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  • 1. Accordini, S
    et al.
    Corsico, A
    Cerveri, I
    Gislason, D
    Gulsvik, A
    Janson, C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Jarvis, D
    Marcon, A
    Pin, I
    Vermeire, P
    Almar, E
    Bugiani, M
    Cazzoletti, L
    Duran-Tauleria, E
    Jõgi, R
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Marinoni, A
    Martínez-Moratalla, J
    Leynaert, B
    de Marco, R
    The socio-economic burden of asthma is substantial in Europe2008In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 116-124Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Few data are available on the asthma burden in the general population. We evaluated the level and the factors associated with the asthma burden in Europe. METHODS: In 1999-2002, 1152 adult asthmatics were identified in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS)-II and the socio-economic burden (reduced activity days and hospital services utilization in the past 12 months) was assessed. RESULTS: The asthmatics with a light burden (only a few reduced activity days) were 13.2% (95% CI: 11.4-15.3%), whereas those with a heavy burden (many reduced activity days and/or hospital services utilization) were 14.0% (95% CI: 12.1-16.1%). The burden was strongly associated with disease severity and a lower quality of life. Obese asthmatics had a significantly increased risk of a light [relative risk ratio (RRR) = 2.17; 95% CI: 1.18-4.00] or a heavy burden (RRR = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.52-5.05) compared with normal/underweight subjects. The asthmatics with frequent respiratory symptoms showed a threefold (RRR = 2.74; 95% CI: 1.63-4.61) and sixfold (RRR = 5.76; 95% CI: 3.25-10.20) increased risk of a light or a heavy burden compared with asymptomatic asthmatics, respectively. Moreover, the lower the forced expiratory volume in 1 s % predicted, the higher the risk of a heavy burden. The coexistence with chronic cough/phlegm only increased the risk of a heavy burden (RRR = 1.88; 95% CI: 1.16-3.06). An interaction was found between gender and IgE sensitization, with nonatopic asthmatic females showing the highest risk of a heavy burden (21.6%; 95% CI: 16.9-27.1%). CONCLUSIONS: The asthma burden is substantial in Europe. A heavy burden is more common in asthmatics with obesity, frequent respiratory symptoms, low lung function, chronic cough/phlegm and in nonatopic females.

  • 2. Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Corsico, Angelo G.
    Braggion, Marco
    Gerbase, Margaret W.
    Gislason, David
    Gulsvik, Amund
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Jarvis, Deborah
    Jõgi, Rain
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Pin, Isabelle
    Schoefer, Yvonne
    Bugiani, Massimiliano
    Cazzoletti, Lucia
    Cerveri, Isa
    Marcon, Alessandro
    de Marco, Roberto
    The Cost of Persistent Asthma in Europe: An International Population-Based Study in Adults2013In: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 1018-2438, E-ISSN 1423-0097, Vol. 160, no 1, p. 93-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study is aimed at providing a real-world evaluation of the economic cost of persistent asthma among European adults according to the degree of disease control [as defined by the 2006 Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines]. Methods: A prevalence-based cost-of-illness study was carried out on 462 patients aged 30-54 years with persistent asthma (according to the 2002 GINA definition), who were identified in general population samples from 11 European countries and examined in clinical settings in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II between 1999 and 2002. The cost estimates were computed from the societal perspective following the bottom-up approach on the basis of rates, wages and prices in 2004 (obtained at the national level from official sources), and were then converted to the 2010 values. Results: The mean total cost per patient was EUR 1,583 and was largely driven by indirect costs (i.e. lost working days and days with limited, not work-related activities 62.5%). The expected total cost in the population aged 30-54 years of the 11 European countries was EUR 4.3 billion (EUR 19.3 billion when extended to the whole European population aged from 15 to 64 years). The mean total cost per patient ranged from EUR 509 (controlled asthma) to EUR 2,281 (uncontrolled disease). Chronic cough or phlegm and having a high BMI significantly increased the individual total cost. Conclusions: Among European adults, the cost of persistent asthma drastically increases as disease control decreases. Therefore, substantial cost savings could be obtained through the proper management of adult patients in Europe.

  • 3. Accordini, Simone
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Jarvis, Deborah
    The Role of Smoking in Allergy and Asthma: Lessons from the ECRHS2012In: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports, ISSN 1529-7322, E-ISSN 1534-6315, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 185-191Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Community Respiratory Health Survey is an international multicenter cohort study of asthma, allergy, and lung function that began in the early-1990s with recruitment of population-based samples of 20- to 44-year-old adults, mainly in Europe. The aims of the study are broad ranging but include assessment of the role of in utero exposure to tobacco smoke, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, and active smoking on the incidence, prevalence, and prognosis of allergy and asthma. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses looking at these associations have been conducted, sometimes only using information collected in one country, and on other occasions using information collected in all the participating centers. This article summarizes the results from these various publications from this large epidemiologic study.

  • 4. Adrian, L.
    et al.
    Svanes, C.
    Johannessen, A.
    Lodge, C.
    Bertelsen, R.
    Dratva, J.
    Forsberg, B.
    Gislason, T.
    Benedikstdottir, B.
    Holm, M.
    Jogi, R.
    Modig, L.
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Omenaas, E.
    Real, F.
    Schlunssen, V
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Skorge, T.
    Timm, S.
    Wieslander, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Dharmage, S.
    Early life parental exposure to cats and dogs reduces the risk of allergic disease in their children: possible intergenerational effect2014In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 69, p. 577-578Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ahlroth Pind, Caroline
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Gunnbjörnsdottír, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research. National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Bjerg, A
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Järvholm, B
    Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Lundbäck, B
    Univ Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Middelveld, R
    Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson Sommar, J
    Umeå Univ, Umeå, Sweden.
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Patient-reported signs of dampness at home may be a risk factor for chronic rhinosinusitis: A cross-sectional study2017In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 47, no 11, p. 1383-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An association between dampness at home and respiratory conditions has been convincingly demonstrated in children. Fewer studies have been performed in adults, and data are lacking for chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). With a prevalence of 10.9% in Europe, CRS imposes a significant burden on quality of life, as well as economy.

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to study CRS and other respiratory conditions in relation to dampness at home in a representative sample of adults.

    METHODS: The Swedish GA2 LEN questionnaire was answered by 26 577 adults (16-75 years) and included questions on respiratory symptoms, smoking, education and environmental exposure. CRS was defined according to the EP3 OS criteria. Dampness was defined as reporting water damage, floor dampness or visible moulds in the home during the last 12 months. The dampness score was ranked from 0 to 3, counting the number of signs of dampness reported.

    RESULTS: Dampness at home was reported by 11.3% and was independently related to respiratory conditions after adjustment for demographic and socio-economic factors and smoking: CRS odds ratio (OR) 1.71; allergic rhinitis OR 1.24; current asthma OR 1.21; wheeze OR 1.37; nocturnal dyspnoea OR 1.80; nocturnal coughing OR 1.34; and chronic bronchitis OR 1.64. The risk of CRS and most of the other respiratory conditions was further elevated in subjects reporting multiple signs of dampness.

    CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This study demonstrated an independent association between dampness at home and CRS in adults. The high burden of this and the other respiratory conditions studied is a strong argument in favour of countering indoor dampness by improving building standards.

  • 6.
    Ahmadi, Zainab
    et al.
    Univ Lund Hosp, Div Resp Med & Allergol, Dept Clin Sci, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Lundstrom, Staffan
    Stockholms Sjukhem Fdn, Palliat Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci Resp Med & Allergol, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Strang, Peter
    Stockholms Sjukhem Fdn, Palliat Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Oncol Pathol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy.
    Currow, David C.
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Discipline Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Palliat Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Support Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia..
    Ekström, Magnus
    Univ Lund Hosp, Div Resp Med & Allergol, Dept Clin Sci, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Discipline Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Palliat Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Support Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia..
    End-of-life care in oxygen-dependent COPD and cancer: a national population-based study2015In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 1190-1193Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ahmadi, Zainab
    et al.
    Univ Lund Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Div Resp Med & Allergol, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Wysham, Nicholas G.
    Duke Univ, Duke Clin Res Inst, Ctr Learning Hlth Care, Div Pulm Allergy & Crit Care,Dept Med, Durham, NC USA..
    Lundstrom, Staffan
    Stockholms Sjukhem Fdn, Palliat Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Currow, David C.
    Flinders Univ S Australia, Dept Discipline Palliat & Support Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia..
    Ekstrom, Magnus
    Univ Lund Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Div Resp Med & Allergol, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden.;Flinders Univ S Australia, Dept Discipline Palliat & Support Serv, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia..
    End-of-life care in oxygen-dependent ILD compared with lung cancer: a national population-based study2016In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 510-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: Advanced fibrosing interstitial lung disease (ILD) is often progressive and associated with a high burden of symptoms and poor prognosis. Little is known about the symptom prevalence and access to palliative care services at end of life (EOL).

    Objectives: Compare prevalence of symptoms and palliative treatments between patients dying with oxygen-dependent ILD and patients dying of lung cancer.

    Methods: Nationwide registry-based cohort study of patients with oxygen-dependent ILD and patients with lung cancer who died between 1 January 2011 and 14 October 2013. Prevalence of symptoms and treatments during the last seven days of life were compared using data in Swedish Registry of Palliative Care.

    Measurements and main results: 285 patients with ILD and 10 822 with lung cancer were included. In ILD, death was more likely to be 'unexpected' (15% vs 4%), less likely to occur in a palliative care setting (17% vs 40%) and EOL discussions with the patients (41% vs 59%) were less common than in lung cancer. Patients with ILD suffered more from breathlessness (75% vs 42%) while patients with lung cancer had more pain (51% vs 73%) (p<0.005 for all comparisons). Patients with ILD had more unrelieved breathlessness, pain and anxiety. The survival time from initiation of oxygen therapy in ILD was a median 8.4 months (IQR 3.4-19.2 months).

    Conclusions: Patients with ILD receive poorer access to specialist EOL care services and experience more breathlessness than patients with lung cancer. This study highlights the need of better EOL care in oxygen-dependent ILD.

