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  • 1.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Orndahl, Lovisa Holm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Kero, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Hedin, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Flachskampf, Frank
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Volumetric quantification of regurgitant volume in asymptomatic severe degenerative mitral regurgitation by echocardiography and cardiac mri with independent validation of forward stroke volume by positron emission tomography2017In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 69, no 11 Suppl, p. 1973-1973Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Baron, Tomasz
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Örndahl, Lovisa Holm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Kero, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Hedin, Eva-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology-Arrhythmia. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Flachskampf, Frank A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Comparison of left ventricular volumes and regurgitant volumes by echocardiography and magnetic resonance in patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation2016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, p. 1239-1239Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ericsson, Anders
    Briley-Soebo, Karen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjørnerud, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    In and ex vivo MR evaluation of acute myocardial ischemia in pigs by determining R1 in steady state after the administration of the intravascular contrast agent NC100150 injection2004In: Investigative Radiology, ISSN 0020-9996, E-ISSN 1536-0210, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 479-486Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    High in-plane resolution T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of acute myocardial ischemia in pigs using the intravascular contrast agent NC100150 injection.2004In: Investigative Radiology, ISSN 0020-9996, E-ISSN 1536-0210, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 470-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale and Objectives: The intravascular contrast agent NC100150 injection was tested for its ability to demarcate nonperfused myocardium in a porcine model of coronary occlusion.

    Materials and Methods: A T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence was acquired ex vivo and in vivo during first pass and steady-state circulation of the contrast agent in 2 dosages (2 and 5 mg Fe/kg bw) or saline.

    Results: Ex vivo, in the high-dose group, the volume of nonperfused myocardium determined from T2-weighted images was 99% of that determined from photographs where perfused myocardium stained with fluorescein. A significantly higher contrast to noise ratio between perfused and nonperfused myocardium was found (both ex and in vivo in steady state) compared with the control group. During first pass, a significant reduction in signal intensity (74 ± 18%) was found in perfused myocardium after contrast injection.

    Conclusion: NC100150 injection, combined with T2-weighted turbo spin echo imaging, allowed detailed visualization of non-perfused myocardium in the steady state, which corresponded to the area at risk as determined by fluorescein.

  • 5.
    Björnerud, Atle
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Assessment of myocardial blood volume and water exchange: theoretical considerations and in vivo results.2003In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 828-837Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Andersson, Jessika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hulthe, Johannes
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Clinically unrecognized myocardial infarction detected at MR imaging may not be associated with atherosclerosis2007In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 245, no 1, p. 103-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate whether there is support for the hypothesis that clinically unrecognized myocardial infarctions (UMIs) detected at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging have an atherosclerotic pathogenesis similar to that of recognized myocardial infarctions (RMIs).

    Materials and Methods: After ethics committee approval and informed consent were obtained, gadolinium-enhanced whole-body MR angiography and late-enhancement MR imaging were performed in 248 randomly chosen 70-year-old subjects (123 women, 125 men). Imaging included the aorta and the carotid, renal, and lower limb arteries to the ankle, but not the coronary arteries. Subjects with myocardial infarction (MI) scars at late-enhancement MR imaging were classified as having RMI (n = 11) (those with a diagnosis of MI at the hospital) or UMI (n = 49) (those without a diagnosis of MI at the hospital). The presence of 50% or higher luminal narrowing in any vessel at whole-body MR angiography was considered to represent significant atherosclerosis. Intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery was measured with ultrasonography. C-reactive protein level was measured, and coronary heart disease risk was estimated. Observers were blinded to any previous results. The chi(2) test analysis of variance, and Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analyses.

    Results: None of the measured parameters differed significantly between the group without MI scars and the UMI group, but parameters were significantly increased in the RMI group (P < .05) compared with those in the group without MI scars. Forty-two of 49 UMIs and nine of 11 RMIs were located within inferolateral segments of the left ventricle.

    Conclusion: MR imaging-detected UMIs might have a different pathogenesis from that of RMIs or may have the same pathogenesis but may manifest at an earlier stage.

  • 7.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Myocardial scars more frequent than expected - Magnetic resonance imaging detects potential risk group2006In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 765-771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of clinically recognized myocardial infarctions (RMIs) and unrecognized myocardial infarctions (UMIs) in 70-year-old subjects, assessed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to relate the findings to cardiac function and morbidity. Background: Late enhancement MRI identifies myocardial scars and thereby has the potential to detect UMI. Methods: Cardiac MRI was performed on 259 randomly chosen 70-year-old subjects. Late enhancement and cine sequences were acquired, and the ejection fraction and left ventricular (LV) mass were calculated. Late enhancement involving the subendocardial layer was considered to represent myocardial infarction (MI) scars, and their volumes were calculated. Information on cardiac morbidity and risk factors was collected from medical records and from a health examination. Subjects with MI scars, with or without a hospital diagnosis of MI were classified as RMI or UMI, respectively. Results: The images from 248 subjects (123 women, 125 men) were assessable. Myocardial infarction scars were found in 60 subjects (24.2%), in 49 of whom (19.8%) they were UMIs. The volumes of the UMIs were significantly smaller than those of the RMIs. There was an increased frequency of chest pain symptoms among the subjects with UMI or RMI compared with those without MI scars. Ejection fraction was significantly lower and LV mass significantly larger in the subjects with UMI or RMI than in those without MI scars. Conclusions: Unrecognized MI detected with MRI was more frequent than expected in 70-year-old subjects. The subjects displaying these UMIs may represent a previously unknown potential risk group for future cardiovascular events.

