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  • 1.
    Beier, Björn Axel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk botanik.
    Nylander, Johan
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk zoologi.
    Chase, Mark W
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Zoology. Systematisk botanik.
    Phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of the desert plant genus Fagonia (Zygophyllaceae), inferred by parsimony and Bayesian model averaging2004In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 91-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bremer, Kåre
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Bremer, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Introduction to phylogeny and systematics of flowering plants2003 (ed. Ny utg.)Book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    de Boer, Hugo J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Schaefer, Hanno
    Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Renner, Susanne S.
    University of Munich (LMU), Systematic Botany and Mycology.
    Evolution and loss of long-fringed petals: A case study using a dated phylogeny of the snake gourds, Trichosanthes (Cucurbitaceae)2012In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 12, p. 108-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The Cucurbitaceae genus Trichosanthes comprises 90–100 species that occur from India to Japan and southeast to Australia and Fiji. Most species have large white or pale yellow petals with conspicuously fringed margins, the fringes sometimes several cm long. Pollination is usually by hawkmoths. Previous molecular data for a small number of species suggested that a monophyletic Trichosanthes might include the Asian genera Gymnopetalum (four species, lacking long petal fringes) and Hodgsonia (two species with petals fringed). Here we test these groups’ relationships using a species sampling of c. 60% and 4759 nucleotides of nuclear and plastid DNA. To infer the time and direction of the geographic expansion of the Trichosanthes clade we employ molecular clock dating and statistical biogeographic reconstruction, and we also address the gain or loss of petal fringes.

    Results

    Trichosanthes is monophyletic as long as it includes Gymnopetalum, which itself is polyphyletic. The closest relative of Trichosanthes appears to be the sponge gourds, Luffa, while Hodgsonia is more distantly related. Of six morphology-based sections in Trichosanthes with more than one species, three are supported by the molecular results; two new sections appear warranted. Molecular dating and biogeographic analyses suggest an Oligocene origin of Trichosanthes in Eurasia or East Asia, followed by diversification and spread throughout the Malesian biogeographic region and into the Australian continent.

    Conclusions

    Long-fringed corollas evolved independently in Hodgsonia and Trichosanthes, followed by two losses in the latter coincident with shifts to other pollinators but not with long-distance dispersal events. Together with the Caribbean Linnaeosicyos, the Madagascan Ampelosicyos and the tropical African Telfairia, these cucurbit lineages represent an ideal system for more detailed studies of the evolution and function of petal fringes in plant-pollinator mutualisms.

  • 4.
    de Boer, Hugo J.
    et al.
    Avd f systematisk botanik. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Thulin, Mats
    Avd f systematisk botanik. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Lectotypification of Callicocca ipecacuanha Brot. and neotypification of Cephaelis acuminata H.Karst., with reference to the drug ipecac2005In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 1080-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    de Boer, Hugo J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Synopsis of Trichosanthes (Cucurbitaceae) based on recent molecular phylogenetic data2012In: PhytoKeys, ISSN 1314-2011, E-ISSN 1314-2003, Vol. 12, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The snake gourd genus, Trichosanthes, is the largest genus in the Cucurbitaceae family, with over 90 species. Recent molecular phylogenetic data have indicated that the genus Gymnopetalum is to be merged with Trichosanthes to maintain monophyly. A revised infrageneric classification of Trichosanthes including Gymnopetalum is proposed with two subgenera, (I) subg. Scotanthus comb. nov. and (II) subg. Trichosanthes, eleven sections, (i) sect. Asterospermae, (ii) sect. Cucumeroides, (iii) sect. Edulis, (iv) sect. Foliobracteola, (v) sect. Gymnopetalum, (vi) sect. Involucraria, (vii) sect. Pseudovariifera sect. nov., (viii) sect. Villosae star. nov., (ix) sect. Trichosanthes, (x) sect. Tripodanthera, and (xi) sect. Truncata. A synopsis of Trichosanthes with the 91 species recognized here is presented, including four new combinations, Trichosanthes orientalis, Trichosanthes tubiflora, Trichosanthes scabra var. pectinata, Trichosanthes scabra var. penicaudii, and a clarified nomenclature of Trichosanthes costata and Trichosanthes scabra.

