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  • 1.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Berga, Mercè
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    The spatial structure of bacterial communities is influenced by historical environmental conditions2014In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 1134-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatial structure of ecological communities, including that of bacteria, is often influenced by species sorting by contemporary environmental conditions. Moreover, historical processes, i.e., ecological and evolutionary events that have occurred at some point in the past, such as dispersal limitation, drift, priority effects, or selection by past environmental conditions, can be important, but are generally investigated much less. Here, we conducted a field study using 16 rock pools, where we specifically compared the importance of past vs. contemporary environmental conditions for bacterial community structure by correlating present differences in bacterial community composition among pools to environmental conditions measured on the same day, as well as to those measured 2, 4, 6, and 8 d earlier. The results prove that selection by past environmental conditions exists, since we were able to show that bacterial communities are, to a greater extent, an imprint of past compared to contemporary environmental conditions. We suggest that this is the result of a combination of different mechanisms, including priority effects that cause rapid adaptation to new environmental conditions of taxa that have been initially selected by past environmental conditions, and slower rates of turnover in community composition compared to environmental conditions.

  • 2. Arnott, Shelley E.
    et al.
    Fugère, Vincent
    Symons, Celia C.
    Melles, Stephanie J.
    Beisner, Beatrix E.
    Cañedo-Argüelles, Miguel
    Hébert, Marie-Pier
    Brentrup, Jennifer A.
    Downing, Amy L.
    Gray, Derek K.
    Greco, Danielle
    Hintz, William D.
    McClymont, Alexandra
    Relyea, Rick A.
    Rusak, James A.
    Searle, Catherine L.
    Astorg, Louis
    Baker, Henry K.
    Ersoy, Zeynep
    Espinosa, Carmen
    Franceschini, Jaclyn M.
    Giorgio, Angelina T.
    Göbeler, Norman
    Hassal, Emily
    Huynh, Mercedes
    Hylander, Samuel
    Jonasen, Kacie L.
    Kirkwood, Andrea
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langvall, Ola
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Lind, Lovisa
    Lundgren, Maria
    Moffett, Emma R.
    Proia, Lorenzo
    Schuler, Matthew S.
    Shurin, Jonathan B.
    Steiner, Christopher F.
    Striebel, Maren
    Thibodeau, Simon
    Urrutia Cordero, Pablo
    Vendrell-Puigmitja, Lidia
    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Derry, Alison M.
    Widespread variation in salt tolerance within freshwater zooplankton species reduces the predictability of community-level salt tolerance2023In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, E-ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 8-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The salinization of freshwaters is a global threat to aquatic biodiversity. We quantified variation in chloride (Cl−) tolerance of 19 freshwater zooplankton species in four countries to answer three questions: (1) How much variation in Cl− tolerance is present among populations? (2) What factors predict intraspecific variation in Cl− tolerance? (3) Must we account for intraspecific variation to accurately predict community Cl− tolerance? We conducted field mesocosm experiments at 16 sites and compiled acute LC50s from published laboratory studies. We found high variation in LC50s for Cl− tolerance in multiple species, which, in the experiment, was only explained by zooplankton community composition. Variation in species-LC50 was high enough that at 45% of lakes, community response was not predictable based on species tolerances measured at other sites. This suggests that water quality guidelines should be based on multiple populations and communities to account for large intraspecific variation in Cl− tolerance.

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  • 3. Baker, Kate L.
    et al.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Nicol, Graeme W.
    Ricketts, Dean
    Killham, Kenneth S.
    Campell, Colin D.
    Prosser, James I.
    Environmental and spatial characterisation of microbial community composition to inform sampling strategies2009In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 41, no 11, p. 2292-2298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil physicochemical properties and microbial communities are highly heterogeneous and vary widely over spatial scales, necessitating careful consideration of sampling strategies to provide representative and reproducible soil samples across field sites. To achieve this, the study aimed to establish appropriate sampling methodology and to determine links between the variability of parameters, utilising two sampling strategies. The first (design 1) involved extracting 25 cores from random locations throughout the field and pooling them into five sets of five cores. The second (design 2) involved a further 25 cores within five 1 m2 sub-plots. Sub-samples from each sub-plot were pooled in order to determine between and within sub-plot variability. All samples were analysed independently and as pooled sub-samples. Results indicate that pooling spatially separated samples significantly reduced the variability in pH, compared to individual samples. Pooling samples from a small area resulted in lower within sub-plot variability than between sub-plots for pH and bacterial community composition assessed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Following multivariate statistical analysis, a large amount of variation in community composition was explained by soil pH, which is remarkable given the relatively small size of the sampling area and minor differences in pH. Moisture content was also important in determining bacterial communities in the random design (design 1). In the 1 m2 sub-plot design (design 2), the spatial location of the plots explained a large degree of the variation in bacterial community composition between plots, which was due to spatial autocorrelation of pH and possible additional environmental parameters. This study emphasises the importance of sampling design for obtaining representative samples from soil.

  • 4.
    Berga, Mercè
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Biological Oceanography, Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde, Germany.
    Zha, Yinghua
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Székely, Anna J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Functional and Compositional Stability of Bacterial Metacommunities in Response to Salinity Changes2017In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 8, article id 948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbances and environmental change are important factors determining the diversity,composition, and functioning of communities. However, knowledge about how naturalbacterial communities are affected by such perturbations is still sparse. We performeda whole ecosystem manipulation experiment with freshwater rock pools where weapplied salinity disturbances of different intensities. The aim was to test how thecompositional and functional resistance and resilience of bacterial communities,alpha- and beta-diversity and the relative importance of stochastic and deterministiccommunity assembly processes changed along a disturbance intensity gradient.We found that bacterial communities were functionally resistant to all salinity levels (3, 6, and 12 psu) and compositionally resistant to a salinity increase to 3 psu andresilient to increases of 6 and 12 psu. Increasing salinities had no effect on local richnessand evenness, beta-diversity and the proportion of deterministically vs. stochasticallyassembled communities. Our results show a high functional and compositional stabilityof bacterial communities to salinity changes of different intensities both at localand regional scales, which possibly reflects long-term adaptation to environmentalconditions in the study system.

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  • 5.
    Berga, Mercè
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Östman, Örjan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Combined effects of zooplankton grazing and dispersal on the diversity and assembly mechanisms of bacterial metacommunities2015In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 2275-2287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effects of dispersal and the presence of predators on diversity, assembly and functioning of bacterial communities are well studied in isolation. In reality, however, dispersal and trophic interactions act simultaneously and can therefore have combined effects, which are poorly investigated. We performed an experiment with aquatic metacommunities consisting of three environmentally different patches and manipulated dispersal rates among them as well as the presence or absence of the keystone species Daphnia magnaDaphnia magnareduced both local and regional diversity, whereas dispersal increased local diversity but decreased beta-diversity having no net effect on regional diversity. Dispersal modified the assembly mechanisms of bacterial communities by increasing the degree of determinism. Additionally, the combination of the D. magna and dispersal increased the importance of deterministic processes, presumably because predator-tolerant taxa were spread in the metacommunity via dispersal. Moreover, the presence of D. magna affected community composition, increased community respiration rates but did not affect bacterial production or abundance, whereas dispersal slightly increased bacterial production. In conclusion, our study suggests that predation by a keystone species such as D. magna and dispersal additively influence bacterial diversity, assembly processes and ecosystem functioning.

  • 6.
    Berga, Mercé
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Székely, Anna J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Effects of Disturbance Intensity and Frequency on Bacterial Community Composition and Function2012In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 5, p. e36959-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbances influence community structure and ecosystem functioning. Bacteria are key players in ecosystems and it is therefore crucial to understand the effect of disturbances on bacterial communities and how they respond to them, both compositionally and functionally. The main aim of this study was to test the effect of differences in disturbance strength on bacterial communities. For this, we implemented two independent short-term experiments with dialysis bags containing natural bacterial communities, which were transplanted between ambient and 'disturbed' incubation tanks, manipulating either the intensity or the frequency of a salinity disturbance. We followed changes in community composition by terminal restriction fragment analysis (T-RFLP) and measured various community functions (bacterial production, carbon substrate utilization profiles and rates) directly after and after a short period of recovery under ambient conditions. Increases in disturbance strength resulted in gradually stronger changes in bacterial community composition and functions. In the disturbance intensity experiment, the sensitivity to the disturbance and the ability of recovery differed between different functions. In the disturbance frequency experiment, effects on the different functions were more consistent and recovery was not observed. Moreover, in case of the intensity experiment, there was also a time lag in the responses of community composition and functions, with functional responses being faster than compositional ones. To summarize, our study shows that disturbance strength has the potential to change the functional performance and composition of bacterial communities. It further highlights that the overall effects, rates of recovery and the degree of congruence in the response patterns of community composition and functioning along disturbance gradients depend on the type of function and the character of the disturbance.

