uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 361
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Reumark, Anna
    Lantmännen.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Riserus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: a randomized controlled trialArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims: It is unclear whether advising a prudent breakfast alone is sufficient to improve blood lipids and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    Methods: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a prudent low-fat breakfast (PB) rich in dietary fiber lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and other cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with elevated LDL-cholesterol levels. In a parallel, controlled, 12-week study, 79 healthy overweight subjects (all regular breakfast eaters) were randomly allocated to a group that received a PB based on Nordic foods provided ad libitum or a control group that consumed their usual breakfast. The PB was in accordance with national and Nordic nutrition recommendations and included oat bran porridge with low-fat milk or yogurt, bilberry or lingonberry jam, whole grain bread, low-fat spread, poultry or fatty fish, and fruit.

    Results: No differences were found in LDL-C, blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism, but SAD, plasma CRP, and TNF-R2 were lower during PB compared with controls (p<0.05). In the overall diet, PB increased dietary fiber and b-glucan compared with controls (p<0.05).

    Conclusions: Advising a prudent breakfast for 3 months did not influence blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism but reduced markers of visceral fat and inflammation.

     

  • 2.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Reumark, Anna
    Marklund, Matti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Role of a prudent breakfast in improving cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: A randomized controlled trial2015In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND & AIMS:

    It is unclear whether advising a prudent breakfast alone is sufficient to improve blood lipids and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight hypercholesterolemic subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a prudent low-fat breakfast (PB) rich in dietary fiber lowers low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and other cardiometabolic risk factors in subjects with elevated LDL-cholesterol levels.

    METHODS:

    In a parallel, controlled, 12-week study, 79 healthy overweight subjects (all regular breakfast eaters) were randomly allocated to a group that received a PB based on Nordic foods provided ad libitum or a control group that consumed their usual breakfast. The primary outcome was plasma LDL-C. Secondary outcomes were other blood lipids, body weight, sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD), glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and inflammation markers (C-reactive protein [CRP] and tumor necrosis factor receptor-2 [TNF-R2]), and blood pressure. The PB was in accordance with national and Nordic nutrition recommendations and included oat bran porridge with low-fat milk or yogurt, bilberry or lingonberry jam, whole grain bread, low-fat spread, poultry or fatty fish, and fruit.

    RESULTS:

    No differences were found in LDL-C, other blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism, but SAD, plasma CRP, and TNF-R2 decreased more during PB compared with controls (p < 0.05). In the overall diet, PB increased dietary fiber and β-glucan compared with controls (p < 0.05).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Advising a prudent breakfast for 3 months did not influence blood lipids, body weight, or glucose metabolism but reduced markers of visceral fat and inflammation. The trial was registered in the Current Controlled Trials database (http://www.controlled-trials.com); International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 84550872.

  • 3.
    Ahlström, Tommy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hagström, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Rudberg, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Correlation between plasma calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in a community-based cohort of men and women2009In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 71, no 5, p. 673-678Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: In recent years, an association has been noted between several abnormalities that characterize the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). These abnormalities include dyslipidaemia, obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension. The correlations between plasma calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the variables in the MetS in a normal population are still unclear.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe correlations between plasma calcium and PTH and the various abnormalities present in the MetS in a healthy population.

    DESIGN: We studied 1016 healthy individuals from the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) population of 70 years old, by means of plasma analyses of calcium, PTH, creatinine, lipids, insulin and glucose, as well as by standardized blood pressure measurements. Further, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were determined.

    RESULTS: The more National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) criteria for the MetS that were met, the higher the s-PTH and albumin-corrected s-calcium. Further, positive correlations between plasma calcium and BMI (P = 0.0003), waist circumference (P = 0.0009) and insulin resistance (P = 0.079) were found. PTH and BMI (P < 0.0001), waist circumference (P < 0.0001), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.0034), diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.0008), serum triglycerides (P = 0.0003) and insulin resistance (P = 0.0003) were positively correlated, whereas serum high density lipoproteins (HDL) (P = 0.036) and PTH were negatively correlated.

    CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that PTH correlates with several of the metabolic factors included in the MetS within a normocalcaemic population. In addition, individuals with mild pHPT present significantly more NCEP criteria for MetS. We postulate that increased levels of PTH in pHPT may be associated with the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality seen in pHPT.

  • 4.
    Akhter, Tansim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Larsson, Marita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Naessén, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Artery Wall Layer Dimensions during Normal Pregnancy: A longitudinal study using non-invasive high-frequency ultrasound2013In: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology, ISSN 0363-6135, E-ISSN 1522-1539, Vol. 304, no 2, p. H229-H234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vascular effects of normal pregnancy were investigated by estimating the intima and media thicknesses of the common carotid artery separately using 22MHz ultrasound (Collagenoson, Meudt, Germany) in 57 healthy women with normal pregnancies and pregnancy outcomes, in all three trimesters and at one year postpartum. A thick intima, thin media and high intima/media (I/M) ratio are signs of a less healthy artery wall. The mean artery wall layer dimensions remained fairly constant during pregnancy but the intima thickness and I/M thickness ratio appeared to improve (decrease) postpartum (p<0.001 for both). The cardiovascular risk parameters age, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure in the first trimester were associated with higher I/M ratios, especially in the second trimester, whereas higher serum estradiol levels were significantly associated with a lower I/M ratio. Changes from the first to second trimesters in I/M ratio, taking into account differential changes in intima and media thickness, were significantly (p<0.05-0.001) associated with all risk parameters tested except age, which was associated with increased intima thickness (p=0.02). Associations with third trimester values and changes from first to third trimesters were similar but less apparent. Thus, fairly constant mean artery wall layer dimensions during pregnancy appeared to improve postpartum. However, higher age, BMI or blood pressure, and lower serum estradiol levels in the first trimester appeared to negatively affect the artery wall, strongly suggesting that pregnancy has negative vascular effects in some women. A less likely explanation involves possible adaptation to physiological changes during and after pregnancy.

  • 5.
    Akhter, Tansim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Naessen, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Changes in the Artery Wall Layer Dimensions in Women with Preeclampsia: an investigation using non-invasive high frequency ultrasound2012In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, no S159, p. 28-28Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Preeclampsia (PE) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease later in life. Whether, the artery wall layer dimensions differ between PE and normal pregnancy is unclear. The aim of this study was to estimate if women with PE have different common carotid artery wall layer dimensions than women with normal pregnancy, both during pregnancy and about one year postpartum.

    Methods:

    By using high-frequency (22MHz) ultrasound (Collagenoson, Meudt, Germany) separate estimates of the common carotid artery intima and media layers were obtained and the I/M ratio was calculated in women with PE (n=55 during pregnancy and n=48 at postpartum) and with normal pregnancy (n=65 during pregnancy and n=59 at postpartum). Thick intima, thin media and a high intima/media ratio are signs of less healthy artery wall and vice versa.

    Results:

    In women with PE, the intima was thicker (0.18 } 0.03 vs. 0.11 } 0.02; p < .001), the media was thinner (0.47 } 0.12 vs. 0.55 } 0.14; p = .001) and the I/M ratio was higher (0.41 } 0.14 vs. 0.20 } 0.05; p < .001) compared to women with normal pregnancy. Further, for changes from pregnancy to postpartum, both for PE and normal pregnancy, the intima and the I/M ratio had improved but still significantly higher in women with PE than in women with normal pregnancy.

    Conclusion:

    In women with PE, we found a thicker intima, thinner media and a higher I/M ratio compared to women with normal pregnancy, indicating a more negatively affected artery wall layer dimensions. Persisting negative effects of PE on artery wall at postpartum, despite improvement of artery wall layers compared to values during pregnancy, indicates a permanent damage of the vascular system in this group of women.

  • 6.
    Akhter, Tansim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Gynecological endocrinology.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Larsson, Marita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Naessén, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Gynecological endocrinology.
    Association between angiogenic factors and signs of arterial aging in women with pre-eclampsia2017In: Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0960-7692, E-ISSN 1469-0705, Vol. 50, p. 93-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Pre-eclampsia (PE) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life. In PE there is a substantial increase in levels of the anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt1) and decreased levels of the pro-angiogenic factor placental growth factor (PlGF). Elevated levels of sFlt1 are also found in individuals with CVD. The aims of this study were to assess sFlt1, PlGF and the sFlt1/PlGF ratio and their correlation with signs of arterial aging by measuring common carotid artery (CCA) intima and media thicknesses and their ratio (I/M ratio) in women with and without PE.

    METHODS: Serum sFlt1 and PlGF levels were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits, and CCA intima and media thicknesses were estimated using high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasonography in 55 women at PE diagnosis and 64 women with normal pregnancies at a similar gestational age, with reassessment one year postpartum. A thick intima, thin media and a high I/M ratio indicate a less healthy arterial wall.

    RESULTS: During pregnancy, higher levels of sFlt1, lower levels of PlGF and thicker intima, thinner media and higher I/M ratios were found in women with PE vs. controls (all p < 0.0001). Further, sFlt1 and the sFlt1/PlGF ratio were positively correlated with intima thickness and I/M ratio (all p < 0.0001), but negatively correlated with media thickness (p = 0.002 and 0.03, respectively). About one year postpartum, levels of sFlt1 and the sFlt1/PlGF ratio had decreased in both groups, but compared with controls women in the PE group still had higher levels (p = 0.001 and 0.02, respectively). Further, sFlt1 levels and the sFlt1/PlGF ratio were still positively correlated with intima thickness and I/M ratio.

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher sFlt1 levels and sFlt1/PlGF ratios in women with PE were positively associated with signs of arterial aging during pregnancy. About one year postpartum sFlt1 levels and the sFlt1/PlGF ratios were still higher in the PE group, and also associated with the degree of arterial aging.