  • 6.
    de Boer, Hugo
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. systematisk botanik.
    Wieringa, Jan
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. systematisk botanik.
    Lectotypification of Callicocca ipecacuanha Brot. and neotypification of Cephaelis acuminata H.Karst., with reference to the drug Ipecac2005In: abstracts XVII International Botanical Congress: Vienna, Austria, Europe 17-23 July 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The main pharmacopoeias cite the roots of Cephaelis ipecacuanha (syn. Callicocca ipecacuanha Brot.) together with the roots of Cephaelis acuminata H.Karst. are the sources of the crude drug ipecac (European Pharmacopoeia, 2002, 2004; United States Pharmacopeia, 2004; British Pharmacopoeia, 2003; Japanese Pharmacopoeia, 2001). Ipecac is an important emetic and expectorant used in case of poisoning, mainly in children. However, C. acuminata does not occur in botanical literature, except in connection with the original description, and this falls entirely within the variation of the widespread and variable Cephaelis ipecacuanha. Callicocca ipecacuanha was described from Brazil, but no type specimen has been found and the name is here lectotypified with an illustration from the protologue. For Cephaelis acuminata, described from Colombia, no original material is extant, and a recent specimen from Colombia is here selected to serve as neotype.

  • 7. Delgado-Salinas, Alfonso
    et al.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Pasquet, Rémy
    Weeden, Norm
    Lavin, Matt
    Vigna (Leguminosae) sensu lato: The names and identities of the American segregate genera2011In: American Journal of Botany, ISSN 0002-9122, E-ISSN 1537-2197, Vol. 98, no 10, p. 1694-1715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Premise of study: The legume genus Vigna and close relatives have highly elaborated floral morphologies that involve the coiling, bending, and intricate connection of flower parts. Banners, levers, platforms, and pumps have evolved that attract pollinators and then manipulate their movement. Given this three-dimensional floral complexity, the taxonomy of Vigna and relatives has been confounded by the study of mostly two-dimensional museum specimens. A molecular phylogenetic analysis was undertaken in the effort to resolve long-standing taxonomic questions centered on floral morphology. Methods: The phylogenetic analysis included cpDNA trnK and nuclear ribosomal ITS/5.8S (ITS) sequence variation. The American species were comprehensively sampled and outgroups included Old World relatives. Key results: The trnK and ITS data analyses concurred in resolving six well-supported clades of American Vigna that are most closely related to other American genera: Dolichopsis, Macroptilium, Mysanthus, Oryxis, Oxyrhynchus, Phaseolus, Ramirezella, and Strophostyles. These 14 American clades ranked here as genera are resolved as sister to a clade comprising the mainly Old World species of Vigna. Conclusions: American Vigna clades were reassigned to the genera Ancistrotropis, Cochliasanthus, Condylostylis, Leptospron, Sigmoidotropis, and the newly described Helicotropis. Vigna sensu stricto in the Americas now includes relatively few and mostly pantropical species. Elaborate floral asymmetries are readily used to apomorphically diagnose nearly all of the American genera. The age estimates of the extant diversification of the American and its Old World sister clade are approximately coeval at ca. 6-7 million yr, which belies much greater floral variation in the Americas.

  • 8. Farah, Mohamed
    et al.
    Olsson, Sten
    Bate, Jenny
    Lindquist, Marie
    Edwards, Ralph
    Simmonds, Monique
    Leon, Christine
    de Boer, Hugo J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    Botanical Nomenclature in Pharmacovigilance and a Recommendation for Standardisation2006In: Drug Safety, ISSN 0114-5916, Vol. 29, p. 1023-1029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nomenclature of plants in pharmacology can be presented by pharmaceutical

    names or scientific names in the form of Linnaean binomials. In this paper,

    positive and negative aspects of both systems are discussed in the context of the

    scientific nomenclatural framework and the systems’ practical applicability. The

    Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC) runs the WHO Programme for International

    Drug Monitoring and is responsible for the WHO Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR)

    database that currently contains 3.6 million records WHO Adverse Drug Reaction

    database. In order for the UMC to monitor pharmacovigilance through ADRs to

    herbal medicine products the following species nomenclatural criteria are important:

    (i) the name should indicate only one species of plant; (ii) the source for this

    name must be authoritative; (iii) the name should indicate which part of the plant

    is used. Based on these criteria, the UMC investigated four options: (i) adopt main

    names used in recognised (inter-) national pharmacopoeias or authoritative publications;

    (ii) adopt option 1, but cite the publication for all names in abbreviated

    form; (iii) three-part pharmaceutical names consisting of Latinised part name plus

    Latinised genus name, plus Latinised specific epithet; (iv) scientific binomial

    names, optionally with author and plant part used. The UMC has selectedchosen

    for the latter option and willas its adoption utilizes the scientific botanical

    nomenclature as defined by the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature.

