, Katia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Caglayan, Demet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Caja, Laia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tzavlaki, Kalliopi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bin Nayeem, Sarmah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bergström, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jiang, Yiwen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsberg-Nillson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Heldin, Carl-Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ferletta, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Moustakas, Aristidis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Snail depletes the tumorigenic potential of glioblastoma2013In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 32, no 47, p. 5409-5420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive brain malignancy characterized by high heterogeneity and invasiveness. It is increasingly accepted that the refractory feature of GBM to current therapies stems from the existence of few tumorigenic cells that sustain tumor growth and spreading, the so-called glioma-initiating cells (GICs). Previous studies showed that cytokines of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family induce differentiation of the GICs, and thus act as tumor suppressors. Molecular pathways that explain this behavior of BMP cytokines remain largely elusive. Here, we show that BMP signaling induces Smad-dependent expression of the transcriptional regulator Snail in a rapid and sustained manner. Consistent with its already established promigratory function in other cell types, we report that Snail silencing decreases GBM cell migration. Consequently, overexpression of Snail increases GBM invasiveness in a mouse xenograft model. Surprisingly, we found that Snail depletes the GBM capacity to form gliomaspheres in vitro and to grow tumors in vivo, both of which are important features shared by GICs. Thus Snail, acting downstream of BMP signaling, dissociates the invasive capacity of GBM cells from their tumorigenic potential.

  • 25. Schmidt, Linnea
    et al.
    Kling, Teresia
    Monsefi, Naser
    Olsson, Maja
    Hansson, Caroline
    Baskaran, Sathishkumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Lundgren, Bo
    Martens, Ulf
    Haggblad, Maria
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Nilsson, Karin Forsberg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Karlsson-Lindahl, Linda
    Gerlee, Philip
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Comparative drug pair screening across multiple glioblastoma cell lines reveals novel drug-drug interactions2013In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 15, no 11, p. 1469-1478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults, and despite state-of-the-art treatment, survival remains poor and novel therapeutics are sorely needed. The aim of the present study was to identify new synergistic drug pairs for GBM. In addition, we aimed to explore differences in drug-drug interactions across multiple GBM-derived cell cultures and predict such differences by use of transcriptional biomarkers. We performed a screen in which we quantified drug-drug interactions for 465 drug pairs in each of the 5 GBM cell lines U87MG, U343MG, U373MG, A172, and T98G. Selected interactions were further tested using isobole-based analysis and validated in 5 glioma-initiating cell cultures. Furthermore, drug interactions were predicted using microarray-based transcriptional profiling in combination with statistical modeling. Of the 5 465 drug pairs, we could define a subset of drug pairs with strong interaction in both standard cell lines and glioma-initiating cell cultures. In particular, a subset of pairs involving the pharmaceutical compounds rimcazole, sertraline, pterostilbene, and gefitinib showed a strong interaction in a majority of the cell cultures tested. Statistical modeling of microarray and interaction data using sparse canonical correlation analysis revealed several predictive biomarkers, which we propose could be of importance in regulating drug pair responses. We identify novel candidate drug pairs for GBM and suggest possibilities to prospectively use transcriptional biomarkers to predict drug interactions in individual cases.

  • 26.
    Segerman, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Univ Uppsala Hosp, Clin Chem & Pharmacol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Niklasson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Haglund, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Bergström, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Xie, Yuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Westermark, Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sönmez, Demet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Pfizer, Vetenskapsvagen 10, S-19190 Sollentuna, Sweden..
    Hermansson, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kastemar, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Naimaie-Ali, Zeinab
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nyberg, Frida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Berglund, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Sundström, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gustafsson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Segerman, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Natl Vet Inst, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Clonal Variation in Drug and Radiation Response among Glioma-Initiating Cells Is Linked to Proneural-Mesenchymal Transition2016In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 2994-3009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is a hallmark of glioblastoma multiforme and thought to negatively affect treatment efficacy. Here, we establish libraries of glioma-initiating cell (GIC) clones from patient samples and find extensive molecular and phenotypic variability among clones, including a range of responses to radiation and drugs. This widespread variability was observed as a continuumof multitherapy resistance phenotypes linked to a proneural-mesenchymal shift in the transcriptome. Multitherapy resistance was associated with a semi-stable cell state that was characterized by an altered DNA methylation pattern at promoter regions of mesenchymal master regulators and enhancers. The gradient of cell states within the GIC compartment constitutes a distinct form of heterogeneity. Our findings may open an avenue toward the development of new therapeutic rationales designed to reverse resistant cell states.