  • 8.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Bjerner, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    The exactness of left ventricular segmentation in cine magnetic resonance imaging and its impact on systolic function values2007In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 285-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of exactness of the segmentation of the left ventricle (LV), using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and methods: Steady-state free-precession cine MRI was performed on 100 randomly selected subjects. Myocardial borders were outlined on short-axis images using three methods: method 1 was computer assisted, excluding papillary muscles from the left ventricular mass (LVM); method 2 was similar but included papillary muscles; and method 3 was manually traced including papillary muscles. LV end-systolic (ES) and end-diastolic (ED) masses and volumes, ejection fraction (EF), stroke volume (SV), and cardiac output (CO) were calculated from these measurements. The difference between the ES and ED LVM was used to estimate the exactness of the methods. Results: Method 3 was the most exact, and method 1 was the least exact. The three methods generated differing EF, SV, and CO measurements. With an ES-ED LVM difference exceeding 20 g, the mean SV measurement error was 8.83.6 ml. Conclusion: Manual tracing proved more exact than computer-assisted quantification. Exactness had an impact on EF, SV, and CO measurements, and the ES-ED LVM difference can be used to identify assessments that would benefit from more exact segmentation.

  • 9.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Several sources of error in estimation of left ventricular mass with M-mode echocardiography in elderly subjects2011In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 116, no 4, p. 258-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. M-mode echocardiography estimates of the left ventricular mass (LVM) were greater than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) estimates. There are substantial differences between the methods both in the means of measuring and the calculation formula. The aim of this study was to investigate whether any difference in estimates of LVM between M-mode echocardiography and MRI is due to the means of measuring or to the calculation formula, using MRI as the gold standard.

    Material and methods. M-mode echocardiography and MRI were performed on 229 randomly selected 70-year-old community-living subjects. LVM was calculated from echocardiography (LVM(echo)) and from MRI (LVM(MRI)) measurements using standard techniques. Additionally LVM was calculated with the echocardiography formula from echo-mimicking measurements made on MR images (LVM(MRI/ASE)).

    Results. There were significant differences between all three LVM estimates in women, in men, and in the entire population. Echocardiography estimated LVM to be larger than did MRI, and the LVM(MRI/ASE) estimate was larger than the LVM(MRI). The difference between LVM(MRI) and LVM(MRI/ASE) was larger than the difference between LVM(echo) and LVM(MRI/ASE). There was a low correlation between LVM(echo) and LVM(MRI) (R(2) = 0.46) as well as between LVM(MRI/ASE) and LVM(MRI) (R(2) = 0.65).

    Conclusion. The means of measuring and the calculation formula both independently add to the error in LVM estimation with M-mode echocardiography. The error of the calculation formula seems to be greater than the error of the means of measuring in a population of community-living elderly men and women.

  • 10.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Nylander, Ruta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Themudo, Raquel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Prevalence of unrecognized myocardial infarction detected with magnetic resonance imaging and its relationship to cerebral ischemic lesions in both sexes2011In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, ISSN 0735-1097, E-ISSN 1558-3597, Vol. 58, no 13, p. 1372-1377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of unrecognized myocardial infarction (UMI) detected with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and whether it is related to cerebral ischemic lesions on MRI in an elderly population-based cohort.

    BACKGROUND: There is a correlation between stroke and recognized myocardial infarction (RMI) and between stroke and UMI detected with electrocardiography, whereas the prevalence of stroke in subjects with MRI-detected UMI is unknown.

    METHODS: Cerebral MRI and cardiac late-enhancement MRI were performed on 394 randomly selected 75-year-old subjects (188 women, 206 men). Images were assessed for cerebral ischemic lesions and myocardial infarction (MI) scars. Medical records were scrutinized. Subjects with MI scars, with or without a hospital diagnosis of MI, were classified as RMI or UMI, respectively.

    RESULTS: UMIs were found in 120 subjects (30%) and RMIs in 21 (5%). The prevalence of UMIs (p = 0.004) and RMIs (p = 0.02) was greater in men than in women. Men with RMI displayed an increased prevalence of cortical and lacunar cerebral infarctions, whereas women with UMI more frequently had cortical cerebral infarctions (p = 0.003).

    CONCLUSIONS: MI scars are more frequent in men than in women at 75 years of age. The prevalence of RMI is related to that of cerebral infarctions.

  • 11.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Themudo, Raquel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Long-term prognosis of unrecognized myocardial infarction detected with cardiovascular magnetic resonance in an elderly population2016In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 1097-6647, E-ISSN 1532-429X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 43-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Individuals with unrecognized myocardial infarctions (UMIs) detected with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) constitute a recently defined group whose prognosis has not been fully evaluated. However, increasing evidence indicate that these individuals may be at considerable cardiovascular risk. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic impact of CMR detected UMIs for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in community living elderly individuals.

    METHODS: Late gadolinium enhancement CMR was performed in 248 randomly chosen 70-year-olds. Individuals with myocardial infarction (MI) scars, with or without a hospital diagnosis of MI were classified as recognized MI (RMI) or UMI, respectively. Medical records and death certificates were scrutinized. MACE was defined as cardiac death, non-fatal MI, a new diagnosis of angina pectoris, or symptom-driven coronary artery revascularization.

    RESULTS: During follow-up (mean 11 years) MACE occurred in 10 % (n = 18/182) of the individuals without MI scars, in 20 % (n = 11/55) of the individuals with UMI, and in 45 % (n = 5/11) of the individuals with RMI, with a significant difference between the UMI group and the group without MI scars (p = 0.045), and between the RMI group and the group without MI scars (p = 0.0004). Cardiac death and/or non-fatal MI occurred in 15, 5, and 3 of the individuals in the NoMI, UMI, and RMI group respectively. Hazards ratios for MACE adjusted for risk factors and sex were 2.55 (95 % CI 1.20-5.42; p = 0.015) for UMI and 3.28 (95 % CI1.16-9.22; p = 0.025) for RMI.

    CONCLUSIONS: The presence of a CMR detected UMI entailed a more than double risk for MACE in community living 70-year-old individuals.