  • 8.
    Al-Shamkhi, Nasrin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Dahlen, S. E.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Expt Asthma & Allergy Res Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hedlin, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Middelveld, R.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Expt Asthma & Allergy Res Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bjerg, A.
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ekerljung, L.
    Univ Gothenburg, Krefting Res Ctr, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Olin, A. C.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sect Occupat & Environm Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, Inst Med,Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Sommar, J.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Occupat & Environm Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Forsberg, B.
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med Occupat & Environm Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Important non-disease-related determinants of exhaled nitric oxide levels in mild asthma - results from the Swedish GA(2)LEN study2016In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 46, no 9, p. 1185-1193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) has a potential clinical role in asthma management. Constitutive factors such as age, height and gender, as well as individual characteristics, such as IgE sensitization and smoking, affect the levels of FeNO in population-based studies. However, their effect on FeNO in subjects with asthma has been scarcely studied. Objective To study the effects on FeNO of these commonly regarded determinants, as demonstrated in healthy subjects, as well as menarche age and parental smoking, in a population of asthmatics. Material and Methods Fractional exhaled nitric oxide was measured in 557 subjects with asthma from the Swedish GA(2)LEN study. Allergic sensitization was assessed by skin prick tests to most common aeroallergens. Upper airway comorbidities, smoking habits, smoking exposure during childhood and hormonal status (for women) were questionnaire-assessed. Results Male gender (P < 0.001), greater height (P < 0.001) and sensitization to both perennial allergens and pollen (P < 0.001) are related to higher FeNO levels. Current smoking (P < 0.001) and having both parents smoking during childhood, vs. having neither (P < 0.001) or only one parent smoking (P = 0.002), are related to lower FeNO. Women with menarche between 9 and 11 years of age had lower FeNO than those with menarche between 12 and 14 years of age (P = 0.03) or 15 and 17 years of age (P = 0.003). Conclusions and Clinical relevance Interpreting FeNO levels in clinical practice is complex, and constitutional determinants, as well as smoking and IgE sensitisation, are of importance in asthmatic subjects and should be accounted for when interpreting FeNO levels. Furthermore, menarche age and parental smoking during childhood and their effects on lowering FeNO deserve further studies.

  • 9. Alving, Kjell
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Nordvall, Lennart
    Performance of a new hand-held device for exhaled nitric oxide measurement in adults and children.2006In: Respir Res, ISSN 1465-993X, Vol. 7, p. 67-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10. Amaral, A F S
    et al.
    Minelli, C
    Guerra, S
    Wjst, M
    Probst-Hensch, N
    Pin, I
    Svanes, C
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Heinrich, J
    Jarvis, D L
    The locus C11orf30 increases susceptibility to poly-sensitization2015In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 328-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of genetic variants have been associated with allergic sensitization, but whether these are allergen specific or increase susceptibility to poly-sensitization is unknown. Using data from the large multicentre population-based European Community Respiratory Health Survey, we assessed the association between 10 loci and specific IgE and skin prick tests to individual allergens and poly-sensitization. We found that the 10 loci associate with sensitization to different allergens in a nonspecific manner and that one in particular, C11orf30-rs2155219, doubles the risk of poly-sensitization (specific IgE/4 allergens: OR = 1.81, 95% CI 0.80-4.24; skin prick test/4+ allergens: OR = 2.27, 95% CI 1.34-3.95). The association of rs2155219 with higher levels of expression of C11orf30, which may be involved in transcription repression of interferon-stimulated genes, and its association with sensitization to multiple allergens suggest that this locus is highly relevant for atopy.

  • 11.
    Amaral, Andre F. S.
    et al.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Coton, Sonia
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Kato, Bernet
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Tan, Wan C.
    Univ British Columbia, Heart Lung Innovat Ctr, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada..
    Studnicka, Michael
    Paracelsus Med Univ, Dept Pulm Med, Salzburg, Austria..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Landspitali Univ Hosp, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Mannino, David
    Univ Kentucky, Div Pulm Crit Care & Sleep Med, Lexington, KY USA..
    Bateman, Eric D.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Med, ZA-7925 Cape Town, South Africa..
    Buist, Sonia
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Burney, Peter G. J.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Lung function defects in treated pulmonary tuberculosis patients2016In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 352-353Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Amaral, Andre F. S.
    et al.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Coton, Sonia
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Kato, Bernet
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Tan, Wan C.
    Univ British Columbia, Heart Lung Innovat Ctr, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada..
    Studnicka, Michael
    Paracelsus Med Univ, Dept Pulm Med, Salzburg, Austria..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Landspitali Univ Hosp, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Mannino, David
    Univ Kentucky, Div Pulm Crit Care & Sleep Med, Lexington, KY USA..
    Bateman, Eric D.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Med, ZA-7925 Cape Town, South Africa..
    Buist, Sonia
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Portland, OR 97201 USA..
    Burney, Peter G. J.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Tuberculosis associates with both airflow obstruction and low lung function: BOLD results2015In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 1104-1112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In small studies and cases series, a history of tuberculosis has been associated with both airflow obstruction, which is characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and restrictive patterns on spirometry. The objective of the present study was to assess the association between a history of tuberculosis and airflow obstruction and spirometric abnormalities in adults. The study was performed in adults, aged 40 years and above, who took part in the multicentre, cross-sectional, general population-based Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease study, and had provided acceptable post-bronchodilator spirometry measurements and information on a history of tuberculosis. The associations between a history of tuberculosis and airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction were assessed within each participating centre, and estimates combined using meta-analysis. These estimates were stratified by high- and low/middle-income countries, according to gross national income. A self-reported history of tuberculosis was associated with airflow obstruction (adjusted odds ratio 2.51, 95% CI 1.83-3.42) and spirometric restriction (adjusted odds ratio 2.13, 95% CI 1.42-3.19). A history of tuberculosis was associated with both airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction, and should be considered as a potentially important cause of obstructive disease and low lung function, particularly where tuberculosis is common.

  • 13.
    Amaral, Andre F. S.
    et al.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Emmanuel Kaye Bldg,1B Manresa Rd, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Newson, Roger B.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Emmanuel Kaye Bldg,1B Manresa Rd, London SW3 6LR, England.;Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Dept Primary Care & Publ Hlth, Sch Publ Hlth, London, England..
    Abramson, Michael J.
    Monash Univ, Sch Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia..
    Anto, Josep M.
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona, Spain.;IMIM Hosp del Mar, Med Res Inst, Barcelona, Spain.;UPF, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain..
    Bono, Roberto
    Univ Turin, Dept Publ Hlth & Pediat, Turin, Italy..
    Corsico, Angelo G.
    Univ Pavia, Div Resp Dis, IRCCS Policlin San Matteo Fdn, Via Palestro 3, I-27100 Pavia, Italy..
    de Marco, Roberto
    Univ Verona, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Dept Publ Hlth & Community Med, I-37100 Verona, Italy..
    Demoly, Pascal
    CHU Montpellier, Dept Pulmonol, Div Allergy, Arnaud de Villeneuve Hosp, Paris, France.;INSERM, EPAR Team, UMR S 1136, Paris, France..
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umea Univ, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden..
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Landspitali, Dept Resp Med & Sleep, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Helmholtz Zentrum, Inst Epidemiol 1, Munich, Germany.;Univ Munich, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & Environm, Inner City Clin, Univ Hosp Munich, Munich, Germany..
    Huerta, Ismael
    Dept Hlth Asturias, Directorate Gen Publ Hlth, Epidemiol Surveillance Sect, Oviedo, Spain..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Jogi, Rain
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research. Tartu Univ Hosp, Lung Clin, Tartu, Estonia..
    Kim, Jeong-Lim
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Publich Hlth & Community Med, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Maldonado, Jose
    Univ Hosp Huelva, Unit Clin Management Pneumol & Allergy, Huelva, Spain..
    Rovira, Jesus Martinez-Moratalla
    Univ Hosp Albacete, Unit Pneumol, Albacete, Spain..
    Neukirch, Catherine
    INSERM, UMR1152, Paris, France.;Univ Paris 07, UMR1152, Paris, France..
    Nowak, Dennis
    Univ Munich, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & Environm, Inner City Clin, Univ Hosp Munich, Munich, Germany.;German Ctr Lung Res, Munich, Germany..
    Pin, Isabelle
    CHU Grenoble, Pole Couple Enfants, Pediat, F-38043 Grenoble, France.;Inst Albert Bonniot, INSERM, U823, Grenoble, France.;Univ Grenoble 1, Grenoble, France..
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Basel, Switzerland.;Univ Basel, Basel, Switzerland..
    Raherison-Semjen, Chantal
    Bordeaux Univ, Inst Publ Hlth & Epidemiol, INSERM, U897, Bordeaux, France..
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, N-5021 Bergen, Norway..
    Landa, Isabel Urrutia
    Galdakao Hosp, Dept Pneumol, Bizkaia, Spain..
    van Ree, Ronald
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Expt Immunol, Meibergdreef 9, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Meibergdreef 9, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Versteeg, Serge A.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Expt Immunol, Meibergdreef 9, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Weyler, Joost
    Univ Antwerp, Epidemiol & Social Med, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium.;Univ Antwerp, StatUA Stat Ctr, B-2020 Antwerp, Belgium..
    Zock, Jan-Paul
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona, Spain.;UPF, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain..
    Burney, Peter G. J.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Emmanuel Kaye Bldg,1B Manresa Rd, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Jarvis, Deborah L.
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Emmanuel Kaye Bldg,1B Manresa Rd, London SW3 6LR, England..
    Changes in IgE sensitization and total IgE levels over 20 years of follow-up2016In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 137, no 6, p. 1788-1795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cross-sectional studies have reported a lower prevalence of sensitization in older adults, but few longitudinal studies have examined whether this is an aging or a year-of-birth cohort effect. Objective: We sought to assess changes in sensitization and total IgE levels in a cohort of European adults as they aged over a 20-year period. Methods: Levels of serum specific IgE to common aeroallergens (house dust mite, cat, and grass) and total IgE levels were measured in 3206 adults from 25 centers in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey on 3 occasions over 20 years. Changes in sensitization and total IgE levels were analyzed by using regression analysis corrected for potential differences in laboratory equipment and by using inverse sampling probability weights to account for nonresponse. Results: Over the 20-year follow-up, the prevalence of sensitization to at least 1 of the 3 allergens decreased from 29.4% to 24.8% (-4.6%; 95% CI, -7.0% to -2.1%). The prevalence of sensitization to house dust mite (-4.3%; 95% CI, -6.0% to -2.6%) and cat (-2.1%; 95% CI, -3.6% to -0.7%) decreased more than sensitization to grass (-0.6%; 95% CI, -2.5% to 1.3%). Age-specific prevalence of sensitization to house dust mite and cat did not differ between year-of-birth cohorts, but sensitization to grass was most prevalent in the most recent ones. Overall, total IgE levels decreased significantly (geometric mean ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.58-0.68) at all ages in all year-of-birth cohorts. Conclusion: Aging was associated with lower levels of sensitization, especially to house dust mite and cat, after the age of 20 years.

