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  • 1.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Extended anatomical grading in diffuse axonal injury using MRI: Hemorrhagic lesions in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome2017In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 5, no 34, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. In this study, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were used to quantify the anatomical distribution of lesions, to grade DAI according to the Adams grading system, and to evaluate the value of lesion localization in combination with clinical prognostic factors to improve outcome prediction. Thirty patients (mean 31.2 years ±14.3 standard deviation) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score [GMS] <6) examined with MRI within 1 week post-injury were included. Diffusion-weighted (DW), T2*-weighted gradient echo and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequences were used. Extended Glasgow outcome score was assessed after 6 months. Number of DW lesions in the thalamus, basal ganglia, and internal capsule and number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Age, GMS at admission, GMS at discharge, and low proportion of good monitoring time with cerebral perfusion pressure <60 mm Hg correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.005) and lesions in the mesencephalic region corresponding to substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p  = 0.008). We conclude that higher age and lesions in substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome in DAI. We propose an extended MRI classification system based on four stages (stage I—hemispheric lesions, stage II—corpus callosum lesions, stage III—brainstem lesions, and stage IV—substantia nigra or mesencephalic tegmentum lesions); all are subdivided by age (≥/<30 years).

  • 2.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Timothy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Intracranial pressure elevations in diffuse axonal injury are associated with non-hemorrhagic MR lesions in central mesencephalic structuresIn: Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is not well defined. This study investigated the occurrence of increased ICP and whether clinical factors and lesion localization on MRI were associated with increased ICP in DAI patients.

    Methods: Fifty-two severe TBI patients (median 24, range 9-61 years), with ICP-monitoring and DAI on MRI, using T2*-weighted gradient echo, susceptibility-weighted and diffusion-weighted (DW) sequences, were enrolled. Proportion of good monitoring time (GMT) with ICP>20 mmHg during the first 120 hours post-injury was calculated and associations with clinical and MRI-related factors were evaluated using linear regression. 

    Results: All patients had episodes of ICP>20 mmHg. The mean proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg was 5% and 27% of the patients (14/52) had more than 5% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. Glasgow Coma Scale motor score at admission (P=0.04) and lesions on DW images in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum (SN-T, P=0.001) were associated with the proportion of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg. In multivariate linear regression, lesions on DW images in SN-T (8% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI 3–13%, P=0.004) and young age (-0.2% of GMT with ICP>20 mmHg, 95% CI -0.07–-0.3%, P=0.0008) were associated with increased ICP.   

    Conclusions: Increased ICP occurs in ~1/3 of severe TBI patients with DAI. Age and lesions on DW images in the central mesencephalon (SN-T) associate with elevated ICP. These findings suggest that MR lesion localization may aid prediction of increased ICP in DAI patients.

  • 3.
    Alemany, Montserrat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Stenborg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Terent, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sonninen, Pirkko
    Röntgenavdelningen, Åbo universitetssjukhus, Åbo, Finland.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Coexistence of microhemorrhages and acute spontaneous brain hemorrhage: correlation with signs of microangiopathy and clinical data2006In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 238, no 1, p. 240-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To evaluate prospectively with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the coexistence of microhemorrhages (MHs) in white patients with acute spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH) and acute ischemic stroke and to study the association with imaging findings of microangiopathy and various clinical data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Before examinations, informed consents were signed by either the patient or a relative. The study was carried out with the approval of the local ethics committee. MR imaging was performed in 90 patients with acute stroke: 45 with acute spontaneous IPHs (24 men and 21 women; median age, 65 and 68 years, respectively) and 45 age-matched control subjects without intracranial hemorrhages (26 men and 19 women; median age for both, 67 years), as determined at computed tomography. MR imaging included transverse T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo, transverse fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, transverse and coronal T2*-weighted gradient-echo, and, in 50 patients, diffusion-weighted sequences. Presence of MHs and signs of microangiopathy, such as T2 hyperintensities or lacunae, were recorded in the white and deep gray matter. The relationships between MH and IPH and between MH and T2 hyperintensities were analyzed by means of regression analysis. Different clinical features, such as arterial hypertension or diabetes, were registered and correlated with the image findings by means of regression analysis. RESULTS: MHs were found in 64% of patients with IPH (29 of 45) and 18% of control subjects (eight of 45). A statistically significant relationship between MH and IPH was determined (P < .001). Among the 29 patients with IPH and MH, 24 (83%) had T2 hyperintensities and 13 (45%) had lacunae; among the 16 patients without MH, seven (44%) had T2 hyperintensities and three (19%) had lacunae. A relationship between MH and occurrence and extent of T2 hyperintensities was also identified (P < .001). There was no clear relationship with the clinical data studied. CONCLUSION: The results support a correlation between the presence of imaging signs of cerebral microangiopathy, clinically silent MHs, and acute IPHs. RSNA, 2006.

  • 4.
    Alemany Ripoll, Montserrat
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Stenborg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sonninen, Pirkko
    Terent, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Detection and appearance of intraparenchymal haematomas of the brain at 1.5 T with spin-echo, FLAIR and GE sequences: poor relationship to the age of the haematoma2004In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 435-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The specific appearance of blood related to time at T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) sequences is generally accepted; thus, these sequences are classically used for estimating the age of haematomas. Magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 T, including T1- and T2-weighted SE fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GE) sequences, was performed on 82 intraparenchymal haematomas (IPHs) and 15 haemorrhagic infarcts (HIs) in order to analyse the appearance at different stages and with different sequences, and to investigate how reliably the age of hematomas can be estimated. The IPHs had been previously detected by CT, were spontaneous ( n=72) or traumatic ( n=10) in origin and were of different sizes (2 mm to 7 cm) and ages (from 7.5 h to 4 years after acute haemorrhagic event). The age of the lesion was calculated from the moment when clinical symptoms started or the traumatic event occurred. The 15 patients with HIs were patients with ischaemic stroke in whom there was either a suspicion of haemorrhagic transformation on CT, or haemorrhage was detected as an additional finding on MR performed for other indications. Patients with conditions that could affect the SI of blood, such as anticoagulant therapy or severe anaemia, were excluded. The signal intensity pattern of the lesions was analysed and related to their ages without prior knowledge of the clinical data. All lesions were detected with T2*-weighted GE. T1-weighted SE missed 13 haematomas and T2-weighted SE and FLAIR sequences missed five. Haemorrhagic transformation was missed in three infarcts by T1-, T2-weighted SE and FLAIR. The signal pattern on FLAIR was identical to that on T2-weighted SE. For all sequences, a wide variety of signal patterns, without a clear relationship to the age of the haematomas, was observed. There was a poor relationship between the real MR appearance of IPHs and the theoretical appearance on SE sequences. T2*-weighted GE was effective for detecting small bleedings but was not useful for estimating the age of a lesion. The FLAIR does not provide any more information than T2-weighted SE.