  • 9. Friis, Ib
    et al.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Avd f systematisk botanik.
    Adsersen, Henning
    Buerger, Anne-Marie
    Patterns of plant diversity and endemism in the Horn of Africa2005In: Biologiske Skrifter, ISSN 0366-3612, Vol. 55, p. 289-314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Gilbert, Michael G.
    et al.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Avd f systematisk botanik.
    Caralluma lamellosa (Apocynaceae), a remarkable new species from Somalia2005In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 523-525Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Hedren, Mikael
    et al.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    A replacement name for a species of Hypoestes (Acanthaceae) from Somalia2015In: Willdenowia, ISSN 0511-9618, E-ISSN 1868-6397, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 93-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypoestes canescens Hedren & Thulin, nom. nov., is proposed for the illegitimate name H. cinerea Hedren, non C. B. Clarke.

  • 12.
    Hjertson, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany.
    A new species of Campylanthus (Scrophulariaceae) from Somalia2005In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 707-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Campylanthus reconditus sp. nov., from limestone hills in north-eastern Somalia, is described and illustrated.

  • 13.
    Jia, Shu-Wen
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Xinjiang Inst Ecol & Geog, Key Lab Biogeog & Bioresource Arid Land, Urumqi 830011, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Sci, Grad Univ, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Ming-Li
    Chinese Acad Sci, Xinjiang Inst Ecol & Geog, Key Lab Biogeog & Bioresource Arid Land, Urumqi 830011, Peoples R China.;Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Bot, Beijing 100093, Peoples R China..
    Raab-Straube, Eckhard V.
    Free Univ Berlin, Bot Garten, Konigin Luise Str 6-8, D-14195 Berlin, Germany.;Free Univ Berlin, Bot Museum Berlin Dahlem, Konigin Luise Str 6-8, D-14195 Berlin, Germany..
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Evolutionary history of Gymnocarpos (Caryophyllaceae) in the arid regions from North Africa to Central Asia2016In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 511-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gymnocarpos has only about ten species distributed in the arid regions of Asia and Africa, but it exhibits a geographical disjunction between eastern Central Asia and western North Africa and Minor Asia. We sampled eight species of the genus and sequenced two chloroplast regions (rps16 and psbB-psbH), and the nuclear rDNA (ITS) to study the phylogeny and biogeography. The results of the phylogenetic analyses corroborated that Gymnocarpos is monophyletic, in the phylogenetic tree two well supported clades are recognized: clade 1 includes Gymnocarpos sclerocephalus and G. decandrus, mainly the North African group, whereas clade 2 comprises the remaining species, mainly in the Southern Arabian Peninsula. Molecular dating analysis revealed that the divergence age of Gymnocarpos was c. 31.33 Mya near the Eocene and Oligocene transition boundary, the initial diversification within Gymnocarpos dated to c. 6.69 Mya in the late Miocene, and the intraspecific diversification mostly occurred during the Quaternary climate oscillations. Ancestral area reconstruction suggested that the Southern Arabian Peninsula was the ancestral area for Gymnocarpos. Our conclusions revealed that the aridification since mid-late Miocene significantly affected the diversification of the genus in these areas.

  • 14.
    Kool, Anneleen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Systematisk botanik.
    Oxelman, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Systematisk botanik.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Systematisk botanik.
    Phylogeny of Withania (Solanaceae)2005In: abstracts XVII International Botanical Congress: Vienna, Austria, Europe 17-23 July 2005, 2005Conference paper (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Withania is a genus of about 11 species, six endemic in the Horn of Africa region, three in the Canary Islands, North Africa and Spain, one in southern Asia, and one widespread in the Old World tropics and subtropics. A phylogeny was inferred on the basis of DNA sequence data from three plastid regions: the trnL intron, trnL-F intergenic spacer, and the rps16 intron, as well as the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS). We found strong evidence for monophyly of Withania. The enigmatic Mellissia begonifolia, endemic to St Helena, probably is Withania’s nearest sistergroup and as sister of Withania and Mellissia we found some evidence for a clade consisting of Athenaea and Aureliana. All species of Withania except for W. aristata and W. frutescens form a clade that have W. aristata and/or W. frutescens as sister group. W. coagulans groups together with W. riebeckii in the chloroplast phylogeny but does not so on the basis of the ITS data. It may be of allopolyploid origin. Otherwise the phylogeny of the Horn of Africa taxa remains poorly resolved.