  • 14. Amaral, Andre F. S.
    et al.
    Ramasamy, Adaikalavan
    Castro-Giner, Francesc
    Minelli, Cosetta
    Accordini, Simone
    Sorheim, Inga-Cecilie
    Pin, Isabelle
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Jõgi, Rain
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Balding, David J.
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Verlato, Giuseppe
    Olivieri, Mario
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Zock, Jan-Paul
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Jarvis, Deborah L.
    Interaction between gas cooking and GSTM1 null genotype in bronchial responsiveness: results from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey2014In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 69, no 6, p. 558-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Increased bronchial responsiveness is characteristic of asthma. Gas cooking, which is a major indoor source of the highly oxidant nitrogen dioxide, has been associated with respiratory symptoms and reduced lung function. However, little is known about the effect of gas cooking on bronchial responsiveness and on how this relationship may be modified by variants in the genes GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1, which influence antioxidant defences. Methods The study was performed in subjects with forced expiratory volume in one second at least 70% of predicted who took part in the multicentre European Community Respiratory Health Survey, had bronchial responsiveness assessed by methacholine challenge and had been genotyped for GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1-rs1695. Information on the use of gas for cooking was obtained from interviewer-led questionnaires. Effect modification by genotype on the association between the use of gas for cooking and bronchial responsiveness was assessed within each participating country, and estimates combined using meta-analysis. Results Overall, gas cooking, as compared with cooking with electricity, was not associated with bronchial responsiveness (beta=-0.08, 95% CI -0.40 to 0.25, p=0.648). However, GSTM1 significantly modified this effect (beta for interaction=-0.75, 95% CI - 1.16 to -0.33, p=4x10(-4)), with GSTM1 null subjects showing more responsiveness if they cooked with gas. No effect modification by GSTT1 or GSTP1-rs1695 genotypes was observed. Conclusions Increased bronchial responsiveness was associated with gas cooking among subjects with the GSTM1 null genotype. This may reflect the oxidant effects on the bronchi of exposure to nitrogen dioxide.

  • 15.
    Amaral, Rita
    et al.
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, CINTESIS Ctr Hlth Technol & Serv Res, Edificio Nascente,Piso 2,Rua Dr Placido Costa S-N, P-4200450 Porto, Portugal;Porto Hlth Sch, Dept Cardiovasc & Resp Sci, Porto, Portugal.
    Fonseca, Joao A.
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, CINTESIS Ctr Hlth Technol & Serv Res, Edificio Nascente,Piso 2,Rua Dr Placido Costa S-N, P-4200450 Porto, Portugal;Univ Porto, Fac Med, MEDCIDS Dept Community Med Informat & Hlth Sci, Porto, Portugal;Inst & Hosp CUF, Dept Allergy, Porto, Portugal.
    Jacinto, Tiago
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, CINTESIS Ctr Hlth Technol & Serv Res, Edificio Nascente,Piso 2,Rua Dr Placido Costa S-N, P-4200450 Porto, Portugal;Porto Hlth Sch, Dept Cardiovasc & Resp Sci, Porto, Portugal;Inst & Hosp CUF, Dept Allergy, Porto, Portugal.
    Pereira, Ana M.
    Univ Porto, Fac Med, CINTESIS Ctr Hlth Technol & Serv Res, Edificio Nascente,Piso 2,Rua Dr Placido Costa S-N, P-4200450 Porto, Portugal;Inst & Hosp CUF, Dept Allergy, Porto, Portugal.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Alving, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Having concomitant asthma phenotypes is common and independently relates to poor lung function in NHANES 2007-20122018In: Clinical and Translational Allergy, ISSN 2045-7022, E-ISSN 2045-7022, Vol. 8, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Evidence for distinct asthma phenotypes and their overlap is becoming increasingly relevant to identify personalized and targeted therapeutic strategies. In this study, we aimed to describe the overlap of five commonly reported asthma phenotypes in US adults with current asthma and assess its association with asthma outcomes. Methods: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) 2007-2012 were used (n =30,442). Adults with current asthma were selected. Asthma phenotypes were: B-Eos-high [if blood eosinophils (B-Eos) >= 300/mm(3)]; FeNO-high (FeNO >= 35 ppb); B-Eos&FeNO-low (B-Eos < 150/mm(3) and FeNO < 20 ppb); asthma with obesity (AwObesity) (BMI >= 30 kg/m(2)); and asthma with concurrent COPD. Data were weighted for the US population and analyses were stratified by age (< 40 and >= 40 years old). Results: Of the 18,619 adults included, 1059 (5.6% [95% CI 5.1-5.9]) had current asthma. A substantial overlap was observed both in subjects aged < 40 years (44%) and >= 40 years (54%). The more prevalent specific overlaps in both age groups were AwObesity associated with either B-Eos-high (15 and 12%, respectively) or B-Eos&FeNO-low asthma (13 and 11%, respectively). About 14% of the current asthma patients were"non-classified". Regardless of phenotype classification, having concomitant phenotypes was significantly associated with (adjusted OR, 95% CI) >= 2 controller medications (2.03, 1.16-3.57), and FEV1 < LLN (3.21, 1.74-5.94), adjusted for confounding variables. Conclusions: A prevalent overlap of commonly reported asthma phenotypes was observed among asthma patients from the general population, with implications for objective asthma outcomes. A broader approach may be required to better characterize asthma patients and prevent poor asthma outcomes.

  • 16.
    Amin, Kawa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Boman, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    The extracellular deposition of mast cell products is increased in hypertrophic airways smooth muscles in allergic asthma but not in nonallergic asthma2005In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 60, no 10, p. 1241-1247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Bronchial asthma is characterized by airways smooth muscle hypertrophy and infiltration of mast cells in the bronchial mucosa. The aim of this investigation was to study the distribution of mast cells in different compartments in the bronchial mucosa of allergic and nonallergic asthma in relation to airways remodeling.

    METHODS: Bronchial biopsies were obtained from 29 subjects with allergic and nonallergic asthma and healthy controls. The biopsies were stained for mast cells by means of the tryptase specific antibody AA1. Extracellular deposition of mast cell products were judged on a semi-quantitative scale. Mast cells per mm(2) were counted in epithelium, lamina propria and the smooth muscle compartment. Smooth muscle was visualized by actin antibodies and the proportion of staining of the biopsy estimated. Laminin and tenascin layers were visualized by their respective antibodies.

    RESULTS: Airways smooth muscle thickness was greater in allergic vs nonallergic asthma (P < 0.001). Mast cells were increased in all three compartments in both allergic and nonallergic asthma, with significantly higher numbers in smooth muscles in allergic asthma (P < 0.03). The extracellular deposition of mast cell products was more common in allergic than nonallergic asthma in lamina propria and smooth muscles (P = 0.025; P = 0.002, respectively). In patients with allergic asthma the numbers of mast cells with extracellular deposition of mast cell products were significantly correlated to the thickness of the laminin and tenascin layers.

    CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that there are large differences between allergic and nonallergic asthmatics as to mast cell activation and airways smooth muscle thickness. Our data implies that mast cells are causally involved in structural alterations in allergic asthma.

  • 17.
    Amin, Kawa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Harvima, Ilkka
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gunnar
    CC chemokine receptors CCR1 and CCR4 are expressed on airway mast cells in allergic asthma2005In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 116, no 6, p. 1383-1386Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Amin, Kawa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Sevéus, Lahja
    Miyazaki, Kaoru
    Virtanen, Ismo
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Uncoordinated production of Laminin-5 chains in airways epithelium of allergic asthmatics2005In: Respiratory research (Online), ISSN 1465-9921, E-ISSN 1465-993X, Vol. 6, p. 110-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Laminins are a group of proteins largely responsible for the anchorage of cells to basement membranes. We hypothesized that altered Laminin chain production in the bronchial mucosa might explain the phenomenon of epithelial cell shedding in asthma. The aim was to characterize the presence of Laminin chains in the SEBM and epithelium in allergic and non-allergic asthmatics.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Biopsies were taken from the bronchi of 11 patients with allergic and 9 patients with non-allergic asthma and from 7 controls and stained with antibodies against the Laminin (ln) chains alpha1-alpha5, beta1-beta2 and gamma1-gamma2.

    RESULTS: Lns-2,-5 and -10 were the main Laminins of SEBM. The layer of ln-10 was thicker in the two asthmatic groups while an increased thickness of lns-2 and -5 was only seen in allergic asthmatics. The ln gamma2-chain, which is only found in ln 5, was exclusively expressed in epithelial cells in association with epithelial injury and in the columnar epithelium of allergic asthmatics.

    CONCLUSION: The uncoordinated production of chains of ln-5 in allergic asthma could have a bearing on the poor epithelial cell anchorage in these patients.