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  • 27.
    Sreedharan, Smitha
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. CSIR, Inst Genom & Integrat Biol, South Campus,Mathura Rd, New Delhi 110025, India.
    Maturi, Naga Prathyusha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Xie, Yuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sundström, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Libard, Sylwia
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Weishaupt, Holger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fryknäs, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Swartling, Fredrik J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mouse models of pediatric supratentorial high-grade glioma reveal how cell-of-origin influences tumor development and phenotype2017In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, no 3, p. 802-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-grade glioma (HGG) is a group of primary malignant brain tumors with dismal prognosis. Whereas adult HGG has been studied extensively, childhood HGG, a relatively rare disease, is less well-characterized. Here, we present two novel platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-driven mouse models of pediatric supratentorial HGG. Tumors developed from two different cells of origin reminiscent of neural stem cells (NSC) or oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC). Cross-species transcriptomics showed that both models are closely related to human pediatric HGG as compared with adult HGG. Furthermore, an NSC-like cell-of-origin enhanced tumor incidence, malignancy, and the ability of mouse glioma cells (GC) to be cultured under stem cell conditions as compared with an OPC-like cell. Functional analyses of cultured GC from these tumors showed that cells of NSC-like origin were more tumorigenic, had a higher rate of self-renewal and proliferation, and were more sensitive to a panel of cancer drugs compared with GC of a more differentiated origin. These two mouse models relevant to human pediatric supratentorial HGG propose an important role of the cell-of-origin for clinicopathologic features of this disease.

  • 28.
    Tchougounova, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Jiang, Yiwen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Bråsäter, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Lindberg, Nanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Kastemar, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Sox5 can suppress platelet-derived growth factor B-induced glioma development in Ink4a-deficient mice through induction of acute cellular senescence2009In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 28, no 12, p. 1537-1548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SOX5 is a member of the high-mobility group superfamily of architectural non-histone proteins involved in gene regulation and maintenance of chromatin structure in a wide variety of developmental processes. Sox5 was identified as a brain tumor locus in a retroviral insertional mutagenesis screen of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB)-induced mouse gliomas. Here we have investigated the role of Sox5 in PDGFB-induced gliomagenesis in mice. We show that Sox5 can suppress PDGFB-induced glioma development predominantly upon Ink4a-loss. In human glioma cell lines and tissues, we found very low levels of SOX5 compared with normal brain. Overexpression of Sox5 in human glioma cells led to a reduction in clone formation and inhibition of proliferation. Combined expression of Sox5 and PDGFB in primary brain cell cultures caused decreased proliferation and an increased number of senescent cells in the Ink4a-/- cells only. Protein analyses showed a reduction in the amount and activation of Akt and increased levels of p27(Kip1) upon Sox5 expression that was dominant to PDGFB signaling and specific to Ink4a-/- cells. Upon inhibition of p27(Kip1), the effects of Sox5 on proliferation and senescence could be reversed. Our data suggest a novel pathway, where Sox5 may suppress the oncogenic effects of PDGFB signaling during glioma development by regulating p27(Kip1) in a p19(Arf)-dependent manner, leading to acute cellular senescence.

  • 29.
    Tchougounova, Elena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Kastemar, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Bråsäter, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Holland, E C
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Loss of Arf causes tumor progression of PDGFB-induced oligodendroglioma2007In: Oncogene, ISSN 0950-9232, E-ISSN 1476-5594, Vol. 26, no 43, p. 6289-6296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a subset of gliomas, the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling pathway is perturbed. This is usually an early event occurring in low-grade tumors. In high-grade gliomas, the subsequent loss of the INK4a-ARF locus is one of the most common mutations. Here, we dissected the separate roles of Ink4a and Arf in PDGFB-induced oligodendroglioma development in mice. We found that there were differential functions of the two tumor suppressor genes. In tumors induced from astrocytes, both Ink4a-loss and Arf-loss caused a significantly increased incidence compared to wild-type mice. In tumors induced from glial progenitor cells there was a slight increase in tumor incidence in Ink4a-/- mice and Ink4a-Arf-/- mice compared to wild-type mice. In both progenitor cells and astrocytes, Arf-loss caused a pronounced increase in tumor malignancy compared to Ink4a-loss. Hence, Ink4a-loss contributed to tumor initiation from astrocytes and Arf-loss caused tumor progression from both glial progenitor cells and astrocytes. Results from in vitro studies on primary brain cell cultures suggested that the PDGFB-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway via extracellular signal-regulated kinase was involved in the initiation of low-grade oligodendrogliomas and that the additional loss of Arf may contribute to tumor progression through increased levels of cyclin D1 and a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent activation of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase causing a strong proliferative response of tumor cells.