  • 15.
    Kool, Anneleen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Perrigo, Allison L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Phylogeny and biogeography of Sphaerocoma (Caryophyllaceae)2010In: XIXth AETFAT Congress, Madagascar, 25-30 April 2010: abstracts, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Kool, Anneleen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Perrigo, Allison
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Bristly versus juicy: Phylogenetic position and taxonomy of Sphaerocoma (Caryophyllaceae)2012In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 61, no 1, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogenetic position of the Afro-Asian genus Sphaerocoma is investigated using DNA sequences from plastid rps16 and ndhF, as well as from nuclear ITS and RPB2. Seven accessions of Sphaerocoma, representing all three currently recognized taxa, are analyzed along with sequences from genera that have been found to be closely related to Sphaerocoma in broader studies of Caryophyllaceae. The Afro-Arabian Pollichia is indicated as sister to Sphaerocoma, and this Sphaerocoma-Pollichia clade is sister to a clade with Macaronesian Polycarpaea and the widely distributed Polycarpon prostratum. A close relationship between the anemochorous Sphaerocoma and the endozoochorous Pollichia has never previously been suggested, but some similarities in, e.g., floral characters are pointed out. Sphaerocoma is strongly supported as monophyletic, but no significant molecular variation within the genus could be detected. A new taxonomy of Sphaerocoma is proposed, where a single species with two geographically and morphologically defined subspecies are recognized: S. hookeri subsp. hookeri in coastal areas along the Red Sea in Egypt, Sudan and Saudi-Arabia, near Aden in Yemen, and in Somalia, and S. hookeri subsp. aucheri comb. & stat. nov. in coastal areas in south-eastern Yemen, Oman, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Iran, and Pakistan. A lectotype is designated for S. hookeri.

  • 17.
    Kool, Anneleen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Perrigo, Allison
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Tough, tiny and terrific Caryophyllaceae, their phylogeny and biogeography2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Kool, Anneleen
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, POB 1172 Blindern, N-0218 Oslo, Norway..
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    A giant spurrey on a tiny island: On the phylogenetic position of Sanctambrosia manicata (Caryophyllaceae) and the generic circumscriptions of Spergula, Spergularia and Rhodalsine2017In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 615-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The only member of the generally herbaceous family Caryophyllaceae that may grow to a small tree is Sanctambrosia manicata, endemic to remote San Ambrosio Island, off the coast of Chile. The monospecific Sanctambrosia has been suggested to be closely related to Spergula and Spergularia (spurreys) on the basis of morphology, despite its treelike habit and gynodioecy. A plastid DNA dataset (ndhF, rps16, trnL-F) is used to investigate the relationships of Sanctambrosia and other members of Sperguleae. Sanctambrosia manicata is shown to be nested in a clade of New World and Australian Spergularia and the new combination Spergularia manicata is proposed. The volcanic San Ambrosio has been estimated to be almost three million years old, and S. manicata presumably evolved its treelike habit and gynodioecy over a short period of time. Spergula and Spergularia are monophyletic and recognizable by their number of carpels, five in Spergula and three in Spergularia. Spergularia fallax, which resembles Spergula in leaf characters, is shown to be sister to all other species of Spergularia. Minuartia subg. Rhodalsine belongs in Sperguleae and is sister to Spergula and Spergularia together, which supports the recent resurrection of Rhodalsine at the generic level.

  • 19.
    Kool, Anneleen
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    A plant that Linnaeus forgot: taxonomic revision of Rhodalsine (Caryophyllaceae)2017In: Willdenowia, ISSN 0511-9618, E-ISSN 1868-6397, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 317-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mainly Mediterranean genus Rhodalsine (Caryophyllaceae) is revised and a single species, R. geniculata, is recognized, distributed from the Canary Islands in the west to Somalia in the east. The history of the taxon, which was known already during the 17th century but entirely overlooked by Linnaeus, is outlined. Variation and taxonomy are discussed and illustrations and a distribution map are provided. Many names are placed in synonymy and most of the names are typified, including six lectotypes designated here.