  • 12.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Themudo, Raquel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Cardiac Troponin I Associated with the Development of Unrecognized Myocardial Infarctions Detected with MRI2014In: Clinical Chemistry, ISSN 0009-9147, E-ISSN 1530-8561, Vol. 60, no 10, p. 1327-1335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Late enhancement MRI (LE-MRI) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) are sensitive methods to detect subclinical myocardial injury. We sought to investigate the relation between plasma concentrations of cTnI measured with a high-sensitivity assay (hs-cTnI) and the development of unrecognized myocardial infarctions (UMIs) detected with LE-MRI.

    METHODS:

    After approval from the ethics committee and written informed consent were obtained, LE-MRI was performed on 248 randomly selected community-living 70-year-old volunteers and hs-cTnI was determined with a highly sensitive premarket assay. Five years later these individuals were invited to a second LE-MRI, and 176 of them (82 women, 94 men), who did not have a hospital diagnosis of MI, constitute the present study population. LE-MR images were analyzed by 2 radiologists independently and in a consensus reading, blinded to any information on previous disease or assessments.

    RESULTS:

    New or larger UMIs were detected in 37 participants during follow-up. Plasma concentrations of hs-cTnI at 70 years of age, which were mainly within what is considered to be the reference interval, were related to new or larger UMIs at 75 years of age with an odds ratio of 1.98 per 1 unit increase in ln-transformed cTnI (95% CI, 1.17-3.35; P = 0.010). Plasma concentrations of hs-cTnI at 70 years of age were associated with the volumes of the UMIs detected at 75 years of age (P = 0.028).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    hs-cTnI in 70-year-old community-living women and men was associated with the development of MRI-detected UMIs within 5 years.

  • 13.
    Eckerbom, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Hansell, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology, Integrative Physiology.
    Weis, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Liss, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Intravoxel Incoherent Motion MR Imaging of the Kidney: Pilot Study2013In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 765, p. 55-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MR examinations (Achieva 3 T, Philips, Best, The Netherlands) were performed at five different occasions in a healthy volunteer (male 60 years) and in one renal cancer patient (male 78 years) with normal renal function (creatinine 88 μmol/L). Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) coefficients D + D* were measured using respiratory-triggered diffusion-weighted spin-echo echo-planar imaging. Perfusion data of the patient were acquired using a saturation-recovery gradient-echo sequence and with the bolus of Gd-BOPTA (Multihance). D + D* were computed by monoexponential fitting of MR signal intensity attenuation versus b for b = 0, 50, 100, 150 s/mm2. Perfusion parameters were evaluated with “NordicICE” software. The map of D + D* was compared qualitatively with the perfusion map computed from the Gd scan. D + D* values of the cortex and medulla were in the range 2.3–2.7 and 1.1–1.6 × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively. In conclusion, in this pilot study a good qualitative relation between IVIM variables D + D* and renal perfusion has been found.

  • 14.
    Eggers, Kai M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Prevalence and pathophysiological mechanisms of elevated cardiac troponin 1 levels in a population-based sample of elderly subjects2008In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 29, no 18, p. 2252-2258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To evaluate the prevalence of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) elevation in an elderly community population and the association of cTnI levels with cardiovascular risk factors, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis, cardiac performance, and areas indicative of infarcted myocardium identified by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS AND RESULTS: cTnI elevation defined as cTnI levels >0.01 microg/L (Access AccuTnI, Beckman Coulter) was found in 21.8% of the study participants (n = 1005). cTnI > 0.01 microg/L was associated with cardiovascular high-risk features, the burden of atherosclerosis in the carotid arteries, left-ventricular mass, and impaired left-ventricular systolic function. No associations were found between cTnI and inflammatory activity, diastolic dysfunction, or myocardial scars. Male gender (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1-2.4), ischaemic ECG changes (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.1-2.7), and NT-pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1-1.7) independently predicted cTnI > 0.01 microg/L. cTnI > 0.01 microg/L correlated also to an increased cardiovascular risk according to the Framingham risk score. CONCLUSION: cTnI > 0.01 microg/L is relatively common in elderly subjects and is associated with cardiovascular high-risk features and impaired cardiac performance. Cardiac troponin determined by a highly sensitive assay might thus serve as an instrument for the identification of subjects at high cardiovascular risk in general populations.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Rolf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Dobutamine-induced stress affects intracellular uptake of manganese: a quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study in pigs2004In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 360-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To determine whether there are differences in increase in longitudinal relaxation rate (DeltaR1) in the myocardium between bolus administration of Mn(2+) ions during rest and during dobutamine-induced stress and, additionally, to determine whether there are differences in DeltaR1 between bolus injection and infusion of Mn(2+) ions during dobutamine-induced stress.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    Pigs were divided into three groups with six pigs in each group. All animals received 15 mumol MnCl(2)/kg of body weight (b.w.) intravenously either as a bolus injection (groups 1 and 2) or as an infusion over one minute (group 3). The animals in groups 2 and 3 were subjected to dobutamine stress before injection of MnCl(2), while those in group 1 were not given dobutamine. T1 was quantified in the myocardium and left ventricular blood pool before contrast injection and repeatedly during a one-hour postinjection period.

    RESULTS:

    A significant difference in DeltaR1 between the groups with and the group without dobutamine stress was noted in the myocardium up to 45 minutes after contrast agent injection. No such significant difference was found between pigs that received the contrast agent as a bolus injection compared to infusion.

    CONCLUSION:

    Dobutamine stress increases uptake of manganese ions in the myocardium. This increase was independent of whether the contrast agent was administered as a bolus injection or as an infusion.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Rolf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Briley Saebo, Karen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Uptake of MnCl2 and mangafodipir trisodium in the myocardium: a magnetic resonance imaging study in pigs2004In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 564-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To examine the changes in the longitudinal relaxation times (DeltaR1) induced in pig myocardium and blood following injections of 5, 10, and 15 micromol mangafodipir trisodium (Mn-DPDP) or MnCl2/kg of body weight (b.w.).