  • 30.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dai, Chengkai
    Celestino, Joseph C
    Rosenblum, Marc K
    Fuller, Gregory N
    Holland, Eric C
    Ink4a-Arf loss cooperates with KRas activation in astrocytes and neuralprogenitors to generate glioblastomas of various morphologies depending onactivated Akt.2002In: Cancer Res, Vol. 62, p. 5551-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nister, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Induction of brain tumors in mice using a recombinant PDGF B retrovirus1998In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 58, no 23, p. 5275-5279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In existing mouse models for malignant brain tumors, genes with no proven pathogenical relevance for humans have been used. Coexpression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGF receptors suggests an autocrine mechanism of growth factor stimulation in the development of brain tumors in man. A murine retrovirus coding for the PDGF B-chain was, therefore, used to induce brain tumors in mice. Of 35 mice who received injections, 15 developed brain tumors of oligo- or monoclonal origin. They coexpressed PDGF B-chain and alpha-receptor mRNA, as expected, from an autocrine mechanism of transformation. Most tumors displayed characteristics of glioblastoma multiforme or of a primitive neuroectodermal tumor, and the consistent expression of nestin suggested that they were all derived from an immature neuroglial progenitor. The results show that an autocrine mechanism of transformation may be an initial or early event in neuro-oncogenesis. The present model provides an ideal system for studies of genetic mechanisms involved in the development of brain tumors.

  • 32.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Östman, Arne
    Nistér, Monica
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dependence of autocrine growth factor stimulation in platelet-derived growth factor-B-induced mouse brain tumor cells2000In: Int J Cancer, Vol. 85, p. 398-406Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Holland, E C
    Modeling gliomagenesis with somatic cell gene transfer using retroviral vectors.2001In: J Neurooncol, ISSN 0167-594X, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 297-305Article, review/survey (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 34.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Tumörbiologen.
    Holland, Eric C
    Somatic cell gene transfer2004In: Mouse Models Of Human Cancer, Wiley-Liss, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey , 2004, p. 474-Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 35.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. IGP462.
    Kastemar, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. IGP462.
    Johansson, Fredrik K
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. IGP462.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. IGP462.
    Holland, Eric C
    Cell type-specific tumor suppression by Ink4a and Arf in Kras-induced mouse gliomagenesis.2005In: Cancer Res, ISSN 0008-5472, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 2065-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nerio, Edward
    Holland, Eric C
    Dissecting tumor maintenance requirements using bioluminescence imaging of cell proliferation in a mouse glioma model.2004In: Nat Med, ISSN 1078-8956, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 1257-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Nister, Monica
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Induction of senescence in human malignant glioma cells by p16INK4A1997In: Oncogene, Vol. 11, p. 111-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Wallmann, Tatjana
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, CCK, R8 01, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhang, Xing-Mei
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Hosp Solna, Dept Clin Neurosci, CMM, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wallerius, Majken
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, CCK, R8 01, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bolin, Sara
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Joly, Anne-Laure
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, CMM, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sobocki, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, CCK, R8 01, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Leiss, Lina
    Haukeland Hosp, Neuro Clin, Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Oncomatrix Res Lab, Bergen, Norway.
    Jiang, Yiwen
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergh, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, CCK, R8 01, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Radiumhemmet, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Holland, Eric C.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Human Biol Solid Tumor & Translat Res, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Enger, Per O.
    Univ Bergen, Oncomatrix Res Lab, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, Bergen, Norway.
    Andersson, John
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, CMM, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Swartling, Fredrik J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Miletic, Hrvoje
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Pathol, Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Dept Biomed, Bergen, Norway.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Harris, Robert A.
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Hosp Solna, Dept Clin Neurosci, CMM, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rolny, Charlotte
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, CCK, R8 01, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Microglia Induce PDGFRB Expression in Glioma Cells to Enhance Their Migratory Capacity2018In: ISCIENCE, ISSN 2589-0042, Vol. 9, p. 71-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-grade gliomas (HGGs) are the most aggressive and invasive primary brain tumors. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling pathway drives HGG progression, and enhanced expression of PDGF receptors (PDGFRs) is a well-established aberration in a subset of glioblastomas (GBMs). PDGFRA is expressed in glioma cells, whereas PDGFRB is mostly restricted to the glioma-associated stroma. Here we show that the spatial location of TAMMs correlates with the expansion of a subset of tumor cells that have acquired expression of PDGFRB in both mouse and human low-grade glioma and HCGs. Furthermore, M2-polarized microglia but not bone marrow (BM)-derived macrophages (BMDMs) induced PDGFRB expression in glioma cells and stimulated their migratory capacity. These findings illustrate a heterotypic cross-talk between microglia and glioma cells that may enhance the migratory and invasive capacity of the latter by inducing PDGFRB.