  • 19.
    Andersson Kallin, Sandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Sommar, Johan Nilsson
    Bossios, Apostolos
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Middelveld, Roelinde
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Excessive daytime sleepiness in asthma: what are the risk factors?2016In: Journal of Asthma, ISSN 0277-0903, E-ISSN 1532-4303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have found that excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is a more common problem in asthmatic subjects than in the general population. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the prevalence of EDS is increased in asthmatic subjects and, if so, to analyse the occurrence of potential risk factors for EDS in asthmatics.

    METHODS: Cross-sectional epidemiological study. In 2008, a postal questionnaire was sent out to a random sample of 45,000 individuals aged 16-75 years in four Swedish cities.

    RESULTS: Of the 25,160 persons who participated, 7.3% were defined as having asthma. The prevalence of EDS was significantly higher in asthmatic subjects (42.1% vs 28.5%, p<0.001) compared with non-asthmatic subjects. Asthma was an independent risk factor for EDS (adjusted OR 1.29) and the risk of having EDS increased with asthma severity. Risk factors for EDS in subjects with asthma included insomnia (OR, 3.87; 95% CI, 3.10-4.84), chronic rhinosinusitis (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.53-2.62), current smoking (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.15-2.22) and obesity (OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.09-2.13).

    CONCLUSIONS: EDS is a common problem among subjects with asthma. Asthma is an independent risk factor for having EDS. Furthermore, subjects with asthma often have other risk factors for EDS, many of them potentially modifiable.

  • 20.
    Andersson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotheraphy.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotheraphy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Accuracy of three activity monitors in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A comparison with video recordings2014In: COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1541-2555, E-ISSN 1541-2563, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 560-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low physical activity and sedentary behaviour characterise the lives of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using activity monitors, assessment of both aspects are possible, but many outcomes are not well validated. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy and equivalency of three activity monitors regarding steps, body position and their ability to differentiate between periods of physical activity and inactivity.

    Fifteen patients with COPD (8 females; median (interquartile range, IQR) age, 64 (59-69) years; forced expiratory volume in one second, 37 (28-48) % predicted; six-minute walk distance, 444 (410-519) m) were enrolled. The DynaPort ADL-monitor, the DynaPort MiniMod monitor and the SenseWear Armband Pro 3 monitor were assessed. Subjects performed a structured protocol alternating physical activity and inactivity while simultaneously wearing all three monitors and being video recorded.

    The mean difference (limits of agreement) in step count from monitors compared to manual step count was -69 (-443 to 305) for the ADL-monitor, -19 (-141 to 103) for the MiniMod and -479 (-855 to -103) for the SenseWear Armband. Compared to the video, the sitting time was 97 (94-100) % when measured by the ADL-monitor and 121 (110-139) % by the MiniMod. Standing time was 114 (107-122) % when measured by the ADL-monitor and 68 (47-106) % by the MiniMod.

    Activity monitors are not equivalent in their abilities to detect steps or body positions. The choice of monitor should be based on the particular outcome of interest. 

  • 21.
    Andersson, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotheraphy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Slinde, Frode
    Groenberg, Anne Marie
    Svantesson, Ulla
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotheraphy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Physical activity level and its clinical correlates in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross-sectional study2013In: Respiratory research (Online), ISSN 1465-9921, E-ISSN 1465-993X, Vol. 14, p. 128-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Decreased physical activity is associated with higher mortality in subjects with COPD. The aim of this study was to assess clinical characteristics and physical activity levels (PALs) in subjects with COPD. Methods: Seventy-three subjects with COPD (67 +/- 7 yrs, 44 female) with one-second forced expiratory volume percentage (FEV1%) predicted values of 43 +/- 16 were included. The ratio of total energy expenditure (TEE) and resting metabolic rate (RMR) was used to define the physical activity level (PAL) (PAL = TEE/RMR). TEE was assessed with an activity monitor (ActiReg), and RMR was measured by indirect calorimetry. Walking speed (measured over 30-meters), maximal quadriceps muscle strength, fat-free mass and systemic inflammation were measured as clinical characteristics. Hierarchical linear regression was applied to investigate the explanatory values of the clinical correlates to PAL. Results: The mean PAL was 1.47 +/- 0.19, and 92% of subjects were classified as physically very inactive or sedentary. The walking speed was 1.02 +/- 0.23 m/s, the quadriceps strength was 31.3 +/- 11.2 kg, and the fat-free mass index (FFMI) was 15.7 +/- 2.3 kg/m(2), identifying 42% of subjects as slow walkers, 21% as muscle-weak and 49% as FFM-depleted. The regression model explained 45.5% (p < 0.001) of the variance in PAL. The FEV1% predicted explained the largest proportion (22.5%), with further improvements in the model from walking speed (10.1%), muscle strength (7.0%) and FFMI (3.0%). Neither age, gender nor systemic inflammation contributed to the model. Conclusions: Apart from lung function, walking speed and muscle strength are important correlates of physical activity. Further explorations of the longitudinal effects of the factors characterizing the most inactive subjects are warranted.

  • 22. Anto, J. M.
    et al.
    Sunyer, J.
    Basagana, X.
    Garcia-Esteban, R.
    Cerveri, I.
    de Marco, R.
    Heinrich, J.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Jarvis, D.
    Kogevinas, M.
    Kuenzli, N.
    Leynaert, B.
    Svanes, C.
    Wjst, M.
    Gislason, T.
    Burney, P.
    Risk factors of new-onset asthma in adults: a population-based international cohort study2010In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 65, no 8, p. 1021-1030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    P>Background: The occurrence of new-onset asthma during adulthood is common, but there is insufficient understanding of its determinants including the role of atopy. Objective: To assess the risk factors for the development of new-onset asthma in middle-aged adults and to compare them according to atopy. Methods: A longitudinal analysis of 9175 young adults who participated in two surveys of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) conducted 9 years apart. Findings: We observed 179 cases of new-onset asthma among 4588 participants who were free of asthma and reported at the beginning of the follow-up that they had never had asthma (4.5 per 1000 person-years). In a logistic regression, the following risk factors were found to increase the risk of new-onset asthma: female gender (OR: 1.97; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38,2.81), bronchial hyperresponsiveness (3.25; 2.19,4.83), atopy (1.55;1.08,2.21), FEV1 < 100 % predicted (1.87;1.34,2.62), nasal allergy (1.98;1.39,2.84) and maternal asthma (1.91;1.13;3.21). Obesity, respiratory infections in early life and high-risk occupations increased the risk of new-onset asthma although we had limited power to confirm their role. Among the atopics, total IgE and sensitization to cat were independently related to the risk of new-onset asthma. The proportion of new-onset asthma attributable to atopy varied from 12% to 21%. Conclusion: Adults reporting that they had never had asthma were at a substantial risk of new-onset asthma as a result of multiple independent risk factors including lung function. Atopy explains a small proportion of new-onset adult asthma.

  • 23. Appelberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Pavlenko, Tatjana
    Hedenstierna, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Lung aeration during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea2010In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 301-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated that patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) have altered ventilation and lung volumes awake and the results suggest that this may be a determinant of severity of desaturations during sleep. However, little is known about regional lung aeration during sleep in patients with OSA. METHODS: Twelve patients with OSA were included in the study. Computed tomography was used to study regional lung aeration during wakefulness and sleep. Lung aeration was calculated in ml gas/g lung tissue in four different regions of interest (ROI(1-4)), along the border of the lung from ventral to dorsal. RESULTS: Lung aeration in the dorsal (dependent) lung region (ROI(4)) was lower during sleep compared to wakefulness 0.78 +/- 0.19 versus 0.88 +/- 0.19 (mean +/- SD) ml gas/g lung tissue (P = 0.005). Associations were found between awake expiratory reserve volume and change in lung aeration from wakefulness to sleep in ROI(4) (r = -0.69; P = 0.012). In addition, the change in lung aeration in the dorsal region correlated to sleep time (r = 0.69; P = 0.014) but not to time in supine position. The difference in lung aeration between inspiration and expiration (i.e. ventilation), was larger in the ventral lung region when expressed as ml gas per g lung tissue. In two patients it was noted that, during on-going obstructive apnoea, lung aeration tended to be increased rather than decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Aeration in the dorsal lung region is reduced during sleep in patients with OSA. The decrease is related to lung volume awake and to sleep time.

  • 24. Arnardottir, E. S.
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Benediktsdottir, B.
    Juliusson, S.
    Pack, A.
    Gislason, T.
    Frequent Nocturnal Sweating - a Symptom of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort Study2012In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 35, no S, p. A179-A180Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25. Arnardottir, Erna Sif
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Bjornsdottir, Erla
    Benediktsdottir, Bryndis
    Juliusson, Sigurdur
    Kuna, Samuel T.
    Pack, Allan I.
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Nocturnal sweating - a common symptom of obstructive sleep apnoea: the Icelandic sleep apnoea cohort2013In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 3, no 5, p. e002795-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and characteristics of frequent nocturnal sweating in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients compared with the general population and evaluate the possible changes with positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment. Nocturnal sweating can be very bothersome to the patient and bed partner. Design: Case-control and longitudinal cohort study. Setting: Landspitali-The National University Hospital, Iceland. Participants: The Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort consisted of 822 untreated patients with OSA, referred for treatment with PAP. Of these, 700 patients were also assessed at a 2-year follow-up. The control group consisted of 703 randomly selected subjects from the general population. Intervention: PAP therapy in the OSA cohort. Main outcome measures: Subjective reporting of nocturnal sweating on a frequency scale of 1-5: (1) never or very seldom, (2) less than once a week, (3) once to twice a week, (4) 3-5 times a week and (5) every night or almost every night. Full PAP treatment was defined objectively as the use for = 4 h/day and = 5 days/week. Results: Frequent nocturnal sweating (= 3x a week) was reported by 30.6% of male and 33.3% of female OSA patients compared with 9.3% of men and 12.4% of women in the general population (p<0.001). This difference remained significant after adjustment for demographic factors. Nocturnal sweating was related to younger age, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, sleepiness and insomnia symptoms. The prevalence of frequent nocturnal sweating decreased with full PAP treatment (from 33.2% to 11.5%, p<0.003 compared with the change in non-users). Conclusions: The prevalence of frequent nocturnal sweating was threefold higher in untreated OSA patients than in the general population and decreased to general population levels with successful PAP therapy. Practitioners should consider the possibility of OSA in their patients who complain of nocturnal sweating.