  • 5.
    Ali, Zafar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Klar, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Jameel, Mohammad
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Khan, Kamal
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Fatima, Ambrin
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Baig, Shahid
    Human Molecular Genetics Laboratory, National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (NIBGE), PIEAS, 38000 Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Novel SACS mutations associated with intellectual disability, epilepsy and widespread supratentorial abnormalities2016In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, ISSN 0022-510X, E-ISSN 1878-5883, Vol. 371, p. 105-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe eight subjects from two consanguineous families segregating with autosomal recessive childhood onset spastic ataxia, peripheral neuropathy and intellectual disability. The degree of intellectual disability varied from mild to severe and all four affected individuals in one family developed aggressive behavior and epilepsy. Using exome sequencing, we identified two novel truncating mutations (c.2656C>T (p.Gln886*)) and (c.4756_4760delAATCA (p.Asn1586Tyrfs*3)) in the SACS gene responsible for autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). MRI revealed typical cerebellar and pontine changes associated with ARSACS as well as multiple supratentorial changes in both families as likely contributing factors to the cognitive symptoms. Intellectual disability and behavioral abnormalities have been reported in some cases of ARSACS but are not a part of the characteristic triad of symptoms that includes cerebellar ataxia, spasticity and peripheral neuropathy. Our combined findings bring further knowledge to the phenotypic spectrum, neurodegenerative changes and genetic variability associated with the SACS gene of clinical and diagnostic importance.

  • 6.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Asymmetric Development of the Hippocampal Region Is Common: A Fetal MR Imaging Study2012In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 513-518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Hippocampal development is poorly understood. This study evaluated the normal development of the hippocampal region during the fetal period by using MR imaging.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR images of 63 fetuses without intracranial pathology were reviewed independently by 2 radiologists with no knowledge of the fetal GA. Three MR images were performed postmortem and 60 in vivo. The progress of hippocampal inversion was analyzed in coronal sections, and the left and right sides of the hippocampal region were compared in every case.

    RESULTS: The fetuses in the postmortem examinations were at GWs 17-18 and in the in vivo examinations, at GWs 19-36. The hippocampal sulcus was open, bi- or unilaterally, in 39 fetuses. The oldest was at GW 32. The sulcus was closed at GW 21 at the earliest, unilaterally. In 26/63 fetuses (41%), the deepening or closure of the hippocampal sulcus or hippocampal inversion was asymmetric; in 23 fetuses, the right side developed faster. A shallow collateral sulcus was found earliest at GW 17. A deep collateral sulcus was visible earliest at GW 26 unilaterally, but in all fetuses from GW 31 onward, it was seen bilaterally. The orientation of the collateral sulcus was not related to the GA.

    CONCLUSIONS: There are wide individual temporal variations in the development and the inversion process of the hippocampal sulcus as well as in the formation of the collateral sulcus. Asymmetric development is common, and in most of the asymmetric cases, the right hippocampus develops faster.

  • 7.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Development of the hippocampal region demonstrated on fetal MRI: A preliminary report2011In: NRJ Digital, ISSN 2239-7493, Vol. 1, no 12, p. 555-557Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coronal slices of three fetal MRIs performed post mortem and 37 performed in utero, all without intracranial pathology, was assessed. Progress of the hippocampal inversion was analyzed, the left and right sides were compared and occurrence of the collateral sulcus was revealed. The fetuses in the post mortem examinations were at gestation weeks (GW) 17-18 and in the in utero examinations at GW 19-35. The symmetric development of the hippocampal sulcus was revealed in 26 subjects and asymmetric in 14. The non-ovoid hippocampal formation could be evaluated at GW 24 at earliest and an ovoid hippocampus at GW 29. The collateral sulcus could be recognized at GW 17 in post mortem and at GW 22 in in utero examinations. From GW 29 onwards it was seen in all fetuses and it was symmetric in all but one case. Evaluation of the hippocampi is difficult on fetal MRI, especially in in utero examinations. The hippocampal development is not fulfilled at GW 21 as presumed. There is a wide temporal variation in the development of the hippocampal region, and the developmental process does not progress simultaneously in the right and left side of the same individual.

  • 8.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Hippocampal development demonstrated by fetal MRI. Asymmetric development is common.2011In: Insights into Imaging, Vol. 2, no Suppl 1, p. B-831-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Hippocampal development at gestation weeks 23 to 36: An ultrasound study on preterm neonates2010In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 489-494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: During fetal development, the hippocampal structures fold around the hippocampal sulcus into the temporal lobe. According to the literature, this inversion should be completed at gestation week (GW) 21. Thereafter, the hippocampal shape should resemble the adult shape. However, incomplete hippocampal inversion (IHI) is found in 19% of the common population. The aim of this study was to study fetal hippocampal development by examining neonates born preterm. METHODS: We analyzed cranial ultrasound examinations, performed as a part of the routine assessment of all preterm infants, over a 3-year period and excluded the infants with brain pathology. The final material consisted of 158 children born <35 GW. A rounded form (the ratio between the horizontal and vertical diameters of the hippocampal body <25 GW and >/=25 GW was statistically highly significant (p < 0.001). The frequency of bilateral IHI was highest in the youngest age group. In the other groups, the left-sided IHI was the most common. CONCLUSION: In about 50% of the neonates, hippocampal inversion is not completed up to GW 24; but from 25 GW onwards, the frequency and laterality of IHI is similar to that in the adult population.

  • 10.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Mattsson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Lundberg, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wang, Chen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Incomplete hippocampal inversion-is there a relation to epilepsy?2009In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 2544-2550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incomplete hippocampal inversion (IHI) has been described in patients with epilepsy or severe midline malformations but also in nonepileptic subjects without obvious developmental anomalies. We studied the frequency of IHI in different epilepsy syndromes to evaluate their relationship. Three hundred patients were drawn from the regional epilepsy register. Of these, 99 were excluded because of a disease or condition affecting the temporal lobes or incomplete data. Controls were 150 subjects without epilepsy or obvious intracranial developmental anomalies. The coronal MR images were analysed without knowledge of the clinical data. Among epilepsy patients, 30% had IHI (40 left-sided, 4 right-sided, 16 bilateral). Of controls, 18% had IHI (20 left-sided, 8 bilateral). The difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients, 25% had IHI, which was not a significantly higher frequency than in controls (P = 0.34). There was no correlation between EEG and IHI laterality. A total of 44% of Rolandic epilepsy patients and 57% of cryptogenic generalised epilepsy patients had IHI. The IHI frequency was very high in some epileptic syndromes, but not significantly higher in TLE compared to controls. No causality between TLE and IHI could be found. IHI can be a sign of disturbed cerebral development affecting other parts of the brain, maybe leading to epilepsy.