  • 7.
    Akhter, Tansim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Gynecological endocrinology.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics. Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Marita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Naessén, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Gynecological endocrinology.
    Serum Pentraxin 3 is associated with signs of arterial alteration in women with preeclampsia.2017In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 241, p. 417-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Preeclampsia (PE) in pregnancy is a state of exaggerated inflammation and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life. Levels of pentraxin 3 (PTX3), a novel inflammation marker, are increased during PE and in individuals with CVD. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether serum PTX3 in women with PE is associated with adverse arterial effects; a thicker intima and higher intima/media (I/M) ratio in the common carotid artery (CCA).

    METHODS: Serum PTX3 levels were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits, and individual CCA intima and media thicknesses were estimated by 22MHz non-invasive ultrasound in 55 women at PE diagnosis and 64 women with normal pregnancies at a similar gestational age, and about one year postpartum. A thick intima, thin media and high I/M ratio indicate a less healthy artery wall.

    RESULTS: During pregnancy serum PTX3 correlated positively with intima thickness and I/M ratio but negatively with media thickness (all p<0.0001), indicating adverse arterial effects. About one year postpartum, PTX3 levels had decreased in both groups and there remained no significant group difference or significant correlation with CCA wall layers.

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of serum PTX3 in women with PE were significantly associated with signs of adverse arterial effects during pregnancy, but not one year postpartum, supporting the rapid dynamics of PTX3.

  • 8.
    Alderson, Helen V.
    et al.
    Vascular Research Group, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK..
    Ritchie, James P
    Vascular Research Group, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK..
    Middleton, Rachel
    Vascular Research Group, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Larsson, Tobias E
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Renal Unit, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kalra, Philip A
    Vascular Research Group, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK;Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK..
    FGF-23 and Osteoprotegerin but not Fetuin-A are associated with death and enhance risk prediction in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease stages 3-52016In: Nephrology (Carlton. Print), ISSN 1320-5358, E-ISSN 1440-1797, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 566-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Numerous biomarkers have been shown to associate with clinical endpoints in chronic kidney disease (CKD). There is limited evidence whether biomarkers improve risk prediction in relation to clinical outcomes. Our study investigates whether a small suite of key chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder biomarkers could be used to enhance risk assessment in CKD.

    METHODS: Fetuin-A, fibroblast growth factor-23 and osteoprotegerin were measured on baseline plasma samples from 463 patients recruited to the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Standards Implementation Study. The biomarkers were analysed in relation to progression to end stage kidney disease, death and major cardiovascular events.

    RESULTS: Over a median follow up of 46 months (interquartile range 21-69), fibroblast growth factor-23 was associated with risk for renal replacement therapy (hazard ratio (HR) 1.35, P = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.001-1.820), cardiovascular events (HR 1.74 P < 0.001, 95% CI 1.303-1.305) and death (HR 1.4 P = 0.005, 95% CI 1.109-1.767). Osteoprotegerin was associated with risk for death (HR 1.06, P = 0.03, 95% CI 1.006-1.117). There was no clear association between Fetuin-A and any of the clinical endpoints. The addition of biomarkers to risk models led to marginal improvement in model discrimination and reclassification.

    CONCLUSION: Biomarkers are often associated with clinical endpoints, and we observed such associations in our study of patients with advanced CKD. However, the markers analysed in our study were of limited benefit in improving the prediction of these outcomes. Any extra information biomarkers may provide to improve risk prediction in clinical practice needs to be carefully balanced against the potential cost of these tools.

  • 9. Alehagen, Urban
    et al.
    Aaseth, Jan
    Alexander, Jan
    Svensson, Erland
    Johansson, Peter
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Less fibrosis in elderly subjects supplemented with selenium and coenzyme Q10-A mechanism behind reduced cardiovascular mortality?2018In: Biofactors, ISSN 0951-6433, E-ISSN 1872-8081, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 137-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In an intervention study where 221 healthy elderly persons received selenium and coenzyme Q10 as a dietary supplement, and 222 received placebo for 4 years we observed improved cardiac function and reduced cardiovascular mortality. As fibrosis is central in the aging process, we investigated the effect of the intervention on biomarkers of fibrogenic activity in a subanalysis of this intervention study.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the present subanalysis 122 actively treated individuals and 101 controls, the effect of the treatment on eight biomarkers of fibrogenic activity were assessed. These biomarkers were: Cathepsin S, Endostatin, Galectin 3, Growth Differentiation Factor-15 (GDF-15), Matrix Metalloproteinases 1 and 9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP 1) and Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 (ST-2). Blood concentrations of these biomarkers after 6 and 42 months were analyzed by the use of T-tests, repeated measures of variance, and factor analyses.

    RESULTS: Compared with placebo, in those receiving supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10, all biomarkers except ST2 showed significant decreased concentrations in blood. The changes in concentrations, that is, effects sizes as given by partial eta2 caused by the intervention were considered small to medium.

    CONCLUSION: The significantly decreased biomarker concentrations in those on active treatment with selenium and coenzyme Q10 compared with those on placebo after 36 months of intervention presumably reflect less fibrogenic activity as a result of the intervention. These observations might indicate that reduced fibrosis precedes the reported improvement in cardiac function, thereby explaining some of the positive clinical effects caused by the intervention. © 2017 BioFactors, 2017.

  • 10. Allander, Susanne Vilhelmsdotter
    et al.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Marké, Lars-Åke
    Svensson, Maria K
    Björn, Wihlén
    Elinder, Carl-Gustaf
    Kreatinin fortfarande den vanligaste njurfunktionsanalysen: Undersökning av praxis i Sverige2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, no 19, p. 960-962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Markers of renal function (glomerular filtration rate; GFR) are frequently used. In most cases GFR is estimated based on plasma creatinine, but cystatin C, creatinine clearance (with urine collection), iohexol clearance and 51Cr-EDTA clearance are also used. A questionnaire was sent to representatives for clinical chemistry laboratories in Sweden to collect information regarding the use of these markers during the years 2006 2009. The aim was to compare the use in different parts of Sweden and how it has changed over time. The overall use of markers of renal function, including creatinine, continues to increase on a national level, with the exception for endogenous creatinine clearance and 51Cr-EDTA clearance. Creatinine, the most frequently used marker, continues to grow in numbers. 5,6 million creatinine analyses and about two hundred thousand cystatin C analyses were performed during year 2009. There were considerable variations between counties in the use of the studied markers.

  • 11. Appelgren, Patrik
    et al.
    Bjarnholt, Gert
    Brenning, Nils
    Elfsberg, Mattias
    Hurtig, Tomas
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Novac, Bucur M.
    Nyholm, Sten E.
    Small Helical Magnetic Flux-Compression Generators: Experiments and Analysis2008In: IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, ISSN 0093-3813, E-ISSN 1939-9375, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 2673-2683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to gain experience in explosive pulsed power and to provide experimental data for modeling, a small high-explosive-driven helical magnetic flux-compression generator (FCG) was designed at the Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI). The generator, of which three have been built, has an overall length of 300 mm and a diameter of 70 mm. It could serve as the energy source in a pulse-forming network to generate high power pulses for various loads. This paper presents the design of, and tests with, this helical FCG. The generator had an initial inductance of 23 mu H and was operated into a load of 0.2 mu H. The generator is charged with 0.27 kg of high explosives (PBXN-5). Various types of diagnostics were used to monitor the operation of the generator, including current probes, optical fibers, and piezo gauges. With seed currents of 5.7 and 11.2 kA, final currents of 269 and 436 kA were obtained, corresponding to current amplification factors of 47 and 39. The peak of the current was reached about 30 mu s after the time of crowbar. The two generators showed only small losses in terms of 2 pi-clocking. Using signals from optical fibers, the deflection angle of the armature could be determined to be 10 degrees in good agreement with hydrodynamic simulations of the detonation process and the detonation velocity to be 8.7 km/s in agreement with tabulated value.

  • 12. Appelgren, Patrik
    et al.
    Brenning, Nils
    Hurtig, Tomas
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Novac, Bucur M.
    Nyholm, Sten E.
    Modeling of a Small Helical Magnetic Flux-Compression Generator2008In: IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, ISSN 0093-3813, E-ISSN 1939-9375, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 2662-2672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to gain experience in explosive pulsed power and to provide experimental data as the basis for computer modeling, a small high-explosive-driven helical magnetic flux-compression generator (FCG) was designed at the Swedish Defence Research Agency. The generator, of which three have been built, has an overall length of 300 mm and a diameter of 70 mm. It could serve as the energy source in a pulse-forming network to generate high-power pulses for various loads. This paper presents a simulation model of this helical FCG. The model, which was implemented in Matlab-Simulink, uses analytical expressions for the generator inductance. The model of resistive losses takes into account the heating of the conductors and the diffusion of the magnetic field into the conductors. The simulation results are compared with experimental data from two experiments with identical generators but with different seed currents, influencing the resistive losses. The model is used to analyze the performance of the generator.

  • 13.
    Arinell, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden..
    Christensen, Kjeld
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden..
    Blanc, Stephane
    Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien–De´partement d’Ecologie, Physiologie,.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Frobert, Ole
    Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden..
    Effect of prolonged standardized bed rest on cystatin C and other markers of cardiovascular risk2011In: BMC Physiology, ISSN 1472-6793, E-ISSN 1472-6793, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 17-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Sedentary lifestyle is associated with coronary artery disease but even shorter periods of physical inactivity may increase cardiovascular risk. Cystatin C is independently associated with cardiovascular disease and our objective was to investigate the relation between this novel biomarker and standardized bed rest. Research of immobilization physiology in humans is challenging because good biological models are in short supply. From the Women International Space simulation for Exploration study (WISE) we studied markers of atherosclerosis and kidney function, including cystatin C, in a standardized bed rest study on healthy volunteers. Fifteen healthy female volunteers participated in a 20-day ambulatory control period followed by 60 days of bed rest in head-down tilt position (-6degrees) 24 h a day, finalized by 20 days of recovery. The subjects were randomized into two groups during bed rest: a control group (n=8) that remained physically inactive and an exercise group (n=7) that participated in both supine resistance and aerobic exercise training.