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  • 7. Besemer, Katharina
    et al.
    Peter, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Logue, Jürg B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Battin, Tom J.
    Unraveling assembly of stream biofilm communities2012In: The ISME Journal: multidisciplinary journal of microbial ecology, ISSN 1751-7362, Vol. 6, no 8, p. 1459-1468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial biofilms assemble from cells that attach to a surface, where they develop into matrix-enclosed communities. Mechanistic insights into community assembly are crucial to better understand the functioning of natural biofilms, which drive key ecosystem processes in numerous aquatic habitats. We studied the role of the suspended microbial community as the source of the biofilm community in three streams using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and the 16S rRNA gene (as a measure for the active and the bulk community, respectively). Diversity was consistently lower in the biofilm communities than in the suspended stream water communities. We propose that the higher diversity in the suspended communities is supported by continuous inflow from various sources within the catchment. Community composition clearly differed between biofilms and suspended communities, whereas biofilm communities were similar in all three streams. This suggests that biofilm assembly did not simply reflect differences in the source communities, but that certain microbial groups from the source community proliferate in the biofilm. We compared the biofilm communities with random samples of the respective community suspended in the stream water. This analysis confirmed that stochastic dispersal from the source community was unlikely to shape the observed community composition of the biofilms, in support of species sorting as a major biofilm assembly mechanism. Bulk and active populations generated comparable patterns of community composition in the biofilms and the suspended communities, which suggests similar assembly controls on these populations.

  • 8.
    Bier, Raven L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Vass, Mate
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Szekely, Anna J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Effects of ecosystem size-induced environmental fluctuations on the temporal dynamics of community assembly mechanisms2022In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 2635-2643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding processes that determine community membership and abundance is important for many fields from theoretical community ecology to conservation. However, spatial community studies are often conducted only at a single timepoint despite the known influence of temporal variability on community assembly processes. Here we used a spatiotemporal study to determine how environmental fluctuation differences induced by mesocosm volumes (larger volumes were more stable) influence assembly processes of aquatic bacterial metacommunities along a press disturbance gradient. By combining path analysis and network approaches, we found mesocosm size categories had distinct relative influences of assembly process and environmental factors that determined spatiotemporal bacterial community composition, including dispersal and species sorting by conductivity. These processes depended on, but were not affected proportionately by, mesocosm size. Low fluctuation, large mesocosms primarily developed through the interplay of species sorting that became more important over time and transient priority effects as evidenced by more time-delayed associations. High fluctuation, small mesocosms had regular disruptions to species sorting and greater importance of ecological drift and dispersal limitation indicated by lower richness and higher taxa replacement. Together, these results emphasize that environmental fluctuations influence ecosystems over time and its impacts are modified by biotic properties intrinsic to ecosystem size.

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  • 9. Coll, Claudia
    et al.
    Bier, Raven L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Stroud Water Research Center, AvondalePennsylvania, 19311, United States.
    Li, Zhe
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Sobek, Anna
    Association between Aquatic Micropollutant Dissipation and River Sediment Bacterial Communities2020In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 54, no 22, p. 14380-14392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of micropollutant biodegradation is essential to determine the persistence of potentially hazardous chemicals in aquatic ecosystems. We studied the dissipation half-lives of 10 micropollutants in sediment–water incubations (based on the OECD 308 standard) with sediment from two European rivers sampled upstream and downstream of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharge. Dissipation half-lives (DT50s) were highly variable between the tested compounds, ranging from 1.5 to 772 days. Sediment from one river sampled downstream from the WWTP showed the fastest dissipation of all micropollutants after sediment RNA normalization. By characterizing sediment bacteria using 16S rRNA sequences, bacterial community composition of a sediment was associated with its capacity for dissipating micropollutants. Bacterial amplicon sequence variants of the genera Ralstonia, Pseudomonas, Hyphomicrobium, and Novosphingobium, which are known degraders of contaminants, were significantly more abundant in the sediment incubations where fast dissipation was observed. Our study illuminates the limitations of the OECD 308 standard to account for variation of dissipation rates of micropollutants due to differences in bacterial community composition. This limitation is problematic particularly for those compounds with DT50s close to regulatory persistence criteria. Thus, it is essential to consider bacterial community composition as a source of variability in regulatory biodegradation and persistence assessments.

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  • 10.
    Comte, Jerome
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Eiler, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Can marine bacteria be recruited from freshwater sources and the air?2014In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 2423-2430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is now clear evidence that microorganisms present biogeographic patterns, yet the processes that create and maintain them are still not well understood. In particular, the contribution of dispersal and its exact impact on local community composition is still unclear. For example, dispersing cells may not thrive in recipient environments, but may still remain part of the local species pool. Here, we experimentally tested if marine bacteria can be retrieved from freshwater communities (pelagic and sediment) and the atmosphere by exposing bacteria from three lakes, that differ in their proximity to the Norwegian Sea, to marine conditions. We found that the percentage of freshwater taxa decreased with increasing salinities, whereas marine taxa increased along the same gradient. Our results further showed that this increase was stronger for lake and sediment compared with air communities. Further, significant increases in the average niche breadth of taxa were found for all sources, and in particular lake water and sediment communities, at higher salinities. Our results therefore suggests that marine taxa can readily grow from freshwater sources, but that the response was likely driven by the growth of habitat generalists that are typically found in marine systems. Finally, there was a greater proportion of marine taxa found in communities originating from the lake closest to the Norwegian Sea. In summary, this study shows that the interplay between bacterial dispersal limitation and dispersal from internal and external sources may have an important role for community recovery in response to environmental change.

  • 11.
    Comte, Jérôme
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Environm & Climate Change Canada, Canada Ctr Inland Waters, Watershed Hydrol & Ecol Res Div, Water Sci & Technol, Burlington, ON L7S 1A1, Canada..
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Berga, Mercè
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Leibniz Inst Balt Sea Res, Biol Oceanog, Seestr 15, D-18119 Rostock, Germany..
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Contribution of different dispersal sources to the metabolic response of lake bacterioplankton following a salinity change2017In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 251-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dispersal can modify how bacterial community composition (BCC) changes in response to environmental perturbations, yet knowledge about the functional consequences of dispersal is limited. Here we hypothesize that changes in bacterial community production in response to a salinity disturbance depend on the possibility to recruit cells from different dispersal sources. To investigate this, we conducted an in situ mesocosm experiment where bacterial communities of an oligotrophic lake were exposed to different salinities (0, 18, 36 psu) for two weeks and subjected to dispersal of cells originating from sediments, air (mesocosms open to air deposition), both or none. BCC was determined using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and bacterial production was measured by 3H leucine uptake. Bacterial production differed significantly among salinity treatments and dispersal treatments, being highest at high salinity. These changes were associated with changes in BCC and it was found that the identity of the main functional contributors differed at different salinities. Our results further showed that after a salinity perturbation, the response of bacterial communities depended on the recruitment of taxa, including marine representatives (e.g. Alphaproteobacteria Loktanella, Erythrobacter and the Gammaproteobacterium Rheiheimera) from dispersal sources, in which atmospheric deposition appeared to play a major role.