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  • 39. Wee, Shimei
    et al.
    Niklasson, Maria
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Marinescu, Voichita Dana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Segerman, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Schmidt, Linnea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Hermansson, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Dirks, Peter
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Linnarsson, Sten
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Andang, Michael
    Selective Calcium Sensitivity in Immature Glioma Cancer Stem Cells2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 12, article id e115698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tumor-initiating cells are a subpopulation in aggressive cancers that exhibit traits shared with stem cells, including the ability to self-renew and differentiate, commonly referred to as stemness. In addition, such cells are resistant to chemo- and radiation therapy posing a therapeutic challenge. To uncover stemness-associated functions in glioma-initiating cells (GICs), transcriptome profiles were compared to neural stem cells (NSCs) and gene ontology analysis identified an enrichment of Ca2+ signaling genes in NSCs and the more stem-like (NSC-proximal) GICs. Functional analysis in a set of different GIC lines regarding sensitivity to disturbed homeostasis using A23187 and Thapsigargin, revealed that NSC-proximal GICs were more sensitive, corroborating the transcriptome data. Furthermore, Ca2+ drug sensitivity was reduced in GICs after differentiation, with most potent effect in the NSC-proximal GIC, supporting a stemness-associated Ca2+ sensitivity. NSCs and the NSC-proximal GIC line expressed a larger number of ion channels permeable to potassium, sodium and Ca2+. Conversely, a higher number of and higher expression levels of Ca2+ binding genes that may buffer Ca2+, were expressed in NSC-distal GICs. In particular, expression of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunit GRIA1, was found to associate with Ca2+ sensitive NSC-proximal GICs, and decreased as GICs differentiated along with reduced Ca2+ drug sensitivity. The correlation between high expression of Ca2+ channels (such as GRIA1) and sensitivity to Ca2+ drugs was confirmed in an additional nine novel GIC lines. Calcium drug sensitivity also correlated with expression of the NSC markers nestin (NES) and FABP7 (BLBP, brain lipid-binding protein) in this extended analysis. In summary, NSC-associated NES+/FABP7(+)/GRIA1(+) GICs were selectively sensitive to disturbances in Ca2+ homeostasis, providing a potential target mechanism for eradication of an immature population of malignant cells.