    RESULTS:

    Compared to baseline values there was a statistically significant increase in cystatin C in both groups after bed rest (P<0.001). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), calculated by both cystatin C and Cockcroft-Gault equation, decreased after bed rest while there were no differences in creatinine or creatine kinase levels. CRP did not change during bed rest in the exercise group, but there was an increase of CRP in the control group during recovery compared to both the baseline and the bed rest periods. The apo-B/apo-Ai ratio increased during bed rest and decreased again in the recovery period. Subjects experienced a small but statistically significant reduction in weight during bed rest and compared to baseline weights remained lower at day 8 of recovery.

    CONCLUSION:

    During and following prolonged standardized bed rest the concentrations of several clinically relevant cardiovascular risk markers change.

  • 14. Arinell, Karin
    et al.
    Frobert, Ole
    Blanc, Stephane
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Christensen, Kjeld
    Down regulation of platelet activation markers during long-term immobilization2012In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 130, no S1, p. S102-S102Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15. Arinell, Karin
    et al.
    Fröbert, Ole
    Blanc, Stéphane
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Christensen, Kjeld
    Downregulation of platelet activation markers during long-term immobilization2013In: Platelets, ISSN 0953-7104, E-ISSN 1369-1635, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 369-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Immobilization and sedentary lifestyle are risk factors for venous thromboembolism and cardiovascular disease, yet little is known about platelet function during long-term physical inactivity. Our aim was to investigate platelet activation markers and their coupling to standardized immobilization: platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and P-selectin. We studied 15 healthy females participating in the Women International Space simulation for Exploration study. Following a 20-day ambulatory control period, the subjects underwent 60 days of bed rest in head-down tilt position (-6°) 24 hours a day, finalized by 20 days of recovery. The subjects were randomized into two groups during bed rest: a control group (n = 8) that remained physically inactive and an exercise group (n = 7) that participated in both supine resistance and aerobic exercise training. Blood samples for the analysis of platelet activation markers were collected at baseline (5 days before bed rest), after 44 days of bed rest and 8 days into the recovery period. Compared to baseline, the levels of P-selectin and PDGF-BB decreased after bed rest (by 55%, p = 0.01 and 73%, p < 0.03, respectively) and remained decreased in the recovery period (by 76%, p < 0.001 and 78%, p < 0.02, respectively, compared to baseline). Platelet count (baseline value for the exercise group 260 000/µl ± 34 000 and baseline value for the control group 210 000/µl ± 30 000) did not change during the bed rest study (two-way repeated measurements ANOVA, p = ns). There were no statistical differences between the physically inactive and the exercise group. During long-term immobilization, a known risk factor for thrombosis, the levels of P-selectin and PDGF-BB decreased. Our findings indicate downregulation of platelet activation during immobilization.

  • 16.
    Arvidson, Nils Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsen, A.
    Aaseth, J.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Short-term effects of the TNFalpha antagonist infliximab on the acute phase reaction and activities of daily life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 337-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate the short-term effects of the tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonist infliximab on the acute phase reaction and activities of daily life (ADL) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Fourteen patients with active RA were treated with an intravenous infusion of 200 mg infliximab. The values of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, granulocyte count, lymphocyte count, platelet count and a patient questionnaire score on ADL, the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), were obtained at baseline and on days 4 and 14. The significance levels and effect sizes (ESs) of the changes from baseline were calculated. Results. Changes by day 4: The ESs and significance levels were: CRP 1.7, p<0.005; lymphocyte count 1.4, p<0.005; fibrinogen 0.9, p<0.005; ESR 0.7, p<0.005; and HAQ 0.6, p<0.01. Changes by day 14: CRP 1.6, p<0.005; ESR 1.5, p<0.005; fibrinogen 1.3, p<0.005; lymphocyte count 1.0, p<0.005; granulocyte count 0.7, p<0.05; and HAQ 0.6, p<0.05. Conclusion. CRP, fibrinogen and ESR showed the largest ESs and were thus the most sensitive variables showing the early effect of infliximab in this study. The score on ADL (HAQ) showed less ES, but still significant short-term improvements.

  • 17.
    Backryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Pain & Rehabil Ctr, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Tanum, Lars
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Dept R&D Mental Hlth, Lorenskog, Norway..
    Lind, Anne-Li
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Evidence of both systemic inflammation and neuroinflammation in fibromyalgia patients, as assessed by a multiplex protein panel applied to the cerebrospinal fluid and to plasma2017In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In addition to central hyperexcitability and impaired top-down modulation, chronic inflammation probably plays a role in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia (FM). Indeed, on the basis of both animal experiments and human studies involving the analysis of cytokines and other inflammation-related proteins in different body fluids, neuroinflammatory mechanisms are considered to be central to the pathophysiology of many chronic pain conditions. However, concerning FM, previous human plasma/serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytokine studies have looked only at a few predetermined cytokine candidates. Instead of analyzing only a few substances at a time, we used a new multiplex protein panel enabling simultaneous analysis of 92 inflammation-related proteins. Hence, we investigated the CSF and plasma inflammatory profiles of 40 FM patients compared with CSF from healthy controls (n= 10) and plasma from blood donor controls (n= 46). Using multivariate data analysis by projection, we found evidence of both neuroinflammation (as assessed in CSF) and chronic systemic inflammation (as assessed in plasma). Two groups of proteins (one for CSF and one for plasma) highly discriminating between patients and controls are presented. Notably, we found high levels of CSF chemokine CX3CL1 (also known as fractalkine). In addition, previous findings concerning IL-8 in FM were replicated, in both CSF and plasma. This is the first time that such an extensive inflammatory profile has been described for FM patients. Hence, FM seems to be characterized by objective biochemical alterations, and the lingering characterization of its mechanisms as essentially idiopathic or even psychogenic should be seen as definitively outdated.

  • 18. Barber, RM
    et al.
    Fullman, N
    Sorensen, RJD
    Bollyky, T
    McKee, M
    Nolte, E
    Abajobir, AA
    Abate, KH
    Abbafati, C
    Abbas, KM
    Abd-Allah, F
    Abdulle, AM
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Younis, MZ
    Yu, C
    Zaidi, Z
    El Sayed Zaki, M
    Zambrana-Torrelio, C
    Zapata, T
    Zenebe, ZM
    Zodpey, S
    Zoeckler, L
    Zuhlke, LJ
    Murray, CJL
    Healthcare Access and Quality Index based on mortality from causes amenable to personal health care in 195 countries and territories, 1990-2015: a novel analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.2017In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 390, no 10091, p. 231-266, article id S0140-6736(17)30818-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: National levels of personal health-care access and quality can be approximated by measuring mortality rates from causes that should not be fatal in the presence of effective medical care (ie, amenable mortality). Previous analyses of mortality amenable to health care only focused on high-income countries and faced several methodological challenges. In the present analysis, we use the highly standardised cause of death and risk factor estimates generated through the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) to improve and expand the quantification of personal health-care access and quality for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2015.

    METHODS: We mapped the most widely used list of causes amenable to personal health care developed by Nolte and McKee to 32 GBD causes. We accounted for variations in cause of death certification and misclassifications through the extensive data standardisation processes and redistribution algorithms developed for GBD. To isolate the effects of personal health-care access and quality, we risk-standardised cause-specific mortality rates for each geography-year by removing the joint effects of local environmental and behavioural risks, and adding back the global levels of risk exposure as estimated for GBD 2015. We employed principal component analysis to create a single, interpretable summary measure-the Healthcare Quality and Access (HAQ) Index-on a scale of 0 to 100. The HAQ Index showed strong convergence validity as compared with other health-system indicators, including health expenditure per capita (r=0·88), an index of 11 universal health coverage interventions (r=0·83), and human resources for health per 1000 (r=0·77). We used free disposal hull analysis with bootstrapping to produce a frontier based on the relationship between the HAQ Index and the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a measure of overall development consisting of income per capita, average years of education, and total fertility rates. This frontier allowed us to better quantify the maximum levels of personal health-care access and quality achieved across the development spectrum, and pinpoint geographies where gaps between observed and potential levels have narrowed or widened over time.

    FINDINGS: Between 1990 and 2015, nearly all countries and territories saw their HAQ Index values improve; nonetheless, the difference between the highest and lowest observed HAQ Index was larger in 2015 than in 1990, ranging from 28·6 to 94·6. Of 195 geographies, 167 had statistically significant increases in HAQ Index levels since 1990, with South Korea, Turkey, Peru, China, and the Maldives recording among the largest gains by 2015. Performance on the HAQ Index and individual causes showed distinct patterns by region and level of development, yet substantial heterogeneities emerged for several causes, including cancers in highest-SDI countries; chronic kidney disease, diabetes, diarrhoeal diseases, and lower respiratory infections among middle-SDI countries; and measles and tetanus among lowest-SDI countries. While the global HAQ Index average rose from 40·7 (95% uncertainty interval, 39·0-42·8) in 1990 to 53·7 (52·2-55·4) in 2015, far less progress occurred in narrowing the gap between observed HAQ Index values and maximum levels achieved; at the global level, the difference between the observed and frontier HAQ Index only decreased from 21·2 in 1990 to 20·1 in 2015. If every country and territory had achieved the highest observed HAQ Index by their corresponding level of SDI, the global average would have been 73·8 in 2015. Several countries, particularly in eastern and western sub-Saharan Africa, reached HAQ Index values similar to or beyond their development levels, whereas others, namely in southern sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and south Asia, lagged behind what geographies of similar development attained between 1990 and 2015.

