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  • 1.
    Gidhagen, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Persson Ridell, Oscar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Provider Value in Reciprocal Value Creation2012In: AMA SERVSIG 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Gidhagen, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Persson Ridell, Oscar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    From Firm to Blurred: The Service Logic Effect on Firm Boundaries: The Case of Orchestrating Value Co-Creation in the Video Game Industry2010In: AMA SERVSIG 2010: Proceedings / [ed] Lia Patrício, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Gidhagen, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Persson Ridell, Oscar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    The Orchestrating Firm: Value Creation in the Video Game Industry2011In: Managing Service Quality, ISSN 0960-4529, E-ISSN 1758-8030, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 392-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The objective of this paper is to present an empirically founded outline of value creation and the orchestration of this process.

    Design/Methodology/Approach – A qualitative study of the video game industry was undertaken for which data were collected through use of both primary and secondary sources. The gathered data enabled a categorization of the industry, from both a user and a firm perspective, into different archetypical modes of value creation.

    Findings – The study adds to the understanding of value creation by illustrating that a firm can orchestrate the process through which value is created by being: (1) an inspirator; (2) an attendant, and; (3) a facilitator. In illustrating the continuity of this process, the paper introduces the orchestrating firm and the value emergence process.

    Research implications/limitations – In describing the modes through which interaction occurs within the video game industry, the paper provides an outline which can be used for investigations of value creation. This industry holds, however, certain features making the arguments presented in need of further research.

    Practical implications – Based on the empirical findings, an outline is provided for the allocation and deployment of internal resources in order to enable continuous value creation.

    Originality/Value – The paper empirically exemplifies how value creation is orchestrated by developing firms within the video game industry, and illustrates value creation as a continuous process; a value emergence process.

  • 4.
    Gidhagen, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie. G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Communities as Resource-Integrating Actors.2013In: QUIS13, The 13th International Research Symposium on Service Excellence in Management, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Gidhagen, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    The Online Community as a Vehicle for Mutually Beneficial Value Creation2013In: The 2013 Naples Forum on Service, Proceedings: Service Dominant logic, Network & Systems Theory and Service Science: Integrating three perspectives for a new service agenda, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Gidhagen, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie G.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Modern Media and the Role of the Dialogue for External Effectiveness2015In: Proceedings of the 2015 Naples Forum on Service / [ed] Gummesson, Evert; Mele, Christina; Polese, Francesco, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Koskela-Huotari, Kaisa
    et al.
    CTF, Service Research Center, Karlstad University.
    Edvardsson, Bo
    CTF, Service Research Center, Karlstad University.
    Jonas, Julia
    Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Institute of Information Systems.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Witell, Lars
    Linköping University, Industrial Engineering and Management.
    Innovation in service ecosystems: Breaking, making and maintaining institutionalized rules of resource integration2016In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 69, no 8, p. 2964-2971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

         Drawing on service-dominant logic and institutional theory, this paper examines innovation as a process that unfolds through changes in the institutional arrangements that govern resource integration practices in service ecosystems. Four cases are used to illustrate the interdependent patterns of breaking, making and maintaining the institutionalized rules of resource integration occurring on multiple levels of institutional context. Such institutional work allows actors to cocreate value in novel and useful ways by a) including new actors, b) redefining roles of involved actors and c) reframing resources within service ecosystems. Our findings show that while the efforts of breaking and making the institutionalized rules are required for such changes to occur, at the same time, institutional maintenance is also important for these changes to institutionalize, that is, to become an integral part of the institutional structure coordinating value cocreation.

  • 8.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Linköpings universitet, Sverige.
    Persson Ridell, Oscar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Introducing the concept of a value proposing platform: A practice-centric view of value cocreation2011In: Otago Forum-3: Service integration and coordination in a complex world / [ed] David Ballantyne, 2011, p. 1-18Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Central to service-dominant (S-D) logic is the value proposition concept. However, research to date has not examined the cocreation of a value proposition in practice. Thus, this study aims to understand the cocreative practice of crafting and establishing a value proposition.

    Design/methodology/approach: The article reports on a qualitative study which investigates participants in a practice of cocreating a value proposition, from initiation to establishment. Two insight-stimulating examples are given.

    Findings: The cocreation of a value proposition is conceptualized as taking place on a value proposing platform on which resource integration can take place. Rather than focusing a priori on value cocreation from the perspective of a specific resource integrator, we argue that the cocreative practice should be the focal object to study.

    Research limitations/implications: The study concerns value propositions on a lower order systems level whereas higher and medium order systems have not been studied.

    Practical implications: Managers ought to strive towards finding a suitable balance in the outline of the value proposing platform as regards its openness. Thus, managers outlining a value proposing platform must clearly establish its boundaries by framing and explicating the wants and needs vis-à-vis the cocreative endeavor of the firm that they represent.

    Originality/value: The value proposing platform is a novel concept recognizing the bounded and time-based nature of crafting and establishing a value proposition. The adoption of knowledge during cocreative endeavors conditions the cocreative practice as it delineates the path for the latter‟s forthcoming applications, considerations, adaptations and adoptions of knowledge and competence.