  • 20. Ollerton, Jeff
    et al.
    Dötterl, Stefan
    Ghorpadé, Kumar
    Heiduk, Annemarie
    Liede-Schumann, Sigrid
    Masinde, Siro
    Meve, Ulrich
    Peter, Craig
    Prieto-Benítez, Samuel
    Punekar, Sachin
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Whittington, Andrew
    Diversity of Diptera families that pollinate Ceropegia (Apocynaceae) trap flowers: An update in light of new data and phylogenetic analyses2017In: Flora: Morphologie, Geobotanik, Oekophysiologie, ISSN 0367-2530, E-ISSN 1618-0585, Vol. 234, p. 233-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pollination by flies (Diptera) has been important to the diversification and ecology of the flowering plants, but is poorly understood in contrast to pollination by other groups such as bees, butterflies and birds. Within the Apocynaceae the genera Ceropegia and Riocreuxia temporarily trap flies, releasing them after a fixed, species-specific period of time, during which pollination and/or pollen removal occurs. This "trap flower" pollination system shows convergent evolution with unrelated species in other families and fascinated Stefan Vogel for much of his career, leading to ground-breaking work on floral function in Ceropegia (Apocynaceae). In this new study we extend the work of the latest broad analysis published by some of the authors (Ollerton et al., 2009 − Annals of Botany). This incorporates previously unpublished data from India and Africa, as well as recently published information, on the diversity of pollinators exploited by Ceropegia. The analyses are based on a more accurate phylogenetic understanding of the relationships between the major groups, and significantly widens the biogeographic scope of our understanding of fly pollination within Ceropegia. Information about the pollinators of 69 taxa (species, subspecies and natural varieties) of Ceropegia is now available. Twenty five families of Diptera are known to visit the flowers of Ceropegia, of which sixteen are confirmed as pollinators. Most taxa are pollinated by species from a single family. Overall, there were no major biogeographic differences in the types of Diptera that were used in particular regions, though some subtle differences were apparent. Likewise there were no differences between the two major clades of Ceropegia, but clear differences when comparing the range of Diptera exploited by Ceropegia with that of the stapeliads. This clade, one of the largest in the Asclepiadoideae, is a fascinating example of a species radiation driven by an apparently relatively uniform set of pollinators.

  • 21. Ren, Sa
    et al.
    Delin, Wu
    Dezhao, Chen
    Dianxiang, Zhang
    Hang, Sun
    Puhua, Huang
    Gilbert, Michael G.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Wilmot-Dear, Melanie
    Ohashi, Hiroyoshi
    Phaseoleae2010In: Flora of China: vol. 10, Fabaceae, Beijing: Science Press, 2010, p. 196-261Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22. Rogers, S. Zachary
    et al.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Peltophorum dasyrhachis (Miq.) Kurz: a new record of a Southeast Asian species of Fabaceae (Caesalpinioideae) naturalized in northwestern Madagascar2012In: Candollea, ISSN 0373-2967, E-ISSN 2235-3658, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 145-147Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Sheikh, Sanea
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Cavender, James C.
    Ohio Univ, Dept Environm & Plant Biol, Athens, OH, USA.
    Escalante, Ricardo
    UAM, CSIC, IIB Inst Invest Biomed Alberto Sols, Madrid, Spain.
    Kawakami, S
    Yamagata Prefectural Museum, Yamagata, Yamagata, Japan.
    Lado, Carlos
    CSIC, Real Jardin Bot, Madrid, Spain.
    Landolt, John C.
    Shepherd Univ, Dept Biol, Shepherdstown, WV, USA.
    Nanjundiah, Vidyanand
    Ctr Human Genet, BioTech Pk, Elect City Phase I, Bangalore, Karnataka, India.
    Queller, David C.
    Washington Univ, Dept Biol, St Louis, MO, USA.
    Strassmann, Joan E.
    Washington Univ, Dept Biol, St Louis, MO, USA.
    Spiegel, Frederick W.
    Univ Arkansas, Dept Biol Sci, Fayetteville, AR, USA.
    Stephenson, Steven L.
    Univ Arkansas, Dept Biol Sci, Fayetteville, AR, USA.
    Vadell, Eduardo M.
    JF Kennedy Univ, Escuela Farm & Bioquim, Buenos Aires, DF, Argentina.
    Baldauf, Sandra L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    A New Classification of the Dictyostelids2018In: Protist, ISSN 1434-4610, E-ISSN 1618-0941, Vol. 169, no 1, p. 1-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional morphology-based taxonomy of dictyostelids is rejected by molecular phylogeny. A new classification is presented based on monophyletic entities with consistent and strong molecular phylogenetic support and that are, as far as possible, morphologically recognizable. All newly named clades are diagnosed with small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) sequence signatures plus morphological synapomorphies where possible. The two major molecular clades are given the rank of order, as Acytosteliales ord. nov. and Dictyosteliales. The two major clades within each of these orders are recognized and given the rank of family as, respectively, Acytosteliaceae and Cavenderiaceae fam. nov. in Acytosteliales, and Dictyosteliaceae and Raperosteliaceae fam. nov. in Dictyosteliales. Twelve genera are recognized: Cavenderia gen. nov. in Cavenderiaceae, Acytostelium, Rostrostelium gen. nov. and Heterostelium gen. nov. in Acytosteliaceae, Tieghemostelium gen. nov., Hagiwaraea gen. nov., Raperostelium gen. nov. and Speleostelium gen. nov. in Raperosteliaceae, and Dictyostelium and Polysphondylium in Dictyosteliaceae. The “polycephalum” complex is treated as Coremiostelium gen. nov. (not assigned to family) and the “polycarpum” complex as Synstelium gen. nov. (not assigned to order and family). Coenonia, which may not be a dictyostelid, is treated as a genus incertae sedis. Eighty-eight new combinations are made at species and variety level, and Dictyostelium ammophilum is validated.