    INTERPRETATION: This novel extension of the GBD Study shows the untapped potential for personal health-care access and quality improvement across the development spectrum. Amid substantive advances in personal health care at the national level, heterogeneous patterns for individual causes in given countries or territories suggest that few places have consistently achieved optimal health-care access and quality across health-system functions and therapeutic areas. This is especially evident in middle-SDI countries, many of which have recently undergone or are currently experiencing epidemiological transitions. The HAQ Index, if paired with other measures of health-system characteristics such as intervention coverage, could provide a robust avenue for tracking progress on universal health coverage and identifying local priorities for strengthening personal health-care quality and access throughout the world.

    FUNDING: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

  • 19.
    Basu, Samar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.
    Harris, Holly
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Vasson, Marie-Paule
    Wolk, Alicja
    Is There any Role for Serum Cathepsin S, CRP levels on Prognostic Information in Breast Cancer?: The Swedish Mammography Cohort2015In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 23, no 16, p. 1298-1302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and both low-grade inflammation and cathepsins might have important roles in breast cancer. We questioned whether prediagnostic circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), cathepsin B and cathepsin S were associated with breast cancer risk. Sixty-nine incident breast cancer cases diagnosed after blood collection and 719 controls from the Swedish Mammography Cohort were analysed for systemic CRP, cathepsin B and cathepsin S. Cathepsin S and inflammation (hsCRP) adjusted cathepsin S were inversely associated with breast cancer risk (cathepsin S: OR for top vs. bottom tertile = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.23-0.92; Ptrend = 0.02; hsCRP adjusted cathepsin S: OR of 0.44; 95% CI = 0.22-0.87; Ptrend = 0.02). hsCRP was significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk (OR for top vs. bottom tertile= 2.01; 95% CI = 1.02-3.95; Ptrend = 0.04). No significant association was observed between cathepsin B and breast cancer risk (OR for top vs. bottom tertile= 0.67; 95% CI = 0.32-1.40; Ptrend = 0.30). These observations lead to hypothesis that levels of cathepsin S and hsCRP observed in women who later developed breast cancer may provide prognostic information regarding tumor development and need to be evaluated in prospective studies.

  • 20.
    Basu, Samar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Vessby, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Type 1 diabetes is associated with increased cyclooxygenase- and cytokine-mediated inflammation2005In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 1371-1375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The extent of involvement of cyclooxygenase (COX)-mediated inflammation in type 1 diabetes is unknown, and the association between the COX- and cytokine-mediated inflammatory responses in type 1 diabetes is not fully understood.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), 24-h urinary and plasma 15-keto-dihydro-prostaglandin F(2alpha) (a metabolite of prostaglandin F(2alpha) [PGF(2alpha)] and an indicator of COX-mediated inflammation), serum amyloid protein A (SAA), and interleukin (IL)-6 (indicators of inflammation) were measured in 38 subjects with type 1 diabetes and 41 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects.

    RESULTS: The inflammatory indicators (urinary 15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2alpha), P < 0.01; IL-6, P < 0.04) were increased in men with diabetes. CRP and SAA did not show any significant difference between the diabetic and the control subjects. Urinary levels of 15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2alpha) correlated with the degree of glycemic control, HbA(1c) (r = 0.42, P < 0.0005). No correlation was found between the duration of diabetes and the inflammatory biomarkers or metabolic measurements.

    CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that an early low-grade inflammatory process reflected by elevated levels of PGF(2alpha) and IL-6 is involved in type 1 diabetes. Thus, both COX- and cytokine-mediated inflammatory pathways are significantly related to type 1 diabetes.

  • 21.
    Basu, Samar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Helmersson, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Cytokine-mediated inflammation is independently associated with insulin sensitivity measured by the euglycemic insulin clamp in a community-based cohort of elderly men2011In: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, ISSN 1940-5901, E-ISSN 1940-5901, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 164-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Both clinical and experimental studies suggest a close relation between an inflammatory state and insulin resistance. We investigated the association between cytokine-mediated inflammation (high sensitivity C reactive protein [hsCRP] and interleukin [IL] 6) and insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated glucose disposal rate, assessed by the euglycemic insulin clamp) in a community-based cohort, with subgroup analyses of normal weight individuals without diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (NCEP). hsCRP and IL-6 were inversely associated with insulin sensitivity (multivariable-adjusted regression coefficient for 1-SD increase of hsCRP -0.12 (-0.21-(-0.03), p=0.01) and of IL-6 -0.11 (-0.21-(-0.02), p=0.01) in models adjusting for age and components of the metabolic syndrome (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, antihypertensive drugs, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting plasma glucose, waist circumference). The multivariable-adjusted association between hsCRP, IL-6 and insulin sensitivity were of a similar magnitude in normal weight individuals without diabetes and without the metabolic syndrome. Our data show that cytokine -mediated subclinical inflammation is independently associated with decreased insulin sensitivity also in apparently metabolically healthy normal weight individuals, indicating that the interplay between inflammatory processes and insulin resistance is present already in the early stages of the development of glucometabolic disease.

  • 22. Bell, Max
    et al.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Bellomo, Rinaldo
    Mårtensson, Johan
    Assessment of cell-cycle arrest biomarkers to predict early and delayed acute kidney injury2015In: Disease Markers, ISSN 0278-0240, E-ISSN 1875-8630, Vol. 2015, article id 158658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To assess urinary tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 ([TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7]), urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and urinary cystatin-C as acute kidney injury predictors (AKI) exploring the association of nonrenal factors with elevated biomarker levels.

    Methods. We studied 94 patients with urine collected within 48 hours of ICU admission and no AKI at sampling. AKI was defined by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Predictive performance was assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. Associations between biomarkers and clinical factors were assessed by multivariate linear regression.

    Results. Overall, 19 patients (20%) developed AKI within 48 hours. [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, or cystatin-C admission levels did not differ between patients without AKI and patients developing AKI. [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, and cystatin-C were poor AKI predictors (ROC areas 0.34-0.51). Diabetes was independently associated with higher [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7] levels (P = 0.02) but AKI was not (P = 0.24). Sepsis was independently associated with higher NGAL (P < 0.001) and cystatin-C (P = 0.003) levels.

    Conclusions. Urinary [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, and cystatin-C should be used cautiously as AKI predictors in general ICU patients since urine levels of these biomarkers are affected by factors other than AKI and their performance can be poor.

  • 23.
    Benedict, Christian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Schiöth, Helgi B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    The fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) is linked to higher plasma levels of the hunger hormone ghrelin and lower serum levels of the satiety hormone leptin in older adults2014In: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 63, no 11, p. 3955-3959Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms through which common polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) drive the development of obesity in humans are poorly understood. By using C: ross-sectional data from 985 elderly (50% females) who participated at age 70 years in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors, circulating levels of ghrelin and leptin were measured after an overnight fast. In addition, subjects were genotyped for FTO rs17817449 (AA, n=345 (35%); AC/CA, n=481 (48.8%); CC, n=159 (16.1%). Linear regression analyses controlling for sex, self-reported physical activity level, fasting plasma glucose, and body mass index were utilized. A positive relationship between the number of FTO C risk alleles and plasma ghrelin levels was found (P=0.005; relative plasma ghrelin difference between CC and AA carriers = ∼9%). In contrast, serum levels of the satiety enhancing hormone leptin were inversely linked to the number of FTO C risk alleles (P=0.001; relative serum leptin difference between CC and AA carriers = ∼11%). These associations were also found when controlling for waist circumference. The present findings suggest that FTO may facilitate weight gain in humans by shifting the endocrine balance from the satiety hormone leptin toward the hunger promoting hormone ghrelin.

  • 24.
    Ben-Yosef, Yaara
    et al.
    PixCell Med Technol Ltd, Yokneam Ilit, Israel.
    Marom, Barak
    PixCell Med Technol Ltd, Yokneam Ilit, Israel.
    Hirshberg, Galit
    PixCell Med Technol Ltd, Yokneam Ilit, Israel.
    D'Souza, Carol
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Biomed Sci, London, England.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Bransky, Avishay
    PixCell Med Technol Ltd, Yokneam Ilit, Israel.
    The HemoScreen, a novel haematology analyser for the point of care2016In: Journal of Clinical Pathology, ISSN 0021-9746, E-ISSN 1472-4146, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 720-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: A haematology analyser, based on a new technology, is presented herein. The analyser that provides a complete blood count (CBC) and five-part differential accepts disposable cartridges containing all required reagents, making it maintenance-free and ideal for point-of-care (POC) settings. The test reproducibility and imperviousness to analytical errors are attributed to the imaging-based analysis employed. Imaging enables cell-morphology-based differentiation, which is analogous to the gold standard microscopic analysis. This article presents the HemoScreen new technology and evaluates its performance through a small-scale study conducted in its designated clinical settings.

    METHODS: Thirty anticoagulated whole blood samples were analysed on the HemoScreen and Sysmex XE-2100. Linear regression was performed for the methods comparison. Two samples with 15 replicates were processed for imprecision. Ease of use of the device was also considered.

    RESULTS: The HemoScreen demonstrated acceptable imprecision and good agreement with the Sysmex XE-2100. The white blood cells (WBCs), red blood cells (RBCs), haemoglobin (HGB), haematocrit (HCT), platelets (PLT), neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils have coefficients of correlation (r) >0.97. For mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell HGB (MCH) and RBC distribution width (RDW), r values ranged from 0.92 to 0.96. For mean cell HGB concentration (MCHC) and monocytes r=0.82 was demonstrated. User-friendliness and suitability of the device for operation in the designated POC settings was also confirmed.