  • 11.
    Bajic, Dragan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Wang, Cheng
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Mattsson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Lundberg, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus: a common developmental anomaly2008In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 138-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus, an imperfect fetal development, has been described in patients with epilepsy or severe midline malformations. We studied this condition in a nonepileptic population without obvious developmental anomalies. We analyzed the coronal MR images of 50 women and 50 men who did not have epilepsy. Twenty of them were healthy volunteers and 80 were patients without obvious intracranial developmental anomalies, intracranial masses, hydrocephalus or any condition affecting the temporal lobes. If the entire hippocampus (the head could not be evaluated) were affected, the incomplete inversion was classified as total, otherwise as partial. Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus was found in 19/100 subjects (9 women, 10 men). It was unilateral, always on the left side, in 13 subjects (4 women, 9 men): 9 were of the total type, 4 were partial. It was bilateral in six subjects (five women, one man): four subjects had total types bilaterally, two had a combination of total and partial types. The collateral sulcus was vertically oriented in all subjects with a deviating hippocampal shape. We conclude that incomplete inversion of the hippocampus is not an unusual morphologic variety in a nonepileptic population without other obvious intracranial developmental anomalies.

  • 12. Brandberg, Göran
    et al.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hypothalamic hamartoma with gelastic seizures in Swedish children and adolescents2004In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 35-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Hypothalamic hamartoma with gelastic seizures (HHGS) is an uncommon, often unrecognized, epileptic syndrome with onset of symptoms during childhood. AIM: In order to study the occurrence, clinical symptoms and different investigations of HHGS in Swedish children and adolescents, a nationwide survey was undertaken. Methods. Twelve patients, three females, aged 5 to 19 years were identified and their hospital records reviewed. MRI examinations were reinvestigated. RESULTS: Gelastic seizures were noted before the age of six months in seven patients in at least three as early as the neonatal period. During the course of disease one or more other seizure types developed in 11 patients. Behaviour disorder became subsequently obvious in ten patients, and mental retardation was diagnosed in seven. Precocious puberty was diagnosed in five patients. A total of 46 MRI examinations were performed in 11 patients, revealing hypothalamic tumors, eight of which were drooping with a broad base. Interictal and ictal EEG examinations were pathological in 10 patients with nonspecific results. Nonspecific results were also found on SPECT and PET performed in six and two patients, respectively. Available antiepileptic drugs had little or no effect on gelastic seizures, but some effect on other seizure types. Precocious puberty was treated with a GnRH-agonist. Neurosurgical treatment of the hypothalamic hamartoma, performed in three patients, had a rather good outcome concerning gelastic seizures and behaviour. Vagal nerve stimulation in five patients had no effect. CONCLUSIONS: Review of the literature and experience from this group's own cases confirms that early diagnosis of HHGS is important. Hypothalamic hamartoma should be considered in any child with laughing attacks. MRI investigation is compulsory, and neurosurgery the most important treatment.

  • 13.
    Burman, Joachim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Univ Uppsala Hosp, Dept Neurol, SE-75185 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Blennow, Kaj
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Axelsson, Markus
    Malmeström, Clas
    YKL-40 is a CSF biomarker of intrathecal inflammation in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.2016In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 292, p. 52-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    YKL-40 (CHI3L1) is a glycoprotein predominantly produced by reactive astrocytes in chronic active MS lesions, which are common in secondary progressive MS. In this study, YKL-40 was investigated in different stages of MS and in relation to MRI findings. YKL-40 levels in CSF samples from two independent patient cohorts of MS patients were determined with ELISA. CSF YKL-40 was increased in patients with active relapsing-remitting MS and correlated with the number of gadolinium enhancing lesions. Patients with secondary progressive MS had similar high levels of YKL-40, whereas not active relapsing-remitting MS patients had YKL-40 levels comparable to healthy controls.

  • 14.
    Burman, Joachim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Fagius, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Bilateral and recurrent optic neuritis in multiple sclerosis2011In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 123, no 3, p. 207-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective - To assess the frequency of bilateral and recurrent optic neuritis (ON) in multiple sclerosis (MS) and to compare these results with epidemiological data of ON in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and recurrent ON without other signs of disease. Methods - We identified 472 patients with diagnosis of MS from the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Register. These patients were evaluated for the presence of ON and whether the ON was the presenting symptom of MS; unilateral or bilateral; monophasic or recurrent. Results - Twenty-one percent presented with ON as their first manifestation of MS. The proportion of patients developing a second attack of ON before demonstration of other manifestations of MS was 5.5% and the frequency of recurrent bilateral ON as the presenting symptom was 3.8%. Only two patients presented with simultaneously appearing bilateral ON corresponding to 0.42%. Conclusion - Recurrent ON, whether unilateral or bilateral, is a common presentation of MS. As MS is a much more common disease than NMO, care must be taken when evaluating the work-up of patients with recurrent ON. In some cases repeated MRI and lumbar punctures are warranted to improve diagnostic accuracy, even in the presence of the serological marker NMO-IgG.

  • 15.
    Burman, Joachim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Svensson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fransson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Loskog, Angelica S I
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zetterberg, Henrik
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Fagius, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Mangsbo, Sara M
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    The cerebrospinal fluid cytokine signature of multiple sclerosis: A homogenous response that does not conform to the Th1/Th2/Th17 convention2014In: Journal of Neuroimmunology, ISSN 0165-5728, E-ISSN 1872-8421, Vol. 277, no 1-2, p. 153-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this cross-sectional study, we wanted to identify key cytokines characteristic of different stages of multiple sclerosis (MS). To this end, cerebrospinal fluid from patients with MS was investigated with a multiplexed fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. In total 43 cytokines were assessed and related to clinical and imaging data. Increased levels of CCL22, CXCL10 and sCD40L characterized relapsing-remitting MS patients with the presence of gadolinium-enhancing lesions; decreased CCL2 and increased CXCL1 and CCL5 were typical of relapsing-remitting MS patients irrespectively of the presence of gadolinium-enhancing lesions. These homogenous patterns of cytokine activation do not conform to conventional Th1/Th2/Th17 responses.

  • 16.
    Burman, Joachim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Zetterberg, H
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Fransson, Moa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Loskog, Angelica SI.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Fagius, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Assessing tissue damage in multiple sclerosis: a biomarker approach2014In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 130, no 2, p. 81-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and spinal cord is the gold standard for assessing disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI is an excellent instrument for determination of accumulated damage to the brain and spinal cord, but tells us little about ongoing tissue damage. In this study, biomarkers of oligodendrocyte, axonal and astrocyte injury were related to MRI and clinical findings and used to assess tissue damage in MS.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    Cerebrospinal fluid from 44 patients with relapsing-remitting MS, 20 with secondary progressive MS and 15 controls were investigated with ELISA to determine levels of myelin basic protein (MBP), neurofilament light (NFL) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAp). Patients underwent MRI of the brain and spinal cord, and gadolinium enhancing lesions, T1 lesions and T2 lesions were counted.