    MATERIALS AND METHODS:

    Twelve pigs were divided into two groups, one group receiving MnCl2 and the other receiving Mn-DPDP. Three consecutive doses of contrast agent (5, 10, and 15 micromol/kg of b.w.) were injected in each animal with a 40-minute time interval between each dose. Measurements of T1 in blood and myocardium were made 5, 15, 25, and 35 minutes after each injection. Additionally, relaxivity measurements in blood samples were performed.

    RESULTS:

    An increase in myocardial R1 was observed for both contrast agents at all concentration levels tested. This increase peaked 5 minutes after injection and then declined. An increase could still be detected 35 minutes after injection. The effect was larger when using MnCl2 than when using Mn-DPDP.

    CONCLUSION:

    The dissociation kinetics of Mn2+ from the DPDP ligand limits the relaxation increase of Mn-DPDP relative to that of MnCl2. On the other hand, the toxicity of MnCl2 may exclude it from clinical use.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Rolf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Karlsson, Jan Olof G.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Contrast enhancement of manganese-hydroxypropyl-tetraacetic acid, an MR contrast agent with potential for detecting differences in myocardial blood flow2006In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 858-863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To determine whether the contrast agent MnHPTA has potential for detecting differences in myocardial blood flow.

    Materials and Methods: R1 in the myocardium was calculated from MR signal intensity measurements in 18 pigs after intravenous injection of 5, 15, or 25 mu mol MnHPTA/kg body weight. Measurements were made in each animal after administration at rest and during dobutamine-induced stress.

    Results: A difference of approximately 0.1 see(-1) in the R1 increase between rest and stress still remained 31 minutes after administration of 25 mu mol MnHPTA/kg body weight. When two consecutive MnHPTA injections were performed, the second injection induced a lower R1 increase than the corresponding first injection.

    Conclusion: MnHPTA at a dose of 25 mu mol/kg body weight (b.w.) has the potential to detect perfusion differences in myocardium. When two consecutive injections of MnHPTA were administered, the RI change after the second injection was affected by the earlier administration. Therefore, a protocol including more than one administration is not ideal for this contrast agent.

  • 18.
    Fahlström, Markus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Mani, Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Nyman, Rickard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Åberg, Karin
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Morell, Arvid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Aortastentgraft ingen kontra­indikation för undersökning med MR: Men undersökningskvaliteten kan påverkas, visar litteraturstudie2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, no 27-28, p. 1184-1187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Endovascular implantation of stent grafts is currently considered the preferred treatment for many aortic pathologies. In Sweden, approximately 900 patients are treated with an aortic stent graft. Stent grafts consists of a metal stent which is manufactured in stainless steel or nitinol covered by a prosthetic graft material. The possibility to perform successful magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a patient depends on the metal composition of and the localisation of the stent graft. This article presents the most common types of stent grafts and how they affect patients’ possibility to undergo an MRI examination successfully.

  • 19.
    Flachskampf, Frank A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Biering-Sorensen, Tor
    Solomon, Scott D.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Smiseth, Otto A.
    Heart Rate Is an Important Consideration for Cardiac Imaging of Diastolic Function Reply2016In: JACC Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 1936-878X, E-ISSN 1876-7591, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 758-759Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Flachskampf, Frank A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Biering-Sörensen, Tor
    Harvard Univ, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Sch Med, Cardiovasc Div, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Solomon, Scott D.
    Harvard Univ, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Sch Med, Cardiovasc Div, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Smiseth, Otto A,
    Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Oslo Univ Hosp,Dept Cardiol, Ctr Cardiol Innovat,KG Jebsen Cardiac Res Ctr,Ctr, N-0027 Oslo, Norway; Univ Oslo, Rikshosp, Oslo Univ Hosp,Inst Surg Res, Ctr Cardiol Innovat,KG Jebsen Cardiac Res Ctr,Ctr, N-0027 Oslo, Norway.
    Cardiac Imaging to Evaluate Left Ventricular Diastolic Function2015In: JACC Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 1936-878X, E-ISSN 1876-7591, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 1071-1093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in clinical practice is generally diagnosed by imaging. Recognition of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction has increased interest in the detection and evaluation of this condition and prompted an improved understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of different imaging modalities for evaluating diastolic dysfunction. This review briefly provides the pathophysiological background for current clinical and experimental imaging parameters of diastolic dysfunction, discusses the merits of echocardiography relative to other imaging modalities in diagnosing and grading diastolic dysfunction, summarizes Lessons from clinical trials that used parameters of diastolic function as an inclusion criterion or endpoint, and indicates current areas of research.

  • 21. Hammar, P.
    et al.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Nordenskjold, A. M.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johansson, Lars O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Unrecognized myocardial infarction assessed by CMR is associated with hemodynamically significant stenosis at coronary angiography in patients with stable angina pectoris2013In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 34, no S1, p. 818-818Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hammar, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Nordenskjöld, Anna M
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Unrecognized myocardial infarctions assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance are associated with the severity of the stenosis in the supplying coronary artery2015In: Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, ISSN 1097-6647, E-ISSN 1532-429X, Vol. 17, article id 98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A previous study has shown an increased prevalence of late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (LGE CMR) detected unrecognized myocardial infarction (UMI) with increasing extent and severity of coronary artery disease. However, the coronary artery disease was evaluated on a patient level assuming normal coronary anatomy. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of UMI identified by LGE CMR imaging in patients with stable angina pectoris and no known previous myocardial infarction; and to investigate whether presence of UMI is associated with stenotic lesions in the coronary artery supplying the segment of the myocardium in which the UMI is located, using coronary angiography to determine the individual coronary anatomy in each patient.