    CONCLUSIONS: The HemoScreen employs innovative technologies of viscoelastic focusing and microfluidics within a disposable cartridge for an image-based blood cell analysis. By providing accurate and repeatable CBC and five-part differential results within minutes and maintaining the simplicity of operation, the HemoScreen could have far-reaching implications for use at POC. Further extended evaluation is in progress.

  • 25.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Enheten för onkologi.
    Brattström, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Enheten för onkologi.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences. klinisk kemi.
    Hesselius, Patrik
    Brodin, Ola
    Wagenius, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Enh för onkologi.
    The role of circulating anti-p53 antibodies in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and their correlation to clinical parameters and survival.2004In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 66-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Bergström, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Enheten för onkologi.
    Dreilich, Martin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Enheten för onkologi.
    Wagenius, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Enh för onkologi.
    Brattström, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Enheten för onkologi.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences. klinisk kemi.
    Hesselius, Patrik
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Enh för onkologi.
    The presence of anti-p53 antibodies in sera from patients with oesophageal carcinoma: correlation to treatment, tumour volume and survival.2004In: In Vivo, ISSN 0258-851X, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 615-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Bjuhr, Mathias
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    External quality assessment of HbA(1c) for point of care testing2006In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 111, no 2, p. 201-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. To evaluate the long term total imprecision of HbA(1c) testing within the county of Uppsala in relation to the Swedish analytical goal of coefficient of variation (CV) < 3% for HbA(1c) and to study the cost of an external quality assurance program for point-of-care HbA(1c) The county uses Bayer DCA 2000 (TM) for point-of care HbA(1c) testing currently having 23 of these instruments.

    Methods. Method imprecision was assessed by analysis of patient samples performed as split samples during a 3 year period (2002-2004) as part of the quality assurance program for point-of-care HbA(1c) testing. The samples were first analysed on a Bayer DCA 2000 (TM) and the samples were then sent to the centralised laboratory for reanalysis with an HPLC system (Variant II (TM), Biorad). The testing was performed approximately 8 times per year with each instrument.

    Results. The median CV between the HPLC method and the point-of-care instruments for each unit was slightly higher than 3%.

    Conclusion. The DCA 2000 (TM) systems have an acceptable imprecision and agreement with the central laboratory. The test results show acceptable agreements within the county regardless where the patient is tested. The cost of the external quality assurance program is calculated to be approximately SEK 1340 (Euro 150) per instrument.

  • 28. Björk, Jonas
    et al.
    Grubb, Anders
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Hansson, Lars-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Flodin, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Sterner, Gunnar
    Lindström, Veronica
    Nyman, Ulf
    Accuracy of GFR estimating equations combining standardized cystatin C and creatinine assays: a cross-sectional study in Sweden2015In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 403-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Background: The recently established international cystatin C calibrator makes it possible to develop non-laboratory specific glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating (eGFR) equations. This study compares the performance of the arithmetic mean of the revised Lund-Malmö creatinine and CAPA cystatin C equations (MEANLM-REV+CAPA), the arithmetic mean of the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation (CKD-EPI) creatinine and cystatin C equations (MEANCKD-EPI), and the composite CKD-EPI equation (CKD-EPICREA+CYSC) with the corresponding single marker equations using internationally standardized calibrators for both cystatin C and creatinine.

    Methods: The study included 1200 examinations in 1112 adult Swedish patients referred for measurement of GFR (mGFR) 2008-2010 by plasma clearance of iohexol (median 51 mL/min/1.73 m2). Bias, precision (interquartile range, IQR) and accuracy (percentage of estimates ±30% of mGFR; P30) were compared.

    Results: Combined marker equations were unbiased and had higher precision and accuracy than single marker equations. Overall results of MEANLM-REV+CAPA/MEANCKD-EPI/CKD-EPICREA+CYSC were: median bias -2.2%/-0.5%/-1.6%, IQR 9.2/9.2/8.8 mL/min/1.73 m2, and P30 91.3%/91.0%/91.1%. The P30 figures were about 7-14 percentage points higher than the single marker equations. The combined equations also had a more stable performance across mGFR, age and BMI intervals, generally with P30 ≥90% and never <80%. Combined equations reached P30 of 95% when the difference between eGFRCREA and eGFRCYSC was <10% but decreased to 82% at a difference of ≥40%.

    Conclusions: Combining cystatin C and creatinine assays improves GFR estimations with P30 ≥90% in adults. Reporting estimates of both single and combined marker equations in clinical settings makes it possible to assess the validity of the combined equation based on the agreement between the single marker equations.

  • 29.
    Björkesten, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Shen, Qiujin
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Wik, Lotta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hougaard, David
    Statens Serum Inst, Danish Ctr Neonatal Screening, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Cohen, Arieh
    Statens Serum Inst, Danish Ctr Neonatal Screening, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sörensen, Lene
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Ctr Inherited Metab Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Ingelsson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Landegren, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stability of Proteins in Dried Blood Spot Biobanks.2017In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 1286-1296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important motivation for the construction of biobanks is to discover biomarkers that identify diseases at early, potentially curable stages. This will require biobanks from large numbers of individuals, preferably sampled repeatedly, where the samples are collected and stored under conditions that preserve potential biomarkers. Dried blood samples are attractive for biobanking because of the ease and low cost of collection and storage. Here we have investigated their suitability for protein measurements. 92 proteins with relevance for oncology were analyzed using multiplex proximity extension assays (PEA) in dried blood spots collected on paper and stored for up to 30 years at either +4&deg;C or -24&deg;C.</p> <p>Our main findings were that 1) the act of drying only slightly influenced detection of blood proteins (average correlation of 0.970), and in a reproducible manner (correlation of 0.999), 2) detection of some proteins was not significantly affected by storage over the full range of three decades (34% and 76% of the analyzed proteins at +4&deg;C and -24&deg;C, respectively), while levels of others decreased slowly during storage with half-lives in the range of 10 to 50 years, and 3) detectability of proteins was less affected in dried samples stored at -24&deg;C compared to at +4&deg;C, as the median protein abundance had decreased to 80% and 93% of starting levels after 10 years of storage at +4&deg;C or -24&deg;C, respectively. The results of our study are encouraging as they suggest an inexpensive means to collect large numbers of blood samples, even by the donors themselves, and to transport, and store biobanked samples as spots of whole blood dried on paper. Combined with emerging means to measure hundreds or thousands of protein, such biobanks could prove of great medical value by greatly enhancing discovery as well as routine analysis of blood biomarkers.

  • 30.
    Bolander, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Oncology.
    Wagenius, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Brattström, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Ullenhag, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Hesselius, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Ekman, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Bergqvist, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    The Role of Circulating Angiogenic Factors in Patients Operated on for Localized Malignant Melanoma2007In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 27, no 5A, p. 3211-3217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malignant melanoma is a disease capable of rapid progression and rapidly developing metastases. Angiogenesis is a key event signalling tumour progression and elevated levels of angiogenic markers may indicate metastatic disease. No previously published work has, so far, examined plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor, VEGFR-1, in melanoma. This study investigated circulating levels of the angiogenic factors, VEGF-A and -D, their receptors 1-3 and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/scatter factor, in patients shortly after primary surgery for localized malignant melanoma. Elevated circulating levels of VEGF and its receptors, and of HGF, were found postoperatively, possibly derived from the reactive stroma adjacent to the tumours. Using univariate analysis, a correlation between levels of VEGFR-1 and relapse was found, but a correlation between the investigated angiogenic factors and survival could not be established. The results of the present study indicate that production of these angiogenic factors may be due to sources other than malignant melanoma cells.

  • 31.
    Bourlev, Vladimir
    et al.
    Research Centre of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Perinatology, Russian Academy of the Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. klinisk kemi.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Elevated levels of fibroblast growth factor-2 in serum from women with endometriosis.2006In: Am J Obstet Gynecol, ISSN 1097-6868, Vol. 194, no 3, p. 755-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Bourlev, Vladimir
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Volkov, N.
    Pavlovitch, S.
    Lets, N.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Olovsson, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    The relationship between microvessel density, proliferative activity and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A and its receptors in eutopic endometrium and endometriotic lesions2006In: Reproduction, ISSN 1470-1626, E-ISSN 1476-3990, Vol. 132, no 3, p. 501-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies were performed to elucidate the possible relationship between microvessel density, proliferative activity and angiogenesis in eutopic endometrium from women with and without endometriosis and peritoneal endometriotic lesions. The question whether changes in these parameters in endometriotic lesions were reflected by the level of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in serum and peritonea fluid was also studied. Biopsy specimens of both eutopic endometrium and peritoneal endometriotic lesions from women with endometriosis (n=25) as well as eutopic endometrium from women without endometriosis (n=14) were analysed immunohistochemically regarding microvessel density, proliferative activity, and expression of VEGF-A and its receptors vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2 (VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2) in stroma, glands and blood vessels. The VEGF-A concentration was measured in peritoneal fluid and serum. Secretory phase eutopic endometrium from women with endometriosis had significantly higher microvessel density, expression of VEGF-A in glandular epithelium and VEGFR-2 in endometrial blood vessels than those from women without endometriosis. Endometriotic lesions with high proliferative activity had a higher microvessel density and showed higher vascular expression of VEGFR-2 as well as being accompanied by higher levels of VEGF-A in peritoneal fluid and serum, compared with lesions with low proliferative activity. In conclusion, there seems to be a dysregulation of angiogenic activity in the eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis and endometriotic lesions with high proliferative activity were accompanied by higher local angiogenic activity and higher levels of VEGF in serum and peritoneal fluid.

  • 33.
    Byström, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Berglund, Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johansson, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Evaluation of predictive markers for patients with advanced colorectal cancer2012In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 849-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background.