    RESULTS:

    Patients in clinical relapse and patients with nonsymptomatic gadolinium enhancing lesions had high levels of MBP and NFL, indicating ongoing damage to oligodendrocytes and axons. The level of MBP dropped quickly within a week from the onset of a relapse, whereas NFL remained elevated for several weeks and GFAp slowly rose during the course of a relapse. Relapsing-remitting MS patients without gadolinium enhancing lesions had values of MBP, NFL and GFAp similar to controls, while patients with secondary progressive disease had moderately increased values of all biomarkers.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Analysis of MBP, NFL and GFAp provides direct means to measure tissue damage and is a useful addition to our methods for evaluation of MS.

  • 17.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ribeiro, Valentina
    Teixeira, João
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikstrom, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Visualization of the Fetal Lip and Palate: Is Brain-Targeted MRI Reliable?2013In: The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal, ISSN 1055-6656, E-ISSN 1545-1569, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 513-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective : 

    To evaluate the ability of brain-targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess the anatomy of the fetal upper lip and palate.

    Design : 

    Two independent readers made a blind retrospective review of 60 brain-targeted MRIs of fetuses from 20 to 38 gestational weeks (GW). Fifty-five MRIs were normal and five had orofacial anomalies, including one isolated cleft lip and four cleft lip and palate. Both normal and cleft MRIs had postnatal confirmation. The upper lip, primary palate, secondary palate, and nasal septum were scored into four levels, from evidently normal to evidently abnormal. In case of a suspected pathology, the readers attempted a diagnosis.

    Setting :

    Collaboration between a university hospital and a large private practice MRI center.

    Results : 

    Interobserver agreement (weighted kappa) was 0.79 for the upper lip, 0.70 for the primary palate, 0.86 for the secondary palate, and 0.90 for the nasal septum. The scoring levels of the readers did not change significantly across gestational age. Normality was correctly scored in 96% to 100% of the normal lips and primary palates and in 93% to 97% of the normal secondary palates depending on the reader. A deviated septum was only scored in two fetuses with unilateral cleft palates. The readers identified all pathological cases.

    Conclusion :

    Brain-targeted fetal MRI in experienced hands seems to be highly accurate for the evaluation of the lip and palate in fetuses above 20 GW, regardless of gestational age. The assessment of the secondary palate may be slightly more limited than the lip or primary palate.

  • 18.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ribeiro, Valentina
    Hospital S. Antonio, Porto, Portugal.
    Teixeira, João
    Hospital S. Antonio, Porto, Portugal.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Visualisation of the fetal lip and palate: is brain-targeted MRI reliable?2011In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632XArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the ability of brain-targeted MRI to assess the anatomy of the fetal upper lip and palate.

     

    Methods: Two independent readers made a blind retrospective review of 60 MRI of fetuses of 20 to 38 gestational weeks (GW). Fifty-five fetuses had normal post-natal follow-up.  Five fetuses had oro-facial anomalies at post-natal follow-up, including five cleft lips (two bilateral, three unilateral), four cleft primary palates (two bilateral, two unilateral) and two cleft secondary palates.

    The upper lip, primary palate, secondary palate and nasal septum were scored into four levels, from evidently normal to evidently abnormal. In case of a suspected pathology, the readers attempted a diagnosis.

     

    Results: Interobserver agreement (weighted kappa) was 0.79 for the upper lip, 0.70 for the primary palate, 0.86 for the secondary palate, and 0.90 for the nasal septum. The scoring levels of the readers did not change significantly across gestational age.

    The readers identified 100% of all pathological cases. The normality was correctly scored in 96-100% of the normal lips and primary palates and in 93-97% of the normal secondary palates depending on the reader. A deviated septum was only scored in two fetuses with unilateral cleft palates.

     

    Conclusion:  MRI in experienced hands seems reliable for assessment of the fetal lip and palate, even in brain-targeted examinations. Attention should therefore be paid to the lip and palate in all fetal MRI examinations, since unsuspected clefts may be revealed.

     

     

  • 19.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Teixeira, J.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    The ear in fetal MRI: What can we really see?2011In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 53, no Suppl 1, p. S23-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Teixeira, João
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    The ear in fetal MRI: what can we really see?2011In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 53, no 12, p. 1001-1008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the ability to depict the components of the ear on brain-oriented fetal MRI studies.

    METHODS: Retrospective evaluation of the ear in MRI studies was performed post-mortem in 16 fetuses ranging from 15 to 22 gestation weeks (GW), and in 122 examinations in vivo of fetuses ranging from 20 to 38 GW. The cochlea, vestibular apparatus, middle ear, and external auditory canal were separately graded according to the components that were delineated.

    RESULTS: The components of the inner and middle ear were fully delineated in 100% of the post-mortem examinations, but the external auditory canals were only seen in only 25%. In the in vivo group, the imaging detail was much lower. Cochlear turns could be identified in 75% of the fetuses, the vestibule and the lateral semicircular canals in 72% andossicles in 70%. Before 25 GW, the ability to identify these individual parts was 50%, 30%, and 33%, respectively, and above it was 89%, 93%, and 90% . In most cases, the external auditory canals could only be seen after 29 GW.

    CONCLUSION: In fetal MRI studies in vivo, it is possible to depict the components of the ear in the majority of the fetuses, in such a manner as to exclude major malformations. However, MRI might not provide enough detail to rule out pathology of the ear before 25 GW, this being a critical age for pregnancy management in many countries.

  • 21.
    Canto Moreira, Nuno
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Teixeira, João
    Department of Neuroradiology, H. G. S. Antonio, Porto, Portugal.
    Themudo, Raquel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Amini, Hashem
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Measurements of the normal fetal brain at gestation weeks 17 to 23: a MRI study2011In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 43-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: To obtain measurements of the normal fetal brain before 24 weeks of gestation (GW), a deadline for medical decisions on fetal viability in a large number of countries. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 70 normal MR examinations of fetuses aged GW 17 to 23. The fronto-occipital diameter, the cerebral bi-parietal diameter, the transverse cerebellar diameter, the vermian height, and antero-posterior diameter were measured. RESULTS: The median, maximum, and minimum values for each parameter were displayed for each individual GW. CONCLUSION: The recorded data might contribute to a better assessment of fetal health by providing normal boundaries for the brain growth.