  • 12.
    Cunillera-Montcusi, David
    et al.
    WasserCluster Lunz Biol Stn GmbH, Lunz Am See, Austria.;Univ Barcelona, Freshwater Ecol Hydrol & Management Grp FEHM, Sect Ecol, Dept Evolutionary Biol Ecol & Environm Sci, Barcelona, Spain..
    Beklioglu, Meryem
    Middle East Tech Univ, Limnol Lab, Dept Biol Sci, Ankara, Turkey.;Middle East Tech Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Res & Implementat, Ankara, Turkey..
    Canedo-Arguelles, Miguel
    Univ Barcelona, Freshwater Ecol Hydrol & Management Grp FEHM, Dept Biol Evolut Ecol & Ciencies Ambientals, Inst Recerca Aigua IdRA, Barcelona, Spain..
    Jeppesen, Erik
    Middle East Tech Univ, Limnol Lab, Dept Biol Sci, Ankara, Turkey.;Middle East Tech Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Res & Implementat, Ankara, Turkey.;Aarhus Univ, Dept Eoosci, Aarhus, Denmark.;Aarhus Univ, WATEC, Aarhus, Denmark.;SinoDanish Ctr Educ & Res SDC, Aarhus, Denmark.;Middle East Tech Univ, Inst Marine Sci, Mersin, Turkey..
    Ptacnik, Robert
    WasserCluster Lunz Biol Stn GmbH, Lunz Am See, Austria..
    Amorim, Cihelio A.
    Middle East Tech Univ, Limnol Lab, Dept Biol Sci, Ankara, Turkey.;Middle East Tech Univ, Ctr Ecosyst Res & Implementat, Ankara, Turkey..
    Arnott, Shelley E.
    Queens Univ, Dept Biol, Kingston, ON, Canada..
    Berger, Stella A.
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries I, Dept Plankton & Microbial Ecol, Alten Fischerhuette 2, D-16775 Stechlin, Germany..
    Brucet, Sandra
    Cent Univ Catalonia, Univ Vic, Aquat Ecol Grp, Vic, Catalonia, Spain.;Catalan Inst Res & Adv Studies ICREA, Barcelona, Spain..
    Dugan, Hilary A.
    Univ Wisconsin, Ctr Limnol, Madison, WI 53706 USA..
    Gerhard, Miriam
    Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Inst Chem & Biol Marine Environm ICBM, Schleusenstr 1, D-26382 Wilhelmshaven, Germany..
    Horvath, Zsofia
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Ecol & Genet, Erken Lab, Noma Malmavagen 45, S-76173 Norrtalje, Sweden..
    Nejstgaard, Jens C.
    Leibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries I, Dept Plankton & Microbial Ecol, Alten Fischerhuette 2, D-16775 Stechlin, Germany..
    Reinikainen, Marko
    Air Pollut & Climate Secretariat AirClim, Forsta Langgatan 18, S-41328 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Striebel, Maren
    Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Inst Chem & Biol Marine Environm ICBM, Schleusenstr 1, D-26382 Wilhelmshaven, Germany..
    Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol Aquat Ecol, Ecol Bldg, SE-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    Vad, Csaba F.
    Ctr Ecol Res, Inst Aquat Ecol, Budapest, Hungary.;Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Aquat Ecol Evolut & Conservat, Leuven, Belgium..
    Zadereev, Egor
    Russian Acad Sci, Inst Biophys, Krasnoyarsk Sci Ctr, Siberian Branch, Akad Gorodok 50-50, Krasnoyarsk 660036, Russia.;Siberian Fed Univ, 79 Svobodniy Ave, Krasnoyarsk 660041, Russia..
    Matias, Miguel
    CSIC, Museo Nacl Ciencias Nat, Madrid, Spain.;Univ Evora, Biodivers Res Chair, Med Mediterranean Inst Agr Environm & Dev, Evora, Portugal..
    Freshwater salinisation: a research agenda for a saltier world2022In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 440-453Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread salinisation of freshwater ecosystems poses a major threat to the biodiversity, functioning, and services that they provide. Human activities promote freshwater salinisation through multiple drivers (e.g., agriculture, resource extraction, urbanisation) that are amplified by climate change. Due to its complexity, we are still far from fully understanding the ecological and evolutionary consequences of freshwater salinisation. Here, we assess current research gaps and present a research agenda to guide future studies. We identified different gaps in taxonomic groups, levels of biological organisation, and geographic regions. We suggest focusing on global- and landscape-scale processes, functional approaches, genetic and molecular levels, and ecoevolutionary dynamics as key future avenues to predict the consequences of freshwater salinisation for ecosystems and human societies.

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  • 13. Eiler, Alexander
    et al.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Heterotrophic bacterial growth efficiency and community structure at different natural organic carbon concentrations2003In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 69, p. 3701-3709Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Eiler, Alexander
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. limnologi.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. limnologi.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. limnologi.
    Tranvik, Lars J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. limnologi.
    Heterotrophic bacterial growth efficiency and community structure at different natural organic carbon concentrations.2003In: Appl Environ Microbiol, ISSN 0099-2240, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 3701-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Freixa, Anna
    et al.
    Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Girona, Spain.;Univ Girona, Inst Aquat Ecol, GRECO, Girona, Spain..
    Perujo, Nuria
    Catalan Inst Water Res ICRA, Girona, Spain.;Univ Girona, Inst Aquat Ecol, GRECO, Girona, Spain..
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Romani, Anna M.
    Univ Girona, Inst Aquat Ecol, GRECO, Girona, Spain..
    River biofilms adapted to anthropogenic disturbances are more resistant to WWTP inputs2020In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 96, no 9, article id fiaa152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sensitivity and spatial recovery of river sediment biofilms along 1 km after the input of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in two river reaches with different degrees of anthropogenic influence were investigated. First, at the upper reach, we observed an inhibition of some microbial functions (microbial respiration and extracellular enzyme activities) and strong shifts in bacterial community composition (16S rRNA gene), whereas an increase in microbial biomass and activity and less pronounced effect on microbial diversity and community composition were seen at the lower reach. Second, at the lower reach we observed a quick spatial recovery (around 200 m downstream of the effluent) as most of the functions and community composition were similar to those from reference sites. On the other hand, bacterial community composition and water quality at the upper reach was still altered 1 km from the WWTP effluent. Our results indicate that biofilms in the upstream sites were more sensitive to the effect of WWTPs due to a lower degree of tolerance after a disturbance than communities located in more anthropogenically impacted sites.

  • 16. Gerhard, Miriam
    et al.
    Koussoroplis, Apostolos-Manuel
    Raatz, Michael
    Pansch, Christian
    Fey, Samuel B.
    Vajedsamiei, Jahangir
    Calderó-Pascual, Maria
    Cunillera-Montcusí, David
    Juvigny-Khenafou, Noël P. D.
    Polazzo, Francesco
    Thomas, Patrick K.
    Symons, Celia C.
    Beklioğlu, Meryem
    Berger, Stella A.
    Chefaoui, Rosa M.
    Ger, Kemal Ali
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Nejstgaard, Jens C.
    Ptacnik, Robert
    Striebel, Maren
    Environmental variability in aquatic ecosystems: Avenues for future multifactorial experiments2023In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, E-ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 247-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relevance of considering environmental variability for understanding and predicting biological responses to environmental changes has resulted in a recent surge in variability-focused ecological research. However, integration of findings that emerge across studies and identification of remaining knowledge gaps in aquatic ecosystems remain critical. Here, we address these aspects by: (1) summarizing relevant terms of variability research including the components (characteristics) of variability and key interactions when considering multiple environmental factors; (2) identifying conceptual frameworks for understanding the consequences of environmental variability in single and multifactorial scenarios; (3) highlighting challenges for bridging theoretical and experimental studies involving transitioning from simple to more complex scenarios; (4) proposing improved approaches to overcome current mismatches between theoretical predictions and experimental observations; and (5) providing a guide for designing integrated experiments across multiple scales, degrees of control, and complexity in light of their specific strengths and limitations.

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  • 17.
    Guzman, Laura Melissa
    et al.
    Univ Southern Calif, Marine & Environm Biol Sect, Dept Biol Sci, Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA.;Univ British Columbia, Dept Zool, Vancouver, BC, Canada.;Univ British Columbia, Biodivers Res Ctr, Vancouver, BC, Canada.;Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
    Thompson, Patrick L.
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Zool, Vancouver, BC, Canada.;Univ British Columbia, Biodivers Res Ctr, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Viana, Duarte S.
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Halle, Germany.;Univ Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.
    Vanschoenwinkel, Bram
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Dept Biol, Brussels, Belgium.;Univ Free State, Ctr Environm Management, Bloemfontein, South Africa.
    Horvath, Zsofia
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Aquat Ecol Evolut & Conservat, Leuven, Belgium.;WasserCluster Lunz Biolog Stn, Lunz Am See, Austria.;Inst Aquat Ecol, Ctr Ecol Res, Budapest, Hungary.
    Ptacnik, Robert
    WasserCluster Lunz Biolog Stn, Lunz Am See, Austria.
    Jeliazkov, Alienor
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Halle, Germany.;Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Dept Comp Sci, Halle, Germany.;Univ Paris Saclay, HYCAR, INRAE, Antony, France.
    Gascon, Stephanie
    Univ Girona, Inst Aquat Ecol, GRECO, Girona, Spain.
    Lemmens, Pieter
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Aquat Ecol Evolut & Conservat, Leuven, Belgium.
    Anton-Pardo, Maria
    Univ Girona, Inst Aquat Ecol, GRECO, Girona, Spain.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    De Meester, Luc
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Lab Aquat Ecol Evolut & Conservat, Leuven, Belgium.;Leibniz Inst Gewasserokol & Binnenfischerei IGB, Berlin, Germany.;Free Univ Berlin, Inst Biol, Berlin, Germany.;Berlin Brandenburg Inst Adv Biodivers Res BBIB, Berlin, Germany.
    Chase, Jonathan M.
    German Ctr Integrat Biodivers Res iDiv, Halle, Germany.;Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Dept Comp Sci, Halle, Germany.
    Accounting for temporal change in multiple biodiversity patterns improves the inference of metacommunity processes2022In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 103, no 6, article id 3683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In metacommunity ecology, a major focus has been on combining observational and analytical approaches to identify the role of critical assembly processes, such as dispersal limitation and environmental filtering, but this work has largely ignored temporal community dynamics. Here, we develop a "virtual ecologist" approach to evaluate assembly processes by simulating metacommunities varying in three main processes: density-independent responses to abiotic conditions, density-dependent biotic interactions, and dispersal. We then calculate a number of commonly used summary statistics of community structure in space and time and use random forests to evaluate their utility for inferring the strength of these three processes. We find that (i) both spatial and temporal data are necessary to disentangle metacommunity processes based on the summary statistics we test, and including statistics that are measured through time increases the explanatory power of random forests by up to 59% compared to cases where only spatial variation is considered; (ii) the three studied processes can be distinguished with different descriptors; and (iii) each summary statistic is differently sensitive to temporal and spatial sampling effort. Including repeated observations of metacommunities over time was essential for inferring the metacommunity processes, particularly dispersal. Some of the most useful statistics include the coefficient of variation of species abundances through time and metrics that incorporate variation in the relative abundances (evenness) of species. We conclude that a combination of methods and summary statistics is probably necessary to understand the processes that underlie metacommunity assembly through space and time, but we recognize that these results will be modified when other processes or summary statistics are used.