    To evaluate the predictive and prognostic value of serum and plasma tumor markers, in comparison with clinical and biomedical parameters for response rate (RR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) among patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with combination chemotherapy.

    Material and methods.

    One-hundred and six patients with mCRC from three centers, part of a multicenter study, received irinotecan with the Nordic bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and folinic acid schedule (FLIRI) or the de Gramont schedule (Lv5FU2-IRI). Blood samples for CEA, CA19-9, TPA, TIMP-1, SAA, transthyretin and CRP were taken at baseline and after two, four and eight weeks of treatment. Tumor marker levels at baseline and longitudinally were compared with responses evaluated (CT/MRI) after two and four months of treatment. The correlations to RR, PFS and OS were evaluated with regression analyses.

    Results.

    A significant correlation to OS was seen for baseline levels of all markers. In multivariate analyses with clinical parameters, TPA, CRP, SAA and TIMP-1 provided independent information. The baseline values of CEA, TPA and TIMP-1 were also significantly correlated to PFS and TPA to RR. Changes during treatment, i.e. the slope gave with the exception of CA19-9 for OS less information about outcomes. The best correlation to response was seen for CEA, CA19-9 and TPA with AUC values of 0.78, 0.83 and 0.79, respectively, using a combined model based upon an interaction between the slope and the baseline value.

    Conclusions.

    Baseline tumor markers together with clinical parameters provide prognostic information about survival in patients with mCRC. The ability of the individual tumor markers to predict treatment response and PFS is limited. Changes in marker levels during the first two months of treatment are less informative of outcome.

  • 34. Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    et al.
    Lind, Anne-Li
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala Berzelii Technology Center for Neurodiagnostics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thulin, Måns
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala Berzelii Technology Center for Neurodiagnostics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    High levels of cerebrospinal fluid chemokines point to the presence of neuroinflammation in peripheral neuropathic pain: a cross-sectional study of 2 cohorts of patients compared with healthy controls2017In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 158, no 12, p. 2487-2495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal models suggest that chemokines are important mediators in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain. Indeed, these substances have been called "gliotransmitters," a term that illustrates the close interplay between glial cells and neurons in the context of neuroinflammation and pain. However, evidence in humans is scarce. The aim of the study was to determine a comprehensive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammatory profile of patients with neuropathic pain. Our hypothesis was that we would thereby find indications of a postulated on-going process of central neuroinflammation. Samples of CSF were collected from 2 cohorts of patients with neuropathic pain (n = 11 and n = 16, respectively) and healthy control subjects (n = 11). The samples were analyzed with a multiplex proximity extension assay in which 92 inflammation-related proteins were measured simultaneously (Proseek Multiplex Inflammation I; Olink Bioscience, Uppsala, Sweden). Univariate testing with control of false discovery rate, as well as orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, were used for statistical analyses. Levels of chemokines CXCL6, CXCL10, CCL8, CCL11, CCL23 in CSF, as well as protein LAPTGF-beta-1, were significantly higher in both neuropathic pain cohorts compared with healthy controls, pointing to neuroinflammation in patients. These 6 proteins were also major results in a recent similar study in patients with fibromyalgia. The findings need to be confirmed in larger cohorts, and the question of causality remains to be settled. Because it has been suggested that prevalent comorbidities to chronic pain (eg, depression, anxiety, poor sleep, and tiredness) also are associated with neuroinflammation, it will be important to determine whether neuroinflammation is a common mediator.

  • 35.
    Carlander, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Avian Antibodies Can Eliminate Interference Due To Complement Activation In ELISA2002In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 106, no 3, p. 189-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibodies derived from egg yolk offer many advantages over mammalian antibodies in several aspects. Chicken antibodies do not activate the human complement system and are sometimes a more suitable choice in designing solid-phase immunometric assays than mammalian antibodies. The material often recommended for immunological assays is serum. A freshly drawn serum sample contains an active complement system, which is inactivated during storage. Mammalian antibodies used in most immunological assays may activate the human complement system. Activated complement components will bind to the antibodies thereby partly block the antibody binding epitopes. We show that an active complement system in undiluted samples reduce the absorbance values by approximately 50 % when using goat antibodies but not when using chicken antibodies. This difference will cause erroneous test results that will vary depending on the handling of the samples. Chicken antibodies can be used to eliminate this interference problem.

  • 36.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Calamia, Michael
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1 is associated with insulin resistance: Results from two community-based studies of elderly individuals2014In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 103, no 3, p. 516-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Insulin resistance has been shown to be closely associated with glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, even prior to the development of diabetes. Urinary kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1) is a novel, highly specific marker of kidney tubular damage. The role of insulin resistance in the development of kidney tubular damage is not previously reported. Thus, we aimed to investigate the associations between insulin sensitivity (assessed by HOMA) and urinary KIM-1.

    DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS AND MEASUREMENTS: Two community-based cohorts of elderly individuals were investigated: Prospective Investigation of the vasculature in Uppsala seniors (PIVUS, n=701; mean age 75 years, 52% women); and Uppsala Longitudinal Study of adult men (ULSAM, n=533; mean age 78 years).

    RESULTS: Lower insulin sensitivity was associated with higher urinary KIM-1 in both cohorts after adjustments for age, BMI, blood pressure, antihypertensive treatment, glomerular filtration rate, and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (PIVUS: regression coefficient for 1-SD higher HOMA-IR 0.11, 95% CI 0.03-0.20, p=0.009, and ULSAM: 0.13, 95% CI 0.04-0.22, p=0.007). Results were similar in individuals without diabetes, with normal kidney function and normo-albuminuria.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our findings in elderly individuals support the notion that the interplay between an impaired glucose metabolism and renal tubular damage is evident even prior to the development of diabetes and overt kidney disease.

  • 37.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Carrero, Juan-Jesús
    Stenvinkel, Peter
    Bottai, Matteo
    Barany, Peter
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Endostatin, Cathepsin S, and Cathepsin L, and Their Association with Inflammatory Markers and Mortality in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis2015In: Blood Purification, ISSN 0253-5068, E-ISSN 1421-9735, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 259-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Although both endostatin and cathepsins S have been associated with higher mortality, data in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are scarce.

    METHODS: A longitudinal cohort study of 207 prevalent patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    RESULTS: Cathepsins S and L were associated with soluble receptors for tumor necrosis factor (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2, rho between 0.28 and 0.43, p < 0.001 for all). Weaker or absent associations between endostatin, cathepsins S and L were seen with other inflammatory biomarkers, that is, CRP, interleukin 6, pentraxin 3, and TNF. In Cox and Laplace regression models adjusted for age, sex, dialysis vintage, and diabetes: standard deviation increments of endostatin was associated with a lower mortality (hazard ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57-0.98), and with 6.8 months longer median survival.

    CONCLUSIONS: The high levels of endostatin, cathepsins S and L, and their associations with sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 warrant further studies exploring mortality, and the angiogenic and inflammatory pathways in ESRD.

  • 38.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Carrero, Juan-Jesús
    Stenvinkel, Peter
    Bottai, Matteo
    Barany, Peter
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    High levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 and their association with mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis2015In: Cardiorenal medicine, ISSN 1664-3828, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 89-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Circulating soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression in patients with CKD or diabetes, and with higher mortality. However, data in patients with end-stage renal disease are scarce. Therefore, we analyzed serum levels of sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 and investigated their association with inflammatory markers and mortality in dialysis patients.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This was a longitudinal cohort study of 207 prevalent patients (median age 66 years, 56% men) undergoing hemodialysis in Stockholm, Sweden. Demographics, clinical characteristics, including comorbidities and laboratory data, were obtained at baseline, together with prospective follow-up for mortality.

    RESULTS: The median sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 levels were 17,680 ng/l [95% confidence interval (CI) 17,023-18,337] and 24,450 ng/l (95% CI 23,721-25,179), respectively. During a follow-up of 31 months (interquartile range, 21-38), 77 patients died. There was no association between the levels of sTNFRs and mortality in Cox regression models, and no consistent trend towards higher or lower mortality was seen in Laplace regression models. sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 levels were highly associated with other inflammatory markers including interleukin-6, pentraxin 3 and TNF-α.

    CONCLUSIONS: Prevalent hemodialysis patients have several-fold higher levels of sTNFRs compared to previous studies in CKD stage 4 patients. As no consistent association between TNFR and mortality was observed, clinical implications of measuring these receptors to predict outcome end-stage renal disease patients provide limited results.

  • 39.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Sch Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Carrero, Juan Jesus
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Feldreich, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Stenemo, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Use of Proteomics To Investigate Kidney Function Decline over 5 Years2017In: American Society of Nephrology. Clinical Journal, ISSN 1555-9041, E-ISSN 1555-905X, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 1226-1235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Using a discovery/replication approach, we investigated associations between a multiplex panel of 80 circulating proteins associated with cardiovascular pathology or inflammation, and eGFR decline per year and CKD incidence.

    DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: We used two cohorts, the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors Study (PIVUS; n=687, mean age of 70 years, 51% women) and the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM; n=360 men, mean age of 78 years), with 5-year follow-up data on eGFR. There were 231 and 206 incident cases of CKD during follow-up in the PIVUS and ULSAM studies, respectively. Proteomic profiling of 80 proteins was assessed by a multiplex assay (proximity extension assay). The assay uses two antibodies for each protein and a PCR step to achieve a high-specific binding and the possibility to measure multiple proteins in parallel, but gives no absolute concentrations.