    METHODS: In this prospective multicenter study, we included patients with stable angina pectoris and without prior myocardial infarction, scheduled for coronary angiography. A LGE CMR examination was performed prior to the coronary angiography. The study cohort consisted of 235 patients (80 women, 155 men) with a mean age of 64.8 years.

    RESULTS: UMIs were found in 25 % of patients. There was a strong association between stenotic lesions (≥70 % stenosis) in a coronary artery and the presence of an UMI in the myocardial segments supplied by the stenotic artery; it was significantly more likely to have an UMI downstream a stenosis ≥ 70 % as compared to < 70 % (OR 5.1, CI 3.1-8.3, p < 0.0001). 56 % of the UMIs were located in the inferior and infero-lateral myocardial segments, despite predominance for stenotic lesions in the left anterior descending artery.

    CONCLUSION: UMI is common in patients with stable angina and the results indicate that the majority of the UMIs are of ischemic origin due to severe coronary atherosclerosis. In contrast to what is seen in recognized myocardial infarctions, UMIs are predominately located in the inferior and infero-lateral myocardial segments.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: The PUMI study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT01257282 ).

  • 23.
    Harms, Hendrik Johannes
    et al.
    Department of Nuclear Medicine & PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital.
    Tolbod, Lars Poulsen
    Department of Nuclear Medicine & PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital.
    Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Kero, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Örndahl, Lovisa Holm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Kim, Won Yong
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bouchelouche, Kirsten
    Department of Nuclear Medicine & PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital.
    Wiggers, Henrik
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Frøkiær, Jørgen
    Department of Nuclear Medicine & PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Department of Nuclear Medicine & PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital.
    Automatic extraction of forward stroke volume using dynamic PET/CT: a dual-tracer and dual-scanner validation in patients with heart valve disease.2015In: EJNMMI physics, ISSN 2197-7364, Vol. 2, no 1, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to develop and validate an automated method for extracting forward stroke volume (FSV) using indicator dilution theory directly from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies for two different tracers and scanners.

    METHODS: 35 subjects underwent a dynamic (11)C-acetate PET scan on a Siemens Biograph TruePoint-64 PET/CT (scanner I). In addition, 10 subjects underwent both dynamic (15)O-water PET and (11)C-acetate PET scans on a GE Discovery-ST PET/CT (scanner II). The left ventricular (LV)-aortic time-activity curve (TAC) was extracted automatically from PET data using cluster analysis. The first-pass peak was isolated by automatic extrapolation of the downslope of the TAC. FSV was calculated as the injected dose divided by the product of heart rate and the area under the curve of the first-pass peak. Gold standard FSV was measured using phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR).

    RESULTS: FSVPET correlated highly with FSVCMR (r = 0.87, slope = 0.90 for scanner I, r = 0.87, slope = 1.65, and r = 0.85, slope = 1.69 for scanner II for (15)O-water and (11)C-acetate, respectively) although a systematic bias was observed for both scanners (p < 0.001 for all). FSV based on (11)C-acetate and (15)O-water correlated highly (r = 0.99, slope = 1.03) with no significant difference between FSV estimates (p = 0.14).

    CONCLUSIONS: FSV can be obtained automatically using dynamic PET/CT and cluster analysis. Results are almost identical for (11)C-acetate and (15)O-water. A scanner-dependent bias was observed, and a scanner calibration factor is required for multi-scanner studies. Generalization of the method to other tracers and scanners requires further validation.

  • 24. Hedström, Erik
    et al.
    Arheden, Håkan
    Eriksson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Importance of perfusion in myocardial viability studies using delayed contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging2006In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 77-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether an extracellular gadolinium-(Gd)-based contrast agent (CA) enters nonperfused myocardium during acute coronary occlusion, and whether nonperfused myocardium presents as hyperintense in delayed contrast-enhanced (DE) MR images in the absence of CA in that region. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was occluded for 200 minutes in six pigs. The longitudinal relaxation rate (R(1)) in blood, perfused myocardium, and nonperfused myocardium was repeatedly measured using a Look-Locker sequence before and during the first hour after administration of Gd-DTPA-BMA. RESULTS: While blood and perfused myocardium showed a major increase in R(1) after CA administration, nonperfused myocardium did not. R(1) in nonperfused myocardium was significantly lower than in blood and perfused myocardium during the first hour after CA administration. When the signal from perfused myocardium was nulled, demarcation of the hyperintense nonperfused myocardium was achieved in all of the study animals. CONCLUSION: Gd-DTPA-BMA does not enter ischemic myocardium within one hour after administration during acute coronary occlusion. The ischemic region with complete absence of CA still appears bright when the signal from perfused myocardium is nulled using inversion-recovery DE-MRI. This finding is important for understanding the basic pathophysiology of inversion-recovery viability imaging, as well as for imaging of acute coronary syndromes.

  • 25.
    Hellgren, Laila
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Landelius, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Kvidal, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Severe mitral regurgitation: relations between magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography and natriuretic peptides2008In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Assessment of the severity of mitral regurgitation by echocardiography can be technically demanding in certain patients and supplementary methods are therefore desirable. This study addressed the agreement between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography, and their relations to natriuretic peptides (NT-proANP and NT-proBNP), in quantifying severe mitral regurgitation.

    METHODS:

    Eighteen patients with severe mitral regurgitation scheduled for surgery underwent MRI, echocardiography and assay of natriuretic peptides preoperatively for clinical assessment.

    RESULTS:

    MRI and echocardiography were comparable in measuring severity of regurgitation qualitatively but not quantitatively, mitral regurgitant fraction (mean difference 27.5 (11) ml). There was a correlation between increasing regurgitant fraction on MRI and increased levels of plasma NT-proANP and NT-proBNP. In echocardiography, increasing vena contracta width and increasing PISA correlated to increased levels of plasma NT-proANP and NT-proBNP. No other correlation was found between measures on MRI and echocardiography and natriuretic peptides.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    MRI and echocardiography were comparable grading the severity of mitral regurgitation with qualitative measures but not with quantitative measures. MRI might be a complement to echocardiography when a more distinct measure of the regurgitant volume is needed, as in paravalvular leakage.