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  • 40.
    Westermark, Ulrica K
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för onkologi-patologi.
    Lindberg, Nanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Roswall, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Bråsäter, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Helgadottir, Hildur R
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York.
    Hede, Sanna
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för onkologi-patologi.
    Zetterberg, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för onkologi-patologi.
    Jasin, Maria
    Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York.
    Nistér, Monica
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för onkologi-patologi.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    RAD51 can inhibit PDGFB-induced gliomagenesis and genomic instability2011In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 13, no 12, p. 1277-1287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Faithful replication and DNA repair are vital for maintenance of genome integrity. RAD51 is a central protein in homologous recombination repair and during replication, when it protects and restarts stalled replication forks. Aberrant RAD51 expression occurs in glioma, and high expression has been shown to correlate with prolonged survival. Furthermore, genes involved in DNA damage response (DDR) are mutated or deleted in human glioblastomas, corroborating the importance of proper DNA repair to suppress gliomagenesis. We have analyzed DDR and genomic instability in PDGF-B-induced gliomas and investigated the role of RAD51 in glioma development. We show that PDGF-B-induced gliomas display genomic instability and that co-expression of RAD51 can suppress PDGF-B-induced tumorigenesis and prolong survival. Expression of RAD51 inhibited proliferation and genomic instability of tumor cells independent of Arf status. Our results demonstrate that the RAD51 pathway can prevent glioma initiation and maintain genome integrity of induced tumors, suggesting reactivation of the RAD51 pathway as a potential therapeutic avenue.

  • 41. Wolf, Rebecca M.
    et al.
    Draghi, Nicole
    Liang, Xiquan
    Dai, Chengkai
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Eklöf, Charlotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Holland, Eric C.
    Resh, Marilyn D.
    p190RhoGAP can act to inhibit PDGF-induced gliomas in mice: a putative tumor suppressor encoded on human chromosome 19q13.3.2003In: Development, Genes and Evolution, ISSN 0949-944X, E-ISSN 1432-041X, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 476-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    p190RhoGAP and Rho are key regulators of oligodendrocyte differentiation. The gene encoding p190RhoGAP is located at 19q13.3 of the human chromosome, a locus that is deleted in 50%-80% of oligodendrogliomas. Here we provide evidence that p190RhoGAP may suppress gliomagenesis by inducing a differentiated glial phenotype. Using a cell culture model of autocrine loop PDGF stimulation, we show that reduced Rho activity via p190RhoGAP overexpression or Rho kinase inhibition induced cellular process extension, a block in proliferation, and reduced expression of the neural precursor marker nestin. In vivo infection of mice with retrovirus expressing PDGF and the p190 GAP domain caused a decreased incidence of oligodendrogliomas compared with that observed with PDGF alone. Independent experiments revealed that the retroviral vector insertion site in 3 of 50 PDGF-induced gliomas was within the p190RhoGAP gene. This evidence strongly suggests that p190 regulates critical components of PDGF oncogenesis and can act as a tumor suppressor in PDGF-induced gliomas by down-regulating Rho activity.

  • 42.
    Xie, Yuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Bergström, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Jiang, Yiwen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Johansson, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Marinescu, Voichita Dana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Lindberg, Nanna
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Segerman, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Wicher, Grzegorz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Niklasson, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Baskaran, Sathishkumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Sreedharan, Smitha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Everlien, Isabelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Kastemar, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Hermansson, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Elfineh, Lioudmila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Libard, Sylwia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Holland, Eric Charles
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Hesselager, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Dept Immunol Genet & Pathol, Sci Life Lab, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    The Human Glioblastoma Cell Culture Resource: Validated Cell Models Representing All Molecular Subtypes2015In: EBioMedicine, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 2, no 10, p. 1351-1363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and malignant form of primary brain tumor. GBM is essentially incurable and its resistance to therapy is attributed to a subpopulation of cells called gliomastem cells (GSCs). To meet the present shortage of relevant GBM cell (GC) lines we developed a library of annotated and validated cell lines derived from surgical samples of GBM patients, maintained under conditions to preserve GSC characteristics. This collection, which we call the Human Glioblastoma Cell Culture (HGCC) resource, consists of a biobank of 48 GC lines and an associated database containing high-resolution molecular data. We demonstrate that the HGCC lines are tumorigenic, harbor genomic lesions characteristic of GBMs, and represent all four transcriptional sub-types. The HGCC panel provides an open resource for in vitro and in vivo modeling of a large part of GBM diversity useful to both basic and translational GBM research.