  • 26.
    Arne, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Lisspers, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology.
    Ställberg, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i D län (CKFD).
    Boman, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Hedenström, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotheraphy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    How often is diagnosis of COPD confirmed with spirometry?2010In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 104, no 4, p. 550-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diagnosis is customarily confirmed with spirometry, but there are few studies on documented spirometry use in everyday clinical practice. Methods: In a cross-sectional survey and study of the medical records of primary and secondary care COPD patients aged 18-75 in a Swedish region, patients with COPD were randomly selected from the registers of 56 primary care centres and 14 hospital outpatient clinics. Spirometry data at diagnosis ±6 months were analyzed. Results: From 1,114 patients with COPD, 533 with a new diagnosis of COPD during the four-year study period were identified. In 59% (n=316), spirometry data in connection with diagnosis were found in the medical records. Spirometry data with post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/ vital capacity (VC) ratios were available in 45% (n=241). FEV1/VC ratio <0.70 were found in 160 patients, which corresponds to 30% of the patients with a new diagnosis. Lower age, female gender, current smoking, higher body mass index (BMI) and shorter forced exhalation time were related to COPD diagnosis despite an FEV1/VC ratio of ≥0.70. The most common problem in the quality assessment was an insufficient exhalation time. Conclusions: Only a third of Swedish patients with COPD had their diagnosis confirmed with spirometry. Our data indicate that female gender, current smoking, higher BMI and short exhalation time increase the risk of being diagnosed with COPD without fulfilling the spirometric criteria for the disease.

  • 27.
    Arne, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Lundin, Fredrik
    Boman, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Janson, Staffan
    Emtner, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Physiotheraphy.
    Factors associated with good self-rated health and quality of life in subjects with self-reported COPD2011In: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 6, p. 511-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) state that COPD is both preventable and treatable. To gain a more positive outlook on the disease it is interesting to investigate factors associated with good, self-rated health and quality of life in subjects with self-reported COPD in the population.

    Methods: In a cross-sectional study design, postal survey questionnaires were sent to a stratified, random population in Sweden in 2004 and 2008. The prevalence of subjects (40–84 years) who reported having COPD was 2.1% in 2004 and 2.7% in 2008. Data were analyzed for 1475 subjects. Regression models were used to analyze the associations between health measures (general health status, the General Health Questionnaire, the EuroQol five-dimension questionnaire) and influencing factors.

    Results: The most important factor associated with good, self-rated health and quality of life was level of physical activity. Odds ratios for general health varied from 2.4 to 7.7 depending on degree of physical activity, where subjects with the highest physical activity level reported the best health and also highest quality of life. Social support and absence of economic problems almost doubled the odds ratios for better health and quality of life.

    Conclusions: In this population-based public health survey, better self-rated health status and quality of life in subjects with self-reported COPD was associated with higher levels of physical activity, social support, and absence of economic problems. The findings indicated that of possible factors that could be influenced, promoting physical activity and strengthening social support are important in maintaining or improving the health and quality of life in subjects with COPD. Severity of the disease as a possible confounding effect should be investigated in future population studies.

  • 28. Asbjoernsdóttir, H
    et al.
    Sigurjonsdóttir, R
    Sveinsdóttir, SV
    Birgisdóttir, A
    Cook, E
    Gí­slason, D
    Jansson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Olafsson, I
    Gí­slason, T
    Thjóthleifsson, B
    Foodborne infections in Iceland. Relationship to allergy and lung function2006In: Laeknabladid, ISSN 0023-7213, Vol. 92, no 6, p. 437-44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Benedikstdottir, B.
    et al.
    Arnardottir, E. S.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Pack, A.
    Juliusson, S.
    Gislason, T.
    Prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome among Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea before and after CPAP Treatment, Compared to the General Population: the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort (ISAC) Study2012In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 35, no S, p. A265-A265Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30. Benedikstdottir, B.
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Arnardottir, E. S.
    Gislason, T.
    What characterizes those with excessive daytime sleepiness?: an epidemiological study on general population in Iceland and Sweden2012In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 35, no S, p. A272-A272Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31. Benediktsdottir, Bryndis
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Arnardóttir, Erna Sif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Olafsson, Isleifur
    Cook, Elizabeth
    Thorarinsdottir, Elin Helga
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Prevalence of restless legs syndrome among adults in Iceland and Sweden: Lung function, comorbidity, ferritin, biomarkers and quality of life2010In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 11, no 10, p. 1043-1048Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study investigates the prevalence and the association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and a large variety of health variables in two well-characterized random samples from the general population in Reykjavik, Iceland, and Uppsala, Sweden. Methods: Using the national registries of inhabitants, a random sample from adults aged 40 and over living in Reykjavík, Iceland (n= 939), and Uppsala, Sweden (n= 998), were invited to participate in a study on the prevalence of COPD (response rate 81.1% and 62.2%). In addition, the participants were asked to answer the following questionnaires: International RLS Rating Scale, Short Form-12, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and questions about sleep, gastroeosophageal reflux, diabetes and hypertension, as well as pharmacological treatment. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP) and ferritin were measured in serum. Results: RLS was more commonly reported in Reykjavik (18.3%) than in Uppsala (11.5%). Icelandic women reported RLS almost twice as often as Swedish women (24.4 vs. 13.9% p= 0.001), but there was no difference in prevalence of RLS between Icelandic and Swedish men. RLS was strongly associated with sleep disturbances and excessive daytime sleepiness. Subjects with RLS were more likely to be ex- and current smokers than subjects without RLS (p< 0.001). Respiratory symptoms and airway obstruction were more prevalent among those reporting RLS and they also estimated their physical quality of life lower than those without RLS (p< 0.001). RLS was not associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome like hypertension, obesity, markers of systemic inflammation (IL-6 and CRP) or cardiovascular diseases. Ferritin levels were significantly lower in RLS participants (p= 0.0002), but not (p= 0.07) after adjustment for center, age, sex and smoking history. Conclusion: Restless legs syndrome was twice as common among Icelandic women compared to Swedish women. No such difference was seen for men. RLS was strongly associated with smoking and respiratory symptoms, decreased lung function, sleep disturbances, excessive daytime sleepiness, and physical aspects of life quality. RLS was not associated with markers of the metabolic syndrome like hypertension, obesity, cardiovascular diseases or biomarkers of systemic inflammation.

  • 32.
    Bengtsson, Caroline
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Jonsson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Holmström, Mats
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Div Ear Nose & Throat Dis, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Sundbom, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Hedner, Jan
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Sleep Med Resp Med & Allergol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Middelveld, Roelinde
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Allergy Res, Stockholm, Sweden.; Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Occupat & Environm Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Chronic rhinosinusitis impairs sleep quality: Results of the GA(2)LEN study2017In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 40, no 1, article id zsw021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To analyse the prevalence of sleep problems in subjects with CRS and to determine whether the disease severity of CRS affects sleep quality.

    METHODS: Questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 45 000 adults in four Swedish cities. Questions on CRS, asthma, allergic rhinitis, co-morbidities, tobacco use, educational level and physical activity were included. CRS was defined according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EPOS) epidemiological criteria. The disease severity of CRS was defined by the number of reported CRS symptoms. Sleep quality was assessed using the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire.

    RESULTS: Of the 26 647 subjects, 2249 (8.4%) had CRS. Reported sleep problems were 50-90% more common among subjects with CRS compared with those without or the total population. The prevalence of reported sleep problems increased in conjunction with the severity of CRS. After adjusting for gender, BMI, age, tobacco use, asthma, somatic diseases, physical activity level and educational level, participants with four symptoms of CRS (compared with subjects without CRS symptoms) displayed a higher risk of snoring (adj. OR (95% CI): 3.13 (2.22-4.41)), difficulties inducing sleep (3.98 (2.94-5.40)), difficulties maintaining sleep (3.44 (2.55-4.64)), early morning awakening (4.71 (3.47-6.38)) and excessive daytime sleepiness (4.56 (3.36-6.18)). The addition of persistent allergic rhinitis to CRS further increased the risk of sleep problems.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sleep problems are highly prevalent among subjects with CRS. The disease severity of CRS negatively affects sleep quality.

  • 33. Bergström, G
    et al.
    Berglund, G
    Blomberg, A
    Brandberg, J
    Engström, G
    Engvall, J
    Eriksson, M
    de Faire, U
    Flinck, A
    Hansson, Mats G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Hedblad, B
    Hjelmgren, O
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jernberg, T
    Johnsson, Å
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Löfdahl, C-G
    Melander, O
    Östgren, C J
    Persson, A
    Persson, M
    Sandström, A
    Schmidt, C
    Söderberg, S
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Toren, K
    Waldenström, A
    Wedel, H
    Vikgren, J
    Fagerberg, B
    Rosengren, A
    The Swedish CArdioPulmonary BioImage Study: objectives and design2015In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 278, no 6, p. 645-659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiopulmonary diseases are major causes of death worldwide, but currently recommended strategies for diagnosis and prevention may be outdated because of recent changes in risk factor patterns. The Swedish CArdioPulmonarybioImage Study (SCAPIS) combines the use of new imaging technologies, advances in large-scale 'omics' and epidemiological analyses to extensively characterize a Swedish cohort of 30 000 men and women aged between 50 and 64 years. The information obtained will be used to improve risk prediction of cardiopulmonary diseases and optimize the ability to study disease mechanisms. A comprehensive pilot study in 1111 individuals, which was completed in 2012, demonstrated the feasibility and financial and ethical consequences of SCAPIS. Recruitment to the national, multicentre study has recently started.