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  • 18. Hillebrand, Helmut
    et al.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lebret, Karen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Östman, Örjan
    Striebel, Maren
    Decomposing multiple dimensions of stability in global change experiments2018In: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecological stability is the central framework to understand an ecosystem's ability to absorb or recover from environmental change. Recent modelling and conceptual work suggests that stability is a multidimensional construct comprising different response aspects. Using two freshwater mesocosm experiments as case studies, we show how the response to single perturbations can be decomposed in different stability aspects (resistance, resilience, recovery, temporal stability) for both ecosystem functions and community composition. We find that extended community recovery is tightly connected to a nearly complete recovery of the function (biomass production), whereas systems with incomplete recovery of the species composition ranged widely in their biomass compared to controls. Moreover, recovery was most complete when either resistance or resilience was high, the latter associated with low temporal stability around the recovery trend. In summary, no single aspect of stability was sufficient to reflect the overall stability of the system.

  • 19.
    Hintz, William D.
    et al.
    Univ Toledo, Dept Environm Sci, 2801 W Bancroft St, Toledo, OH 43606 USA.;Univ Toledo, Lake Erie Ctr, Oregon, OH 43616 USA..
    Arnott, Shelley E.
    Queens Univ, Biol Dept, Kingston, ON K7L 3J9, Canada..
    Symons, Celia C.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Greco, Danielle A.
    Queens Univ, Biol Dept, Kingston, ON K7L 3J9, Canada..
    McClymont, Alexandra
    Queens Univ, Biol Dept, Kingston, ON K7L 3J9, Canada..
    Brentrup, Jennifer A.
    Dartmouth Coll, Dept Biol Sci, Hanover, NH 03755 USA..
    Canedo-Arguelles, Miguel
    Univ Barcelona, Inst Recerca Aigua, Freshwater Ecol Hydrol & Management Lab, Barcelona 08007, Spain..
    Derry, Alison M.
    Univ Quebec Montreal, Interuniv Grp Limnol, Dept Sci Biol, Montreal, PQ H2L 2C4, Canada..
    Downing, Amy L.
    Ohio Wesleyan Univ, Biol Dept, Delaware, OH 43015 USA..
    Gray, Derek K.
    Wilfrid Laurier Univ, Dept Biol, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5, Canada..
    Melles, Stephanie J.
    Ryerson Univ, Urban Water Res Ctr, Chem & Biol Dept, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada..
    Relyea, Rick A.
    Rensselaer Polytech Inst, Darrin Fresh Water Inst, Dept Biol Sci, Troy, NY 12180 USA..
    Rusak, James A.
    Queens Univ, Biol Dept, Kingston, ON K7L 3J9, Canada.;Ontario Minist Environm Conservat & Pk, Dorset Environm Sci Ctr, Dorset, ON P0A 1E0, Canada..
    Searle, Catherine L.
    Purdue Univ, Dept Biol Sci, W Lafayette, IN 47906 USA..
    Astorg, Louis
    Univ Quebec Montreal, Interuniv Grp Limnol, Dept Sci Biol, Montreal, PQ H2L 2C4, Canada..
    Baker, Henry K.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Sect Ecol Behav & Evolut, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA..
    Beisner, Beatrix E.
    Univ Quebec Montreal, Interuniv Grp Limnol, Dept Sci Biol, Montreal, PQ H2L 2C4, Canada..
    Cottingham, Kathryn L.
    Dartmouth Coll, Dept Biol Sci, Hanover, NH 03755 USA..
    Ersoy, Zeynep
    Univ Evora, Mediterranean Inst Agr Environm & Dev, Rui Nabeiro Biodivers Chair, P-7004516 Evora, Portugal..
    Espinosa, Carmen
    Univ Vic, Ctr Study Mediterranean Rivers, Cent Univ Catalonia, Manlleu 08500, Spain..
    Franceschini, Jaclyn
    Wilfrid Laurier Univ, Dept Biol, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5, Canada..
    Giorgio, Angelina T.
    Rensselaer Polytech Inst, Darrin Fresh Water Inst, Dept Biol Sci, Troy, NY 12180 USA..
    Gobeler, Norman
    Univ Helsinki, Tvarminne Zool Stn, Hango 10900, Finland..
    Hassal, Emily
    Ontario Tech Univ, Fac Sci, Oshawa, ON L1G 0C5, Canada..
    Hebert, Marie-Pier
    Univ Quebec Montreal, Interuniv Grp Limnol, Dept Sci Biol, Montreal, PQ H2L 2C4, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Biol, Montreal, PQ H3A 0G4, Canada..
    Huynh, Mercedes
    Wilfrid Laurier Univ, Dept Biol, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5, Canada..
    Hylander, Samuel
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, SE-39231 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Jonasen, Kacie L.
    Purdue Univ, Dept Biol Sci, W Lafayette, IN 47906 USA..
    Kirkwood, Andrea E.
    Ontario Tech Univ, Fac Sci, Oshawa, ON L1G 0C5, Canada..
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langvall, Ola
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Unit Field Based Forest Res, SE-79230 Mora, Sweden..
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Forest Ecol & Management, SE-90183 Umeå, Sweden..
    Lind, Lovisa
    Karlstads Univ, Dept Environm & Life Sci, S-65188 Karlstad, Sweden..
    Lundgren, Maria
    Linnaeus Univ, Dept Biol & Environm Sci, SE-39231 Kalmar, Sweden..
    Proia, Lorenzo
    Univ Vic, Technol Ctr Biodivers Ecol & Environm & Food Tech, TECNIO Network, Cent Univ Catalonia, Vic 08500, Spain..
    Schuler, Matthew S.
    Montclair State Univ, Dept Biol, Montclair, NJ 07043 USA..
    Shurin, Jonathan B.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Sect Ecol Behav & Evolut, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA..
    Steiner, Christopher F.
    Wayne State Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Detroit, MI 48202 USA..
    Striebel, Maren
    Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Inst Chem & Biol Marine Environm, Plankton Ecol, D-26382 Wilhelmshaven, Germany..
    Thibodeau, Simon
    Univ Quebec Montreal, Interuniv Grp Limnol, Dept Sci Biol, Montreal, PQ H2L 2C4, Canada..
    Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics.
    Vendrell-Puigmitja, Lidia
    Univ Vic, Technol Ctr Biodivers Ecol & Environm & Food Tech, TECNIO Network, Cent Univ Catalonia, Vic 08500, Spain..
    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala Univ, Dept Ecol & Genet, Limnol, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Current water quality guidelines across North America and Europe do not protect lakes from salinization2022In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 119, no 9, article id e2115033119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human-induced salinization caused by the use of road deicing salts, agricultural practices, mining operations, and climate change is a major threat to the biodiversity and functioning of freshwater ecosystems. Yet, it is unclear if freshwater ecosystems are protected from salinization by current water quality guidelines. Leveraging an experimental network of land-based and in-lake mesocosms across North America and Europe, we tested how salinization-indicated as elevated chloride (C-) concentration-will affect lake food webs and if two of the lowest Cl- thresholds found globally are sufficient to protect these food webs. Our results indicated that salinization will cause substantial zooplankton mortality at the lowest Cl- thresholds established in Canada (120 mg Cl-/L) and the United States (230 mg Cl-/L) and throughout Europe where Cl- thresholds are generally higher. For instance, at 73% of our study sites, Cl- concentrations that caused a >= 50% reduction in cladoceran abundance were at or below Cl thresholds in Canada, in the United States, and throughout Europe. Similar trends occurred for copepod and rotifer zooplankton. The loss of zooplankton triggered a cascading effect causing an increase in phytoplankton biomass at 47% of study sites. Such changes in lake food webs could alter nutrient cycling and water clarity and trigger declines in fish production. Current Cl- thresholds across North America and Europe clearly do not adequately protect lake food webs. Water quality guidelines should be developed where they do not exist, and there is an urgent need to reassess existing guidelines to protect lake ecosystems from human-induced salinization.