  • 24. Thiv, Mike
    et al.
    van der Niet, Timotheues
    Rutschmann, Frank
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Brune, Thomas
    Linder, Hans Peter
    Old-New World and trans-African disjunctions of Thamnosma (Rutaceae): Intercontinental long-distance dispersal and local differentiation in the succulent biome2011In: American Journal of Botany, ISSN 0002-9122, E-ISSN 1537-2197, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 76-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Premise of the study : The succulent biome is highly fragmented throughout the Old and New World. The resulting disjunctions on global and regional scales have been explained by various hypotheses. To evaluate these, we used Thamnosma, which is restricted to the succulent biome and has trans-Atlantic and trans-African disjunctions. Its three main distribution centers are in southern North America, southern and eastern Africa including Socotra. Methods : We conducted parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses based on chloroplast and nuclear sequence data. We applied molecular clock calculations using the programs BEAST and MULTIDIVTIME and biogeographic reconstructions using S-DIVA and Lagrange. Key results : Our data indicate a weakly supported paraphyly of the New World species with respect to a palaeotropical lineage, which is further subdivided into a southern African and a Horn of Africa group. The disjunctions in Thamnosma are mostly dated to the Miocene. Conclusions : We conclude that the Old-New World disjunction of Thamnosma is likely the result of long-distance dispersal. The Miocene closure of the arid corridor between southern and eastern Africa may have caused the split within the Old World lineage, thus making a vicariance explanation feasible. The colonization of Socotra is also due to long-distance dispersal. All recent Thamnosma species are part of the succulent biome, and the North American species may have been members of the arid Neogene Madro-Tertiary Geoflora. Phylogenetic niche conservatism, rare long-distance dispersal, and local differentiation account for the diversity among species of Thamnosma.

  • 25.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Avd f systematisk botanik.
    A new species of Rhytidocaulon (Apocynaceae) from Somalia2005In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 533-534Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Avd f systematisk botanik.
    A new species of Scutellaria (Lamiaceae) from Somalia2005In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 535-536Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Aloe nugalensis sp. nov. (Asphodelaceae), a new gypsum endemic from northeastern Somalia2012In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 729-731Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new species Aloe nugalensis Thulin, a shrubby plant with long, drooping leaves and a drooping, branched inflorescence with long-pedicellate orange red flowers, is described from a gypsum hill in the Nugaal valley of northeastern Somalia. The only known material is an individual grown in the Botanical Garden of Uppsala University from seeds collected in Nov 1985 that first flowered in Feb 2011.

  • 28.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    An earlier name for Lindernia andringitrae Eb. Fischer (Linderniaceae)2013In: Candollea, ISSN 0373-2967, E-ISSN 2235-3658, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 63-64Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology.
    Cyclamen somalense, an extraordinary discovery2013In: Genus Cyclamen: in science, cultivation, art and culture / [ed] Brian Mathew, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK: Kew Publishing, 2013, p. 124-128Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Disentangling the history of Forsskål's "Camellia"2016In: Symbolae Botanicae Upsalienses, ISSN 0082-0644, Vol. 38, p. 139-143Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    En ny lokal för gotlandsranunkel upptäckt i Ardre2018In: Rindi: tidskrift för gotländsk botanik, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 47-49Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Avd f systematisk botanik.
    Horn of Africa2005In: Hotspots revisited, CEMEX , 2005, p. 276-283Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Lectotypification of Paramollugo nudicaulis (Molluginaceae)2017In: Candollea, ISSN 0373-2967, E-ISSN 2235-3658, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 31-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The typification of Paramollugo nudicaulis (Lam.) Thulin (≡ Mollugo nudicaulis Lam.) has been problematic as no original material has been found in P. The lectotype designated here, Commerson s. n. from Mauritius, is the single specimen cited by Lamarck in the protologue, and has been located in MPU.