  • 34.
    Bertelsen, R. J.
    et al.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, POB 7804, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Bergen, Norway..
    Rava, M.
    INSERM U1168, VIMA Aging & Chron Dis Epidemiol & Publ Hlth Appr, Villejuif, France.;Univ Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, UMR S 1168, Montigny Le Bretonneux, France.;Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Genet & Mol Epidemiol Grp, Madrid, Spain..
    Carsin, A. E.
    Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain.;Univ Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain..
    Accordini, S.
    Univ Verona, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Verona, Italy..
    Benediktsdottir, B.
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Dratva, J.
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Basel, Switzerland..
    Franklin, K. A.
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Umea, Sweden..
    Heinrich, J.
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 1, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Neuherberg, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & Environm, Munich, Germany..
    Holm, M.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Janson, C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Johannessen, A.
    Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Clin Res Ctr, Bergen, Norway..
    Jarvis, D. L.
    Imperial Coll, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Resp Epidemiol Occupat Med & Publ Hlth, London, England..
    Jogi, R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research. Tartu Univ Hosp, Lung Clin, Tartu, Estonia..
    Leynaert, B.
    INSERM, UMR 1152, Pathophysiol & Epidemiol Resp Dis, Epidemiol Team, Paris, France.;Univ Paris Diderot Paris 7, UMR 1152, Paris, France..
    Norback, D.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Omenaas, E. R.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, POB 7804, N-5020 Bergen, Norway.;Haukeland Hosp, Clin Res Ctr, Bergen, Norway..
    Raherison, C.
    Bordeaux Univ, INSERM U897, Bordeaux, France..
    Sanchez-Ramos, J. L.
    Univ Huelva, Dept Nursing, Huelva, Spain..
    Schlunssen, V.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark.;Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Sigsgaard, T.
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Dharmage, S. C.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat Hlth, Allergy & Lung Hlth Unit, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Svanes, C.
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Bergen, Norway.;Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Dept Global Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Bergen, Norway..
    Clinical markers of asthma and IgE assessed in parents before conception predict asthma and hayfever in the offspring2017In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 627-638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Mice models suggest epigenetic inheritance induced by parental allergic disease activity. However, we know little of how parental disease activity before conception influences offspring's asthma and allergy in humans. Objective We aimed to assess the associations of parental asthma severity, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), and total and specific IgEs, measured before conception vs. after birth, with offspring asthma and hayfever. Methods The study included 4293 participants (mean age 34, 47% men) from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) with information on asthma symptom severity, BHR, total and specific IgEs from 1991 to 1993, and data on 9100 offspring born 1972-2012. Adjusted relative risk ratios (aRRR) for associations of parental clinical outcome with offspring allergic disease were estimated with multinomial logistic regressions. Results Offspring asthma with hayfever was more strongly associated with parental BHR and specific IgE measured before conception than after birth [BHR: aRRR = 2.96 (95% CI: 1.92, 4.57) and 1.40 (1.03, 1.91), respectively; specific IgEs: 3.08 (2.13, 4.45) and 1.83 (1.45, 2.31), respectively]. This was confirmed in a sensitivity analysis of a subgroup of offspring aged 11-22 years with information on parental disease activity both before and after birth. Conclusion & Clinical Relevance Parental BHR and specific IgE were associated with offspring asthma and hayfever, with the strongest associations observed with clinical assessment before conception as compared to after birth of the child. If the hypothesis is confirmed in other studies, parental disease activity assessed before conception may prove useful for identifying children at risk for developing asthma with hayfever.

  • 35. Birgisdóttir, Alda
    et al.
    Asbjörnsdottir, Hulda
    Cook, E
    Gislason, David
    Jansson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Olafsson, Isleifur
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Jögi, Rain
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Lungmedicin och allergologi.
    Thjodleifsson, Bjarni
    Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in Sweden, Estonia and Iceland.2006In: Scand J Infect Dis, ISSN 0036-5548, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 625-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Bjerg, Anders
    et al.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Eriksson, Jonas
    Olafsdottir, Inga Sif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Middelveld, Roelinde
    Franklin, Karl A.
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Larsson, Kjell
    Lotvall, Jan
    Toren, Kjell
    Dahlen, Sven-Erik
    Lundback, Bo
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Higher Risk of Wheeze in Female than Male Smokers. Results from the Swedish GA(2)LEN Study2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 1, p. e54137-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Women who smoke have higher risk of lung function impairment, COPD and lung cancer than smoking men. An influence of sex hormones has been demonstrated, but the mechanisms are unclear and the associations often subject to confounding. This was a study of wheeze in relation to smoking and sex with adjustment for important confounders. Methods: In 2008 the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2)LEN) questionnaire was mailed to 45.000 Swedes (age 16-75 years), and 26.851 (60%) participated. "Any wheeze'': any wheeze during the last 12 months. "Asthmatic wheeze'': wheeze with breathlessness apart from colds. Results: Any wheeze and asthmatic wheeze was reported by 17.3% and 7.1% of women, vs. 15.8% and 6.1% of men (both p<0.001). Although smoking prevalence was similar in both sexes, men had greater cumulative exposure, 16.2 pack-years vs. 12.8 in women (p<0.001). Most other exposures and characteristics associated with wheeze were significantly overrepresented in men. Adjusted for these potential confounders and pack-years, current smoking was a stronger risk factor for any wheeze in women aged <53 years, adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.85 (1.56-2.19) vs. 1.60 (1.30-1.96) in men. Cumulative smoke exposure and current smoking each interacted significantly with female sex, aOR 1.02 per pack-year (p<0.01) and aOR 1.28 (p = 0.04) respectively. Female compared to male current smokers also had greater risk of asthmatic wheeze, aOR 1.53 vs. 1.03, interaction aOR 1.52 (p = 0.02). These interactions were not seen in age >= 53 years. Discussion: In addition to the increased risk of COPD and lung cancer female, compared to male, smokers are at greater risk of significant wheezing symptoms in younger age. This became clearer after adjustment for important confounders including cumulative smoke exposure. Estrogen has previously been shown to increase the bioactivation of several compounds in tobacco smoke, which may enhance smoke-induced airway inflammation in fertile women.

  • 37. Bjerg, Anders
    et al.
    Ekerljung, Linda
    Middelveld, Roelinde
    Dahlén, Sven-Erik
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Franklin, Karl
    Larsson, Kjell
    Lötvall, Jan
    Olafsdottir, Inga Sif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Torén, Kjell
    Lundbäck, Bo
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Increased Prevalence of Symptoms of Rhinitis but Not of Asthma between 1990 and 2008 in Swedish Adults: Comparisons of the ECRHS and GA(2)LEN Surveys2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 2, p. e16082-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The increase in asthma prevalence until 1990 has been well described. Thereafter, time trends are poorly known, due to the low number of high quality studies. The preferred method for studying time trends in prevalence is repeated surveys of similar populations. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of asthma symptoms and their major determinants, rhinitis and smoking, in Swedish young adults in 1990 and 2008. Methods: In 1990 the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) studied respiratory symptoms, asthma, rhinitis and smoking in a population-based sample (86% participation) in Sweden. In 2008 the same symptom questions were included in the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA(2)LEN) survey (60% participation). Smoking questions were however differently worded. The regions (Gothenburg, Uppsala, Umea) and age interval (20-44 years) surveyed both in 1990 (n = 8,982) and 2008 (n = 9,156) were analysed. Results: The prevalence of any wheeze last 12 months decreased from 20% to 16% (p<0.001), and the prevalence of "asthma-related symptoms" was unchanged at 7%. However, either having asthma attacks or using asthma medications increased from 6% to 8% (p<0.001), and their major risk factor, rhinitis, increased from 22% to 31%. Past and present smoking decreased. Conclusion: From 1990 to 2008 the prevalence of obstructive airway symptoms common in asthma did not increase in Swedish young adults. This supports the few available international findings suggesting the previous upward trend in asthma has recently reached a plateau. The fact that wheeze did not increase despite the significant increment in rhinitis, may at least in part be due to the decrease in smoking.

  • 38. Bjerg, Anders
    et al.
    Eriksson, Jonas
    Olafsdottir, Inga Sif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Middelveld, Roelinde
    Franklin, Karl
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Larsson, Kjell
    Toren, Kjell
    Dahlen, Sven-Erik
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    The association between asthma and rhinitis is stable over time despite diverging trends in prevalence2015In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 109, no 3, p. 312-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite the well-known association between asthma and rhinitis, in Swedish adults the prevalence of rhinitis rose from 22% to 31% between 1990 and 2008 while asthma prevalence was unchanged. We tested whether the association of rhinitis with asthma was stable over time using the same population-based databases. Methods: Two surveys of adults (20-44 years) living in three regions of Sweden, carried out in 1990 (n = 8982) and 2008 (n = 9156) were compared. Identical questions regarding respiratory symptoms, asthma and rhinitis were used. Asthmatic wheeze: Wheeze with breathlessness apart from colds. Current asthma: Asthma attacks and/or asthma medication use. Results: Subjects with rhinitis had level time trends in asthmatic wheeze, current asthma and most nocturnal respiratory symptoms between 1990 and 2008, adjusted for age, sex, area and smoking. Any wheeze however decreased slightly. In never-smokers asthma symptoms were similarly associated with rhinitis in 1990 and 2008: any wheeze OR 4.0 vs. 4.4 (p = 0.339); asthmatic wheeze OR 6.0 vs. 5.9 (p = 0.937); and current asthma OR 9.6 vs. 7.7 (p = 0.213). In the whole population there were decreases in the asthma symptoms most closely associated to smoking, which decreased by half 1990-2008. Conversely current asthma, which was strongly associated with rhinitis and not with smoking, increased (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The association of rhinitis with asthma was stable between 1990 and 2008. The pattern in the time trends of asthma outcomes strongly suggests that decreased smoking counterbalanced the driving effect of increased rhinitis on asthma prevalence. The findings illustrate the public health benefits of decreased smoking. (c) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Bjornsdottir, E.
    et al.
    Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Sigurdsson, J. F.
    Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Gehrman, P.
    Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Perlis, M.
    Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Juliusson, S.
    Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Arnardottir, E. S.
    Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Kuna, S. T.
    Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Pack, A. I.
    Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Gislason, T.
    Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Benediktsdottir, B.
    Univ Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Insomnia phenotypes response to obstructive sleep apnea treatment in co-morbid insomnia/OSA2016In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 44-45Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Bjornsdottir, Erla
    et al.
    Landspitali, Dept Resp Med & Sleep, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Arnardottir, Erna Sif
    Landspitali, Dept Resp Med & Sleep, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Benediktsdottir, Bryndis
    Landspitali, Dept Resp Med & Sleep, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Garcia-Aymerich, Judith
    ISGlobal, Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona, Spain.;UPF, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain..
    Elie Carsin, Anne
    ISGlobal, Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona, Spain.;UPF, Barcelona, Spain.;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ CIBERESP, Barcelona, Spain..
    Gomez Real, Francisco
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Bergen, Norway..
    Toren, Kjell
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Univ Hosp Munich, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & Environm, Munich, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Epidemiol 1, Neuherberg, Germany..
    Nowak, Dennis
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Univ Hosp Munich, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & Environm, Munich, Germany..
    Luis Sanchez-Ramos, Jose
    Univ Huelva, Dept Nursing, Huelva, Spain..
    Demoly, Pascal
    Univ Hosp Montpellier, Dept Pneumol, Montpellier, France..
    Dorado Arenas, Sandra
    Galdakao Usansolo Hosp, Dept Pulmonol, Biscay, Spain..
    Coloma Navarro, Ramon
    Hosp Gen Univ, Serv Neumol, Unidad Sueno, Albacete, Spain..
    Schlunssen, Vivi
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Aarhus, Denmark.;Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Raherison, Chantal
    Bordeaux Populat Hlth Res Ctr, U1219, Bordeaux, France..
    Jarvis, Debbie L.
    Imperial Coll London, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, Populat Hlth & Occupat Dis, London, England.;Imperial Coll London, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, London, England..
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Landspitali, Dept Resp Med & Sleep, Reykjavik, Iceland.;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Respiratory symptoms are more common among short sleepers independent of obesity2017In: BMJ OPEN RESPIRATORY RESEARCH, ISSN 2052-4439, Vol. 4, no 1, article id e000206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Sleep length has been associated with obesity and various adverse health outcomes. The possible association of sleep length and respiratory symptoms has not been previously described. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between sleep length and respiratory symptoms and whether such an association existed independent of obesity. Methods This is a multicentre, cross-sectional, population-based study performed in 23 centres in 10 different countries. Participants (n=5079, 52.3% males) were adults in the third follow-up of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III. The mean +/- SD age was 54.2 +/- 7.1 (age range 39-67 years). Information was collected on general and respiratory health and sleep characteristics. Results The mean reported nighttime sleep duration was 6.9 +/- 1.0 hours. Short sleepers (<6 hours per night) were n=387 (7.6%) and long sleepers (>= 9 hours per night) were n=271 (4.3%). Short sleepers were significantly more likely to report all respiratory symptoms (wheezing, waking up with chest tightness, shortness of breath, coughing, phlegm and bronchitis) except asthma after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), centre, marital status, exercise and smoking. Excluding BMI from the model covariates did not affect the results. Short sleep was related to 11 out of 16 respiratory and nasal symptoms among subjects with BMI >= 30 and 9 out of 16 symptoms among subjects with BMI <30. Much fewer symptoms were related to long sleep, both for subjects with BMI <30 and >= 30. Conclusions Our results show that short sleep duration is associated with many common respiratory symptoms, and this relationship is independent of obesity.

  • 41. Bjornsdottir, Erla
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Sigurdsson, Jon F.
    Gehrman, Philip
    Perlis, Michael
    Juliusson, Sigurdur
    Arnardottir, Erna S.
    Kuna, Samuel T.
    Pack, Allan I.
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Benediktsdottir, Bryndis
    Symptoms of Insomnia among Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Before and After Two Years of Positive Airway Pressure Treatment2013In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 1901-1909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Objectives: To assess the changes of insomnia symptoms among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from starting treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP) to a 2-y follow-up. Design: Longitudinal cohort study. Setting: Landspitali-The National University Hospital of Iceland. Participants: There were 705 adults with OSA who were assessed prior to and 2 y after starting PAP treatment. Intervention: PAP treatment for OSA. Measurements and Results: All patients underwent a medical examination along with a type 3 sleep study and answered questionnaires on health and sleep before and 2 y after starting PAP treatment. The change in prevalence of insomnia symptoms by subtype was assessed by questionnaire and compared between individuals who were using or not using PAP at follow-up. Symptoms of middle insomnia were most common at baseline and improved significantly among patients using PAP (from 59.4% to 30.7%, P < 0.001). Symptoms of initial insomnia tended to persist regardless of PAP treatment, and symptoms of late insomnia were more likely to improve among patients not using PAP. Patients with symptoms of initial and late insomnia at baseline were less likely to adhere to PAP (odds ratio [OR] 0.56, P = 0.007, and OR 0.53, P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Positive airway pressure treatment significantly reduced symptoms of middle insomnia. Symptoms of initial and late insomnia, however, tended to persist regardless of positive airway pressure treatment and had a negative effect on adherence. Targeted treatment for insomnia may be beneficial for patients with obstructive sleep apnea comorbid with insomnia and has the potential to positively affect adherence to positive airway pressure.

  • 42. Bjornsdottir, Erla
    et al.
    Keenan, Brendan T
    Eysteinsdottir, Bjorg
    Arnardottir, Erna Sif
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Gislason, Thorarinn
    Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik
    Kuna, Samuel T
    Pack, Allan I
    Benediktsdottir, Bryndis
    Quality of life among untreated sleep apnea patients compared with the general population and changes after treatment with positive airway pressure2015In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 328-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obstructive sleep apnea leads to recurrent arousals from sleep, oxygen desaturations, daytime sleepiness and fatigue. This can have an adverse impact on quality of life. The aims of this study were to compare: (i) quality of life between the general population and untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea; and (ii) changes of quality of life among patients with obstructive sleep apnea after 2 years of positive airway pressure treatment between adherent patients and non-users. Propensity score methodologies were used in order to minimize selection bias and strengthen causal inferences. The enrolled obstructive sleep apnea subjects (n = 822) were newly diagnosed with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea who were starting positive airway pressure treatment, and the general population subjects (n = 742) were randomly selected Icelanders. The Short Form 12 was used to measure quality of life. Untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea had a worse quality of life when compared with the general population. This effect remained significant after using propensity scores to select samples, balanced with regard to age, body mass index, gender, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. We did not find significant overall differences between full and non-users of positive airway pressure in improvement of quality of life from baseline to follow-up. However, there was a trend towards more improvement in physical quality of life for positive airway pressure-adherent patients, and the most obese subjects improved their physical quality of life more. The results suggest that co-morbidities of obstructive sleep apnea, such as obesity, insomnia and daytime sleepiness, have a great effect on life qualities and need to be taken into account and addressed with additional interventions.

  • 43. Björnsdóttir, Erla
    et al.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Gíslason, Thorarinn
    Sigurdsson, Jón F
    Pack, Allan I
    Gehrman, Philip
    Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís
    Insomnia in untreated sleep apnea patients compared to controls2012In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 131-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) often coexist, but the nature of their relationship is unclear. The aims of this study were to compare the prevalence of initial and middle insomnia between OSA patients and controls from the general population as well as to study the influence of insomnia on sleepiness and quality of life in OSA patients. Two groups were compared, untreated OSA patients (n = 824) and controls ≥ 40 years from the general population in Iceland (n = 762). All subjects answered the same questionnaires on health and sleep and OSA patients underwent a sleep study. Altogether, 53% of controls were males compared to 81% of OSA patients. Difficulties maintaining sleep (DMS) were more common among men and women with OSA compared to the general population (52 versus 31% and 62 versus 31%, respectively, P < 0.0001). Difficulties initiating sleep (DIS) and DIS + DMS were more common among women with OSA compared to women without OSA. OSA patients with DMS were sleepier than patients without DMS (Epworth Sleepiness Scale: 12.2 versus 10.9, P < 0.001), while both DMS and DIS were related to lower quality of life in OSA patients as measured by the Short Form 12 (physical score 39 versus 42 and mental score 36 versus 41, P < 0.001). DIS and DMS were not related to OSA severity. Insomnia is common among OSA patients and has a negative influence on quality of life and sleepiness in this patient group. It is relevant to screen for insomnia among OSA patients and treat both conditions when they co-occur.

  • 44.
    Björnsson, Eyþór
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm .
    Lúdviksdóttir, Dóra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm .
    Hedenström, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology.
    Eriksson, Britt-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Högman, Marieann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Jansson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Airway hyperresponsiveness, peak flow variability and inflammatory markers in non-asthmatic subjects with respiratory infections2007In: Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 1752-6981, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 42-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to characterise non-asthmatic subjects with asthma-like symptoms during a common cold, particularly in relation to airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Materials and Methods: Subjects with acute respiratory infections and a group of controls (n = 20 + 20), age 20-65 years, underwent bronchial provocations with methacholine, adenosine and cold air. All were non-smokers and had no history of asthma or heart disease. Those with infection had asthma-like symptoms (> , 2). Measurements of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), serum levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil peroxidase, myeloperoxidase and human neutrophil lipocalin were made at each provocation. A 17-day symptom and peak flow diary was calculated. Results: No differences between the two groups were found, regarding responsiveness to methacholine, adenosine or cold air challenge, as well as the inflammatory markers measured. In the infected group, the mean (standard deviation) ECP was higher in those with AHR to methacholine or cold air [15.7 (6.5) and 11.4 (4.2) mg/L, respectively; P < , 0.05], furthermore, eNO was higher in the infected group [116 ( 54) and 88 ( 52) nL/min, respectively, P = 0.055]. The infected group had, at all times, more symptoms and higher peak flow, with a decrease in the symptoms (P = 0.02) and a tendency to change in peak flow variation (P = 0.06). Conclusion: AHR does not seem to be the main cause of asthma-like symptoms in adults with infectious wheezing. Peak flow variation and symptom prevalence during the post-infection period may imply airway pathology different from AHR.

  • 45. Boudier, Anne
    et al.
    Curjuric, Ivan
    Basagana, Xavier
    Hazgui, Hana
    Anto, Josep M.
    Bousquet, Jean
    Bridevaux, Pierre O.
    Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise
    Garcia-Aymerich, Judith
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Kuenzli, Nino
    Leynaert, Benedicte
    de Marco, Roberto
    Rochat, Thierry
    Schindler, Christian
    Varraso, Raphaelle
    Pin, Isabelle
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Sunyer, Jordi
    Kauffmann, Francine
    Siroux, Valerie
    Ten-Year Follow-up of Cluster-based Asthma Phenotypes in Adults A Pooled Analysis of Three Cohorts2013In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 188, no 5, p. 550-560Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rationale: The temporal stability of adult asthma phenotypes identified using clustering methods has never been addressed. Longitudinal cluster-based methods may provide novel insights in the study of the natural history of asthma. Objectives: To compare the stability of cluster-based asthma phenotype structures a decade apart in adults and to address the individuals' phenotypic transition across these asthma phenotypes. Methods: The latent transition analysis was applied on longitudinal data (twice, 10 yr apart) from 3,320 adults with asthma who took part in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey, the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults, or the Epidemiological Study on Genetics and Environment of Asthma. Nine variables covering personal and phenotypic characteristics measured twice, 10 years apart, were simultaneously considered. Measurements and Main Results: Latent transition analysis identifies seven asthma phenotypes (prevalence range, 8.4-20.8%), mainly [GRAPHICS] characterized by the level of asthma symptoms ( low, moderate, high), the allergic status, and pulmonary function. Phenotypes observed 10 years apart showed strong similarities. The probability of membership in the same asthma phenotype at both times varied across phenotypes from 54 to 88%. Different transition patterns were observed across phenotypes. Transitions toward increased asthma symptoms were more frequently observed among nonallergic phenotypes as compared with allergic phenotypes. Results showed a strong stability of the allergic status over time. Conclusions: Adult asthma phenotypes identified by a clustering approach, 10 years apart, were highly consistent. This study is the first to model the probabilities of transitioning over time between comprehensive asthma phenotypes.

  • 46. Bousquet, P-J
    et al.
    Chinn, S.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Kogevinas, M.
    Burney, P.
    Jarvis, D.
    Geographical variation in the prevalence of positive skin tests to environmental aeroallergens in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey I2007In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 301-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many studies have reported the prevalence of sensitization using skin prick tests. However, comparisons between studies and between regions are difficult because the number and the type of allergens tested vary widely. Using the European Community Health Respiratory Survey I data, the geographical variation of sensitization to environmental allergen as measured by skin tests was established. Methods: Adults aged 20-44 years, living in 35 centres in 15 developed countries, underwent skin tests for allergy to nine common aeroallergens: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, timothy grass, cat, Cladosporium herbarium, Alternaria alternately birch, Olea europea, common ragweed and Parietaria judaica. The age-sex standardized prevalence of sensitization was determined and centres with high (95% confidence interval above and excluding study median) and low prevalence (95% confidence interval below and excluding study median) of sensitization to each allergen and to any of the nine allergens were identified. Results: There was substantial geographical variation in the prevalence of sensitization to each of the nine allergens tested and in the prevalence of sensitization to any allergen (lowest 17.1%, median 36.8% and highest 54.8%). Sensitization to D. pteronyssinus, grass pollen and cat were usually the most prevalent (median between centre 21.7%, 16.9% and 8.8%, respectively). Timothy grass sensitization was higher than that for any other pollen species. Conclusions: As expected, geographical variations of sensitization to environmental allergen were observed across centres. These findings were compatible for those observed with serum-specific IgE. Skin tests can be used to assess the geographical distribution of allergens in a multicentric epidemiological survey.

  • 47. Burney, Peter
    et al.
    Jithoo, Anamika
    Kato, Bernet
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Mannino, David
    Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, Ewa
    Studnicka, Michael
    Tan, Wan
    Bateman, Eric
    Kocabas, Ali
    Vollmer, William M.
    Gislason, Thorarrin
    Marks, Guy
    Koul, Parvaiz A.
    Harrabi, Imed
    Gnatiuc, Louisa
    Buist, Sonia
    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality and prevalence: the associations with smoking and poverty-a BOLD analysis2014In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 69, no 5, p. 465-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a commonly reported cause of death and associated with smoking. However, COPD mortality is high in poor countries with low smoking rates. Spirometric restriction predicts mortality better than airflow obstruction, suggesting that the prevalence of restriction could explain mortality rates attributed to COPD. We have studied associations between mortality from COPD and low lung function, and between both lung function and death rates and cigarette consumption and gross national income per capita (GNI). Methods National COPD mortality rates were regressed against the prevalence of airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction in 22 Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study sites and against GNI, and national smoking prevalence. The prevalence of airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction in the BOLD sites were regressed against GNI and mean pack years smoked. Results National COPD mortality rates were more strongly associated with spirometric restriction in the BOLD sites (<60 years: men r(s)=0.73, p=0.0001; women r(s)=0.90, p<0.0001; 60+ years: men r(s)=0.63, p=0.0022; women r(s)=0.37, p=0.1) than obstruction (<60 years: men r(s)=0.28, p=0.20; women r(s)=0.17, p<0.46; 60+ years: men r(s)=0.28, p=0.23; women r(s)=0.22, p=0.33). Obstruction increased with mean pack years smoked, but COPD mortality fell with increased cigarette consumption and rose rapidly as GNI fell below US$ 15 000. Prevalence of restriction was not associated with smoking but also increased rapidly as GNI fell below US$ 15 000. Conclusions Smoking remains the single most important cause of obstruction but a high prevalence of restriction associated with poverty could explain the high 'COPD' mortality in poor countries.

  • 48. Burney, Peter
    et al.
    Kato, Bernet
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Mannino, David
    Studnicka, Michael
    Tan, Wan
    Bateman, Eric
    Kocabas, Ali
    Vollmer, William M.
    Gislason, Thorarrin
    Marks, Guy
    Koul, Parvaiz A.
    Gnatiuc, Louisa
    Buist, Sonia
    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality and prevalence: the associations with smoking and poverty: a BOLD analysis-authors' reply2014In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 69, no 9, p. 869-870Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Cai, Gui-Hong
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Theorell-Haglöw, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden CRC, Dept Hlth Sci,Div Geriatr Med, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Both Weight at Age 20 and Weight Gain Have an Impact on Sleep Disturbances Later in Life: Results of the EpiHealth Study2018In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 41, no 1, article id zsx176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Objectives: Obesity is often associated with impaired sleep, whereas the impact of body mass index (BMI) at younger age and previous weight gain on sleep problems remains unknown.

    Methods: The present study utilized data from the Swedish EpiHealth cohort study. A total of 15 845 participants (45-75 years) filled out an internet-based questionnaire. BMI was calculated from both measured data at study time and self-reported data at age 20 from the questionnaire.

    Results: Sleep-related symptoms were most common among obese individuals (BMI >30 kg/m(2)). An association between weight gain and sleep problems was found and those with a low BMI at age 20 were most vulnerable to weight gain when it came to risk of sleep problems. Among those who were underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m(2)) at age 20, weight gain (kg/year) was associated with difficulties initiating sleep with an adjusted OR of 2.64 (95% CI: 1.51-4.62) after adjusting for age, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, education, and civil status. The corresponding adjusted OR's among those who had been normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.99) and overweight (BMI 25-29.99 kg/m(2)) at age 20 were 1.89 (1.47-2.45) and 1.02 (0.48-2.13), respectively. Also difficulties maintaining sleep and snoring were most strongly related to weight gain among those who were underweight at age 20 with decreasing odds with increasing BMI at that age.

    Conclusions: Sleep problems are related to weight gain and obesity. The impact of weight is most pronounced among those who had a low BMI when young.

  • 50.
    Cai, Gui-Hong
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Mälarstig, Björn
    Kumlin, Anders
    Johansson, Ingrid
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Norbäck, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Fungal DNA and pet allergen levels in Swedish day care centers and associations with building characteristics2011In: Journal of Environmental Monitoring, ISSN 1464-0325, E-ISSN 1464-0333, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 2018-2024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pet allergens and mold growth related to damp are common phenomena in day care centers in Sweden but exposure measurements of these factors are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between building construction and indoor environment quality in Swedish day care centers and the potential for exposure to fungi (analyzed by quantitative PCR) and animal allergens (analyzed by ELISA). Measurements were performed in 21 day care centers (103 rooms) from one municipality in Sweden, which were identified as constructions at risk of dampness (85% of the buildings) and with visible damage and mold growth (54% of the buildings). Dust samples were collected using cotton swab and Petri dishes. Total fungal DNA was detected in 99% and 100%, Aspergillus/Penicillium DNA in 54% and 68%, and Stachybotrys chartarum DNA in 4% and 9% of the investigated rooms in cotton swab and Petri dish samples, respectively. The total fungal DNA levels (Geometric Mean, GM) were 4.2 × 106 cell equivalents per m2 and 2.9 × 105 cell equivalents per m2 per day in the swab and Petri dish samples, respectively. The concentrations (GM) of cat (Fel d1), dog (Can f1), and horse (Equ cx) allergens were 9.4, 7.2 ng m−2 day−1, and 5.0 unit per m2 per day, respectively. Total fungal DNA levels were higher in risk construction buildings (p = 0.01), in rooms with linoleum flooring material (p = 0.003), and in buildings with rotating heat exchangers (p = 0.02). There were associations between total fungal DNA levels and cat (p = 0.02), dog (p < 0.001), and horse (p = 0.001) allergens. In conclusion, risk constructions, damp constructions, mould growth, fungal DNA, and animal allergens were common exposure factors in Swedish day care centers. Building constructions that represent a high risk for internal dampness should be avoided in the future, and measures to reduce allergen levels should be considered to protect pet-allergic children from asthmatic problems.

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