    RESULTS: In the discovery cohort from the PIVUS Study, 28 plasma proteins were significantly associated with eGFR decline per year, taking into account the multiple testing. Twenty of these proteins were significantly associated with eGFR decline per year in the replication cohort from the ULSAM Study after adjustment for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors, medications, and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (in order of significance: TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 2*, CD40L receptor, TNF receptor 1*, placenta growth factor*, thrombomodulin*, urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor*, growth/differentiation factor 15*, macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1, fatty acid-binding protein*, cathepsin D, resistin, kallikrein 11*, C-C motif chemokine 3, proteinase-activated receptor 1*, cathepsin L, chitinase 3-like protein 1, TNF receptor 2*, fibroblast growth factor 23*, monocyte chemotactic protein 1, and kallikrein 6). Moreover, 11 of the proteins predicted CKD incidence (marked with * above). No protein consistently predicted eGFR decline per year independently of baseline eGFR in both cohorts.

    CONCLUSIONS: Several circulating proteins involved in phosphate homeostasis, inflammation, apoptosis, extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, and endothelial dysfunction were associated with worsening kidney function. Multiplex proteomics appears to be a promising way of discovering novel aspects of kidney disease pathology.

  • 40.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Centre for Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Research Unit Skellefteå, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Heart Centre, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ruge, Toralph
    Dept of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet and Function of Emergency Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Centre for Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; School of Health and Social Sciences, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2, gender, and risk of myocardial infarction in Northern Sweden2018In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 272, p. 41-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

    Soluble receptors for tumor necrosis factor alpha (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, and some evidence points towards a difference in associated risk between men and women. We aimed to study the association between sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 and incident myocardial infarctions (MI) and to explore the influence of established cardiovascular risk factors in men and women.

    METHODS:

    We conducted a nested case control study in three large Swedish cohorts, including 533 myocardial infarction cases, and 1003 age-, sex- and cohort-matched controls. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated.

    RESULTS:

    An association between circulating sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 and an increased risk for MI was found when comparing cases and controls. The odds ratios were significant after adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors and C-reactive protein in women (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.08-1.93 for TNFR1, and 1.61, 95% CI 1.11-2.34 for TNFR2), but was abolished in men. Women with a combination of elevated CRP and values in the upper quartile of TNFR1 or TNFR2 had a 5-fold higher risk of myocardial infarction versus those with normal CRP and values in the lower three quartiles of TNFR1 or TNFR2.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    As the risk estimates for TNFR1 and TNFR2 were higher and remained significant after adjustments for established cardiovascular risk factors in women but not in men, a potential role for TNFR1 and TNFR2 in identifying women with a higher MI risk is possible. The future clinical role of TNFR1 and TNFR2 in combination with CRP to identify high risk patients for coronary heart disease has yet to be determined.

  • 41.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Juhlin, C Christofer
    Larsson, Tobias E
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1) is associated with increased total mortality due to cancer and cardiovascular causes: Findings from two community based cohorts of elderly2014In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 237, no 1, p. 236-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Experimental evidence support soluble receptors for tumor necrosis factor alpha as important mediators of the underlying pathology leading to cardiovascular disease and cancer. However, prospective data concerning the relation between circulating soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (sTNFR1) and mortality in humans are lacking. We aimed to explore and validate the association between sTNFR1 and mortality, and to explore the influence of other established risk factors for mortality, including other inflammatory markers.

    METHODS: The association between serum sTNFR1and the risk for mortality was investigated in two community-based cohorts of elderly: the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS; women 50%, n = 1005, mean age 70 years, median follow-up 7.9 years) and the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM, n = 775, mean age 77 years, median follow-up 8.1 years).

    RESULTS: In total, 101 participants in PIVUS and 274 in ULSAM died during follow-up. In multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for inflammation, lifestyle and established cardiovascular risk factors, one standard deviation (SD) higher sTNFR1 was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) for mortality of 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-1.60, in PIVUS and HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.37 in ULSAM. Moreover, circulatingsTNFR1 was associated with cardiovascular mortality (HR per SD of sTNFR1, 1.24, 95% CI 1.07-1.44) and cancer mortality (HR per SD of sTNFR1, 1.32, 95% CI 1.11-1.57) in the ULSAM cohort. High levels of sTNFR1 identified individuals with increased risk of mortality among those with high as well as low levels of systemic inflammation.

    CONCLUSIONS: An association between circulating sTNFR1 and an increased risk for mortality was found and validated in two independent community-based cohorts. The future clinical role of sTNFR1 to identify high risk patients for adverse outcomes and mortality has yet to be determined.

  • 42.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Larsson, Tobias E
    Bottai, Matteo
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Urinary Kidney Injury Molecule-1 and the Risk of Cardiovascular Mortality in Elderly Men2014In: Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, ISSN 1555-905X, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 1393-1401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives

    Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) has been suggested as a clinically relevant highly specific biomarker of acute kidney tubular damage. However, community-based data on the association between urinary levels of KIM-1 and the risk for cardiovascular mortality are lacking. This study aimed to investigate the association between urinary KIM-1 and cardiovascular mortality.

    Design, setting, participants, & measurements

    This was a prospective study, using the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (N=590; mean age 77 years; baseline period, 1997–2001; median follow-up 8.1 years; end of follow-up, 2008).

    Results

    During follow-up, 89 participants died of cardiovascular causes (incidence rate, 2.07 per 100 person-years at risk). Models were adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (age, systolic BP, diabetes, smoking, body mass index, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, antihypertensive treatment, lipid-lowering treatment, aspirin treatment, and history of cardiovascular disease) and for markers of kidney dysfunction and damage (cystatin C–based eGFR and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio). Higher urinary KIM-1/creatinine (from 24-hour urine collections) was associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio per SD increase, 1.27; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.05 to 1.54; P=0.01). Participants with a combination of high KIM-1/creatinine (upper quintile, ≥175 ng/mmol), low eGFR (≤60 ml/min per 1.73 m2), and microalbuminuria/macroalbuminuria (albumin/creatinine ratio≥3 g/mol) had a >8-fold increased risk compared with participants with low KIM-1/creatinine (<175 ng/mmol), normal eGFR (>60 ml/min per 1.73 m2), and normoalbuminuria (albumin/creatinine ratio<3 g/mol) (hazard ratio, 8.56; 95% CI, 4.17 to 17.56; P<0.001).

    Conclusions

    These findings suggest that higher urinary KIM-1 may predispose to a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality independently of established cardiovascular risk factors, eGFR, and albuminuria. Additional studies are needed to further assess the utility of measuring KIM-1 in the clinical setting.

  • 43.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Larsson, Tobias E
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Urinary kidney injury molecule 1 and incidence of heart failure in elderly men2013In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 441-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    There is growing recognition of the clinical importance of cardiorenal syndrome-the bidirectional interplay between kidney and cardiac dysfunction. Yet, the role of kidney tubular damage in the development of heart failure is less studied. The objective of this study was to investigate whether urinary kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1, a specific marker of tubular damage, predisposes to an increased heart failure risk.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    This was a community-based cohort study [Uppsala Longitudinal study of Adult Men (ULSAM)] of 565, 77-year-old men free from heart failure at baseline. Heart failure hospitalizations were used as outcome. During follow-up (median 8.0 years), 73 participants were hospitalized for heart failure. In models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, body mass index, LDL/HDL ratio, antihypertensive treatment, lipid-lowering treatment, aspirin treatment, LV hypertrophy, and prevalent cardiovascular disease) and markers of kidney dysfunction and damage [cystatin C-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio], a higher urinary KIM-1/creatinine ratio was associated with higher risk for heart failure (hazard ratio upper vs. lower tertile, 1.81; 95% confidence interval 1.01-3.29; P < 0.05). Participants with a combination of low GFR (<60 mL/min/1.72 m(2)) and high KIM-1/creatinine (>128 ng/mmol) had a 3-fold increase in heart failure risk compared with participants with normal GFR and KIM-1 (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION:

    Our findings suggest that kidney tubular damage predisposes to an increased risk for heart failure in the community. Further studies are needed to clarify the causal role of KIM-1 in the development of heart failure, and to evaluate the clinical utility of urinary KIM-1 measurements.

  • 44.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Larsson, Tobias E
    Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Soluble TNF Receptors and Kidney Dysfunction in the Elderly2014In: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, ISSN 1046-6673, E-ISSN 1533-3450, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1313-1320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of TNF-α and its soluble receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) in the development of kidney disease is being unraveled. Yet, community-based data regarding the role of sTNFRs are lacking. We assessed serum sTNFRs and aspects of kidney damage cross-sectionally in two independent community-based cohorts of elderly participants: Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (n=815; mean age, 75 years; 51% women) and Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n=778; mean age, 78 years). Serum sTNFR1 correlated substantially with different aspects of kidney pathology in the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men cohort (R=-0.52 for estimated GFR, R=0.22 for urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio, and R=0.17 for urinary kidney injury molecule-1; P<0.001 for all), with similar correlations in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors cohort. These associations remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, inflammatory markers, and cardiovascular risk factors and were also evident in participants without diabetes. Serum sTNFR2 was associated with all three markers in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors cohort (P<0.001 for all). Our findings from two independent community-based cohorts confirm and extend results of previous studies supporting circulating sTNFRs as relevant biomarkers for kidney damage and dysfunction in elderly individuals, even in the absence of diabetes.

  • 45.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Division of Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Nordquist, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Larsson, Tobias E.
    Carrero, Juan-Jesús
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. gSchool of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun , Sweden.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 Is Associated with Glomerular Filtration Rate Progression and Incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Two Community-Based Cohorts of Elderly Individuals2015In: Cardiorenal Medicine, ISSN 1664-3828, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 278-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: We aimed to explore and validate the longitudinal associations between soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1), glomerular filtration rate (GFR) progression, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) incidence in two independent community-based cohorts of elderly individuals with prespecified subgroup analyses in individuals without prevalent diabetes. Research Design and Methods: Two community-based cohorts of elderly individuals were used with 5-year follow-up data on estimated GFR: the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM; n = 437 men; mean age: 78 years) and the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS; n = 703; mean age: 70 years; 51% women). GFR categories were defined as >= 60, 30-60, and = 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) at baseline, higher sTNFRs were associated with incident CKD after 5 years in both cohorts [ULSAM: OR per SD increase 1.49 (95% CI 1.16-1.9) and PIVUS: OR 1.84 (95% CI 1.50-2.26)]. Associations were similar in individuals without diabetes. Conclusions: Higher circulating sTNFR1 independently predicts the progression to a worse GFR category and CKD incidence in elderly individuals even in the absence of diabetes. Further studies are warranted to investigate the underlying mechanisms, and to evaluate the clinical relevance of our findings.