  • 34.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Lobeliaceae2010In: Flore du Gabon: 40, Apodanthaceae, Balanophoraceae, Campanulaceae, Caricaceae, Hyacinthaceae, Hydroleaceae, Lobeliaceae, Menyanthaceae, Nymphaeaceae, Pontederiaceae, Typhaceae, Weikersheim: Margraf , 2010, p. 35-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Lunchrastbotanik2016In: Daphne, ISSN 1101-5527, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 26-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Avd f systematisk botanik.
    Notes on Convolvulus, Astripomoea, Ipomoea and Merremia (Convolvulaceae) from the Horn of Africa2005In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 629-640Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Ogaden - still terra incognita?2012In: The Ethiopian Flora Project 1980-2009: exploration, collaboration, inspiration / [ed] Hedberg, Inga, Uppsala universitet, 2012, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 79-93Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Avd f systematisk botanik.
    Phyllanthus xylorrhizus (Phyllanthaceae), a new species from Somalia2005In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 385-387Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Starrlokaler i Roslagen - gamla och nya2015In: Daphne, ISSN 1101-5527, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 18-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Avd f systematisk botanik.
    Three new species of Chascanum (Verbenaceae) and notes on the genus in the Horn of Africa region2005In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 513-517Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Avd f systematisk botanik.
    Three new species of Heliotropium (Boraginaceae) from the Horn of Africa region2005In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 527-532Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Thulin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Botany. Avd f systematisk botanik.
    Two new species of Dyschoriste (Acanthaceae) from Somalia2005In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 519-522Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Thulin, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Biology.
    Aagaard, Sunniva M.D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Biology.
    Wikström, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Evolution, Genomics and Systematics, Systematic Biology.
    Jarvis, Charles
    Revised lectotypification of Lycopodium complanatum L. (Lycopodiaceae)2009In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 974-976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The currently accepted lectotype of the circumboreal species Lycopodium complanatum L., or Diphasiastrum complanatum (L.) Holub, is a specimen of the related species L. tristachyum Pursh, or D. tristachyum (Pursh) Holub, mainly distributed in eastern North America and Europe. This lectotype, in LINN, is here superseded in favour of an alternative original element in the Celsius herbarium in Uppsala, supported by an epitype, on the grounds of conflict with the protologue. Thereby the traditional usage of the well-known name L. complanatum can be maintained.

  • 44.
    Thulin, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Darbyshire, Iain
    Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK.
    Banks, Hannah I.
    Micromorphology Section, Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, UK.
    Chorisochora (Acanthaceae) in Somalia: the new species C. chascanoides2012In: Kew bulletin, ISSN 0075-5974, E-ISSN 1874-933X, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 601-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new species Chorisochora chascanoides is described from limestone cliffs in north-eastern Somalia. Three species were previously known in Chorisochora, two in Yemen (Socotra) and one in NE South Africa and Botswana. On morphological grounds the Somali species is believed to be most closely related to the two species on Socotra. The pollen of the new species is of the Ecbolium-type, in agreement with the other species of Chorisochora.

  • 45.
    Thulin, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Decarlo, Anjanette
    Aromat Plant Res Ctr, 230 N 1200 E,Suite 100, Lehi, UT 84604 USA.
    Johnson, Stephen P.
    Aromat Plant Res Ctr, 230 N 1200 E,Suite 100, Lehi, UT 84604 USA.
    Boswellia occulta (Burseraceae), a new species of frankincense tree from Somalia (Somaliland)2019In: Phytotaxa, ISSN 1179-3155, E-ISSN 1179-3163, Vol. 394, no 3, p. 219-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new species Boswellia occulta is described from a small area in the Ceel Afweyn District of Somaliland (northwestern Somalia), where it is locally of considerable socio-economic importance. Although used for frankincense production by many generations of local harvesters, it has been unknown to science until now. Apart from the recently collected type material, it is also known from a sterile and hitherto misunderstood collection made in 1945. The simple-leaved Boswellia occulta is morphologically compared with B. sacra and B. frereana, the two major frankincense-producing species in the region, both with imparipinnate leaves, and it appears to be most closely related to B. sacra. The new species is the only simple-leaved species of Boswellia known outside Socotra.