  • 20. Hébert, Marie-Pier
    et al.
    Symons, Celia C.
    Cañedo-Argüelles, Miguel
    Arnott, Shelley E.
    Derry, Alison M.
    Fugère, Vincent
    Hintz, William D.
    Melles, Stephanie J.
    Astorg, Louis
    Baker, Henry K.
    Brentrup, Jennifer A.
    Downing, Amy L.
    Ersoy, Zeynep
    Espinosa, Carmen
    Franceschini, Jaclyn M.
    Giorgio, Angelina T.
    Göbeler, Norman
    Gray, Derek K.
    Greco, Danielle
    Hassal, Emily
    Huynh, Mercedes
    Hylander, Samuel
    Jonasen, Kacie L.
    Kirkwood, Andrea
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langvall, Ola
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Lind, Lovisa
    Lundgren, Maria
    McClymont, Alexandra
    Proia, Lorenzo
    Relyea, Rick A.
    Rusak, James A.
    Schuler, Matthew S.
    Searle, Catherine L.
    Shurin, Jonathan B.
    Steiner, Christopher F.
    Striebel, Maren
    Thibodeau, Simon
    Urrutia Cordero, Pablo
    Vendrell-Puigmitja, Lidia
    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Beisner, Beatrix E.
    Lake salinization drives consistent losses of zooplankton abundance and diversity across coordinated mesocosm experiments2023In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, E-ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human-induced salinization increasingly threatens inland waters; yet we know little about the multifaceted response of lake communities to salt contamination. By conducting a coordinated mesocosm experiment of lake salinization across 16 sites in North America and Europe, we quantified the response of zooplankton abundance and (taxonomic and functional) community structure to a broad gradient of environmentally relevant chloride concentrations, ranging from 4 to ca. 1400 mg Cl− L−1. We found that crustaceans were distinctly more sensitive to elevated chloride than rotifers; yet, rotifers did not show compensatory abundance increases in response to crustacean declines. For crustaceans, our among-site comparisons indicate: (1) highly consistent decreases in abundance and taxon richness with salinity; (2) widespread chloride sensitivity across major taxonomic groups (Cladocera, Cyclopoida, and Calanoida); and (3) weaker loss of functional than taxonomic diversity. Overall, our study demonstrates that aggregate properties of zooplankton communities can be adversely affected at chloride concentrations relevant to anthropogenic salinization in lakes.

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  • 21. Jezberova, Jitka
    et al.
    Jezbera, Jan
    Brandt, Ulrike
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Hahn, Martin W.
    Ubiquity of Polynucleobacter necessarius ssp asymbioticus in lentic freshwater habitats of a heterogenous 2000 km2 area2010In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 658-669Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a survey on the distribution and habitat range of Polynucleobacter necessarius ssp. asymbioticus (PnecC), a numerically and functionally important taxon in the plankton of freshwater systems. We systematically sampled stagnant freshwater habitats in a heterogeneous 2000 km2 area, together with ecologically different habitats outside this area. In total, 137 lakes, ponds and puddles were investigated, which represent an enormous diversity of habitats differing, e.g. in depth (< 10 cm - 171 m) and pH (3.9-8.5). PnecC bacteria were detected by cultivation-independent methods in all investigated habitats, and their presence was confirmed by cultivation of strains from selected habitats representing the whole studied ecological range. The determined relative abundance of the subspecies ranged from values close to the detection limit of FISH (0.2%) to 67% (average 14.5%), and the highest observed absolute abundance was 5.3 x 106 cells ml-1. Statistical analyses revealed that the abundance of PnecC bacteria was partially controlled by factors linked to concentrations of humic substances, which support the hypothesis that these bacteria utilize photodegradation products of humic substances. Based on the revealed statistical relationships, an average relative abundance of this subspecies of 20% in global freshwater habitats was extrapolated. Our study provides important implications for the current debate on ubiquity and biogeography in microorganisms.

  • 22. Kritzberg, Emma S.
    et al.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Limnologi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Limnologi. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Influence of dissolved organic matter source on lake bacterioplankton community structure and function: implications for seasonal dynamics of community structure.2006In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 406-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that autochthonous (internally produced) organic carbon and allochthonous (externally produced) organic carbon are utilized by phylogenetically different bacterioplankton. We examined the relationship between the source of organic matter and the structure and function of lake bacterial communities. Differences and seasonal changes in bacterial community composition in two lakes differing in their source of organic matter were followed in relation to environmental variables. We also performed batch culture experiments with amendments of various organic substrates, namely fulvic acids, leachates from algae, and birch and maple leaves. Differences in bacterial community composition between the lakes, analysed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, correlated with variables related to the relative loading of autochthonous and allochthonous carbon (water colour, dissolved organic carbon, nutrients, and pH). Seasonal changes correlated with temperature, chlorophyll and dissolved organic carbon in both lakes. The substrate amendments led to differences in both structure and function, i.e. production, respiration and growth yield, of the bacterial community. In conclusion, our results suggest that the source of organic matter influences community composition both within and among lakes and that there may be a coupling between the structure and function of the bacterial community.

  • 23.
    Langenheder, S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolutionary Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Kisand, V.
    Wikner, J.
    Tranvik, L. J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Salinity as a structuring factor for the composition and performance of bacterioplankton degrading riverine DOC2003In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, Vol. 45, p. 189-202Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Berga, Mercé
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Östman, Örjan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Population and Conservation Biology.
    Székely, Anna J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Temporal variation of beta-diversity and assembly mechanisms in a bacterial metacommunity2012In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 1107-1114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The turnover of community composition across space, beta-diversity, is influenced by different assembly mechanisms, which place varying weight on local habitat factors, such as environmental conditions and species interactions, and regional factors such as dispersal and history. Several assembly mechanisms may function simultaneously; however, little is known about how their importance changes over time and why. Here, we implemented a field survey where we sampled a bacterial metacommunity consisting of 17 rock pools located at the Swedish Baltic Sea coast at 11 occasions during 1 year. We determined to which extent communities were structured by different assembly mechanisms using variation partitioning and studied changes in beta-diversity across environmental gradients over time. beta-Diversity was highest at times of high overall productivity and environmental heterogeneity in the metacommunity, at least partly due to species sorting, that is, selection of taxa by the prevailing environmental conditions. In contrast, dispersal-driven assembly mechanisms were primarily detected at times when beta-diversity was relatively low. There were no indications for strong and persistent differences in community composition or beta-diversity between permanent and temporary pools, indicating that the physical disturbance regime is of relatively minor importance. In summary, our study clearly suggests that there are temporal differences in the relative importance of different assembly mechanisms related to abiotic factors and shows that the temporal variability of those factors is important for a more complete understanding of bacterial metacommunity dynamics.

  • 25.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bulling, Mark T.
    Prosser, James I.
    Solan, Martin
    Role of functionally dominant species in varying environmental regimes: evidence for the performance-enhancing effect of biodiversity2012In: BMC Ecology, E-ISSN 1472-6785, Vol. 12, p. 14-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Theory suggests that biodiversity can act as a buffer against disturbances and environmental variability via two major mechanisms: Firstly, a stabilising effect by decreasing the temporal variance in ecosystem functioning due to compensatory processes; and secondly, a performance enhancing effect by raising the level of community response through the selection of better performing species. Empirical evidence for the stabilizing effect of biodiversity is readily available, whereas experimental confirmation of the performance-enhancing effect of biodiversity is sparse. Results: Here, we test the effect of different environmental regimes (constant versus fluctuating temperature) on bacterial biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relations. We show that positive effects of species richness on ecosystem functioning are enhanced by stronger temperature fluctuations due to the increased performance of individual species. Conclusions: Our results provide evidence for the performance enhancing effect and suggest that selection towards functionally dominant species is likely to benefit the maintenance of ecosystem functioning under more variable conditions.

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  • 26.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bulling, Mark T.
    Solan, Martin
    Prosser, James I.
    Bacterial biodiversity-ecosystem function relations are modified by environmental complexity2010In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 5, p. e10834-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    With the recognition that environmental change resulting from anthropogenic activities is causing a global decline in biodiversity, much attention has been devoted to understanding how changes in biodiversity may alter levels of ecosystem functioning. Although environmental complexity has long been recognised as a major driving force in evolutionary processes, it has only recently been incorporated into biodiversity-ecosystem functioning investigations. Environmental complexity is expected to strengthen the positive effect of species richness on ecosystem functioning, mainly because it leads to stronger complementarity effects, such as resource partitioning and facilitative interactions among species when the number of available resource increases.

    Methodology/Principal Findings

    Here we implemented an experiment to test the combined effect of species richness and environmental complexity, more specifically, resource richness on ecosystem functioning over time. We show, using all possible combinations of species within a bacterial community consisting of six species, and all possible combinations of three substrates, that diversity-functioning (metabolic activity) relationships change over time from linear to saturated. This was probably caused by a combination of limited complementarity effects and negative interactions among competing species as the experiment progressed. Even though species richness and resource richness both enhanced ecosystem functioning, they did so independently from each other. Instead there were complex interactions between particular species and substrate combinations.

    Conclusions/Significance

    Our study shows clearly that both species richness and environmental complexity increase ecosystem functioning. The finding that there was no direct interaction between these two factors, but that instead rather complex interactions between combinations of certain species and resources underlie positive biodiversity ecosystem functioning relationships, suggests that detailed knowledge of how individual species interact with complex natural environments will be required in order to make reliable predictions about how altered levels of biodiversity will most likely affect ecosystem functioning.

  • 27.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Jurgens, K
    Regulation of bacterial biomass and community structure by metazoan and protozoan predation2001In: LIMNOLOGY AND OCEANOGRAPHY, ISSN 0024-3590, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 121-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We performed food web manipulation experiments in three eutrophic Daphnia-dominated ponds, to compare the predation impact on planktonic bacteria exerted by metazoan and protozoan bacterial consumers. We analyzed the bacterial morphological composition by

  • 28.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. Limnologi.
    Kisand, Veljo
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. Limnologi.
    Wikner, Johan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Tranvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. Limnologi.
    Growth dynamics within bacterial communities in riverine and estuarine batch cultures2004In: Aquatic Microbial Ecology, Vol. 37, p. 137-148Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution.
    Kisand, Veljo
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Wikner, Johan
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Growth dynamics within bacterial communities in riverine and estuarine batch cultures2004In: Aquatic Microbial Ecology, Vol. 37, p. 137-148Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution.
    Kisand, Veljo
    Wikner, Johan
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Salinity as a structuring factor for the composition and performance of bacterioplankton degrading riverine DOC2003In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, Vol. 45, p. 189-202Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Factors influencing aquatic and terrestrial bacterial community assembly2019In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 306-315Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years, many studies have shown that different processes including drift, environmental selection and dispersal can be important for the assembly of bacterial communities in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. However, we lack a conceptual overview about the ecological context and factors that influence the relative importance of the different assembly mechanisms and determine their dynamics in time and space. Focusing on free-living, i.e., nonhost associated, bacterial communities, this minireview, therefore, summarizes and conceptualizes findings from empirical studies about how (i) environmental factors, such as environmental heterogeneity, disturbances, productivity and trophic interactions; (ii) connectivity and dispersal rates (iii) spatial scale, (iv) community properties and traits and (v) the use of taxonomic/phylogenetic or functional metrics influence the relative importance of different community assembly processes. We find that there is to-date little consistency among studies and suggest that future studies should now address how (i)-(v) differ between habitats and organisms and how this, in turn, influences the temporal and spatial-scale dependency of community assembly processes in microorganisms.

  • 32.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Do environmental conditions determine bacterial community composition and functioning? A test of the ubiquity of aquatic bacteriaIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. limnologi.
    Lindström, Eva S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. limnologi.
    Tranvik, Lars J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. limnologi.
    Structure and function of bacterial communities emerging from different sources under identical conditions.2006In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 72, p. 212-220Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution.
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution.
    Weak coupling between community composition and functioning of aquatic bacteria2005In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 957-967Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We performed a batch culture experiment with a factorial design in which sterile water from four lakes and bacterial assemblages (size-fractionated lake water) from the same lakes were set up in all possible combinations. The functional performance (biomass yield, respiration, growth rates, and growth efficiency) of bacterial communities growing in the cultures depended primarily on the type of the medium and to a much lesser extent on the origin of the bacterial assemblage. Functional changes were only partly paralleled by changes in community composition, as indicated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Similar bacterial communities developed in different cultures as a result of receiving either the same medium or the same inoculum, indicating that bacterial communities are comprised of populations of generalists that can grow under most conditions as well as populations with the life strategy of specialists. However, bacteria originating from a slightly acidic polyhumic lake failed to grow, grew unsteadily, or exhibited an extended lag phase when exposed to media originating from other lakes, indicating that the bacterial community in the polyhumic lake was not able to adapt rapidly to changes in environmental conditions.

  • 35.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Prosser, James I.
    Resource availability influences the diversity of a functional group of heterotrophic soil bacteria.2008In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 2245-2256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource availability is a key factor regulating biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, but the relationship between resource availability and diversity has only been rarely investigated in microbial communities. The aim of this study was to determine how diversity and community structure of a functional group of soil bacteria are influenced by resource concentration. To achieve this, we used soil microcosms to investigate degradation of benzoate, which served as a model compound, by soil bacterial communities. Microcosms were supplied with 13C-labelled benzoate at four concentrations and RNA-stable isotope probing followed by molecular fingerprinting analysis of 16S rRNA genes was employed to identify bacteria able to assimilate benzoate at different concentrations. The composition of the benzoate degrader community differed at different concentrations and there was a significant decrease in taxa evenness at the highest substrate concentration. Active organisms could be grouped into generalists, occurring at all substrate concentrations, specialists, active at one particular benzoate concentration only, and taxa that were active at either the two lowest or two highest concentrations. The study comprises the first explicit demonstration that resource availability has an effect on the diversity of a functional group of heterotrophic soil bacteria.

  • 36.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Ragnarsson, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    The role of environmental and spatial factors for the composition of aquatic bacterial communities2007In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 88, no 9, p. 2154-2161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the importance of local vs. spatial factors on bacterial community composition of 35 rock pools at the Baltic Sea coast. The pools were located in five distinct spatial clusters over a total scale of <500 m and differed widely in terms of water chemistry. To determine the fractions of the variance in bacterial community composition (BCC) between rock pools that are explained by local environmental vs. spatial factors, a variance partitioning procedure using partial canonical correspondence analysis was performed. Three environmental variables (salinity, chlorophyll a concentration, and water color) had a significant effect on BCC, irrespective of the spatial location of the pools. Vice versa, there was a significant effect of spatial factors on BCC irrespective of any of the environmental factors included in this study. Hence, the patchy spatial distribution of the pools was partly reflected in the composition of the bacterial communities in the pools, which might be caused by congruent colonization events of adjacent pools, such as simultaneous sea-spray inputs or direct exchange of bacteria via connecting rivulets. This study shows that the composition of planktonic bacteria can show provincialism at small spatial scales, which is likely to be caused by -environmental conditions as well as historical events.

  • 37.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Sobek, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Tranvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Changes in bacterial community composition along a solar radiation gradient in humic waters2006In: AQUATIC SCIENCES, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 415-424Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Szekely, Anna J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Species sorting and neutral processes are both important during the initial assembly of bacterial communities2011In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 1086-1094Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies have shown that species sorting, that is, the selection by local environmental conditions is important for the composition and assembly of bacterial communities. On the other hand, there are other studies that could show that bacterial communities are neutrally assembled. In this study, we implemented a microcosm experiment with the aim to determine, at the same time, the importance of species sorting and neutral processes for bacterial community assembly during the colonisation of new, that is, sterile, habitats, by atmospheric bacteria. For this we used outdoor microcosms, which contained sterile medium from three different rock pools representing different environmental conditions, which were seeded by rainwater bacteria. We found some evidence for neutral assembly processes, as almost every 4th taxon growing in the microcosms was also detectable in the rainwater sample irrespective of the medium. Most of these taxa belonged to widespread families with opportunistic growth strategies, such as the Pseudomonadaceae and Comamonadaceae, indicating that neutrally assembled taxa may primarily be generalists. On the other hand, we also found evidence for species sorting, as one out of three media selected a differently composed bacterial community. Species sorting effects were relatively weak and established themselves via differences in relative abundance of generalists among the different media, as well as media-specific occurrences of a few specific taxa. In summary, our results suggest that neutral and species sorting processes interact during the assembly of bacterial communities and that their importance may differ depending on how many generalists and specialists are present in a community.

  • 39.
    Langenheder, Silke
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Wang, Jianjun
    Department of Geosciences and Geography, University of Helsinki, Helsinki FIN-00014, Finland; State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, China.
    Karjalainen, Satu Maaria
    Finnish Environment Institute, Freshwater Centre, FI-90570 Oolu, Finland.
    Laamanen, Tiina M.
    Finnish Environment Institute, Freshwater Centre, FI-90570 Oolu, Finland.
    Tolonen, Kimmo T.
    Finnish Environment Institute, Natural Environment Centre, Biodiversity, FI-90570 Oulu, Finland.
    Vilmi, Annika
    Finnish Environment Institute, Natural Environment Centre, Biodiversity, FI-90570 Oulu, Finland.
    Heino, Jani
    Finnish Environment Institute, Natural Environment Centre, Biodiversity, FI-90570 Oulu, Finland.
    Bacterial metacommunity organization in a highly connected aquatic system2017In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 93, no 4, article id fiw225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatial structure and underlying assembly mechanisms of bacterial communities have been studied widely across aquatic systems, focusing primarily on isolated sites, such as different lakes, ponds and streams. Here, our main aim was to determine the underlying mechanisms for bacterial biofilm assembly within a large, highly connected lake system in Northern Finland using associative methods based on taxonomic and phylogenetic alpha- and beta-diversity and a large number of abiotic and biotic variables. Furthermore, null model approaches were used to quantify the relative importance of different community assembly processes. We found that spatial variation in bacterial communities within the lake was structured by different assembly processes, including stochasticity, species sorting and potentially even dispersal limitation. Species sorting by abiotic environmental conditions explained more of the taxonomic and particularly phylogenetic turnover in community composition compared with that by biotic variables. Finally, we observed clear differences in alpha diversity (species richness and phylogenetic diversity), which were to a stronger extent determined by abiotic compared with biotic factors, but also by dispersal effects. In summary, our study shows that the biodiversity of bacterial biofilm communities within a lake ecosystem is driven by within-habitat gradients in abiotic conditions and by stochastic and deterministic dispersal processes.

  • 40.
    Lebret, Karen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Colinas, Noemi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Östman, Örjan
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Resources, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Lindström, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Increased water colour affects freshwater plankton communities in a mesocosm study2018In: Aquatic Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0948-3055, E-ISSN 1616-1564, Vol. 81, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increases in water colour (brownification) have been observed in aquatic systems in the Northern Hemisphere, partly caused by increased loading of organic carbon from terrestrial origins. We investigated the effect of increase in water colour on the composition, structure and function of lake plankton communities (bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton) conducting a mesocosm experiment in 3 medium-coloured lakes (average absorbance at 420 nm: 0.034 cm(-1)), with different nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton community composition. To simulate an increase in water colour, we added humic substances (HuminFeed) at 3 different concentrations. The additions significantly affected the water colour of the mesocosms, but had no measurable effect on total organic carbon concentration, thus change in light conditions was the main effect of our treatment on the plankton communities. The increase in water colour did not significantly affect the measured functions (productivity, respiration) and biomass of the plankton communities (bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton), but led to changes in the relative abundance of some phytoplankton taxa and, to a lesser extent, the bacterial community (differences in relative abundance). The treatments had no significant effect on zooplankton biomass or composition. Our study suggests that increases in water colour favour low-light-adapted phytoplankton species, which in turn also can affect bacterial composition, whereas the change in light climate had no clear impact on the functioning of plankton communities in weakly humic lakes.

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  • 41.
    Lebret, Karen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial model Systems - EEMiS, Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnæus University, SE-391 82, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Östman, Örjan
    Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Skolgatan 6, SE-742 42, Öregrund, Sweden.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Drakare, Stina
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences - SLU, PO Box 7050, SE-750 07, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Guillemette, François
    Research Center on Watershed – Aquatic Ecosystem Interactions (RIVE), Department of Environmental Sciences, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Québec, Canada.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    High abundances of the nuisance raphidophyte Gonyostomum semen in brown water lakes are associated with high concentrations of iron2018In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 13463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Algal blooms occur frequently in lakes and oceans and the causes and consequences of those are often studied. In this study, we focus on a less well known type of algal bloom by the freshwater raphidophyte Gonyostomum semen. This species’ abundance and occurrence is increasing, especially in brown water lakes, the most abundant lake type in the boreal zone. The aim of the study was to investigate which environmental factors are associated with G. semen by statistical evaluation of field data of 95 Swedish lakes over five years. Although we found G. semen to be associated with dark waters it was, contrary to our expectations, mainly high concentrations of iron, and only to a lesser extent high TOC (total organic carbon) concentrations, that were associated with blooms of G. semen. In addition, high phosphorus concentrations and low pH also appear to facilitate G. semen blooms. We suggest that browning of lakes caused by increased iron concentrations may decrease net heterotrophy by fostering heavy algal blooms, i.e. the opposite to commonly assumed effects of increased DOM (dissolved organic matter).

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  • 42.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Eiler, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Drakare, Stina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Ragnarsson, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Limnology.
    Does ecosystem size determine aquatic bacterial richness? Comment2007In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 252-253Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Local and regional factors influencing bacterial community assembly2012In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 1-9Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The classical view states that microbial biogeography is not affected by dispersal barriers or historical events, but only influenced by the local contemporary habitat conditions (species sorting). This has been challenged during recent years by studies suggesting that also regional factors such as mass effect, dispersal limitation and neutral assembly are important for the composition of local bacterial communities. Here we summarize results from biogeography studies in different environments, i.e. in marine, freshwater and soil as well in human hosts. Species sorting appears to be the most important mechanism. However, this result might be biased since this is the mechanism that is easiest to measure, detect and interpret. Hence, the importance of regional factors may have been underestimated. Moreover, our survey indicates that different assembly mechanisms might be important for different parts of the total community, differing, for example, between generalists and specialists, and between taxa of different dispersal ability and motility. We conclude that there is a clear need for experimental studies, first, to clearly separate regional and local factors in order to study their relative importance, and second, to test whether there are differences in assembly mechanisms depending on different taxonomic or functional groups.

  • 44.
    Logares, Ramiro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Logue, Jürg Brendan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Paterson, Harriet
    Laybourn-Parry, Johanna
    Rengefors, Karin
    Tranvik, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Biogeography of bacterial communities exposed to progressive long-term environmental change2013In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 7, no 5, p. 937-948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The response of microbial communities to long-term environmental change is poorly understood. Here, we study bacterioplankton communities in a unique system of coastal Antarctic lakes that were exposed to progressive long-term environmental change, using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA gene (V3-V4 regions). At the time of formation, most of the studied lakes harbored marine-coastal microbial communities, as they were connected to the sea. During the past 20 000 years, most lakes isolated from the sea, and subsequently they experienced a gradual, but strong, salinity change that eventually developed into a gradient ranging from freshwater (salinity 0) to hypersaline (salinity 100). Our results indicated that present bacterioplankton community composition was strongly correlated with salinity and weakly correlated with geographical distance between lakes. A few abundant taxa were shared between some lakes and coastal marine communities. Nevertheless, lakes contained a large number of taxa that were not detected in the adjacent sea. Abundant and rare taxa within saline communities presented similar biogeography, suggesting that these groups have comparable environmental sensitivity. Habitat specialists and generalists were detected among abundant and rare taxa, with specialists being relatively more abundant at the extremes of the salinity gradient. Altogether, progressive long-term salinity change appears to have promoted the diversification of bacterioplankton communities by modifying the composition of ancestral communities and by allowing the establishment of new taxa. The ISME Journal (2013) 7, 937-948; doi:10.1038/ismej.2012.168; published online 20 December 2012

  • 45.
    Logue, Jürg Brendan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Andersson, Anders F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Drakare, Stina
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU).
    Lanzén, Anders
    Centre for Geobiology and Department of Biology, University of Bergen.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Freshwater bacterioplankton richness in oligotrophic lakes depends on nutrient availability rather than on species-area relationships2012In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 1127-1136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central goal in ecology is to grasp the mechanisms that underlie and maintain biodiversity and patterns in its spatial distribution can provide clues about those mechanisms. Here, we investigated what might determine bacterioplankton richness (BR) in lakes by means of 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We further provide a BR estimate based upon a sampling depth and accuracy, which, to our knowledge, are unsurpassed for freshwater bacterioplankton communities. Our examination of 22 669 sequences per lake showed that freshwater BR in fourteen nutrient-poor lakes was positively influenced by nutrient availability. Our study is, thus, consistent with the finding that the supply of available nutrients is a major driver of species richness; a pattern that may well be universally valid to the world of both micro- and macro-organisms. We, furthermore, observed that BR increased with elevated landscape position, most likely as a consequence of differences in nutrient availability. Finally, BR decreased with increasing lake and catchment area that is negative species-area relationships (SARs) were recorded; a finding that re-opens the debate about whether positive SARs can indeed be found in the microbial world and whether positive SARs can in fact be pronounced as one of the few “laws” in ecology.