  • 46.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ruge, Toralph
    Kjøller, Erik
    Hilden, Jørgen
    Kolmos, Hans Jørn
    Sajadieh, Ahmad
    Kastrup, Jens
    Jensen, Gorm Boje
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Nowak, Christoph
    Jakobsen, Janus Christian
    Winkel, Per
    Gluud, Christian
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    10-Year Associations between Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors 1 and 2 and Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stable Coronary Heart Disease: A CLARICOR (Effect of Clarithromycin on Mortality and Morbidity in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease) Trial Substudy.2018In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 7, no 9, article id e008299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to assess the associations and predictive powers between the soluble receptors for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (TNFR1 and TNFR2) and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: CLARICOR (Effect of Clarithromycin on Mortality and Morbidity in Patients With Ischemic Heart Disease) is a randomized clinical trial comparing clarithromycin with placebo in patients with stable coronary heart disease. The primary outcome was a composite of nonfatal acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina pectoris, cerebrovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. Patients were followed up for 10 years; discovery sample, those assigned placebo (1204 events in n=1998); and replication sample, those assigned clarithromycin (1220 events in n=1979). We used Cox regression adjusted for C-reactive protein level, established cardiovascular risk factors, kidney function, and cardiovascular drugs. After adjustments, higher serum levels of TNFR1 and TNFR2 were associated with the composite outcome in the discovery sample (hazard ratio per SD increase, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.22; P=0.001 for TNFR1; hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.24; P<0.001 for TNFR2). The associations were similar in the replication sample. The associations with the composite outcome were mainly driven by acute myocardial infarction, cardiovascular mortality, and noncardiovascular mortality. The addition of TNFR1 and TNFR2 to established cardiovascular risk factors improved prediction only modestly (<1%).

    CONCLUSIONS: Increased concentrations of circulating TNFR1 and TNFR2 were associated with increased risks of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease. Yet, the utility of measuring TNFR1 and TNFR2 to improve risk prediction in these patients appears limited.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00121550.

  • 47.
    Carlsson, Axel C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ruge, Toralph
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Association between circulating endostatin, hypertension duration, and hypertensive target-organ damage2013In: Hypertension, ISSN 0194-911X, E-ISSN 1524-4563, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 1146-1151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our aim is to study associations between circulating endostatin, hypertension duration, and hypertensive target-organ damage. Long-term hypertension induces cardiovascular and renal remodeling. Circulating endostatin, a biologically active derivate of collagen XVIII, has been suggested to be a relevant marker for extracellular matrix turnover and remodeling in various diseases. However, the role of endostatin in hypertension and hypertensive target-organ damage is unclear. Serum endostatin was measured in 2 independent community-based cohorts: the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS; women 51%; n=812; mean age, 75 years) and the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM; n=785; mean age, 77.6 years). Retrospective data on blood pressure measurements and antihypertensive medication (PIVUS >5 years, ULSAM >27 years), and cross-sectional data on echocardiographic left ventricular mass, endothelial function (endothelium-dependent vasodilation assessed by the invasive forearm model), and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio were available. In PIVUS, participants with ≥5 years of history of hypertension portrayed 0.42 SD (95% confidence interval, 0.23-0.61; P<0.001) higher serum endostatin, compared with that of normotensives. This association was replicated in ULSAM, in which participants with 27 years hypertension duration had the highest endostatin (0.57 SD higher; 95% confidence interval, 0.35-0.80; P<0.001). In addition, higher endostatin was associated with higher left ventricular mass, worsened endothelial function, and higher urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (P<0.03 for all) in participants with prevalent hypertension. Circulating endostatin is associated with the duration of hypertension, and vascular, myocardial, and renal indices of hypertensive target-organ damage. Further studies are warranted to assess the prognostic role of endostatin in individuals with hypertension.

  • 48.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Karolinska Inst, Div Family Med, Dept Neurobiol, Care Sci & Soc, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Carrero, Juan Jesus
    Karolinska Inst, Div Renal Med, Dept Clin Sci, Intervent & Technol, Karlskrona, Sweden..
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Stenemo, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Sci, Dalarna, Sweden..
    Use of a proximity extension assay proteomics chip to discover new biomarkers associated with albuminuria2017In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, no 4, p. 340-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The underlying mechanisms for the development of albuminuria and the increased cardiovascular risk in patients with elevated albuminuria levels are incompletely understood. We therefore investigated the associations between 80 cardiovascular proteins and the urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR).

    METHODS: We used a discovery/replication approach in two independent community-based cohorts of elderly patients: the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 662; mean age 78 years) and the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (n = 757; mean age 75 years; 51% women). A proteomic chip with a panel of 80 plasma proteins associated with different aspects of cardiovascular disease was analysed. In the discovery cohort, we used a false discovery rate of 5% to take into account the multiple statistical testing. Nominal p values were used in the replication.

    RESULTS: Higher levels of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-1, placenta growth factor, growth/differentiation factor-15, urokinase plasminogen activator surface receptor and kallikrein-11 were robustly associated with a higher ACR in both cohorts in multivariable linear regression models adjusted for sex, established cardiovascular risk factors, antihypertensive treatment, prevalent cardiovascular disease and glomerular filtration rate (p < 0.02 for all). All associations were also significant in separate analyses of patients without diabetes.

    CONCLUSIONS: We discovered and replicated associations between ACR and five cardiovascular proteins involved in tubular injury, atherosclerosis, endothelial function, heart failure, inflammation, glomerulosclerosis and podocyte injury. Our findings put forward multiplex proteomics as a promising approach to explore novel aspects of the complex detrimental interplay between kidney function and the cardiovascular system.

  • 49.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Karolinska Inst, Div Family Med, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Östgren, C. J.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Lanne, T.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Nyström, F. H.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden..
    The association between endostatin and kidney disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes2016In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. - Circulating endostatin, a biologically active derivate of collagen XVIII, is considered to be a marker of kidney disease and a risk factor for its related mortality. However, less is known of the role of endostatin in diabetes and the development of diabetic nephropathy. For this reason, our study investigated the associations between circulating endostatin and the prevalence and progression of kidney disease, and its mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Methods. - This was a cohort study of 607 patients with T2D (mean age: 61 years, 44% women). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) creatinine equation, was used to assess the patients' kidney function decline and mortality. Results. - Of the total study cohort, 20 patients declined by >= 20% in eGFR over 4 years, and 44 died during the follow-up (mean duration: 6.7 years). At baseline, participants with diabetic nephropathy (defined as eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and/or microalbuminuria [defined as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) > 3 g/mol] had higher median levels of endostatin than those without nephropathy (62.7 mu g/L vs 57.4 mu g/L, respectively; P = 0.031). In longitudinal analyses adjusted for age, gender, baseline eGFR and ACR, higher endostatin levels were associated with a higher risk of decline (>= 20% in eGFR, OR per 1 SD increase: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.13-2.65) and a higher risk of mortality (HR per 1 SD increase: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.19-2.07). Conclusion. - In patients with T2D, circulating endostatin levels can predict the progression of kidney disease and mortality independently of established kidney disease markers. The clinical usefulness of endostatin as a risk marker in such patients merits further studies.

  • 50.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden..
    Nystrom, Fredrik H
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden..
    Länne, Toste
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden..
    Jennersjö, Pär
    Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden..
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Association of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 with nephropathy, cardiovascular events, and total mortality in type 2 diabetes2016In: Cardiovascular Diabetology, ISSN 1475-2840, E-ISSN 1475-2840, Vol. 15, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) contribute to experimental diabetic kidney disease, a condition with substantially increased cardiovascular risk when present in patients. Therefore, we aimed to explore the levels of sTNFRs, and their association with prevalent kidney disease, incident cardiovascular disease, and risk of mortality independently of baseline kidney function and microalbuminuria in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. In pre-defined secondary analyses we also investigated whether the sTNFRs predict adverse outcome in the absence of diabetic kidney disease.

    METHODS: The CARDIPP study, a cohort study of 607 diabetes patients [mean age 61 years, 44 % women, 45 cardiovascular events (fatal/non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke) and 44 deaths during follow-up (mean 7.6 years)] was used.

    RESULTS: Higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were associated with higher odds of prevalent kidney disease [odd ratio (OR) per standard deviation (SD) increase 1.60, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.32-1.93, p < 0.001 and OR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.21-1.97, p = 0.001, respectively]. In Cox regression models adjusting for age, sex, glomerular filtration rate and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, higher sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 predicted incident cardiovascular events [hazard ratio (HR) per SD increase, 1.66, 95 % CI 1.29-2.174, p < 0.001 and HR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.13-1.91, p = 0.004, respectively]. Results were similar in separate models with adjustments for inflammatory markers, HbA1c, or established cardiovascular risk factors, or when participants with diabetic kidney disease at baseline were excluded (p < 0.01 for all). Both sTNFRs were associated with mortality.

    CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS: Higher circulating sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 are associated with diabetic kidney disease, and predicts incident cardiovascular disease and mortality independently of microalbuminuria and kidney function, even in those without kidney disease. Our findings support the clinical utility of sTNFRs as prognostic markers in type 2 diabetes.

1234567 1 - 50 of 361
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf