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  • 1.
    Alassaad, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Bertilsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    The effects of pharmacist intervention on emergency department visits in patients 80 years and older: subgroup analyses by number of prescribed drugs and appropriate prescribing2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 11, p. e111797-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical pharmacist interventions have been shown to have positive effect on occurrence of drug-related issues as well as on clinical outcomes. However, evidence about which patients benefiting most from the interventions is limited. We aimed to explore whether pharmacist intervention is equally effective in preventing emergency department (ED) visits in patients with few or many prescribed drugs and in those with different levels of inappropriate prescribing. Methods: Patient and outcome data from a randomized controlled trial exploring the clinical effects of a ward-based pharmacist intervention in patients, 80 years and older, were used. The patients were divided into subgroups according to the number of prescribed drugs (< 5 or >= 5 drugs) and the level of inappropriate prescribing [using the Screening Tool Of Older People's potentially inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP) and the Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) with a score of >= 2 (STOPP) and >= 1 (START) as cutoff points]. The effect of the intervention on the number of times the different subgroups visited the ED was analyzed. Results: The pharmacist intervention was more effective with respect to the number of subsequent ED visits in patients taking < 5 drugs on admission than in those taking >= 5 drugs. The rate ratio (RR) for a subsequent ED visit was 0.22 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.09-0.52] for,5 drugs and 0.70 (95% CI 0.47-1.04) for >= 5 drugs (p = 0.02 for the interaction). The effect of intervention did not differ between patients with high or low STOPP or START scores. Conclusion: In this exploratory study, the pharmacist intervention appeared to be more effective in preventing visits to the ED for patients who were taking fewer drugs before the intervention. Our analysis of STOPP and START scores indicated that the level of inappropriate prescribing on admission had no effect on the outcomes of intervention with respect to ED visits.

  • 2.
    Alassaad, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Division of Pharmacokinetics and Drug Therapy.
    Bertilsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Division of Pharmacokinetics and Drug Therapy.
    Prescription and transcription errors in multidose-dispensed medications on discharge from hospital: an observationaland interventional study2013In: Journal of Evaluation In Clinical Practice, ISSN 1356-1294, E-ISSN 1365-2753, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 185-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background 

    Medication errors frequently occur when patients are transferred between health care settings. The main objective of this study was to investigate the frequency, type and severity of prescribing and transcribing errors for drugs dispensed in multidose plastic packs when patients are discharged from the hospital. The secondary objective was to correct identified errors and suggest measures to promote safe prescribing.

    Methods 

    The drugs on the patients' multidose drug dispensing (MDD) order sheets and the medication administration records were reconciled prior to the MDD orders being sent to the pharmacy for dispensing. Discrepancies were recorded and the prescribing physician was notified and given the opportunity to change the order. Discrepancies categorized as unintentional and related to the discharge process were subject to further analysis.

    Results 

    Seventy-two (25%) of the 290 reviewed MDD orders had at least one discharge error. In total, 120 discharge errors were identified, of which 49 (41%) were assessed as being of moderate and three (3%) of major severity. Orders with a higher number of medications and orders from the orthopaedic wards had a significantly higher error rate.

    Conclusion 

    The main purpose of the MDD system is to increase patient safety by reducing medication errors. However, this study shows that prescribing and transcribing errors frequently occur when patients are hospitalized. Because the population enrolled in the MDD system is an elderly, physically vulnerable group with a high number of prescribed drugs, preventive measures to ensure safe prescribing of MDD drugs are warranted.

  • 3.
    Alassaad, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Bertilsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    A tool for prediction of risk of rehospitalisation and mortality in the hospitalised elderly: secondary analysis of clinical trial data2015In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 2, article id e007259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To construct and internally validate a risk score, the '80+ score', for revisits to hospital and mortality for older patients, incorporating aspects of pharmacotherapy. Our secondary aim was to compare the discriminatory ability of the score with that of three validated tools for measuring inappropriate prescribing: Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions (STOPP), Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) and Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI). Setting: Two acute internal medicine wards at Uppsala University hospital. Patient data were used from a randomised controlled trial investigating the effects of a comprehensive clinical pharmacist intervention. Participants: Data from 368 patients, aged 80 years and older, admitted to one of the study wards. Primary outcome measure: Time to rehospitalisation or death during the year after discharge from hospital. Candidate variables were selected among a large number of clinical and drug-specific variables. After a selection process, a score for risk estimation was constructed. The 80+ score was internally validated, and the discriminatory ability of the score and of STOPP, START and MAI was assessed using C-statistics. Results: Seven variables were selected. Impaired renal function, pulmonary disease, malignant disease, living in a nursing home, being prescribed an opioid or being prescribed a drug for peptic ulcer or gastroesophageal reflux disease were associated with an increased risk, while being prescribed an antidepressant drug (tricyclic antidepressants not included) was linked to a lower risk of the outcome. These variables made up the components of the 80+ score. The C-statistics were 0.71 (80+), 0.57 (STOPP), 0.54 (START) and 0.63 (MAI). Conclusions: We developed and internally validated a score for prediction of risk of rehospitalisation and mortality in hospitalised older people. The score discriminated risk better than available tools for inappropriate prescribing. Pending external validation, this score can aid in clinical identification of high-risk patients and targeting of interventions.

  • 4.
    Basu, Samar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Olofsson, Helena
    Johansson, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Association between oxidative stress and bone mineral density2001In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 288, no 1, p. 275-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Free radicals have been shown to be involved in bone resorption in vitro and in rodents. We studied the effect of oxidative stress on bone mineral density (BMD) in 48 women and 53 men from a population-based study. The levels of 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) (a major F(2)-isoprostane and a biomarker of oxidative stress) and a control, 15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2alpha) (a biomarker of inflammatory response), were measured in urinary samples and their association with BMD and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements were examined. In multivariate linear regression analyses, 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) levels were negatively associated with both BMD and QUS. In contrast, no association was found for 15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2alpha). Our findings establish a biochemical link between increased oxidative stress and reduced bone density and provide a rational for further studies investigating the role of pro- and antioxidants in osteoporosis. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  • 5.
    Berglund, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Berne, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Svärdsudd, Kurt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Seasonal variations of insulin sensitivity from a euglycemic insulin clamp in elderly men2012In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 35-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Seasonal variations in hemoglobin-A1c have been reported in diabetic patients, but the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated.

    Aims

    To study if insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and fasting plasma glucose showed seasonal variations in a Swedish population-based cohort of elderly men.

    Methods

    Altogether 1117 men were investigated with a euglycemic insulin clamp and measurements of fasting plasma glucose and insulin secretion after an oral glucose tolerance test. Values were analyzed in linear regression models with an indicator variable for winter/summer season and outdoor temperature as predictors.

    Results

     During winter, insulin sensitivity (M/I, unit = 100 × mg × min-1 × kg-1/(mU × L-1)) was 11.0% lower (4.84 versus 5.44, P = 0.0003), incremental area under the insulin curve was 16.4% higher (1167 versus 1003 mU/L, P = 0.007). Fasting plasma glucose was, however, not statistically significantly different (5.80 versus 5.71 mmol/L, P = 0.28) compared to the summer season. There was an association between outdoor temperature and M/I (0.57 units increase (95% CI 0.29–0.82, P < 0.0001) per 10°C increase of outdoor temperature) independent of winter/summer season. Adjustment for life-style factors, type 2 diabetes, and medication did not alter these results.Read More:http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/03009734.2011.628422

    Conclusions

    Insulin sensitivity showed seasonal variations with lower values during the winter and higher during the summer season. Inverse compensatory variations of insulin secretion resulted in only minor variations of fasting plasma glucose. Insulin sensitivity was associated with outdoor temperature. These phenomena should be further investigated in diabetic patients.

  • 6.
    Bergström, Monica Frick
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Extent and consequences of misclassified injury diagnoses in a national hospital discharge registry2011In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 108-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Classification of injuries and estimation of injury severity on the basis of ICD-10 injury coding are powerful epidemiological tools. Little is known about the characteristics and consequences of primary coding errors and their consequences for such applications. Materials and methods From the Swedish national hospital discharge register, 15 899 incident injury cases primarily admitted to the two hospitals in Uppsala County between 2000 and 2004 were identified. Of these, 967 randomly selected patient records were reviewed. Errors in injury diagnosis were corrected, and the consequences of these changes were analysed. Results Out of 1370 injury codes, 10% were corrected, but 95% of the injury codes were correct to the third position. In 21% (95% CI 19% to 24%) of 967 hospital admissions, at least one ICD-10 code for injury was changed or added, but only 13% (127) had some change made to their injury mortality diagnosis matrix classification. Among the cases with coding errors, the mean ICD-based injury severity score changed slightly (difference 0.016; 95% CI 0.007 to 0.032). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.892 for predicting hospital mortality and remained essentially unchanged after the correction of codes (95% CI for difference -0.022 to 0.013). Conclusion Errors in ICD-10-coded injuries in hospital discharge data were common, but the consequences for injury categorisation were moderate and the consequences for injury severity estimates were in most cases minor. The error rate for detailed levels of cause-of-injury codes was high and may be detrimental for identifying specific targets for prevention.

  • 7.
    Brändström, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Gerdhem, P.
    Stiger, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Obrant, K. J.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Åkesson, K.
    Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human gene for osteoprotegerin are not related to bone mineral density or fracture in elderly women2004In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 18-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a secreted member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, is a potent inhibitor of osteoclast activation and differentiation. In animal models OPG prevents bone loss, and in humans bone resorption can be reduced by injections of OPG. OPG may also play a role in cardiovascular disease since mice lacking the OPG gene display arterial calcification. In a screening effort of the OPG gene, we recently discovered a single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of OPG (T950C), and reported an association with vascular morphology and function in 59 healthy individuals. Due to the pronounced effect of OPG on bone turnover, the present study was conducted to investigate whether OPG polymorphisms are also associated with bone mineral density or with fracture. The relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region of OPG (T950C) and the first intron (C1217T), and bone mineral density, measured by DXA in the hip or spine or ultrasound of the heel, was investigated in the Malmö OPRA-study of 1044 women, all 75 years old. The possible relation to fracture incidence was also analyzed. Among the 858 and 864 individuals respectively, genotyped, no significant associations between the investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms and bone mineral density measurements (T950C P = 0.50-0.64, C1217T P = 0.51-1.00), quantitative ultrasound measurements of the calcaneus, or fractures (T950C P = 0.61-0.66, C1217T P = 0.14-0.33) were found. Thus, our results show that polymorphisms in the OPG gene, one of which has previously been found to be associated with cardiovascular morphology and function, are not associated with bone mineral density in elderly Swedish women.

  • 8.
    Brändström, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Stiger, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kahan, Thomas
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Nyström, F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Öhman, K. P.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Malmqvist, K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    A single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of the osteoprotegerin gene is related to intima-media thickness of the carotid artery in hypertensive patients: The Swedish Irbesartan Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Investigation vs Atenolol (SILVHIA)2004In: Blood Pressure, ISSN 0803-7051, E-ISSN 1651-1999, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 152-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a secreted member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, and in previous studies has been shown to regulate osteoclast activity and differentiation. Ablation of the OPG gene in mice results in calcification of the aorta and renal arteries. We have previously reported an association between a single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of OPG and vascular morphology and function in healthy humans. The objective with this study was to confirm our previous results in a larger population, and in addition, to study subjects with hypertension. The OPG genotype was determined by restriction fragment length and the intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery was measured by ultrasound in 100 patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy, and 75 healthy normotensive control subjects. In the hypertensive group subjects with the CC genotype (n=24) showed a significantly increased IMT compared to those with the TC (n=52, p=0.007) and TT (n=24, p=0.009) genotype, in the hypertensive group only (mean +/- SD for TT=0.88 +/- 0.21 mm, TC=0.90 +/- 0.16 mm, CC=1.05 +/- 0.31 mm). The allele distribution did not differ between hypertensive and control individuals. The present study confirms our previous finding and shows that polymorphism in the promoter region of OPG is associated with vascular morphology in hypertensive subjects.

  • 9.
    Brändström, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Stiger, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kahan, Thomas
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    A single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of the human gene for osteoprotegerin is related to vascular morphology and function2002In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 293, no 1, p. 13-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a secreted member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, and has previously been shown to regulate bone mass by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activation. Recent evidence indicates that OPG also plays a role in the vascular system, since ablation of the OPG gene in mice results in calcification of the aorta and renal arteries, and association has been found between serum levels of OPG and cardiovascular mortality. This study presents a novel single nucleotide polymorphism, a T/C transition located 129 bp upstream the TATA-box of the human OPG gene, detected by sequence analysis. The OPG genotype was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism in a cohort consisting of 59 healthy subjects. The intima-media thickness (IMT) in the common carotid artery and maximal post-ischemic forearm blood flow (FBF) were investigated. Subjects with the CC genotype showed a significantly increased IMT (p<0.05) and a concommitantly reduced maximal FBF (p<0.01) as compared to those with the T allele. Thus, our results show that the polymorphism in the promoter region of OPG is associated with both vascular morphology and function in apparently healthy subjects.

  • 10. Burgaz, A.
    et al.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Rautiainen, S.
    Orsini, N.
    Håkansson, N.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wolk, A.
    Confirmed hypertension and plasma 25(OH)D concentrations amongst elderly men2011In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 269, no 2, p. 211-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives.

    The results of experimental studies suggest that vitamin D deficiency activates the renin-angiotensin system and predisposes to hypertension. Results of previous epidemiological studies investigating the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status and hypertension have not been consistent, perhaps because of their sole reliance on office blood pressure (BP) measurements leading to some misclassification of hypertension status. No previous studies have examined the association between 25(OH)D status and confirmed hypertension assessed with both office and 24-h BP measurements.

    Design.

    In this cross-sectional study, we investigated 833 Caucasian men, aged 71 +/- 0.6 years, to determine the association between plasma 25(OH)D concentrations, measured with high-pressure liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and the prevalence of hypertension. We used both supine office and 24-h BP measurements for classifying participants as normotensive or confirmed hypertensive; participants with inconsistent classifications were excluded.

    Results.

    In a multivariable adjusted logistic regression model, men with 25(OH)D concentrations < 37.5 nmol L-1 had a 3-fold higher prevalence of confirmed hypertension compared to those with >= 37.5 nmol L-1 25(OH)D (odds ratio = 3.3, 95% CI: 1.0-11.0).

    Conclusions.

    Our results show that low plasma 25(OH)D concentration is associated with a higher prevalence of confirmed hypertension.

  • 11.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Cars, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Prediction of fracture risk in men: A cohort study2012In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 797-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    FRAX is a tool that identifies individuals with high fracture risk who will benefit from pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis. However, a majority of fractures among elderly occur in people without osteoporosis and most occur after a fall. Our aim was to accurately identify men with a high future risk of fracture, independent of cause. In the population-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM) and using survival analysis we studied different models' prognostic values (R(2) ) for any fracture and hip fracture within 10 years from age 50 (n = 2322), 60 (n = 1852), 71 (n = 1221), and 82 (n = 526). During the total follow-up period from age 50, 897 fractures occurred in 585 individuals. Of these, 281 were hip fractures occurring in 189 individuals. The rates of any fracture were 5.7/1000 person-years at risk from age 50 and 25.9/1000 person-years at risk from age 82. Corresponding hip fractures rates were 2.9 and 11.7/1000 person-years at risk. The FRAX model included all variables in FRAX except bone mineral density. The full model combining FRAX variables, comorbidity, medications, and behavioral factors explained 25-45% of all fractures and 80-92% of hip fractures, depending on age. The corresponding prognostic values of the FRAX model were 7-17% for all fractures and 41-60% for hip fractures. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) comparing the full model with the FRAX model ranged between 40 and 53% for any fracture and between 40 and 87% for hip fracture. Within the highest quintile of predicted fracture risk with the full model, 1/3 of the men will have a fracture within 10 years after age 71 years and 2/3 after age 82 years. We conclude that the addition of comorbidity, medication and behavioral factors to the clinical components of FRAX can substantially improve the ability to identify men at high risk of fracture, especially hip fracture. 

  • 12.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Olsson, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Karlström, Brita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Reply to WB Grant2017In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 700-701Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Olsson, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Karlström, Brita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Reply to Y Mao and H Yu.2017In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 698-699Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Bäckström, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Taipalensuu, Jan
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Brändström, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Svensson, Ann-Cathrin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Artursson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Genetic variation in the ATP-binding cassette transporter gene ABCG2(BCRP) in a Swedish population2003In: European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, ISSN 0928-0987, E-ISSN 1879-0720, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 359-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2 (also named breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP) functions as a drug efflux transporter and is expressed at high levels in the human small intestine. The aim of this study was to screen the human ABCG2 gene for genetic variation. The regions of the gene most likely to affect function, namely the coding parts, exon/intron boundaries, 5' untranslated region and 3' untranslated region and the proposed promoter region, were included in the screening. DNA was obtained from 60 Swedish individuals. The screening was performed using a polymerase chain reaction-denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography approach followed by sequence analysis. Eight sites of genetic variation were identified. The sequence variations considered to be most likely to affect transcription level or transport function were a CTCA deletion in the 5' flanking region, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a 5' flanking CpG island, two non-synonymous SNPs, changing valine at amino acid position 12 to methionine and glutamine at position 141 to lysine, respectively. Genotyping of these sequence variations revealed linkage between the CTCA deletion and the SNP changing glutamine 141 for lysine. This information forms the basis for future association studies to investigate the genetic basis of differences of drug disposition due to sequence variation in the ABCG2 gene.

  • 15.
    Cederberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Knight, Stefan
    Svenson, Svante
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Itch and skin rash from chocolate during fluoxetine and sertraline treatment: case report2004In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 4, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The skin contains a system for producing serotonin as well as serotonin receptors. Serotonin can also cause pruritus when injected into the skin. SSRI-drugs increase serotonin concentrations and are known to have pruritus and other dermal side effects. CASE PRESENTATION: A 46-year-old man consulted his doctor due to symptoms of depression. He did not suffer from any allergy but drinking red wine caused vasomotor rhinitis. Antidepressive treatment with fluoxetine 20 mg daily was initiated which was successful. After three weeks of treatment an itching rash appeared. An adverse drug reaction (ADR) induced by fluoxetine was suspected and fluoxetine treatment was discontinued. The symptoms disappeared with clemastine and betametasone treatment. Since the depressive symptoms returned sertraline medication was initiated. After approximately two weeks of sertraline treatment he noted an intense itching sensation in his scalp after eating a piece of chocolate cake. The itch spread to the arms, abdomen and legs and the patient treated himself with clemastine and the itch disappeared. He now realised that he had eaten a chocolate cake before this episode and remembered that before the first episode he had had a chocolate mousse dessert. He had never had any reaction from eating chocolate before and therefore reported this observation to his doctor. CONCLUSIONS: This case report suggests that there may be individuals that are very sensitive to increases in serotonin concentrations. Dermal side reactions to SSRI-drugs in these patients may be due to high activity in the serotonergic system at the dermal and epidermo-dermal junctional area rather than a hypersensitivity to the drug molecule itself.

  • 16.
    Englund, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Hallberg, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. klin farm.
    Artursson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Association between the number of coadministered P-glycoprotein inhibitors and serum digoxin levels in patients on therapeutic drug monitoring2004In: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 2, p. 8-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The ABC transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is recognized as a site for drug-drug interactions and provides a mechanistic explanation for clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions with digoxin. The question of whether several P-gp inhibitors may have additive effects has not yet been addressed. METHODS: We evaluated the effects on serum concentrations of digoxin (S-digoxin) in 618 patients undergoing therapeutic drug monitoring. P-gp inhibitors were classified as Class I, with a known effect on digoxin kinetics, or Class II, showing inhibition in vitro but no documented effect on digoxin kinetics in humans. Mean S-digoxin values were compared between groups of patients with different numbers of coadministered P-gp inhibitors by a univariate and a multivariate model, including the potential covariates age, sex, digoxin dose and total number of prescribed drugs. RESULTS: A large proportion (47%) of the digoxin patients undergoing therapeutic drug monitoring had one or more P-gp inhibitor prescribed. In both univariate and multivariate analysis, S-digoxin increased in a stepwise fashion according to the number of coadministered P-gp inhibitors (all P values < 0.01 compared with no P-gp inhibitor). In multivariate analysis, S-digoxin levels were 1.26 +/- 0.04, 1.51 +/- 0.05, 1.59 +/- 0.08 and 2.00 +/- 0.25 nmol/L for zero, one, two and three P-gp inhibitors, respectively. The results were even more pronounced when we analyzed only Class I P-gp inhibitors (1.65 +/- 0.07 for one and 1.83 +/- 0.07 nmol/L for two). CONCLUSIONS: Polypharmacy may lead to multiple drug-drug interactions at the same site, in this case P-gp. The S-digoxin levels increased in a stepwise fashion with an increasing number of coadministered P-gp inhibitors in patients taking P-gp inhibitors and digoxin concomitantly. As coadministration of digoxin and P-gp inhibitors is common, it is important to increase awareness about P-gp interactions among prescribing clinicians.

  • 17.
    Engstrand, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Daluiski, Aaron
    Bahamonde, Matthew E.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lyons, Karen M.
    Transient production of bone morphogenetic protein 2 by allogeneic transplanted transduced cells induces bone formation2000In: Human Gene Therapy, ISSN 1043-0342, E-ISSN 1557-7422, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of transplantation of genetically modified allogeneic cells as a method to induce bone formation. In this study, we infected a murine osteoprogenitor cell line with a retroviral vector containing the human bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2) gene. Transduced cells exhibited more alkaline phosphatase activity than cells treated with any of the tested doses of recombinant human BMP2 protein (rhBMP2). The transduced cells were suspended in a collagen solution and injected into the quadriceps muscle in immunocompetent outbred mice. Radiographic and histological examinations demonstrate abundant ectopic bone formation in 85% of the transplanted animals (n = 13). PCR and Southern blot analysis for the puromycin resistance gene revealed that the transplanted cells were detectable for up to 1 week, but not at later time points. None of the animals developed tumors. Our results suggest that allogeneic BMP2-expressing transduced cells may have therapeutic potential for enhancing new bone formation. This model also provides a simple, inexpensive, and sensitive assay for evaluating in vivo the osteoinductive potentials of secreted proteins without the requirement of protein purification or the use of immunodeficient animals.

  • 18. Fall, Tove
    et al.
    Shiue, Ivy
    af Geijerstam, Per Bergea
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Relations of circulating vitamin D concentrations with left ventricular geometry and function2012In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 14, no 9, p. 985-991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with risk of overt cardiovascular disease (CVD), but associations with subclinical disease are not well characterized. Hence, we examined associations of circulating vitamin D concentrations and left ventricular (LV) geometry and function by echocardiography at baseline and after 5 years in a community-based study. In the PIVUS study, we measured serum 25-dihydroxyvitamin-D (25-OH D) at age 70 and performed echocardiography including LV mass, wall thickness, end-diastolic diameter, end-systolic diameter (LVESD), left atrial diameter, fractional shortening, ejection fraction, isovolumic relaxation time, and E/A ratio at both age 70 and 75. We included 870 participants (52 women) without prior myocardial infarctions, heart failure, or prevalent valvular disease. After adjusting for potential confounders, 25-OH D at baseline was found to be significantly associated with LVESD, fractional shortening, and ejection fraction (, 0.42 mm, P 0.03; , 0.70, P 0.03; and , 0.91 P 0.01, respectively), per 1 SD increase in 25-OH D (SD 20 nmol/L) at baseline. In longitudinal analyses, vitamin D levels at baseline were not significantly associated with change in LV geometry and function after 5 years. In our community-based study among the elderly, we found higher circulating vitamin D concentrations to be associated cross-sectionally with better LV systolic function and smaller LVESD at baseline. The association persisted after adjusting for several potential confounders, including cardiovascular risk factors and calcium, phosphate, and parathyroid hormone levels. Randomized clinical trials are needed to establish firmly or refute a causal relationship between vitamin D levels and changes in LV geometry and function.

  • 19.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Chen, Li-Hui
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Thiblin, Ingemar
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, Maryland; Department of Surgical Sciences—Forensic Medicine.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Warner, Margaret
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Prehospital injury deaths-Strengthening the case for prevention: Nationwide cohort study2012In: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, ISSN 2163-0755, E-ISSN 2163-0763, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 765-772Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To determine the frequency and characteristics of prehospital deaths compared with hospital deaths in different subpopulations with severe injuries.

    METHODS: Population-based cohort study using person-based linkage of the Swedish nationwide hospital discharge register with death certificate data. In all, 28,715 injury deaths were identified among 419,137 cases of severe injury during 1998 to 2004. Prehospital deaths were defined as autopsied out-of-hospital deaths with injury as the underlying cause. Their impact on mortality prediction was assessed using the International Classification of Disease Injury Severity Score with the C statistic as a measure of discrimination.

    RESULTS: The majority of all injury deaths occurred either at the scene or before hospitalization. Among persons younger than 65 years, for each hospital death there were nine prehospital deaths. A high proportion of deaths from drowning, suffocation, and firearm injuries were prehospital (85, 82, and 67% of all cases, respectively). More than 90% of hospital deaths resulted from unintentional injuries, while only 43% of prehospital deaths were unintentional. The largest increase in a cause-specific case fatality risk estimate was seen for poisoning, where inclusion of prehospital deaths increased the risk estimate from 1.6% to 22.8%. Injury mortality prediction based on International Classification of Disease Injury Severity Score improved when prehospital deaths were added to hospital data (C statistic increased from 0.86 to 0.93).

    CONCLUSIONS: Prehospital deaths constitute the majority of trauma deaths and differ in major characteristics from hospital deaths. The high proportion of prehospital deaths among young and middle aged people highlights the potential impact of preventive efforts.

  • 20.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Thiblin, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Population density and mortality among individuals in motor vehicle crashes2010In: Injury Prevention, ISSN 1353-8047, E-ISSN 1475-5785, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 302-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To assess whether higher mortality rates among individuals in motor vehicle crashes in areas with low population density depend on injury type and severity or are related to the performance of emergency medical services (EMS).

    Methods

    Prehospital and hospital deaths were studied in a population-based cohort of 41 243 motor vehicle crashes that occurred in Sweden between 1998 and 2004. The final multivariable analysis was restricted to 6884 individuals in motor vehicle crashes, to minimise the effects of confounding factors.

    Results

    Crude mortality rates following motor vehicle crashes were inversely related to regional population density. In regions with low population density, the unadjusted rate ratio for prehospital death was 2.2 (95% CI 1.9 to 2.5) and for hospital death 1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.9), compared with a high-density population. However, after controlling for regional differences in age, gender and the type/severity of injuries among 6884 individuals in motor vehicle crashes, low population density was no longer associated with increased mortality. At 25 years of age, predicted prehospital mortality was 9% lower (95% CI 5% to 12%) in regions with low population density compared with high population density. This difference decreased with increasing age, but was still 3% lower (95% CI 0.5% to 5%) at 65 years of age.

    Conclusions

    The inverse relationship between population density and mortality among individuals in motor vehicle crashes is related to pre-crash factors that influence the type and severity of injuries and not to differences in EMS.

  • 21. Gerdhem, P.
    et al.
    Brändström, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Stiger, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Obrant, K.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Åkesson, K.
    Association of the collagen type 1 (COL1A 1) Sp1 binding site polymorphism to femoral neck bone mineral density and wrist fracture in 1044 elderly Swedish women2004In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 264-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identification of risk factors for osteoporosis has been essential for understanding the development of osteoporosis and related fragility fractures. A polymorphism of the binding site for the transcription factor Sp1 of the collagen I alpha 1 gene (COLIA1) has shown an association to bone mass and fracture, but the findings have not been consistent, which may be related to population differences. The Sp1 polymorphism was determined in 1044 women, all 75 years old, participating in the population-based Osteoporosis Prospective Risk Assessment study in Malmö (OPRA). Bone mineral density, heel ultrasound and all previous fractures were registered. BMD was 2.7% lower in the femoral neck in women carrying at least one copy of the "s" allele ( P = 0.027). There was no difference in bone mass at any other site, weight, BMI or age at menopause. Women with a prevalent wrist fracture (n = 181) had an increased presence of the "s" allele. The odds ratio for prevalent wrist fracture was 2.73 (95% CI 1.1-6.8) for the ss homozygotes and 1.4 (95% CI 1.0-2.0) for the Ss heterozygotes when compared with the SS homozygotes. In conclusion, in this large and homogeneous cohort of 75-year-old Swedish women, there was an association among the Sp1 COLIA1 polymorphism, bone mass, and fracture. The presence of at least one copy of the "s" allele was associated with lower femoral neck BMD and previous wrist fracture and in addition, it was related to an increased risk for wrist fracture.

  • 22.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Alassaad, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Morlin, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Henrohn, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Bertilsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Effects of Pharmacists' Interventions on Appropriateness of Prescribing and Evaluation of the Instruments' (MAI, STOPP and STARTs') Ability to Predict Hospitalization-Analyses from a Randomized Controlled Trial2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 5, p. e62401-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Appropriateness of prescribing can be assessed by various measures and screening instruments. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of pharmacists' interventions on appropriateness of prescribing in elderly patients, and to explore the relationship between these results and hospital care utilization during a 12-month follow-up period. Methods: The study population from a previous randomized controlled study, in which the effects of a comprehensive pharmacist intervention on re-hospitalization was investigated, was used. The criteria from the instruments MAI, STOPP and START were applied retrospectively to the 368 study patients (intervention group (I) n = 182, control group (C) n = 186). The assessments were done on admission and at discharge to detect differences over time and between the groups. Hospital care consumption was recorded and the association between scores for appropriateness, and hospitalization was analysed. Results: The number of Potentially Inappropriate Medicines (PIMs) per patient as identified by STOPP was reduced for I but not for C (1.42 to 0.93 vs. 1.46 to 1.66 respectively, p<0.01). The number of Potential Prescription Omissions (PPOs) per patient as identified by START was reduced for I but not for C (0.36 to 0.09 vs. 0.42 to 0.45 respectively, p<0.001). The summated score for MAI was reduced for I but not for C (8.5 to 5.0 and 8.7 to 10.0 respectively, p<0.001). There was a positive association between scores for MAI and STOPP and drug-related readmissions (RR 8-9% and 30-34% respectively). No association was detected between the scores of the tools and total re-visits to hospital. Conclusion: The interventions significantly improved the appropriateness of prescribing for patients in the intervention group as evaluated by the instruments MAI, STOPP and START. High scores in MAI and STOPP were associated with a higher number of drug-related readmissions.

  • 23.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Alassaad, Anna
    Hospital Pharmacy, University Hospital of Uppsala, Sweden.
    Henrohn, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Garmo, Hans
    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Toss, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Kettis-Lindblad, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology.
    Mörlin, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    A comprehensive pharmacist intervention to reduce morbidity in patients 80 years or older: a randomized controlled trial2009In: Archives of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0003-9926, E-ISSN 1538-3679, Vol. 169, no 9, p. 894-900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND

    Patients 80 years or older are underrepresented in scientific studies. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of interventions performed by ward-based pharmacists in reducing morbidity and use of hospital care among older patients.

    METHODS

    A randomized controlled study of patients 80 years or older was conducted at the University Hospital of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden. Four hundred patients were recruited consecutively between October 1, 2005, and June 30, 2006, and were randomized to control (n = 201) and intervention (n = 199) groups. The interventions were performed by ward-based pharmacists. The control group received standard care without direct involvement of pharmacists at the ward level. The primary outcome measure was the frequency of hospital visits (emergency department and readmissions [total and drug-related]) during the 12-month follow-up period.

    RESULTS

    Three hundred sixty-eight patients (182 in the intervention group and 186 in the control group) were analyzed. For the intervention group, there was a 16% reduction in all visits to the hospital (quotient, 1.88 vs 2.24; estimate, 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-0.99) and a 47% reduction in visits to the emergency department (quotient, 0.35 vs 0.66; estimate, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.37-0.75). Drug-related readmissions were reduced by 80% (quotient, 0.06 vs 0.32; estimate, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.10-0.41). After inclusion of the intervention costs, the total cost per patient in the intervention group was $230 lower than that in the control group.

    CONCLUSION

    If implemented on a population basis, the addition of pharmacists to health care teams would lead to major reductions in morbidity and health care costs.

  • 24.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Alassaad, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Mörlin, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Henrohn, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Bertilsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Effects of pharmacists’ interventions on appropriateness of prescribing for elderly and exploration of a possible correlation between scores for appropriateness and clinical outcomes: analyses from a randomized controlled trialManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Inappropriate prescribing can cause substantial morbidity and represents a clinical and economic burden for patients and society. Appropriateness of prescribing can be assessed by various measures and screening tools, however, for a tool to be valid there should be casual links to important clinical health outcomes. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a pharmacist intervention on appropriateness of prescribing, and to explore the relationship between these results and clinical health outcomes defined as re-visits to hospital.

    Methods:

    The study population from a previous randomized controlled study, in which the effects of a comprehensive pharmacist intervention on re-hospitalisation was investigated, was used. The criteria from the validated instruments STOPP, START and MAI were applied retrospectively to the study patients (368 patients; intervention group n=182, control group n=186). The quality assessments were done on admission and at discharge to detect differences over time between the control- and the intervention group. Hospital care consumption one year after admission was recorded and the correlation between scores for appropriateness, as well as number of drugs at discharge, and hospital visits was analysed.

    Results:

    The number of Potentially Inappropriate Medicines (PIMs) per patient as identified by STOPP was reduced for the intervention group but not for the control group (1.42 and 0.93 vs. 1.46 and 1.66 respectively, p<0.01) The number of Potential Prescription Omissions (PPOs) per patient as identified by START was reduced for the intervention group but not for the control group (0.36 and 0.09 vs. 0.42 and 0.45 respectively, p<0.001). The summated score for MAI was reduced for the intervention group but not for the control group (8.5 to 5.0 and 8.7 to 10.0 respectively, p< 0.001). There was no correlation between the scores of the tools and total visits to hospital. Number of drugs (unadjusted) correlated with visits to hospital and the rate ratio was 4%. For readmissions to hospital, MAI (unadjusted) and the number of drugs showed a positive correlation. There was a correlation between MAI and STOPP and drug-related readmissions (RR 8-9% and 30-34% respectively).

    Conclusion:

    The addition of a comprehensive pharmacist service to standard care significantly improved the appropriateness of prescribing for patients in the intervention group that participated in the randomized controlled trial, as evaluated by all three instruments used; STOPP, START and MAI. However, the results on correlation between the tools and re-visits to hospital were inconclusive.

  • 25.
    Hagström, Emil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ahlström, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Parathyroid hormone and calcium are independently associated with subclinical vascular disease in a community-based cohort2015In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 238, no 2, p. 420-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Diseases with abnormal levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcium, such as primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism, are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, there is paucity on the association between calcium, PTH and abnormalities in the vascular system in the general population.

    METHODS:

    In the PIVUS study (Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors), a community based cohort of 70-year old men and women (n = 1016), the associations between s-calcium, p-PTH and endothelial function, arterial stiffness and blood pressures were investigated, adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and mineral metabolism.

    RESULTS:

    In multivariable linear regression models 1 SD increase in calcium was associated with 1.1 units decrease in the stroke volume/pulse pressure ratio and 0.06 decrease in common carotid artery distensibility (p < 0.001) indicative of increased arterial stiffness. Further, calcium was associated with increasing calculated central pulse pressure with 1.3 mmHg elevation per 1 SD increase in calcium (p < 0.05). 1 SD increase in PTH was associated with 1.9 and 1.0 mmHg increase in intra-arterially measured brachial artery systolic and diastolic blood pressures, respectively (p < 0.01), as well as 1.6 and 0.9 mmHg increase in calculated central systolic and diastolic blood pressures (p < 0.05). PTH was not associated with arterial stiffness, endothelial function or pulse pressure.

    CONCLUSION:

    In a large community-based sample of elderly, calcium was independently associated with increased arterial stiffness, and PTH independently to intra-arterial peripheral and calculated central blood pressures. The findings indicate a possible link between the vasculature and mineral metabolism.

  • 26.
    Hagström, Emil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Larsson, Tobias E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Plasma parathyroid hormone and the risk of cardiovascular mortality in the community2009In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 119, no 21, p. 2765-2771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Diseases with elevated levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH) such as primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism are associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and death. However, data on the prospective association between circulating PTH levels and cardiovascular mortality in the community are lacking. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM), a community-based cohort of elderly men (mean age, 71 years; n=958), was used to investigate the association between plasma PTH and cardiovascular mortality. During follow-up (median, 9.7 years), 117 participants died of cardiovascular causes. In Cox proportional-hazards models adjusted for established cardiovascular risk factors (age, systolic blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, body mass index, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, antihypertensive treatment, lipid-lowering treatment, and history of cardiovascular disease), higher plasma PTH was associated with higher risk for cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio for 1-SD increase in PTH, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.18 to 1.60; P<0.001). This association remained essentially unaltered in participants without previous cardiovascular disease and in participants with normal PTH (<6.8 pmol/L) with no other signs of a disturbed mineral metabolism (normal serum calcium, 2.2 to 2.6 mmol/L; normal glomerular filtration rate, >50 mL . min(-1) . 1.73 m(-2) and without vitamin D deficiency, plasma 25-OH vitamin D >37.5 nmol/L). Interestingly, elevated plasma PTH (>5.27 pmol/L) accounted for 20% (95% confidence interval, 10 to 26) of the population-attributable risk proportion for cardiovascular mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma PTH levels predict cardiovascular mortality in the community, even in individuals with PTH within the normal range. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical implications of measuring PTH in cardiovascular risk prediction and to elucidate whether PTH is a modifiable risk factor.

  • 27.
    Hagström, Emil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Larsson, Tobias E.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Held, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Plasma parathyroid hormone and risk of congestive heart failure in the community2010In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 1186-1192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In experimental studies parathyroid hormone (PTH) has been associated with underlying causes of heart failure (HF) such as atherosclerosis, left ventricular hypertrophy, and myocardial fibrosis. Individuals with increased levels of PTH, such as primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism patients, have increased risk of ischaemic heart disease and HF. Moreover, increasing PTH is associated with worse prognosis in patients with overt HF. However, the association between PTH and the development HF in the community has not been reported. In a prospective, community-based study of 864 elderly men without HF or valvular disease at baseline (mean age 71 years, the ULSAM study) the association between plasma (P)-PTH and HF hospitalization was investigated adjusted for established HF risk factors (myocardial infarction, hypertension, diabetes, electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy, smoking, and hypercholesterolaemia) and variables reflecting mineral metabolism (S-calcium, S-phosphate, P-vitamin D, S-albumin, dietary calcium and vitamin D intake, physical activity, glomerular filtration rate, and blood draw season). During follow-up (median 8 years), 75 individuals were hospitalized due to HF. In multivariable Cox-regression analyses, higher P-PTH was associated with increased HF hospitalization (hazard ratio for 1-SD increase of PTH, 1.41, 95% CI 1.12-1.77, P = 0.003). Parathyroid hormone also predicted hospitalization in participants without apparent ischaemic HF and in participants with normal P-PTH. In a large community-based sample of elderly men, PTH predicted HF hospitalizations, also after accounting for established risk factors and mineral metabolism variables. Our data suggest a role for PTH in the development of HF even in the absence of overt hyperparathyroidism.

  • 28.
    Hagström, Emil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Nylander, Ruta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Larsson, Elna-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Arnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Plasma Parathyroid Hormone Is Associated with Vascular Dementia and Cerebral Hyperintensities in Two Community-Based Cohorts2014In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 99, no 11, p. 4181-4189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context:

    In diseases with increased PTH such as hyperparathyroidism and chronic renal failure, dementia is common. Little is known of PTH and dementia in the community.

    Objective:

    We sought to investigate relations between PTH, clinical dementia and cerebral micro-vascular disease.

    Setting and Design:

    The Uppsala Longitudinal Study Of Adult Men (ULSAM) was prospective, baseline, 1991-1995; followup, 15.8 years. The Prospective Investigation Of The Vasculature In Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) was cross-sectional, baseline, 2001. Both settings were community based.

    Participants and Main Outcome Measure:

    In the ULSAM study of 998 men (age 71) the association between PTH and dementia was investigated. In the PIVUS study of 406 men and women (age 70) the relation between PTH and magnetic resonance imaging signs of cerebral small vascular disease was investigated.

    Results:

    During followup, 56 individuals were diagnosed with vascular, 91 with Alzheimer's, and 59 with other dementias. In Cox-regression analyses, higher PTH was associated with vascular dementia (hazard ratio per 1 SD increase of PTH, 1.41; P < .01), but not with other dementias. The top tertile of PTH accounted for 18.5% of the population-attributable risk for vascular dementia, exceeding all other risk factors. In linear regression analysis in PIVUS, PTH was associated with increasing white matter hyperintensities (WMHI), reflecting increasing burden of cerebral small vessel disease (1 SD PTH increase, 0.31 higher category of WMHI; P = .016). All models were adjusted for vascular risk factors and mineral metabolism.

    Conclusions:

    In two community-based samples, PTH predicted clinically diagnosed and neuroimaging indices of vascular dementia and cerebral small vessel disease. Our data suggest a role for PTH in the development of vascular dementia.

  • 29.
    Hagström, Emil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Arnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Plasma-Parathyroid Hormone Is Associated With Subclinical and Clinical Atherosclerotic Disease in 2 Community-Based Cohorts2014In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 1567-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular risk factors have different impact on different arterial territories. Diseases with elevated circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) such as primary hyperparathyroidism and chronic renal failure have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, predominantly heart or cerebrovascular diseases. However, data on the associations between circulating PTH and peripheral atherosclerosis are limited.

    APPROACH AND RESULTS: Two prospective, community-based studies were used. In 306 men and women, who were 70 years old, from the Prospective investigation of the vasculature in Uppsala seniors (PIVUS) study, cross-sectional relations between PTH and atherosclerotic burden assessed by whole-body magnetic resonance angiography were investigated. In 998 men, who were 71 years old, from the Uppsala longitudinal study of adult men (ULSAM) study, the association between PTH concentration and risk of subsequent nonfatal atherosclerotic disease (excluding coronary or cerebrovascular disease) was investigated. Adjusting for established vascular risk factors, PTH was associated with burden of atherosclerosis (increase in total atherosclerotic score per SD PTH increase: 0.04, 0.003-0.08; P=0.03) in the PIVUS study. During follow-up in the ULSAM study (median 16.7 years), 89 men were diagnosed with nonfatal atherosclerotic disease. In Cox-regression analyses adjusting for established vascular risk factors and mineral metabolism, higher PTH was associated with an increased risk of nonfatal atherosclerotic disease (hazard ratio for 1 SD increase of PTH: 1.55, 1.33-1.88; P<0.0001). Results were similar when including fatal atherosclerotic disease in the outcome.