  • 26.
    Hemmingsson, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ericsson, A
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Contrast agents in acute myocardial infarction2001In: Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine, ISSN 0968-5243, E-ISSN 1352-8661, Vol. 12, no 2-3, p. 96-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experimental design in examination of acute myocardial infarctions should be valid in terms of flow, perfusion and re-flow after intervention. The contrast agents concentration in experimental studies can be measured by microdialysis. We have assessed the usefulness of different extracellular and blood pool contrast agents for visualization of the area at risk in coronary artery occlusions. The double contrast technique, where Dy-DTPA-BMA was combined with Gd-DTPA-BMA yielded a superior infarct visualization. Blood pool agents for example NC100/150 injection is also promising in first path myocardial perfusion imaging.

  • 27.
    Johansson, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjornerud, Atle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Tarlo, Kirk S
    Lorenz, Christine H
    Utility of NC100150 injection in cardiac MRI2002In: Academic Radiology, ISSN 1076-6332, E-ISSN 1878-4046, Vol. 9, no Suppl 1, p. S79-S81Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Linder, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Korsavidou-Hult, Nafsika
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Hedberg, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    18F-FDG-PET/MRI in preoperative staging of esophageal- and gastroesophageal junctional cancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 29. Nordenskjold, A. M.
    et al.
    Hammar, P.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Eggers, Kai M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Frobert, P.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Cardiac troponin I, NT-proBNP and galactin-3 are elevated in patients with unrecognized myocardial infarction detected by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging2014In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 35, p. 1002-1003Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Nordenskjold, Anna M.
    et al.
    Univ Orebro, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, S-70185 Orebro, Sweden..
    Hammar, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Vasteras Hosp, Dept Radiol, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Eggers, Kai M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Frobert, Ole
    Univ Orebro, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, S-70185 Orebro, Sweden..
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Unrecognized myocardial infarctions detected by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are associated with cardiac troponin I levels2016In: Clinica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0009-8981, E-ISSN 1873-3492, Vol. 455, p. 189-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Both unrecognized myocardial infarction (UMI) and elevated levels of biomarkers are common in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). The objective of this study was to determine the association between levels of cardiac biomarkers, UMI and extent of CAD in patients with stable CAD.

    Methods: A total of 235 patients (median age: 65 years; 34% women) with stable CAD without previously known myocardial infarction were examined with late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and coronary angiography. Blood samples were drawn at enrolment and high sensitivity cardiac troponin I (cTnI), NT-proBNP and Galectin-3 were analyzed.

    Results: UMI was detected in 58 patients (25%). The median levels of cTnI, NT-proBNP and Galectin-3 were significantly higher in patients with UMI compared to those without, (p < 0.001, p = 0.006 and p = 0.033, respectively). After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, left ventricular ejection fraction and renal function, cTnI remained independently associated with the presence of UMI (p = 0.031) and the extent of CAD (p = 0.047). Neither NT-proBNP, nor Galectin-3, was independently associated with UMI or extent of CAD.

    Conclusions: The independent association between levels of cTnI and UMI indicates a common pathophysiological pathway for the cTnI elevation and development of UMI.

  • 31.
    Nordenskjöld, Anna M.
    et al.
    Univ Orebro, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden.;Univ Orebro, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, Sodra Grev Rosengatan, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Hammar, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Vastmanland Hosp Vasteras, Dept Radiol, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Eggers, Kai M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Frobert, Ole
    Univ Orebro, Fac Hlth, Dept Cardiol, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Hadziosmanovic, Nermin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Unrecognized Myocardial Infarction Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging - Prognostic Implications2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2, article id e0148803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Clinically unrecognized myocardial infarctions (UMI) are not uncommon and may be associated with adverse outcome. The aims of this study were to determine the prognostic implication of UMI in patients with stable suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) and to investigate the associations of UMI with the presence of CAD. Methods and Findings In total 235 patients late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) imaging and coronary angiography were performed. For each patient with UMI, the stenosis grade of the coronary branch supplying the infarcted area was determined. UMIs were present in 25% of the patients and 67% of the UMIs were located in an area supplied by a coronary artery with a stenosis grade >= 70%. In an age-and gender-adjusted model, UMI independently predicted the primary endpoint (composite of death, myocardial infarction, resuscitated cardiac arrest, hospitalization for unstable angina pectoris or heart failure within 2 years of follow-up) with an odds ratio of 2.9; 95% confidence interval 1.1-7.9. However, this association was abrogated after adjustment for age and presence of significant coronary disease. There was no difference in the primary endpoint rates between UMI patients with or without a significant stenosis in the corresponding coronary artery. Conclusions The presence of UMI was associated with a threefold increased risk of adverse events during follow up. However, the difference was no longer statistically significant after adjustments for age and severity of CAD. Thus, the results do not support that patients with suspicion of CAD should be routinely investigated by LGE-CMR for UMI. However, coronary angiography should be considered in patients with UMI detected by LGE-CMR.