  • 22.
    Feresiadou, Amalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Larsen, Hans-Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Nygren, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Melberg, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Recurrence of Susac Syndrome following 23 Years of Remission2014In: Case Reports in Neurology, ISSN 1662-680X, E-ISSN 1662-680X, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 171-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Susac syndrome is an autoimmune microangiopathy affecting the brain, retina and inner ear (cochlea and semicircular canals), leading to encephalopathy, branch retinal artery occlusions (BRAOs) and asymmetric neurosensory hearing loss, respectively. The natural history and long-term prognosis are variable as the disease has been shown to be monophasic and self-limiting, polycyclic or chronic continuous. We describe a 35-year-old woman who presented with a sudden hearing loss in the left ear in the 37th week of her second pregnancy. She subsequently developed BRAO in the right eye 2.5 months after having given birth. MRI findings included round lesions in the corpus callosum which are pathognomonic for Susac syndrome. Previous patient records documented encephalopathy, sudden deafness of the right ear and visual field defects in the left eye at the age of 12, followed by permanent hearing and visual defects. We expand on the variability in the course of Susac syndrome as recurrence may occur after as long as 23 years. Cases of monophasic self-limiting Susac syndrome may in fact turn polycyclic with an interval of more than 2 decades between the bouts of the disease. In these cases, suspecting the development of exacerbation early is important in order to start the treatment promptly.

  • 23.
    Finnsson, Johannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Melberg, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    1H-MR spectroscopy of adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy with autonomic symptoms2013In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 933-939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adult-onset ADLD with autonomic symptoms is a rare disease with a clinical course somewhat similar to chronic progressive MS but with different imaging findings consisting of extensive white matter changes in the cerebrum and cerebellar peduncles. Patients usually present in the fourth to sixth decade with autonomic symptoms, manifesting later symptoms from the pyramidal tracts and ataxia. Here, we present magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings in this disease. Fourteen subjects, from two non-related families, with genetic linkage to the disease were studied with magnetic resonance imaging and single-voxel MRS. Clinically, they ranged from asymptomatic to wheelchair-using. Their results were compared to those of age- and sex-matched healthy controls. One MRS was excluded due to suboptimal quality. The remaining 13 subjects manifested characteristic evidence of pathology on MRI, 11 of them exhibited extensive changes. The metabolite concentrations of total Cr, total Cho, and total NAA measured in millimolars, using internal water as a reference, were significantly lower in these 11 subjects compared to controls, and we found linear correlations between all these metabolite levels. When total Cr was used as a reference, we found no difference between subjects and controls. No lactate was detected. The decreased metabolite concentrations measured using internal water as a reference are most likely due to increased water content in the tissues, diluting all metabolites to a similar degree. This is also in agreement with the high signal intensity exhibited in the white matter on T2-weighted MR images and with the reported histopathological findings of vacuolated myelin.

  • 24.
    Finnsson, Johannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Melberg, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    1H-MR spectroscopy only shows elevated water content in adult onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) with autonomic symptoms2012In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 19, no S1, p. 401-401Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Finnsson, Johannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Melberg, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    MRI and clinical  follow-up in adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) with autonomic symptoms2012In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 54, no Suppl1, p. S61-, article id O1A-3.7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Finnsson, Johannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Melberg, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Proton MR spectroscopy of supraventricular white matter in adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) with autonomic symptoms2011In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 53, no Suppl 1, p. S50-S51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Finnsson, Johannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Savitcheva, I
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Melberg, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Glucose metabolism in adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) with autonomic symptoms2013In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 55, no Suppl1, p. S36-, article id S.18.06Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Finnsson, Johannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sundblom, Jimmy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Melberg, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    LMNB1-related autosomal-dominant leukodystrophy: Clinical and radiological course2015In: Annals of Neurology, ISSN 0364-5134, E-ISSN 1531-8249, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 412-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Duplication of the LMNB1 gene encoding lamin B1 causes adult-onset autosomal-dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) starting with autonomic symptoms, which are followed by pyramidal signs and ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain reveals characteristic findings. This is the first longitudinal study on this disease. Our objective is to describe the natural clinical and radiological course of LMNB1-related ADLD.

    METHODS: Twenty-three subjects in two families with LMNB1 duplications were studied over two decades with clinical assessment and MRI of the brain and spinal cord. They were 29 to 70 years old at their first MRI. Repeated MRIs were performed in 14 subjects over a time period of up to 17 years.

    RESULTS: Pathological MRI findings were found in the brain and spinal cord in all examinations (i.e., even preceding clinical symptoms). MRI changes and clinical symptoms progressed in a definite order. Autonomic dysfunction appeared in the fifth to sixth decade, preceding or together with gait and coordination difficulties. Motor signs developed ascending from spastic paraplegia to tetraplegia and pseudobulbar palsy in the seventh decade. There were clinical, radiological, and neurophysiological signs of myelopathy. Survival lasted more than two decades after clinical onset.

    INTERPRETATION: LMNB1-related ADLD is a slowly progressive neurological disease. MRI abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord can precede clinical symptoms by more than a decade and are extensive in all symptomatic patients. Spinal cord involvement is a likely contributing factor to early autonomic symptoms and spastic paraplegia. Ann Neurol 2015;78:412-425.

  • 29.
    Finnsson, Johannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Sundblom, Jimmy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Melberg, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    O151-Longitudinal MRI Study of the Spinal Cord in Lamin B1 Autosomal Dominant Leukodystrophy: Do the first symptoms come from the spinal cord?2014In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 56, no Suppl 1, p. S246-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Hellström, Jussi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Romanos Zapata, Romina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Libard, Sylwia
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ortiz-Nieto, Francisco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Clinical value of MR spectroscopy: How often does MRS yield more information than MRI?2015In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 57, no Suppl1, p. 143-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Hellström, Jussi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Romanos Zapata, Romina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ortiz-Nieto, Francisco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Libard, Sylwia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Evaluation of INTERPRET Decision Support System (DSS) in clinical MRS of intracranial lesions and comparison to conventional MRS analysis and MRI.2015In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 57, no Suppl1, p. 67-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Jameel, Muhammad
    et al.
    Klar, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tariq, Muhammad
    Moawia, Abubakar
    Altaf Malik, Naveed
    Seema Waseem, Syeda
    Abdullah, Uzma
    Naeem Khan, Tahir
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Baig, Shahid Mahmood
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    A novel AP4M1 mutation in autosomal recessive cerebral palsy syndrome and clinical expansion of AP-4 deficiency2014In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 15, p. 133-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability in one-third of cases. Recent findings support Mendelian inheritance in subgroups of patients with the disease. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel genetic cause of paraplegic CP with intellectual disability in a consanguineous Pakistani family.

    METHODS:

    We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in two brothers with CP and intellectual disability. Analysis of AP4M1 mRNA was performed using quantitative real-time PCR on total RNA from cultured fibroblasts. The brothers were investigated clinically and by MRI.