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  • 43.
    Xie, Yuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Sundström, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Maturi, Naga P
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tan, E-Jean
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Marinescu, Voichita D
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Jarvius, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tirfing, Malin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Chen, Lei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular tools. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Johansson, Fredrik J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nelander, Sven
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Jiang, Yiwen
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    LGR5 promotes tumorigenicity and invasion of glioblastoma stem-like cells and is a potential therapeutic target for a subset of glioblastoma patients2019In: Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0022-3417, E-ISSN 1096-9896, Vol. 247, no 2, p. 228-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary malignant brain tumor which lacks efficient treatment and predictive biomarkers. Expression of the epithelial stem cell marker Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (LGR5) has been described in GBM, but its functional role has not been conclusively elucidated. Here, we have investigated the role of LGR5 in a large repository of patient-derived GBM stem cell (GSC) cultures. The consequences of LGR5 overexpression or depletion have been analyzed using in vitro and in vivo methods, which showed that, among those with highest LGR5 expression (LGR5(high)), there were two phenotypically distinct groups: one that was dependent on LGR5 for its malignant properties and another that was unaffected by changes in LGR5 expression. The LGR5-responding cultures could be identified by their significantly higher self-renewal capacity as measured by extreme limiting dilution assay (ELDA), and these LGR5(high)-ELDA(high) cultures were also significantly more malignant and invasive compared to the LGR5(high)-ELDA(low) cultures. This showed that LGR5 expression alone would not be a strict marker of LGR5 responsiveness. In a search for additional biomarkers, we identified LPAR4, CCND2, and OLIG2 that were significantly upregulated in LGR5-responsive GSC cultures, and we found that OLIG2 together with LGR5 were predictive of GSC radiation and drug response. Overall, we show that LGR5 regulates the malignant phenotype in a subset of patient-derived GSC cultures, which supports its potential as a predictive GBM biomarker. Copyright (c) 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 44.
    Yu, Di
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Jin, Chuan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ramachandran, Mohanraj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Xu, Jing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Nilsson, Berith
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Le Blanc, Katarina
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Adamson, Rachel
    Maitland, Norman
    Fan, Xiaolong
    Essand, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Adenovirus Serotype 5 Vectors with Tat-PTD Modified Hexon and Serotype 35 Fiber Show Greatly Enhanced Transduction Capacity of Primary Cell Cultures2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 1, p. e54952-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors represent one of the most efficient gene delivery vectors in life sciences. However, Ad5 is dependent on expression of the coxsackievirus-adenovirus- receptor (CAR) on the surface of target cell for efficient transduction, which limits it's utility for certain cell types. Herein we present a new vector, Ad5PTDf35, which is an Ad5 vector having serotype 35 fiber-specificity and Tat-PTD hexon-modification. This vector shows dramatically increased transduction capacity of primary human cell cultures including T cells, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, pancreatic islets and exocrine cells, mesenchymal stem cells and tumor initiating cells. Biodistribution in mice following systemic administration (tail-vein injection) show significantly reduced uptake in the liver and spleen of Ad5PTDf35 compared to unmodified Ad5. Therefore, replication-competent viruses with these modifications may be further developed as oncolytic agents for cancer therapy. User-friendly backbone plasmids containing these modifications were developed for compatibility to the AdEasy-system to facilitate the development of surface-modified adenoviruses for gene delivery to difficult-to-transduce cells in basic, pre-clinical and clinical research.

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  • 45.
    Zhang, Lei
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Laaniste, Liisi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Imperial Coll, Fac Med, Div Brain Sci, London, England..
    Jiang, Yiwen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Biochem & Biophys, Solna, Sweden..
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pleiotrophin enhances PDGFB-induced gliomagenesis through increased proliferation of neural progenitor cells2016In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 7, no 49, p. 80382-80390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) augments tumor growth by increasing proliferation of tumor cells and promoting vascular abnormalization, but its role in early gliomagenesis has not been evaluated. Through analysis of publically available datasets, we demonstrate that increased PTN mRNA expression is associated with amplification of chromosome 7, identified as one of the earliest steps in glioblastoma development. To elucidate the role of PTN in tumor initiation we employed the RCAS/tv-a model that allows glioma induction by RCAS-virus mediated expression of oncogenes in neural progenitor cells. Intracranial injection of RCAS-PTN did not induce glioma formation when administrated alone, but significantly enhanced RCAS-platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) B-induced gliomagenesis. PTN co-treatment augmented PDGFBinduced Akt activation in neural progenitor cells in vitro, and enhanced neural sphere size associated with increased proliferation. Our data indicates that PTN expression is associated with chromosome 7 gain, and that PTN enhances PDGFB-induced gliomagenesis by stimulating proliferation of neural progenitor cells.

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