  • 46.
    Mondav, Rhiannon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Buck, Moritz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Garcia, Sarahi L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Streamlined and Abundant Bacterioplankton Thrive in Functional Cohorts2020In: mSystems, E-ISSN 2379-5077, Vol. 5, no 5, article id e00316-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While fastidious microbes can be abundant and ubiquitous in their natural communities, many fail to grow axenically in laboratories due to auxotrophies or other dependencies. To overcome auxotrophies, these microbes rely on their surrounding cohort. A cohort may consist of kin (ecotypes) or more distantly related organisms (community) with the cooperation being reciprocal or nonreciprocal and expensive (Black Queen hypothesis) or costless (by-product). These metabolic partnerships (whether at single species population or community level) enable dominance by and coexistence of these lineages in nature. Here we examine the relevance of these cooperation models to explain the abundance and ubiquity of the dominant fastidious bacterioplankton of a dimictic mesotrophic freshwater lake. Using both culture-dependent (dilution mixed cultures) and culture-independent (small subunit [SSU] rRNA gene time series and environmental metagenomics) methods, we independently identified the primary cohorts of actinobacterial genera "Candidatus Planktophila" (acI-A) and "Candidatus Nanopelagicus" (acI-B) and the proteobacterial genus "Candidatus Fonsibacter" (LD12). While "Ca Planktophila" and "Ca. Fonsibacter" had no correlation in their natural habitat, they have the potential to be complementary in laboratory settings. We also investigated the bifunctional catalase-peroxidase enzyme KatG (a common good which "Ca Planktophila" is dependent upon) and its most likely providers in the lake. Further, we found that while ecotype and community cooperation combined may explain "Ca Planktophila" population abundance, the success of "Ca. Nanopelagicus" and "Ca. Fonsibacter" is better explained as a community by-product. Ecotype differentiation of "Ca. Fonsibacter" as a means of escaping predation was supported but not for overcoming auxotrophies.

    IMPORTANCE This study examines evolutionary and ecological relationships of three of the most ubiquitous and abundant freshwater bacterial genera: "Ca Planktophila" (acI-A), "Ca. Nanopelagicus" (acI-B), and "Ca. Fonsibacter" (LD12). Due to high abundance, these genera might have a significant influence on nutrient cycling in freshwaters worldwide, and this study adds a layer of understanding to how seemingly competing clades of bacteria can coexist by having different cooperation strategies. Our synthesis ties together network and ecological theory with empirical evidence and lays out a framework for how the functioning of populations within complex microbial communities can be studied.

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  • 47.
    Münzner, Karla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Csitári, Bianka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Carbon dioxide reduction by photosynthesis undetectable even during phytoplankton blooms in two lakes2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 13503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lakes located in the boreal region are generally supersaturated with carbon dioxide (CO2), which emerges from inflowing inorganic carbon from the surrounding watershed and from mineralization of allochthonous organic carbon. While these CO2 sources gained a lot of attention, processes that reduce the amount of CO2 have been less studied. We therefore examined the CO2 reduction capacity during times of phytoplankton blooms. We investigated partial pressure of CO2 (pCO(2)) in two lakes at times of blooms dominated by the cyanobacterium Gloeotrichia echinulata (Erken, Sweden) or by the nuisance alga Gonyostomum semen (Erssjon, Sweden) during two years. Our results showed that pCO(2) and phytoplankton densities remained unrelated in the two lakes even during blooms. We suggest that physical factors, such as wind-induced water column mixing and import of inorganic carbon via inflowing waters suppressed the phytoplankton signal on pCO(2). These results advance our understanding of carbon cycling in lakes and highlight the importance of detailed lake studies for more precise estimates of local, regional and global carbon budgets.

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  • 48.
    Peter, Hannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Beier, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Lindström, Eva S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Tranvik, Lars J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Function-specific response to depletion of microbial diversity2011In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 351-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent meta-analyses suggest that ecosystem functioning increases with biodiversity, but contradictory results have been presented for some microbial functions. Moreover, observations of only one function underestimate the functional role of diversity because of species-specific trade-offs in the ability to carry out different functions. We examined multiple functions in batch cultures of natural freshwater bacterial communities with different richness, achieved by a dilution-to-extinction approach. Community composition was assessed by molecular fingerprinting of 16S rRNA and chitinase genes, representing the total community and a trait characteristic for a functional group, respectively. Richness was positively related to abundance and biomass, negatively correlated to cell volumes and unrelated to maximum intrinsic growth rate. The response of chitin and cellulose degradation rates depended on the presence of a single phylotype. We suggest that species identity and community composition rather than richness matters for specific microbial processes.

  • 49.
    Philippot, Laurent
    et al.
    Univ Bourgogne Franche Comte, Agroecol, INRAE, AgroSup Dijon, Dijon, France..
    Griffiths, Bryan S.
    SRUC, Dept Agr Hort & Engn Sci, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland..
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Microbial Community Resilience across Ecosystems and Multiple Disturbances2021In: Microbiology and molecular biology reviews, ISSN 1092-2172, E-ISSN 1098-5557, Vol. 85, no 2, article id e00026-20Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of ecosystems to withstand disturbances and maintain their functions is being increasingly tested as rates of change intensify due to climate change and other human activities. Microorganisms are crucial players underpinning ecosystem functions, and the recovery of microbial communities from disturbances is therefore a key part of the complex processes determining the fate of ecosystem functioning. However, despite global environmental change consisting of numerous pressures, it is unclear and controversial how multiple disturbances affect microbial community stability and what consequences this has for ecosystem functions. This is particularly the case for those multiple or compounded disturbances that occur more frequently than the normal recovery time. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the mechanisms that can govern the responses of microbes to multiple disturbances across aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We first summarize and discuss properties and mechanisms that influence resilience in aquatic and soil biomes to determine whether there are generally applicable principles. Following, we focus on interactions resulting from inherent characteristics of compounded disturbances, such as the nature of the disturbance, timing, and chronology that can lead to complex and nonadditive effects that are modulating the response of microorganisms.

  • 50.
    Renes, Sophia Elise
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Aquat Sci & Assessment, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sjöstedt, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Lund Univ, Dept Biol Aquat Ecol, Lund, Sweden.
    Fetzer, Ingo
    Stockholm Univ, Stockholm Resilience Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Bolin Ctr Climate Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Langenheder, Silke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
    Disturbance history can increase functional stability in the face of both repeated disturbances of the same type and novel disturbances2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 11333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is expected to increase the incidences of extremes in environmental conditions. To investigate how repeated disturbances affect microbial ecosystem resistance, natural lake bacterioplankton communities were subjected to repeated temperature disturbances of two intensities (25 °C and 35 °C), and subsequently to an acidification event. We measured functional parameters (bacterial production, abundance, extracellular enzyme activities) and community composition parameters (richness, evenness, niche width) and found that, compared to undisturbed control communities, the 35 °C treatment was strongly affected in all parameters, while the 25 °C treatment did not significantly differ from the control. Interestingly, exposure to multiple temperature disturbances caused gradually increasing stability in the 35 °C treatment in some parameters, while others parameters showed the opposite, indicating that the choice of parameters can strongly affect the outcome of a study. The acidification event did not lead to stronger changes in community structure, but functional resistance of bacterial production towards acidification in the 35 °C treatments increased. This indicates that functional resistance in response to a novel disturbance can be increased by previous exposure to another disturbance, suggesting similarity in stress tolerance mechanisms for both disturbances. These results highlight the need for understanding function- and disturbance-specific responses, since general responses are likely to be unpredictable.

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