    RESULTS:

    We identified a novel homozygous AP4M1 mutation c.194_195delAT, p.Y65Ffs*50 in the affected brothers. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed markedly reduced AP4M1 mRNA levels suggesting partial non-sense mediated mRNA decay. Several clinical and MRI features were consistent with AP-4 complex deficiency. However, in contrast to previously reported cases with AP4M1 mutations our patients show an aggressive behavior and a relatively late onset of disease.

    CONCLUSION:

    This study shows an AP4M1 mutation associated with aggressive behavior in addition to mild dysmorphic features, intellectual disability, spastic paraparesis and reduced head circumference. Our findings expand the clinical spectrum associated with AP-4 complex deficiency and the study illustrates the importance of MRI and WES in the diagnosis of patients with CP and intellectual disability.

  • 33. Karppinen, Jaro
    et al.
    Solovieva, Svetlana
    Luoma, Katariina
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Leino-Arjas, Päivi
    Riihimäki, Hilkka
    Modic changes and interleukin 1 gene locus polymorphisms in occupational cohort of middle-aged men2009In: European spine journal, ISSN 0940-6719, E-ISSN 1432-0932, Vol. 18, no 12, p. 1963-1970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to recent systematic reviews, Modic changes are associated with low-back pain. However, their pathophysiology remains largely unknown. A previous study of Northern Finnish males implicated that IL1A and MMP3 polymorphisms play a role in type II Modic changes. The purpose of the current study was to examine the association of IL1 cluster polymorphisms with Modic changes amongst middle-aged men in Southern Finland. The final study sample consisted of 108 men from three different occupations, who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 0.1 T-scanner. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the IL1 gene cluster (IL1A c.1-889C>T; IL1B c.3954C>T; IL1RN c.1812G>A; IL1RN c.1887G>C; IL1RN c.11100T>C; IL1RN c.1506G>A) were genotyped with the SNP-TRAP method or by allele-specific primer extension on modified microarray. In all, 45 subjects had Modic changes at one or more disc levels. The presence of the minor allele of IL1A (c.1-889C>T) was associated with these changes (any Modic change p = 0.031, type II changes p = 0.036). The carriers of the T-allele had a 2.5-fold risk of Modic change and the association was independent of the other IL1 gene cluster loci studied. In addition, a minor haplotype, with a frequency of 7.5% in the study population, including the minor alleles of IL1A c.1-889C>T, IL1RN c.1812G>A, and IL1RN c.1506G>A, was significantly associated with Modic changes. This observation is in accordance with the previous finding from a different geographical area, and thus confirms the importance of the IL1A gene in the pathophysiology of Modic changes.

  • 34. Kors, E. E.
    et al.
    Melberg, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Vanmolkot, K. R.
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Haan, Jan
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Flink, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Ginjaar, H.B.
    Frants, R.R.
    Ferrari, M.D.
    van den Maagdenberg, A. M.
    Childhood, epilepsy, familial hemiplegic migraine, cerebellar ataxia, and a new CACNA1A mutation2004In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 1136-1137Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Lannsjö, Marianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bustamante, Mariana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
    von Seth, Charlotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Borg, Jörgen
    Brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury: An exploratory study by repeated magnetic resonance examination2013In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 721-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    To explore brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury by repeated magnetic resonance examination.

    Design:

    A prospective follow-up study.

    Subjects:

    Nineteen patients with mild traumatic brain injury presenting with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 14-15.

    Methods:

    The patients were examined on day 2 or 3 and 3-7 months after the injury. The magnetic resonance protocol comprised conventional T1- and T2-weighted sequences including fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), two susceptibility-weighted sequences to reveal haemorrhages, and diffusion-weighted sequences. Computer-aided volume comparison was performed. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE).

    Results:

    At follow-up, 7 patients (37%) reported ≥  3 symptoms in RPQ, 5 reported some anxiety and 1 reported mild depression. Fifteen patients reported upper level of good recovery and 4 patients lower level of good recovery (GOSE 8 and 7, respectively). Magnetic resonance pathology was found in 1 patient at the first examination, but 4 patients (21%) showed volume loss at the second examination, at which 3 of them reported < 3 symptoms and 1 ≥ 3 symptoms, all exhibiting GOSE scores of 8.

    Conclusion:

    Loss of brain volume, demonstrated by computer-aided magnetic resonance imaging volumetry, may be a feasible marker of brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury.

  • 36. Luoma, Katariina
    et al.
    Vehmas, Tapio
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Luukkonen, Ritva
    Riihimäki, Hilkka
    Lumbosacral transitional vertebra: relation to disc degeneration and low back pain2004In: Spine, ISSN 0362-2436, E-ISSN 1528-1159, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 200-5Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI) study. OBJECTIVE To investigate the relation of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra to signs of disc degeneration in MRI and to low back pain (LBP). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: An association between the transitional vertebra and herniation in the disc above has been found in patients with LBP, but knowledge of the relation to other degenerative disc changes detected in MRI and to LBP is lacking. METHODS: MR images of the lumbar spine of 138 middle-aged working men and 25 healthy young men were evaluated. The presence and type of lumbosacral transitional vertebra and of degenerative changes in intervertebral discs were evaluated. The history of low back symptoms was obtained with a questionnaire from the middle-aged men. RESULTS: The prevalence of transitional vertebra was 30%. Transitional vertebra was associated with an increased risk of degenerative changes in the disc above among the young men and with a decreased risk in the disc below among the middle-aged men. Transitional vertebra, symmetric or asymmetric, was not associated with any type of LBP in the middle-aged men. CONCLUSIONS: Lumbosacral transitional vertebra increases the risk of early degeneration in the upper disc. This effect seems to be obscured by age-related changes in the middle age. The degenerative process is slowed down in the lower disc. For these effects, the presence of a transitional vertebra should be noticed when morphologic methods are used in research on lumbosacral spine. Transitional vertebra is not associated with any type of LBP.