    CONCLUSIONS: In 2 independent community-based cohorts, PTH was associated to the degree of atherosclerosis and risk of clinically overt atherosclerotic disease, respectively. Our data confirm and extend previous studies supporting a role for PTH in the development of atherosclerotic disease.

  • 30.
    Hallberg, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Karlsson, Julia
    Kurland, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Kahan, Thomas
    Malmqvist, Karin
    Öhman, K. Peter
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    The CYP2C9 genotype predicts the blood pressure response to irbesartan: results from the Swedish Irbesartan Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Investigation vs Atenolol (SILVHIA) trial2002In: Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0263-6352, E-ISSN 1473-5598, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 2089-2093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The cytochrome P450 CYP2C9 enzyme (CYP2C9) metabolizes many clinically important drugs, for example, phenytoin, warfarin and the angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor antagonists, losartan and irbesartan. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CYP2C9 gene result in the expression of three important variants, CYP2C9*1(wild-type), CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3, the last two exhibiting reduced catalytic activity compared with the wild-type. The CYP2C9 genotype is known to determine sensitivity to and dose requirements for both warfarin and phenytoin, and also the rate of metabolism of losartan. However, its influence on clinical response to treatment with the AT(1) receptor antagonist, irbesartan, has not been investigated. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the CYP2C9genotype influences the blood pressure-decreasing response to antihypertensive treatment with irbesartan. DESIGN AND METHODS: One hundred and two patients with essential hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy were allocated randomly to groups to receive double-blind treatment with either irbesartan (n = 49) or the beta(1)-adrenergic receptor blocker, atenolol ( n= 53). Blood pressure was measured before and after 12 weeks of treatment. genotyping was performed using solid-phase minisequencing. RESULTS: The diastolic blood pressure (DBP) response differed in relation to the CYP2C9 genotype in patients given irbesartan: the reduction in patients with genotype CYP2C9*1/CYP2C9*1 (n = 33) was 7.5% and that with CYP2C9*1/CYP2C9*2 (n = 12) was 14.4% ( P= 0.036). A similar trend was seen for systolic blood pressure. In contrast, no relation was seen between the CYP2C9 genotype and blood pressure response to atenolol, a drug not metabolized via CYP2C9. CONCLUSIONS: The CYP2C9 genotype seems to predict the DBP response to irbesartan, but not to atenolol, in patients with essential hypertension.

  • 31.
    Hallberg, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Billberger, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Karlsson, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kahan, Thomas
    Malmqvist, Karin
    Öhman, K. Peter
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Liljedahl, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Transforming growth factor beta1 genotype and change in left ventricular mass during antihypertensive treatment: results from the Swedish Irbesartan Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Investigation versus Atenolol (SILVHIA)2004In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, E-ISSN 1932-8737, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 169-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Angiotensin II, via the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor, may mediate myocardial fibrosis and myocyte hypertrophy seen in hypertensive left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy through production of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1); AT1-receptor antagonists reverse these changes. The TGF-beta1 G + 915C polymorphism is associated with interindividual variation in TGF-beta1 production. No study has yet determined the impact of this polymorphism on the response to antihypertensive treatment. HYPOTHESIS: We aimed to determine whether the TGF-beta1 G + 915C polymorphism was related to change in LV mass during antihypertensive treatment with either an AT1-receptor antagonists or a beta1-adrenoceptor blocker. The polymorphism was hypothesized to have an impact mainly on the irbesartan group. METHODS: We determined the association between the TGF-beta1 genotype and regression of LV mass in 90 patients with essential hypertension and echocardiographically diagnosed LV hypertrophy, randomized in a double-blind study to receive treatment for 48 weeks with either the AT1-receptor antagonist irbesartan or the beta1-adrenoceptor blocker atenolol. RESULTS: Irbesartan-treated patients who were carriers of the C-allele, which is associated with low expression of TGF-beta1, responded with a markedly greater decrease in LV mass index (LVMI) than subjects with the G/G genotype (adjusted mean change in LVMI -44.7 g/m2 vs. -22.2 g/m2, p = 0.007), independent of blood pressure reduction. No association between genotype and change in LVMI was observed in the atenolol group. CONCLUSIONS: The TGF-beta1 G + 915C polymorphism is related to the change in LVMI in response to antihypertensive treatment with the AT1-receptor antagonist irbesartan.

  • 32.
    Hallberg, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kahan, Thomas
    Malmqvist, Karin
    Öhman, Karl Peter
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Liljedahl, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase genotype and response to antihypertensive therapy2003In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, ISSN 1471-2261, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 11-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Adipocyte-derived leucine aminopeptidase (ALAP) is a recently identified member of the M1 family of zinc-metallopeptidases and is thought to play a role in blood pressure control through inactivation of angiotensin II and/or generation of bradykinin. The enzyme seems to be particularly abundant in the heart. Recently, the Arg528-encoding allele of the ALAP gene was shown to be associated with essential hypertension.

    Methods

    We evaluated the influence of this polymorphism on the change in left ventricular mass index in 90 patients with essential hypertension and echocardiographically diagnosed left ventricular hypertrophy, randomised in a double-blind study to receive treatment with either the angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist irbesartan or the beta1-adrenoceptor blocker atenolol for 48 weeks. Genyotyping was performed using minisequencing.

    Results

    After adjustment for potential covariates (blood pressure and left ventricular mass index at baseline, blood pressure change, age, sex, dose and added antihypertensive treatment), there was a marked difference between the Arg/Arg and Lys/Arg genotypes in patients treated with irbesartan; those with the Arg/Arg genotype responded on average with an almost two-fold greater regression of left ventricular mass index than patients with the Lys/Arg genotype (-30.1 g/m2 [3.6] vs -16.7 [4.5], p = 0.03).

    Conclusions

    The ALAP genotype seems to determine the degree of regression of left ventricular hypertrophy during antihypertensive treatment with the angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist irbesartan in patients with essential hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy. This is the first report of a role for ALAP/aminopeptidases in left ventricular mass regulation, and suggests a new potential target for antihypertensive drugs.

  • 33.
    Hallberg, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research center.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research center.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research center.
    Digoxin and mortality in atrial fibrillation: a prospective cohort study2007In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 63, no 10, p. 959-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The Atrial Fibrillation Follow-up Investigation of Rhythm Management (AFFIRM) study showed that rhythm-control treatment of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) offered no survival advantage over a rate-control strategy. In a subgroup analysis of that study, it was found that digoxin increased the death rate [relative risk (RR) = 1.42), but it was suggested that this may have been attributable to prescription of digoxin for patients at greater risk of death, such as those with congestive heart failure (CHF). No study has investigated a priori the effect of digoxin on mortality in patients with AF. This study aimed to address this question. METHODS: Using data from the Registry of Information and Knowledge about Swedish Heart Intensive care Admissions (RIKS-HIA), we studied the 1-year mortality among patients admitted to coronary care units with AF, CHF, or AF+CHF with or without digoxin (n = 60,764) during 1995-2003. Adjustment for differences in background characteristics and other medications and treatments was made by propensity scoring. RESULTS: Twenty percent of patients with AF without CHF in this cohort were discharged with digoxin. This group had a higher mortality rate than the corresponding group not given digoxin [adjusted RR 1.42 (95% CI 1.29-1.56)], whereas no such difference was seen among patients with CHF with or without AF, although these patients had a nearly three-times higher mortality. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that long-term therapy with digoxin is an independent risk factor for death in patients with AF without CHF.

  • 34.
    Hallberg, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Candidate genes in the pharmacogenomics of antihypertensive treatment:  a review and future aspects2004In: Current Pharmacogenomics, ISSN 1570-1603, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 83-112Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diversity in response to antihypertensive therapy is well-documented. Among many variables in the biological system, reasons include the genetic make-up of individuals. Although individual human genomes are 99.9% identical, the 0.1% difference predicts as many as three million polymorphisms. Some will affect protein expression or function, resulting in phenotypes affected for disease or with altered drug response. Pharmacogenomics focuses on the link between polymorphism in genes and variable response to drugs. The genetic approach to the study of the mechanisms underlying hypertension has led to the identification of some quantitative trait loci or genes that influence blood pressure regulation. An ultimate goal of pharmacogenomic knowledge is to advance beyond the current approach to antihypertensive drug therapy to more individualized approaches. Drugs that are more specific for the molecular characteristics of individual patients should contribute to greater efficacy and reduced toxicity.

     

    In this article, we review the pathophysiology of essential hypertension, the principles of its drug treatment, and those pharmacogenomic studies of antihypertensive treatment which, to our knowledge, have been published so far and which deals primarily with two aspects: the blood pressure lowering effect and the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Also, a selection of functional polymorphisms in potential candidate genes which have not yet appeared in pharmacogenomic studies of antihypertensive treatment but in various ways have been linked to hypertension and / or its related diseases / organ damages are discussed.

  • 35.
    Hallberg, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Digitalis intoxication induced by paroxetine co-administration2006In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 368, no 9551, p. 1963-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Hallberg, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hansson, Lars-Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Cystatin C vs creatinine as markers of renal function in patients on digoxin treatment2004In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 247-253Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The kidney function is a major determinant of the serum concentration of digoxin as this drug is mainly eliminated unchanged through the kidneys. Since digoxin is widely prescribed among the elderly, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) declines with age, it is important that the clinician takes the patient's GFR into account when prescribing digoxin. Serum cystatin C has been suggested to be superior to creatinine for estimation of GFR, which may have relevance for the optimization of treatment with digoxin. METHODS: To evaluate which of the two GFR markers serum creatinine and serum cystatin C that best correlates with serum digoxin, we compared the serum levels of digoxin with the serum levels of creatinine and cystatin C in 149 patients on therapeutic drug monitoring of digoxin at our hospital. RESULTS: Overall, there was a stronger correlation between serum digoxin concentrations and cystatin C (p=0.00001) as compared to creatinine (p= 0.00003). Interestingly, of the patients with a serum digoxin concentration > or = 1.5 nmol/L, 29% had a serum creatinine level within normal limits, as compared to 20% with normal cystatin C levels. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, serum cystatin C correlated better to serum digoxin than did serum creatinine. With improved GFR monitoring, digoxin concentrations should be better controlled.

  • 37.
    Hallberg, Pär
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Digoxin for the treatment of heart failure2003In: New England Journal of Medicine, ISSN 0028-4793, E-ISSN 1533-4406, Vol. 348, no 7, p. 661-662Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Hu, Lijuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine, Clinical Virology.
    Andersson, G.
    Jonsson, Kenneth B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Lind, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Adamts1 is highly induced in rachitic bones of FGF23 transgenic mice and participates in degradation of non-mineralized bone matrix collagen2013In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 430, no 3, p. 901-906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transgenic mice overexpressing fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) in osteoblasts have a rachitic bone phenotype. These mice display hypomineralized bones, increased expression of osteoblast markers, but osteoclast numbers are unaltered or slightly reduced. Paradoxically, they show increased serum levels of the bone resorption marker CTX, a type I collagen degradation fragment. Here we analyzed a matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) like secreted protease, Adamts1, that has previously been associated with osteoblastic type I collagen breakdown in vitro. Bones from FGF23 transgenic (tg) mice displayed increased Adamts1 protein upon both immunohistological staining and Western blotting. We further found Adamts1 protein together with excessively degraded type I collagen in the non-mineralized bone fraction of FGF23 tg mice. A similar degradation pattern of type I collagen was noticed upon forced expression of Adamts1 in osteoblastic cells in vitro. Importantly, these Adamts1-expressing osteoblastic cells exhibited increased release of CTX fragments when cultured on demineralized bone discs. Together, these results demonstrate for the first time that Adamts1 can be highly induced in bone tissue and that this MMP-like protease can increase osteoblastic release of CTX fragments from non-mineralized bone. Thus, Adamts1 potentially contributes to the increased serum levels of CTX in rickets/osteomalacia.

  • 39.
    Hu, Lijuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Jonsson, Kenneth B
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Andersén, Harriet
    Edenro, Anne
    Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Lind, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Over-expression of Adamts1 in mice alters bone mineral density2012In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism, ISSN 0914-8779, E-ISSN 1435-5604, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 304-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ADAMTS1, a secreted multifunctional metalloproteinase with disintegrin and thrombospondin motifs, is an early response gene of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in osteoblasts. Mice engineered to lack Adamts1 are smaller compared to wild-type (WT) mice and ADAMTS1 metalloproteinase activity has been shown to increase osteoblastic growth in collagen gels. However, there are no reports investigating the consequence of Adamts1 over-expression on bone tissue in vivo. Here, we analyze bones of female and male transgenic (TG) mice over-expressing mouse Adamts1 using peripheral quantitative computed tomography to evaluate its effect on bone shape and mineral density. Western blotting of protein extracts and immunohistochemistry of bone sections reveal increased presence of Adamts1 protein in TG bones compared to WT bones. Phenotypic analyses of femur show that female TG mice have reduced metaphyseal total density, trabecular bone mineral density and trabecular mineral content. In contrast, male TG mice which were without changes in the metaphysis showed increased total density and cortical density at the mid-diaphysis cortical site. Female TG mice showed no significant changes at the cortical site compared to WT mice. Furthermore, diaphyseal endosteal compartment was only affected in male TG mice. Along these lines, Adamts1 increased blood levels of PTH only in females whereas it reduced osteocalcin levels only in males. These results reveal that Adamts1 has an impact on bone mineral density and thus further confirm Adamts1 as a potent regulator of bone remodeling.

  • 40.
    Hu, Lijuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sundqvist, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jacobson, Annica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Retinoic acid increases proliferation of human osteoclast progenitors and inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclast differentiation by suppressing RANK2010In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 10, p. e13305-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been shown that high vitamin A intake is associated with bone fragility and fractures in both animals and humans. However, the mechanism by which vitamin A affects bones is unclear. In the present study, the direct effects of retinoic acid (RA) on human and murine osteoclastogenesis were evaluated using cultured peripheral blood CD14(+) monocytes and RAW264.7 cells. Both the activity of the osteoclast marker tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) in culture supernatant and the expression of the genes involved in osteoclast differentiation together with bone resorption were measured. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the effects of RA on human osteoclast progenitors and mature osteoclasts have been studied in vitro. RA stimulated proliferation of osteoclast progenitors both from humans and mice. In contrast, RA inhibited differentiation of the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis of human and murine osteoclast progenitors via retinoic acid receptors (RARs). We also show that the mRNA levels of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK), the key initiating factor and osteoclast associated receptor for RANKL, were potently suppressed by RA in osteoclast progenitors. More importantly, RA abolished the RANK protein in osteoclast progenitors. This inhibition could be partially reversed by a RAR pan-antagonist. Furthermore, RA treatment suppressed the expression of the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and increased the expression of interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8) in osteoclast progenitors via RARs. Also, RA demonstrated differential effects depending on the material supporting the cell culture. RA did not affect TRAP activity in the culture supernatant in the bone slice culture system, but inhibited the release of TRAP activity if cells were cultured on plastic. In conclusion, our results suggest that retinoic acid increases proliferation of human osteoclast progenitors and that it inhibits RANK-stimulated osteoclast differentiation by suppressing RANK.

  • 41.
    Jacobson, Annica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Johansson, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Branting, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Vitamin A differentiall regulates RANKL and OPG expression in human osteoblasts2004In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 322, no 1, p. 162-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) induces bone resorption, but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. We have studied the effect of ATRA on osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) expression in human MG-63 osteosarcoma cells and primary osteoblast-like cultures. ATRA dose-dependently down-regulated protein levels of OPG in MG-63 cells, with a maximum (-56%) observed at a dose of 10(-6)M. This effect was confirmed with quantitative real-time PCR, where OPG mRNA was decreased after 4h (-68%) in primary cultures and after 8h (-87%) in MG-63 cells. The reduction in OPG expression was inhibited by a retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-antagonist and was mimicked by a RARbeta,gamma-agonist, indicating that the ATRA effect is mediated by these receptors. In primary cultures we found a threefold induction of RANKL mRNA expression. Thus, the RANKL/OPG ratio was markedly increased, suggesting a potential mechanism of ATRA-induced bone resorption.

  • 42.
    Jacobson, Annica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wadelius, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Can mutations in ELA2, neutrophil elastase expression or differential cell toxicity explain sulphasalazine-induced agranulocytosis?2004In: BMC Blood Disorders, ISSN 1471-2326, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 5-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Drug-induced agranulocytosis, a severe side effect marked by a deficit or absolute lack of granulocytic white blood cells, is a rare side-effect of the anti-inflammatory drug sulphasalazine. Mutations in the human neutrophil elastase gene (ELA2), causing increased intracellular concentration of this serine protease, inhibits neutrophil differentiation in severe congenital neutropenia (SCN). Since the clinical symptoms of agranulocytosis and SCN are similar, we hypothesized that it may origin from a common genetic variation in ELA2 or that sulphasalazine may affect human neutrophil elastase activity and protein expression. METHODS: We screened for genetic differences in ELA2 in DNA from 36 patients who had suffered from sulphasalazine-induced agranulocytosis, and compared them with 72 patients treated with sulphasalazine without blood reactions. We also performed in vitro studies of the blood cell lines HL60 and U937 after sulphasalazine exposure with respect to cell survival index, neutrophil elastase protein expression and activity. RESULTS: None of the mutations in ELA2, which previously have been reported to be associated with SCN, was found in this material. Protein expression of human neutrophil elastase in lymphoma U937 cells was not affected by treatment with concentrations equivalent to therapeutic doses. Cell survival of lymphoma U937 and promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells was not affected in this concentration range, but exhibited a decreased proliferative capacity with higher sulphasalazine concentrations. Interestingly the promyelocytic cells were more sensitive to sulphasalazine than the lymphoma cell line. CONCLUSION: Neutrophil elastase expression and ELA2 mutations do, however, not seem to be involved in the etilogy of sulphasalazine-induced agranulocytosis. Why sulphasalazine is more toxic to promyelocytes than to lymphocytes remains to be explained.

  • 43.
    Johansson, Jakob
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Blomberg, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Svennblad, Bodil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Karlsten, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) training of ambulance caregivers and impact on survival of trauma victims2012In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 83, no 10, p. 1259-1264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) course has been widely implemented and approximately half a million prehospital caregivers in over 50 countries have taken this course. Still, the effect on injury outcome remains to be established. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between PHTLS training of ambulance crew members and the mortality in trauma patients.

    METHODS:

    A population-based observational study of 2830 injured patients, who either died or were hospitalized for more than 24h, was performed during gradual implementation of PHTLS in Uppsala County in Sweden between 1998 and 2004. Prehospital patient records were linked to hospital-discharge records, cause-of-death records, and information on PHTLS training and the educational level of ambulance crews. The main outcome measure was death, on scene or in hospital.

    RESULTS:

    Adjusting for multiple potential confounders, PHTLS training appeared to be associated with a reduction in mortality, but the precision of this estimate was poor (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-1.19). The mortality risk was 4.7% (36/763) without PHTLS training and 4.5% (94/2067) with PHTLS training. The predicted absolute risk reduction is estimated to correspond to 0.5 lives saved annually per 100,000 population with PHTLS fully implemented.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    PHTLS training of ambulance crew members may be associated with reduced mortality in trauma patients, but the precision in this estimate was low due to the overall low mortality. While there may be a relative risk reduction, the predicted absolute risk reduction in this population was low.

  • 44.
    Johansson, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kindmark, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Vitaminer är inte alltid nyttigt!2001In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 98, no 11, p. 1252-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Johansson, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology.
    Håkansson, Helen
    Oxlund, Hans
    Örberg, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology.
    Subclinical hypervitaminosis A causes fragile bones in rats2002In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 685-689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Excessive intake of vitamin A has been associated with an increased risk of hip fracture in humans. This finding has raised the question of whether long-term intake of relatively moderate doses ("subclinical" hypervitaminosis A) contributes to fracture risk. Although it has been known for more than half a century that toxic doses of vitamin A lead to spontaneous fractures in rats, the lowest intake that induces adverse effects is not known, and the result of exposure to excessive doses that do not cause general toxicity has been rarely investigated. In this study, mature female rats were fed a standard diet with 12 IU vitamin A/g pellet (control, C), or standard diet supplemented with either 120 IU ("10 x C") or 600 IU ("50 x C") vitamin A/g pellet for 12 weeks. Fifteen animals were included in each group. The supplemented diets correspond to a vitamin A intake of approximately 1800 IU/day and 9000 IU/day, respectively. The latter dose is about one third of that previously reported to cause skeletal lesions. At the end of the study, serum retinyl esters were elevated 4- (p < 0.01) and 20-fold (p < 0.001) and the total amount of liver retinoid had increased 3- (p < 0.001) and 7-fold (p < 0.001) in the 10 x C and 50 x C group, respectively. The animals showed no clinical signs of general toxicity, and there were no significant bone changes in the 10 x C group. However, in the 50 x C group, a characteristic thinning of the cortex (cortical area -6.5% [p < 0.001]) and reduction of the diameter of the long bones were evident (bone cross-sectional area -7.2% [p < 0.01] at the midshaft and -11.0% [p < 0.01] at the metaphysis), as measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. In agreement with these data and a decreased polar strength strain index (-14.0%, p < 0.01), the three-point bending breaking force of the femur was reduced by 10.3% (p < 0.01) in the 50 x C group. These data indicate that the negative skeletal effects appear at a subchronic vitamin A intake of somewhere between 10 and 50 times the standard diet. This level is considerably lower than previously reported. Our results suggest that long-term ingestion of modest excesses of vitamin A may contribute to fracture risk.

  • 46.
    Kaluza, Joanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.; Warsaw Univ Life Sci SGGW, Dept Human Nutr, Nutr Res Lab, 159C Nowoursynowska St, PL-02776 Warsaw, Poland..
    Harris, Holly
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Program Epidemiol, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Nutr Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Questionnaire-Based Anti-Inflammatory Diet Index as a Predictor of Low-Grade Systemic Inflammation.2018In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, ISSN 1523-0864, E-ISSN 1557-7716, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 78-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is accumulating evidence that diet may be associated with markers of inflammation. We have evaluated if an empirically developed questionnaire-based Anti-Inflammatory Diet Index (AIDI) may predict low-grade systemic chronic inflammation in a Nordic population. The AIDI was developed using a 123-item food frequency questionnaire among 3503 women (56-74 years old) with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) plasma concentration <20 mg/L. Using Spearman correlations, we identified 20 foods (AIDI-20) statistically significantly related to hsCRP. The median (range) of AIDI-20 was 8 (0-17) scores, and the median concentration of hsCRP in the lowest versus the highest quintile of AIDI-20 (≤6 vs. ≥11 scores) varied by 80% (1.8 vs. 1.0 mg/L, respectively). In a multivariable-adjusted linear regression model, women in the highest quintile of AIDI-20 compared with those in the lowest had a 26% (95% confidence interval [CI] 18-33%; p-trend <0.001) lower hsCRP concentration; each 1-score increment in the AIDI-20 was associated with a 0.06 (95% CI 0.04-0.08) mg/L lower hsCRP. The observed association between the AIDI-20 and hsCRP was robust by all hsCRP levels and in subgroups defined by inflammatory-related factors. Our results lead to the hypothesis that the empirically developed questionnaire-based dietary anti-inflammatory index may predict low-grade systemic inflammation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 78-84.

  • 47.
    Karasik, David
    et al.
    Hebrew Senior Life Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Bar Ilan Univ, Azrieli Fac Med, Safed, Israel.
    Zillikens, M. Carola
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Netherlands Genom Initiat, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Hsu, Yi-Hsiang
    Hebrew Senior Life Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Mol & Integrat Physiol Sci Program, Boston, MA USA.
    Aghdassi, Ali
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Dept Med A, Greifswald, Germany.
    Akesson, Kristina
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Malmo, Sweden;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Malmo, Sweden.
    Amin, Najaf
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Barroso, Ines
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, England;NIHR Cambridge Biomed Res Ctr, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Metab Res Labs, Inst Metab Sci, Addenbrookes Hosp, Cambridge, England.
    Bennett, David A.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.
    Bertram, Lars
    Univ Lubeck, Lubeck Interdisciplinary Platform Genome Analyt, Lubeck, Germany.
    Bochud, Murielle
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Univ Inst Social & Prevent Med, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Borecki, Ingrid B.
    Washington Univ, Dept Genet, Div Stat Gen, Sch Med, St Louis, MO 63110 USA;Washington Univ, Sch Med, Div Biostat, St Louis, MO 63110 USA.
    Broer, Linda
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Buchman, Aron S.
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Campbell, Harry
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Ctr Global Hlth Res, Teviot Pl, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Campos-Obando, Natalia
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Cauley, Jane A.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.
    Cawthon, Peggy M.
    Calif Pacific Med Ctr, Res Inst, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Chambers, John C.
    Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Cardiol, London, England;Imperial Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, London, England;Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England;Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Fdn Trust, NIHR Cardiovasc Biomed Res Unit, London, England;Imperial Coll London, London, England.
    Chen, Zhao
    Univ Arizona, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlth, Tucson, AZ USA.
    Cho, Nam H.
    Ajou Univ, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Suwon, South Korea.
    Choi, Hyung Jin
    Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Dept Internal Med, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Neurosci Res Inst, Dept Anat & Cell Biol, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Wide River Inst Immunol, Hongcheon, South Korea.
    Chou, Wen-Chi
    Hebrew Senior Life Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Broad Inst, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Cummings, Steven R.
    Calif Pacific Med Ctr, Res Inst, San Francisco, CA USA.
    de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.
    Columbia Univ, Med Ctr, Ctr Translat & Computat Neuroimmunol Neurol, New York, NY USA.
    De Jager, Phillip L.
    Broad Inst, Cell Circuits Program, Cambridge, MA USA;Free Univ Berlin, Humboldt Univ Berlin, Charite Univ Med Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
    Demuth, Ilja
    Berlin Inst Hlth, Berlin, Germany;Wageningen Univ, Div Human Nutr, AFSG, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Diatchenko, Luda
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Sch Dent, Reg Ctr Neurosensory Disorders, Chapel Hill, NC USA;McGill Univ, Alan Edwards Ctr Res Pain, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Econs, Michael J.
    Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA;Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA.
    Eiriksdottir, Gudny
    Iceland Heart Assoc Holtasmari, Kopavogur, Iceland.
    Enneman, Anke W.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Eriksson, Joel
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Johan G.
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Dept Gen Practice & Primary Hlth Care, Helsinki, Finland;Helsinki Univ Cent Hosp, Unit Gen Practice, Helsinki, Finland;Folkhalsan Res Ctr, Helsinki, Finland.
    Estrada, Karol
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Biogen Inc, Translat Biol, 14 Cambridge Ctr, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.
    Evans, Daniel S.
    Calif Pacific Med Ctr, Res Inst, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Feitosa, Mary F.
    Washington Univ, Dept Genet, Div Stat Gen, Sch Med, St Louis, MO 63110 USA.
    Fu, Mao
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Program Personalized & Genom Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA.
    Gieger, Christian
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 2, Neuherberg, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Genet Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Grallert, Harald
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 2, Neuherberg, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, CCG Type 2 Diabet, Neuherberg, Germany;German Ctr Diabet Res, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Iceland Heart Assoc Holtasmari, Kopavogur, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Lenore, Launer J.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, Intramural Res Program, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Hayward, Caroline
    Univ Edinburgh, MRC Human Genet Unit, IGMM, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Hofman, Albert
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Netherlands Genom Initiat, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Homuth, Georg
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Interfac Inst Genet & Funct Gen, Greifswald, Germany.
    Huffman, Kim M.
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Duke Mol Physiol Inst, Durham, NC 27706 USA;Duke Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Rheumatol, Durham, NC 27706 USA.
    Husted, Lise B.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Endocrinol & Internal Med, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Illig, Thomas
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Hannover Med Sch, Dept Human Genet, Hannover, Germany.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Stanford, CA USA.
    Ittermann, Till
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany.
    Jansson, John-Olov
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johnson, Toby
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Univ Inst Social & Prevent Med, Lausanne, Switzerland;Univ Lausanne, Dept Med Genet, Lausanne, Switzerland;Swiss Inst Bioinformat, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Biffar, Reiner
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Dept Prosthet Dent Gerodontol & Biomat, Ctr Oral Hlth, Greifswald, Germany.
    Jordan, Joanne M.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Thurston Arthrit Res Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Jula, Antti
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Orthoped, Malmo, Sweden.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Kilpelainen, Tuomas O.
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Sch Clin Med, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge, England;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metabol Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Environm Med & Publ Hlth, New York, NY USA.
    Klopp, Norman
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Hannover Med Sch, Hannover Unified Biobank, Hannover, Germany.
    Kloth, Jacqueline S. L.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Koller, Daniel L.
    Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA;Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA.
    Kooner, Jaspal S.
    Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Cardiol, London, England;Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England;Imperial Coll London, Hammersmith Hosp, Natl Heart & Lung Inst Cardiovasc Sci, Fac Med, Hammersmith Campus, London, England.
    Kraus, William E.
    Duke Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Duke Mol Physiol Inst, Durham, NC USA;Duke Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Cardiol, Durham, NC USA.
    Kritchevsky, Stephen
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Sticht Ctr Hlth Aging & Alzheimers Prevent, Winston Salem, NC USA.
    Kutalik, Zoltan
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Univ Inst Social & Prevent Med, Lausanne, Switzerland;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, CCG Nutrigen & Type 2 Diabet, Neuherberg, Germany;Swiss Inst Bioinformat, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Kuulasmaa, Teemu
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio, Finland.
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio, Finland.
    Laakso, Markku
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio, Finland.
    Lahti, Jari
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Collegium Adv Studies, Helsinki, Finland.
    Lang, Thomas
    UC San Francisco, Dept Radiol & Biomed Imaging, San Francisco, CA USA;UC San Francisco, Sch Dent, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Langdahl, Bente L.
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Endocrinol & Internal Med, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Lerch, Markus M.
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Dept Med A, Greifswald, Germany.
    Lewis, Joshua R.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Med & Pharmacol, Perth, WA, Australia;Univ Sydney, Sydney Med Sch, Sch Publ Hlth, Childrens Hosp Westmead,Ctr Kidney Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Lill, Christina
    Univ Lubeck, Inst Neurogenet, Lubeck, Germany.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.
    Liu, Yongmei
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent, Winston Salem, NC USA.
    Livshits, Gregory
    Tel Aviv Univ, Dept Anat & Anthropol, Sackler Fac Med, Tel Aviv, Israel;Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, St Thomas Campus, London, England.
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and mineral metabolism.
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Environm Med & Publ Hlth, New York, NY USA;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Charles Bronfman Inst Personalized Med, New York, NY 10029 USA;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Inst Child Hlth & Dev, New York, NY 10029 USA;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Genet Obes & Related Traits Program, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Luan, Jian'an
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Environm Med & Publ Hlth, New York, NY USA.
    Luben, Robert N.
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Sect Metabol Genet, Novo Nordisk Fdn Ctr Basic Metab Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Malkin, Ida
    Tel Aviv Univ, Dept Anat & Anthropol, Sackler Fac Med, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    McGuigan, Fiona E.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Malmo, Sweden.
    Medina-Gomez, Carolina
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Meitinger, Thomas
    Tech Univ Munich, Inst Human Genet, MRI, Munich, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Human Genet, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Mellstrom, Dan
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Malmo, Sweden.
    Mitchell, Braxton D.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Program Personalized & Genom Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Vet Adm Med Ctr, Geriatr Res & Educ Clin Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA.
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England;Univ Liverpool, Inst Translat Med, Liverpool, Merseyside, England.
    Mosekilde, Leif
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Endocrinol & Internal Med, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Nethander, Maria
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Newman, Anne B.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.
    O'Connell, Jeffery R.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Program Personalized & Genom Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA.
    Oostra, Ben A.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Clin Genet, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Ctr Med Syst Biol & Netherlands Consortium H, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Orwoll, Eric S.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR USA.
    Palotie, Aarno
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Dept Med Genet, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Cent Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Peacock, Munro
    Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA;Indiana Univ Sch Med, Dept Med & Mol Genet, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA.
    Perola, Markus
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med, Helsinki, Finland;Diabet & Obes Res Program, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Tartu, Estonian Genome Ctr, Tartu, Estonia.
    Peters, Annette
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 2, Neuherberg, Germany.
    Prince, Richard L.
    Univ Western Australia, Sch Med & Pharmacol, Perth, WA, Australia;Sir Charles Gairdner Hosp, Dept Endocrinol & Diabet, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Hlth Serv, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Kaiser Permanente, Washington Hlth Res Inst, Seattle, WA USA.
    Raikkonen, Katri
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Psychol & Logoped, Helsinki, Finland.
    Ralston, Stuart H.
    Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Western Gen Hosp, MRC Inst Genet & Mol Med, Mol Med Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Ripatti, Samuli
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, England;Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Hjelt Inst, Helsinki, Finland.
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Netherlands Genom Initiat, Leiden, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Robbins, John A.
    Univ Calif Davis, Dept Med, Sacramento, CA 95817 USA.
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst, Torrance, CA 90509 USA;Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Torrance, CA 90509 USA.
    Rudan, Igor
    Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
    Satterfield, Suzanne
    Univ Tennessee, Ctr Hlth Sci, Dept Prevent Med, Memphis, TN 38163 USA.
    Schipf, Sabine
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany.
    Shin, Chan Soo
    Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Dept Internal Med, Seoul, South Korea.
    Smith, Albert V.
    Iceland Heart Assoc Holtasmari, Kopavogur, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Smith, Shad B.
    Duke Univ, Dept Anesthesiol, Ctr Translat Pain Med, Durham, NC USA.
    Soranzo, Nicole
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, England.
    Spector, Timothy D.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, St Thomas Campus, London, England.
    Stancakova, Alena
    Univ Eastern Finland, Dept Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Kuopio, Finland.
    Stefansson, Kari
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland;deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth
    Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Mol & Integrat Physiol Sci Program, Boston, MA USA.
    Stolk, Lisette
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Netherlands Genom Initiat, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Streeten, Elizabeth A.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Program Personalized & Genom Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Vet Adm Med Ctr, Geriatr Res & Educ Clin Ctr, Baltimore, MD 21218 USA.
    Styrkarsdottir, Unnur
    deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Swart, Karin M. A.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, EMGO Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Thompson, Patricia
    Univ Arizona, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlth, Tucson, AZ USA;SUNY Stony Brook, Dept Pathol, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA.
    Thomson, Cynthia A.
    Thorleifsson, Gudmar
    deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland;deCODE Genet, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Tikkanen, Emmi
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welfare, Helsinki, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Tranah, Gregory J.
    Calif Pacific Med Ctr, Res Inst, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Netherlands Genom Initiat, Leiden, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Ctr Med Syst Biol & Netherlands Consortium H, Leiden, Netherlands.
    van Schoor, Natasja M.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ Amsterdam Med Ctr, EMGO Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Vandenput, Liesbeth
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Lausanne Univ Hosp, Dept Med Internal Med, Lausanne, Switzerland;Fac Biol & Med, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Volzke, Henry
    Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Wactawski-Wende, Jean
    Univ Buffalo SUNY, Dept Epidemiol & Environm Hlth, Buffalo, NY USA.
    Walker, Mark
    Newcastle Univ, Med Sch, Inst Cellular Med Diabetes, Framlington Pl, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Sch Clin Med, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge, England.
    Waterworth, Dawn
    GlaxoSmithKline, Genet, King Of Prussia, PA USA.
    Weedon, Michael N.
    Univ Exeter, Med Sch, Royal Devon & Exeter Hosp, Genet Complex Traits, Exeter, Devon, England.
    Wichmann, H-Erich
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 2, Neuherberg, Germany;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Neuherberg, Germany;Tech Univ, Inst Med Stat & Epidemiol, Munich, Germany.
    Widen, Elisabeth
    Univ Helsinki, Inst Mol Med Finland, Helsinki, Finland.
    Williams, Frances M. K.
    Kings Coll London, Dept Twin Res & Genet Epidemiol, St Thomas Campus, London, England.
    Wilson, James F.
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Ctr Global Hlth Res, Teviot Pl, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Wright, Nicole C.
    Univ Alabama Birmingham, Dept Epidemiol, Birmingham, AL USA.
    Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Program Personalized & Genom Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Nutr, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA;GlaxoSmithKline, Genet, King Of Prussia, PA USA.
    Yu, Lei
    Rush Univ, Med Ctr, Rush Alzheimers Dis Ctr, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.
    Zhang, Weihua
    Ealing Hosp NHS Trust, Cardiol, London, England;Imperial Coll Healthcare NHS Trust, London, England.
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Univ Cambridge, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Sch Clin Med, Cambridge Biomed Campus, Cambridge, England.
    Zhou, Yanhua
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA USA.
    Nielson, Carrie M.
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR USA.
    Harris, Tamara B.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, Intramural Res Program, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Demissie, Serkalem
    Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Boston, MA USA.
    Kiel, Douglas P.
    Hebrew Senior Life Inst Aging Res, Boston, MA USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Dept Med, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Ohlsson, Claes
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Disentangling the genetics of lean mass2019In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 109, no 2, p. 276-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lean body mass (LM) plays an important role in mobility and metabolic function. We previously identified five loci associated with LM adjusted for fat mass in kilograms. Such an adjustment may reduce the power to identify genetic signals having an association with both lean mass and fat mass. Objectives: To determine the impact of different fat mass adjustments on genetic architecture of LM and identify additional LM loci. Methods: We performed genome-wide association analyses for whole-body LM (20 cohorts of European ancestry with n = 38,292) measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) or bioelectrical impedance analysis, adjusted for sex, age, age(2), and height with or without fat mass adjustments (Model 1 no fat adjustment; Model 2 adjustment for fat mass as a percentage of body mass; Model 3 adjustment for fat mass in kilograms). Results: Seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in separate loci, including one novel LM locus (TNRC6B), were successfully replicated in an additional 47,227 individuals from 29 cohorts. Based on the strengths of the associations in Model 1 vs Model 3, we divided the LM loci into those with an effect on both lean mass and fat mass in the same direction and refer to those as "sumo wrestler" loci (FTO and MC4R). In contrast, loci with an impact specifically on LMwere termed "body builder" loci (VCAN and ADAMTSL3). Using existing available genome-wide association study databases, LM increasing alleles of SNPs in sumo wrestler loci were associated with an adverse metabolic profile, whereas LM increasing alleles of SNPs in "body builder" loci were associated with metabolic protection. Conclusions: In conclusion, we identified one novel LM locus (TNRC6B). Our results suggest that a genetically determined increase in lean mass might exert either harmful or protective effects on metabolic traits, depending on its relation to fat mass.

  • 48.
    Karlsson, F.A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Severe embryopathy and exposure to methimazole in early pregnancy2002In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 87, no 2, p. 947-949Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Karlsson, Julia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hallberg, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Kurland, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Kahan, T.
    Malmqvist, K.
    Ohman, K. P.
    Nyström, F.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Beta1-adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms and response to beta1-adrenergic receptor blockade in patients with essential hypertension2004In: Clinical Cardiology, ISSN 0160-9289, E-ISSN 1932-8737, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 347-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies suggest that the Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly polymorphisms in the beta1-adrenergic receptor might be of functional importance for the cardiovascular system. Both have been associated with altered receptor activity in vitro, and with hypertension and cardiac failure in vivo. HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to test whether these polymorphisms were associated with the change in heart rate or blood pressure in patients with essential hypertension and left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy treated with the beta1-adrenergic receptor blocker atenolol. METHODS: Blood pressure and heart rate were measured in 101 hypertensive patients with echocardiographically verified LV hypertrophy, randomized in a double-blind study to treatment with either the beta1-adrenergic receptor blocker atenolol or the angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist irbesartan. Changes in blood pressure and heart rate were evaluated after 12 weeks. Beta1-adrenergic receptor genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. RESULTS: We found no significant associations between the changes in the measured variables and either of the two polymorphisms. However, carriers of the 49Gly allele showed a tendency toward a greater reduction in heart rate compared with patients with the Ser/Ser49 genotype (p = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: The Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly beta1-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms do not seem to exert a major effect on the changes in heart rate and blood pressure during 12 weeks of treatment with atenolol in patients with essential hypertension and LV hypertrophy.

  • 50.
    Kempen, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Bertilsson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lindner, Karl-Johan
    Pharmacy Department, Västmanland County Council, Västerås, Sweden.
    Sulku, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Reg Gavleborg, Dept Dev, Gavle, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Elisabet I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Högberg, Angelica
    Reg Gavleborg, Dept Dev, Gavle, Sweden.
    Vikerfors, Tomas
    Vasteras Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Gillespie, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Medication Reviews Bridging Healthcare (MedBridge): Study protocol for a pragmatic cluster-randomised crossover trial2017In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, ISSN 1551-7144, E-ISSN 1559-2030, Vol. 61, p. 126-132, article id S1551-7144(16)30455-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mismanaged prescribing and use of medication among elderly puts major pressure on current healthcare systems. Performing a medication review, a structured critical examination of a patient's medications, during hospital stay with active follow-up into primary care could optimise treatment benefit and minimise harm. However, a lack of high quality evidence inhibits widespread implementation. This manuscript describes the rationale and design of a pragmatic cluster-randomised, crossover trial to fulfil this need for evidence.

    AIM: To study the effects of hospital-initiated comprehensive medication reviews, including active follow-up, on elderly patients' healthcare utilisation compared to 1) usual care and 2) solely hospital based reviews.

    DESIGN: Multicentre, three-treatment, replicated, cluster-randomised, crossover trial.

    SETTING: 8 wards with a multidisciplinary team within 4 hospitals in 3 Swedish counties.

    PARTICIPANTS: Patients aged 65years or older, admitted to one of the study wards.

    EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Palliative stage; residing in other than the hospital's county; medication review within the last 30days; one-day admission.

    INTERVENTIONS: 1, comprehensive medication review during hospital stay; 2, same as 1 with the addition of active follow-up into primary care; 3, usual care.

    PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURE: Incidence of unplanned hospital visits during a 12-month follow-up period.

    DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSES: Extraction and collection from the counties' medical record system into a GCP compliant electronic data capture system. Intention-to-treat-analyses using hierarchical models.

    RELEVANCE: This study has a high potential to show a reduction in elderly patients' morbidity, contributing to more sustainable healthcare in the long run.

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