  • 32.
    Steuer, Johnny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Jideus, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ståhle, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Visualisation and quantification of peri-operative myocardial infarction after coronary artery bypass surgery with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.2004In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 25, no 15, p. 1293-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Themudo, Raquel Espregueira
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Signal Intensity of Myocardial Scars at Delayed-enhanced MRI2009In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 652-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Traditionally, unrecognized myocardial infarction (UMI) is defined as the appearance, in a non-acute setting, of a new diagnostic Q wave. In the recent past, delayed-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) has provided a new imaging method for evaluating myocardial viability and to detect myocardial scars. Purpose: To investigate differences in tissue characteristics between UMI and recognized myocardial infarction (RMI) scars, by assessing the signal intensity (SI) detected by DE-MRI. Material and Methods: A randomized subgroup of 259 subjects from the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature of Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study was submitted to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). DE-MRI-detected myocardial scars were divided in two groups, UMI and RMI, according to the hospital medical records. The scars detected by DE-MRI were analyzed by measuring SI ratio of scar tissue to normal myocardium. Results: The mean SI ratio in the UMI group (4.5+/-3.0, mean+/-SD) was lower than in the RMI group 8.9+/-5.1 (P-value = 0.001). This difference was still significant (P <0.0001) after adjustment for gender, body mass index, time of image acquisition after gadolinium administration, scar transmurality, or total myocardial infarction mass. Conclusion: The difference in the SI ratio of the scars between the two groups most likely reflects a different contrast distribution volume of the tissues, which might indicate that UMI and RMI tissues diverge in tissue composition.

  • 34.
    Themudo, Raquel Espregueira
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Eggers, Kai M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Unrecognized myocardial scars detected by delayed-enhanced MRI are associated with increased levels of NT-proBNP2011In: Coronary Artery Disease, ISSN 0954-6928, E-ISSN 1473-5830, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 158-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with unrecognized myocardial infarction (UMI) scars detected by delayed-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) have a decreased left ventricular ejection fraction and an increased left ventricular mass. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a marker of heart failure, and troponin I (TnI) is a marker of myocardial injury. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether NT-proBNP plasma levels (in addition to ejection fraction) differed in patients with UMI scars compared with normal participants. The second aim was to compare whether the TnI levels differed in those two groups. METHODS: Data from the Prospective Investigation of Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors study were used. The participants who had undergone cardiac MRI were included in this study (n=248). Patients were divided into three groups depending on the existence of a myocardial infarction (MI) scar in DE-MRI and their earlier history of MI. In all the patients, a peripheral blood sample was collected and the plasma levels of NT-proBNP and TnI were determined. RESULTS: Patients with UMI had higher plasma levels of NT-proBNP (median 140.2 ng/l; 25th-75th percentiles: 79-225.5) than no-MI participants (median 94.9 ng/l; 25th-75th percentiles: 59.2-144.2; P=0.01) and lower levels than patients with recognized MI (median 310.4 ng/l; 25th-75th percentiles: 122.6-446.5; P=0.02). Plasma TnI values did not differ among the three groups. CONCLUSION: Patients with UMI scars detected by DE-MRI have increased plasma levels of NT-proBNP that is known to correlate with an increased risk of future cardiovascular adverse events.

  • 35.
    Themudo, Raquel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    The number of unrecognized myocardial infarction scars detected at DE-MRI increase during a 5-year follow-up2017In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 715-722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    In an elderly population, the prevalence of unrecognized myocardial infarction (UMI) scars found via late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging was more frequent than expected. This study investigated whether UMI scars detected with LGE-CMR at age 70 would be detectable at age 75 and whether the scar size changed over time.

    Methods

    From 248 participants that underwent LGE-CMR at age 70, 185 subjects underwent a follow-up scan at age 75. A myocardial infarction (MI) scar was defined as late enhancement involving the subendocardium.

    Results

    In the 185 subjects that underwent follow-up, 42 subjects had a UMI scar at age 70 and 61 subjects had a UMI scar at age 75. Thirty-seven (88 %) of the 42 UMI scars seen at age 70 were seen in the same myocardial segment at age 75. The size of UMI scars did not differ between age 70 and 75.

    Conclusions

    The prevalence of UMI scars detected at LGE-CMR increases with age. During a 5-year follow-up, 88 % (37/42) of the UMI scars were visible in the same myocardial segment, reassuring that UMI scars are a consistent finding. The size of UMI scars detected during LGE-CMR did not change over time.

  • 36.
    Torkzad, Michael R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bergman, Antonina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    The Clinical Perspective on Value of 3D, Thin Slice T2-Weighted Images in 3T Pelvic MRI for Tumors2012In: Current Medical Imaging Reviews, ISSN 1573-4056, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 76-81(6)Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pelvic imaging is undergoing rapid changes due to increased use of 3-Tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI). One of the advantages of 3T could be the possibility for thin section 3-dimensional (3D) imaging which could improve accuracy and at the same time reduce the need for multi-planar imaging needed for conventional T2 imaging (TSE). In the following text we review the advantages of 3D thin section imaging for assessment of pelvic tumors.

  • 37.
    Urdzik, Jozef
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wanders, Alkwin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Duraj, Frans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Haglund, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Norén, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Magnetic resonance imaging flowmetry demonstrates portal vein dilatation subsequent to oxaliplatin therapy in patients with colorectal liver metastasis2013In: HPB, ISSN 1365-182X, E-ISSN 1477-2574, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 265-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: 

    Sinusoidal injury (SI) after oxaliplatin-based therapies for colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) can increase postoperative morbidity. Preoperative methods to estimate SI are lacking. The aim of this study was to identify SI by evaluating portal vein haemodynamics.

    Methods: 

    Magnetic resonance imaging flowmetry (MRIF) was used to estimate portal vein haemodynamics in 29 patients with CRLM before liver surgery. Sinusoidal injury was evaluated from resected non-tumorous liver parenchyma according to the combined vascular injury (CVI) score of ≥3.

    Results: 

    All patients with SI (six of 29) received oxaliplatin; however, a significant association could not be proven (P= 0.148). Oxaliplatin-treated patients showed portal vein dilatation in both the SI and non-SI groups compared with patients who had not received oxaliplatin (Bonferroni corrected P= 0.003 and P= 0.039, respectively). Mean portal velocity tended to be lower in patients with SI compared with oxaliplatin-treated patients without SI (Bonferroni corrected P= 0.087). A mean portal velocity of ≤14.35 cm/s together with a cross-section area of ≥1.55 cm2 was found to predict SI with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 78%.