  • 37. Mannerkoski, Minna
    et al.
    Heiskala, H.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Åberg, L.
    Sarna, S.
    Wirtavuori, K.
    Autti, Taina
    Brain magnetic resonance imaging of siblings from families with two or more children with learning or intellectual disabilities and need for full-time special education2009In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 437-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Several factors are involved in determining a child's need for special education (SE). Thus, the value of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for subjects with learning and intellectual disabilities is uncertain. PURPOSE: To evaluate the usefulness of MRI in the diagnostic process of siblings with learning and intellectual disabilities and need for full-time SE. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Altogether, 119 siblings (mean age 11.9 years) from families in which two or more children attended/had previously attended full-time SE underwent prospective brain MRI. SE grouping included three levels, from specific learning disabilities (level 1) to global intellectual disabilities (level 3). Forty-three controls (level 0, mean age 12.0 years) attended mainstream education groups. Signal intensity and structural abnormalities were analyzed, and areas of the cerebrum, posterior fossa, corpus callosum, vermis and brain stem, and diameters of the corpus callosum were measured. In analyses, all area measurements were calculated in proportion to the total inner skull area. RESULTS: Abnormal finding in MRI was more common for siblings (n=62; 52%) in SE (58% for level 3; 49% for level 2; 35% for level 1) than for controls (n=13; 16%). The siblings showed enlarged supra- (P<0.001) and infratentorial (P=0.015) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces and mild corpus callosum abnormalities (P=0.003) compared to controls. Siblings in SE had smaller inner skull area than controls (P<0.001). Further, the relative area of the mesencephalon (P=0.027) and the diameter of the body of the corpus callosum (P=0.015) were significantly smaller than in controls. In binary logistic regression analysis, enlarged supratentorial CSF spaces increased the probability of SE (odds ratio 4.2; P=0.023). CONCLUSION: Subjects with learning and intellectual disabilities commonly have more MRI findings than controls. Enlarged supratentorial CSF spaces were a frequent finding in siblings in full-time SE.

  • 38. Mannerkoski, Minna K.
    et al.
    Heiskala, Hannu J.
    Van Leemput, Koen
    Åberg, Laura E.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Hämäläinen, Janne
    Autti, Taina H.
    Subjects with intellectual disability and familial need for full-time special education show regional brain alterations: a voxel-based morphometry study2009In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 306-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subjects attending full-time special education (SE) often have multifactorial background for their cognitive impairment, and brain MRI may show nonspecific changes. As voxel-based morphometry reveals regional volume differences, we applied this method to 119 subjects with cognitive impairments and familial need for full-time SE--graded into three levels from specific disorders of cognitive processes (level 1) to intellectual disability (IQ <70; level 3)--and to 43 age-matched controls attending mainstream education (level 0). Subjects in SE groups had smaller global brain white matter (WM), cerebrospinal fluid, and total brain volume than controls. Compared with controls, subjects with intellectual disabilities in SE level 3 showed greater regional gray matter volumes bilaterally in the ventral and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and smaller regional gray matter volumes in the left thalamus and cerebellar hemisphere. Further, they had greater WM volume in the left frontoparietal region and smaller WM volumes in the posterior limbs of the internal capsules. Subjects in SE level 1 and 2 groups showed the same tendency, but the results were nonsignificant. In conclusion, compared with controls, subjects with intellectual disabilities showed in voxel-based morphometry analysis several regional brain alterations.

  • 39.
    Melberg, Atle
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Hallberg, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Kalimo, Hannu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    MR characteristics and neuropathology in adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy with autonomic symptoms2006In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 904-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Three families with adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) presenting autonomic dysfunction as the first symptom are reported. We describe detailed MR appearances of the brain in 2 new families and neuropathology in 2 patients and compare the findings with those in other adult-onset leukodystrophies. METHODS: Twenty subjects (12 women and 8 men; age range, 29-70 years) from 2 unrelated families with ADLD were examined with MR. Six subjects were asymptomatic. Fourteen had autonomic dysfunction. Eleven of them also had pyramidal signs and ataxia. The brains of 2 autopsied patients were examined histopathologically. RESULTS: Two subjects manifested no neurologic symptoms, signs, or MR pathology. Eighteen subjects displayed radiologic abnormalities ranging from subtle T2 high-signal-intensity changes in the upper corticospinal tract to extensive confluent white matter changes, predominantly in a frontoparietal distribution, along the corticospinal tracts down to the medulla oblongata and in the upper and middle cerebellar peduncles. Periventricular white matter was spared or less affected than the adjacent white matter. Histopathology revealed marked loss of cerebral and cerebellar myelin without signs of inflammation. Oligodendrocytes were relatively spared, the number of axons not markedly decreased, and reactive gliosis was modest. The number of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum was reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Two families with adult-onset ADLD with the disease entity originally reported by Eldridge et al. (N Engl J Med 1984;311:948-53) were described. We propose naming the disease "adult-onset ADLD with autonomic symptoms." The characteristic radiologic findings, combined with the clinical symptoms and mode of inheritance, enable the diagnosis.

  • 40.
    Melberg, Atle
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Moslemi, Ali-Reza
    Palm, Oscar
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Stålberg, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Oldfors, Anders
    A patient with two mitochondrial DNA mutations causing PEO and LHON2009In: European Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 1769-7212, E-ISSN 1878-0849, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 47-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a 22-year-old man with PEO and optic atrophy. PEO developed before the onset of optic atrophy. The patient showed mitochondrial myopathy with cytochrome c oxidase deficient fibers. In skeletal muscle the patient was homoplasmic for the mtDNA G11778A Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutation and heteroplasmic for the mtDNA 5 kb "common" deletion mutation. In blood only the homoplasmic LHON mutation was identified. The occurrence of two pathogenic mtDNA mutations is exceedingly rare. The clinical findings in this patient indicate that the combination of the two mtDNA mutations resulted in the expected combined phenotype since the mtDNA deletion mutation accounted for the PEO and the mtDNA G11778A point mutation for the optic atrophy.

  • 41.
    Melberg, Atle
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Sundblom, Jimmy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    White matter disorders with autosomal dominant heredity2011In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 124, no 1, p. 71-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Melberg, Atle
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Örlén, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Entesarian, Miriam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dahlqvist, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Gustavson, Karl Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Re-evaluation of the dysequilibrium syndrome2011In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 123, no 1, p. 28-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives - To re-evaluate middle-aged Swedish patients diagnosed with dysequilibrium syndrome (DES) in childhood and to compare their clinical and neuroimaging features to DES with VLDLR gene mutations (DES-VLDR). Materials and methods - Six patients from five families underwent neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Blood samples from the patients were screened for serum carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (s-CDT; disialotransferrin). The very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene was sequenced. Results - Five patients had non-progressive cerebellar ataxia (NPCA), dysarthria and short stature. Mental retardation and strabismus, characteristic for DES-VLDLR, were inconsistent among our patients. None of our patients had VLDLR mutations or MRI findings characteristic of DES-VLDLR. MRI findings were variable from a normal cerebellum to marked cerebellar hypoplasia or atrophy and signal intensity changes. One patient was diagnosed with congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1a (CDG-1a). Conclusions - DES was originally coined on mainly clinical grounds before MRI and specific genetic tests were available, both of which should be used to arrive at an appropriate diagnosis.