  • 46.
    Thulin, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Gilbert, Michael
    (1959) Proposal to reject Lasiostelma somalense (Apocynaceae)2010In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 59, no 4, p. 1282-1283Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Thulin, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Harley, Raymond M.
    Mollugo brasiliensis sp nov (Molluginaceae) from eastern Brazil2015In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 175-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new species Mollugo brasiliensis Thulin & Harley, a perennial viscous herb with 6-8 stamens, few-seeded capsules and tuberculate seeds, is described from eastern Brazil. It is compared primarily with the two other native members of Molluginaceae previously known from Brazil, M. verticillata L. and Glischrothamnus ulei Pilger.

  • 48.
    Thulin, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Harley, Raymond M.
    Royal Bot Gardens Kew, Richmond, Surrey, England.
    Mollugo viscosa sp. nov. (Molluginaceae), a segregate of M. brasiliensis from Minas Gerais in eastern Brazil2019In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 37, no 7, article id e02417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new species Mollugo viscosa Thulin & Harley is described from Minas Gerais in eastern Brazil. It was previously part of the recently published M. brasiliensis Thulin & Harley, a species that was found to be non-monophyletic in molecular phylogenetic analyses. Mollugo brasiliensis is here divided into a northern species (M. brasiliensis s.str.) in Bahia and a southern species (M. viscosa sp. nov.) in Minas Gerais. The new species differs from M. brasiliensis in its denser and more viscous indumentum, and in its distinctly smaller seeds with smaller tubercles and a smaller hilar peg, and from its sister species M. ulei by being a perennial herb with bisexual flowers.

  • 49.
    Thulin, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Heidari, Nahid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cucumis omissus sp nov (Cucurbitaceae) from southern Arabia and Ethiopia and its phylogenetic position2018In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 36, no 10, article id UNSP e02056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new species Cucumis omissus Thulin from Yemen, Oman and Ethiopia is described and illustrated. According to phylogenetic analyses based mainly on nuclear ribosomal ITS sequences and chloroplast trnG sequences, the new species is sister to C. hastatus from Somalia and Ethiopia. A map showing the distributions of both C. omissus and C. hastatus is provided and morphological differences between these two species are highlighted. Cucumis omissus has been confused with C. pustulatus and C. prophetarum in the literature and in herbaria, and morphological differences from these two species are provided as well. Oreosyce africana is nested within Cucumis in this, as well as in several previous studies. We clarify that when O. africana is treated as a Cucumis, its correct name is C. subsericeus.

  • 50.
    Thulin, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edwards, Erika J.
    Brown Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, 80 Waterman St,Box G-W, Providence, RI 02912 USA;Yale Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, POB 208105, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.
    Moore, Abigail J.
    Brown Univ, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biol, 80 Waterman St,Box G-W, Providence, RI 02912 USA;Univ Oklahoma, Dept Microbiol & Plant Biol, 770 Van Vleet Oval, Norman, OK 73019 USA;Univ Oklahoma, Oklahoma Biol Survey, 770 Van Vleet Oval, Norman, OK 73019 USA.
    Phylogeny and Systematics of Kewa (Kewaceae)2018In: Systematic Botany, ISSN 0363-6445, E-ISSN 1548-2324, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 689-700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genus Kewa in the monogeneric family Kewaceae (Caryophyllales) is revised. Six species are recognized, K. acida on St. Helena, K. angrae-pequenae in Namibia and South Africa, K. arenicola (incl. K. trachysperma) in South Africa, K. bowkeriana (incl. K. suffruticosa) widespread in eastern and southern Africa and in Madagascar, K. caespitosa in Angola and Namibia, and K. salsoloides in Namibia, Botswana, and South Africa. Kewa is morphologically distinctive, notably by its simple perianth where the two outer perianth-segments are more or less sepaloid and the three inner ones more or less petaloid, and by its indumentum of short glandular hairs, often with prominent, persistent, wart-like bases. All species have an acid taste, apparently due to the presence of oxalic acid. All names are typified, including one lectotype designated here. An identification key and distribution maps for all species are provided. The phylogeny of Kewa is reconstructed based on plastid trnK-matK and rbcL and nuclear ITS sequences. Kewa is strongly supported and the included species have strong to no support, whereas the relationships between the species are mostly unsupported. The phylogeny is dated and the estimated age of the Kewa stem clade is (37.5-)45.0(-57.0) million years and of the crown lade (3.0-)3.9(-7.4) million years. The age of the crown lade would also be the estimated date when K. acida on the approximately 14 million years old St. Helena diverged from its potential sister group on the African continent, and would coincide with the earliest possible date for the introduction of the ancestor of K. acida to St. Helena.

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