    Conclusions: 

    Oxaliplatin treatment was associated with portal vein dilatation. Patients with SI showed a tendency towards decreased mean portal flow velocity. This may indicate that SI is associated with an increased resistance to blood flow in the liver parenchyma. Portal vein haemodynamic variables estimated by MRIF can identify patients without SI non-invasively.

  • 38.
    Urdzik, Jozef
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wanders, Alkwin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Weis, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Duraj, Frans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Haglund, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Norén, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    The value of pre-operative magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the assessment of steatohepatitis in patients with colorectal liver metastasis2012In: Journal of Hepatology, ISSN 0168-8278, E-ISSN 1600-0641, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 640-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & Aims

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to liver surgery for colorectal metastases can cause marked steatosis (⩾33%) and steatohepatitis defined by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (NAS) as adverse effects on liver parenchyma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the steatosis level prior to liver resection using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) and to compare it with digital quantification of steatosis (DQS) and “classical” histopathology.

    Methods

    1H MRS at 3T evaluated steatosis in 35 patients with colorectal liver metastasis, planned for liver resection. Non-tumorous liver parenchyma samples were obtained after surgery for classical histopathology and DQS utilising automated software for quantification of histopathological slides using image processing.

    Results

    Classical histopathology defined marked steatosis in nine patients. Histopathology was less reliable than DQS (interclass correlation coefficient – ICC 0.771) or 1H MRS (ICC 0.722) in steatosis estimation. 1H MRS showed very similar steatosis levels and high reliability compared to DQS (ICC 0.955). Steatohepatitis was observed in seven patients (NAS ⩾4) and 1H MRS was able to predict it with 100% sensitivity and 89% specificity at threshold 10.9%, without knowing lobular inflammation or hepatocyte ballooning. BMI was significantly higher in the groups with marked steatosis and steatohepatitis. Standard blood tests or chemotherapy had no predictive value.

    Conclusions

    1H MRS is a reliable non-invasive tool for steatosis assessment, and interestingly, it was able to predict steatohepatitis defined by NAS ⩾4 in patients planned for liver resection of colorectal metastases after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  • 39.
    Zemgulis, Vitas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Ronquist, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Henze, Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Waldenström, Anders
    Thelin, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Energy-related metabolites during and after induced myocardial infarction with special emphasis on the reperfusion injury after extracorporeal circulation2001In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 171, no 2, p. 129-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the clinical setting great efforts have been made with contradictory results to operate upon acutely myocardial ischaemic patients. The reasons for the absence of clear-cut results are not well understood nor are they scientifically explored. To resolve this problem further, we attempted to design an experimental in vivo model to mimic acute myocardial ischaemia followed by extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and reperfusion. One of the main targets of our protocol was monitoring of myocardial energy metabolism by microdialysis (MCD) during the periods of coronary occlusion (60 min), hypothermic (30 degrees C) ECC and cardioplegia (45 min), followed by reperfusion with (30 min) and without (60 min) ECC. In eight anaesthetized, open-chest pigs, myocardial lactate, pyruvate, adenosine, taurine, inosine, hypoxanthine and guanosine were sampled with MCD in both ischaemic and non-ischaemic areas. Myocardial area at risk and infarct size were quantified with the modified topographical evaluation methods. The principal finding with this experimental setup was a biphasic release pattern of lactate, adenosine, taurine, inosine, hypoxanthine and guanosine from ischaemic myocardium. Lactate levels were equally high in reperfused ischaemic and non-ischaemic myocardial tissue. Pyruvate demonstrated consistently higher values in non-ischaemic myocardium throughout the experiment. A pattern was discernible, lactate being a marker of compromised cell energy metabolism, and taurine being a marker of disturbed cell integrity. Of special interest was the increased level of pyruvate in microdialysates of non-ischaemic myocardium as compared with its ischaemic counterpart. In conclusion, we found disturbances in energy metabolism and cell integrity not only in ischaemic but also in non-ischaemic tissue during reperfusion implying that non-ischaemic myocardium demonstrated an unexpected accumulation of lactate and pyruvate. These new findings could at least partly be explicatory to the increased risk of heart surgery in connection with acute myocardial infarction.

  • 40.
    Zemgulis, Vitas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Henze, Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Lahtinen, M.
    Waldenström, Anders
    Thelin, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Ronquist, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Discrepant outcome between myocardial energy-related metabolites and infarct size limitation during retroperfusion of the coronary sinus2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, ISSN 0036-5513, E-ISSN 1502-7686, Vol. 61, no 8, p. 651-662Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The basic idea of retroperfusion of the coronary sinus (RCS) is to ameliorate detrimental consequences of myocardial ischaemia. Several experimental models of RCS have been introduced, most with an emphasis on functional myocardial status. Since only few studies have been devoted to energy metabolic considerations and none to continuous monitoring of energy-related metabolites of myocardium during RCS, we here present such a study using microdialysis. This study comprised the following components: Coronary occlusion and drainage on the beating heart with RCS-assist (60 min), hypothermic (30 degrees C) extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and cardioplegia (45 min), reperfusion and rewarming to 38 degrees C on ECC (30 min). The microdialysis analytical outcome mainly reflected anaerobic energy metabolism in potentially ischaemic myocardium. Additionally, a pronounced increase of microdialysate content of lactate, pyruvate and guanosine was observed in non-ischaemic myocardium especially during the reperfusion phase. The planimetric calculation revealed an infarct size reduction from 69% to 19% and was not correlated to clear-cut improvements of potentially ischaemic myocardial energy metabolism. We conclude that prolonged (60 min) anaerobic energy metabolism does not pose an immediate threat to cell viability but could even sustain myocyte survival.

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