  • 43.
    Raininko, Raili
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Bajic, Dragan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    "Hippocampal malrotation": no real malrotation and not rare2010In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959X, Vol. 31, no 4, p. E39; author reply E40-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Raininko, Raili
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Mattsson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Metabolite concentrations in supraventricular white matter from teenage to early old age: A short echo time 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study2010In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 309-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Age- and sex-related changes of metabolites in healthy adult brains have been examined with different (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methods in varying populations, and with differing results. A long repetition time and short echo time technique reduces quantification errors due to T(1) and T(2) relaxation effects and makes it possible to measure metabolites with short T(2) relaxation times. PURPOSE: To examine the effect of age on the metabolite concentrations measured by (1)H MRS in normal supraventricular white matter using a long repetition time (TR) and a short echo time (TE). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Supraventricular white matter of 57 healthy subjects (25 women, 32 men), aged 13 to 72 years, was examined with a single-voxel MRS at 1.5T using a TR of 6000 ms and a TE of 22 ms. Tissue water was used as a reference in quantification. Results: Myoinositol increased slightly and total N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) decreased slightly with increasing age. Glutamine/glutamate complex (Glx) showed U-shaped age dependence, with highest concentrations in the youngest and oldest subjects. No significant age dependence was found in total choline and total creatine. No gender differences were found. Macromolecule/ lipid (ML) fractions were reliably measurable only in 36/57 or even fewer subjects and showed very large deviations. CONCLUSION: The concentrations of several metabolites in cerebral supraventricular white matter are age dependent on (1)H MRS, even in young and middle-aged people, and age dependency can be nonlinear. Each (1)H MRS study of the brain should therefore take age into account, whereas sex does not appear to be so important. The use of macromolecule and lipid evaluations is compromised by less successful quantification and large variations in healthy people.

  • 45.
    Raininko, Raili
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Melberg, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Radiological aspects of genetic disorders with adult-onset CNS symptoms2011In: The Neuroradiology Journal, ISSN 1971-4009, Vol. 1, p. 24-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Rhodin, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    von Ehren, Michaela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Skottheim, B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Grönbladh, Alfhild
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Ortiz-Nieto, Francisco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Nyberg, Fred
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Recombinant human growth hormone improves cognitive capacity in a pain patient exposed to chronic opioids2014In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 759-765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent decades, the increasing use of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain has raised concerns regarding tolerance, addiction, and importantly cognitive dysfunction. Current research suggests that the somatotrophic axis could play an important role in cognitive function. Administration of growth hormone (GH) to GH-deficient humans and experimental animals has been shown to result in significant improvements in cognitive capacity. In this report, a patient with cognitive disabilities resulting from chronic treatment with opioids for neuropathic pain received recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement therapy. A 61-year-old man presented with severe cognitive dysfunction after long-term methadone treatment for intercostal neuralgia and was diagnosed with GH insufficiency by GH releasing hormone-arginine testing. The effect of rhGH replacement therapy on his cognitive capacity and quality of life was investigated. The hippocampal volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and the ratios of the major metabolites were calculated using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cognitive testing revealed significant improvements in visuospatial cognitive function after rhGH. The hippocampal volume remained unchanged. In the right hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio (reflecting nerve cell function) was initially low but increased significantly during rhGH treatment, as did subjective cognitive, physical and emotional functioning. This case report indicates that rhGH replacement therapy could improve cognitive behaviour and well-being, as well as hippocampal metabolism and functioning in opioid-treated patients with chronic pain. The idea that GH could affect brain function and repair disabilities induced by long-term exposure to opioid analgesia is supported.

  • 47.
    Romanos Zapata, Romina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Danfors, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Differential diagnosis of therapy-related changes and recurrent intracranial tumours using perfusion MRI and methionine PET2014In: Insight into Imaging, ISSN 1869-4101, E-ISSN 1869-4101, Vol. 5, no Suppl 1, p. S239-, article id B-0485Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Romanos Zapata, Romina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ortiz-Nieto, Fransisco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Differential diagnosis of brain lesions using MRI, proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) and INTERPRET Decision Making System (DSS): A comparative study2013In: Neuroradiology, ISSN 0028-3940, E-ISSN 1432-1920, Vol. 55, no Suppl1, p. S76-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Schuster, Jens
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sundblom, Jimmy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Thuresson, Ann-Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hassin-Baer, Sharon
    Klopstock, Thomas
    Dichgans, Martin
    Cohen, Oren S.
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Melberg, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Dahl, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Genetics. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Genomic duplications mediate overexpression of lamin B1 in adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) with autonomic symptoms2011In: Neurogenetics, ISSN 1364-6745, E-ISSN 1364-6753, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 65-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) with autonomic symptoms features micturition urgency, constipation, erectile dysfunction, and orthostatic hypotension, usually followed by pyramidal signs and ataxia. Peripheral nerve conduction is normal. The disease is often mistaken for multiple sclerosis in the initial phase. There is a characteristic pattern of white matter changes in the brain and spinal cord on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), mild atrophy of the brain, and a more marked atrophy of the spinal cord. ADLD is associated with duplications of the lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene but the mechanism by which the rearrangement conveys the phenotype is not fully defined. We analyzed four unrelated families segregating ADLD with autonomic symptoms for duplications of the LMNB1 gene. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis revealed novel duplications spanning the entire LMNB1 gene in probands from each of the four families. We then analyzed the expression of lamin B1 in peripheral leukocytes by Western blot analysis in five patients from two available families. The protein levels of lamin B1 were found significantly increased. These results indicate that the ADLD phenotype associated with LMNB1 duplications is mediated by increased levels of the lamin B1 protein. Furthermore, we show that a molecular diagnosis for ADLD with autonomic symptoms can be obtained by a direct analysis of lamin B1 in peripheral leukocytes.

  • 50. Sikk, K
    et al.
    Taba, P
    Haldre, S
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry.
    Nyholm, Dag
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Askmark, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Danfors, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Thurfjell, L
    Raininko, Raili
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Eriksson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Flink, Roland
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Färnstrand, C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Aquilonius, Sten-Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Clinical, neuroimaging and neurophysiological features in addicts with manganese-ephedrone exposure2010In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 121, no 4, p. 237-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective - To identify biomarkers supporting the clinical diagnosis of manganism in patients several years after exposure to manganese (Mn). Methods - Neurophysiological examinations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglycose (FDG) positron emission tomography were performed in four former ephedrone addicts with extrapyramidal symptoms. Results - Peripheral nervous system was not affected. No patients had reduced uptake of (123)I Ioflupane in the striatum. MRI signal intensities were slightly changed in the basal ganglia. All patients showed a widespread, but not uniform, pathological pattern of FDG uptake with changes mainly located to the central part of the brain including the basal ganglia and the surrounding white matter. Conclusions - Presynaptic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway are intact in Mn-induced parkinsonism after prolonged abstinence from ephedrone. The diagnosis is principally based on clinical signs and the history of drug abuse.

12 1 - 50 of 63
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