  • 9.
    Kowalkowski, Christian
    et al.
    Hanken School of economics, Finland.
    Persson Ridell, Oscar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    The co-creative practice of forming a value proposition2012In: Journal of Marketing Management, ISSN 0267-257X, E-ISSN 1472-1376, Vol. 28, no 13-14, p. 1553-1570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using practice theory and an empirical illustration of reciprocal exchange of knowledge between resource-integrating actors, this paper contributes to Service-Dominant Logic by deepening the understanding of the innate intricacies in a co-creative practice of forming a value proposition. A co-creative practice is conceptualised as reciprocal exchange of knowledge that is mediated by the practice-related script - understandings, procedures, and engagements - that each resource-integrating actor draws upon. The paper identifies and labels the activities of this exchange - applying, assessing, adapting, and adopting - using the literature on knowledge creation and management as a point of departure. A granular analysis is provided of how the script of each resource-integrating actor mediates the activities of reciprocal exchange of knowledge when forming a value proposition

  • 10.
    Persson Ridell, Oscar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    How Open Is Open Innovation?: Considering, adapting and adopting user knowledge and competence in the solution space2012In: Managing Open Innovation Technologies / [ed] Eriksson Lundström, J.S.Z.; Wiberg, M.; Hrastinski, S.; E, Springer Publishing Company, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Peters, Linda
    et al.
    University of Nottingham, UK.
    Löbler, Helge
    University of Leipzig, Germany.
    Brodie, Roderick J.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Breidbach, Christoph F.
    University of California, Merced, USA.
    Hollebeek, Linda D.
    Waikato University, New Zealand.
    Smith, Sandra D.
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Varey, Richard J.
    Waikato University, New Zealand.
    Theorizing about resource integration through service-dominant logic2014In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 249-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource integration, as it relates to value creation, has recently been a key aspect of thediscussions about service-dominant (S-D) logic. However, the majority of research pays relativelylittle explicit attention to the process of theorizing and the epistomological and ontologicalassumptions upon which the theorizing process is based. This article addresses these issues. Theprocesses that relate to theorizing and developing strong theory are discussed. We then examinehow to conceptualize ‘resources’ and ‘resource integration’ following differing ontological andepistemological assumptions that guide the theorizing process. Research recommendations to helpnavigate through the finer details underlying the theorizing process and to advance a general theoryof resource integration are developed.

  • 12.
    Rondell, Jimmie G
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sorhammar, David
    Functional identities, resource integrators and the service-dominant logic2010In: Journal of Customer Behaviour, ISSN 1475-3928, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 19-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to initiate a discussion; to propose turning to the theoretical tradition of functionalism as a direction for future refinements of the service-dominant (S-D) logic; introducing the concept of functional identities as a generic designation to identify and define the various actors as resource integrators assisting the study of the networked nature of value creation. Findings and experiences drawn from a case study of the industry/market of recorded music are presented to serve as both inductive and illustrative element to the paper. The main contribution in this paper is to extend and suggest an improvement by adding the following to the S-D logic’s Foundational Premise FP: 9; “All social and economic actors are, defined by their functional identity, resource integrators”. The paper’s functionalistic direction is suggested as a facilitator to advance future refinements of the S-D logic and the study and understanding of the networked nature of value creation.

  • 13. Röndell, Jimmie G
    et al.
    Sörhammar, David
    Exploring the networked nature of value creation: value propositions and value network constellations2010In: AMA SERVSIG 2010: Proceedings / [ed] Lia Patrício, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Röndell, Jimmie G.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    The Post-Industrialism/post-capitalism citizen: a heterogeneous actor in a complex exchange and value creating environment2010In: Journal of Customer Behavior, ISSN 1475-3928, E-ISSN 1477-6421, ISSN 1475-3928, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 335-344Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Röndell, Jimmie G.
    et al.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies. Uppsala universitet.
    Gidhagen, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Co-governance in the consumer engagement process: facilitating multi-beneficial value creation2016In: Journal of Strategic Marketing, ISSN 0965-254X, E-ISSN 1466-4488, Vol. 24, no 3-4, p. 327-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how consumer engagement (CE) in new media can become part of and support the everyday life of companies. Paradoxically, facilitating consumers’ engagement in activities such as co-developing products also implies companies ceding control over their value proposition to consumers. Subsequently, this evokes the issue of management or self-management of the CE process, making it vital to address the challenges of governing the facilitation of value co-creation in service ecosystems. By contextualising how activities within, and the co-governance of, the CE process are manifested, this paper discusses if and how consumers’ new media activities may offer multi-beneficial opportunities for value creation to both social and economic actors within a service ecosystem. The paper furthers the understanding of co-governance as a nexus, facilitating the CE process, which is essential for generating benefits for supplying companies, beyond traditional aspects of collaboration, monetary gains and loyal customers.

  • 16.
    Röndell, Jimmie
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Extending the role of consumers: From marketing targets to participant in business networks2016In: Extending the Business Network Approach: New Territories, New Technologies, New Terms / [ed] Peter Thilenius, Cecilia Pahlberg, Virpi Havila, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 67-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In traditional theories and models of the consumer marketing process, the active role in the marketing process is assumed to be confined to the business firm and/or constellations of commercial actors in a business network, while the role of the consumer is one of an isolated, receptive and, at most, merely re-active individual. By postulating an isolated, undistorted one-way flow of pre-allocated information regarding products (goods and services), the customer is implicitly described as somewhat exogenous to the marketing activities of firms and the business network (cf., Jensen-Schau et al. 2009).

  • 17.
    Sallis, James
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Ernberg, Emma
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Channel Switching or Dual Distribution2005In: Proceedings of the 34th Annual Conference of the European Marketing Academy, Milan, Italy, 2005, p. 347-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Building Together2013Other (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Consumer - Firm Business Relationship and Network: The case of2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Approximately 20 % of all air-travel tickets in Sweden are sold via the Internet despite consumer’s general perception of ticket prices being lower on the Internet when compared to those available in “traditional” stores. The general aim of this study is to generate a deeper understanding of what induces consumers to conduct their exchanges with firms on the Internet, and what induces most consumers to continue carrying out exchanges in “traditional” stores. Using a consumer – firm relationship and network perspective, this dissertation investigates the strength of a consumer – firm business relationship. The study contributes to both markets-as-networks tradition as well as to service/relationship marketing.

    Drawing on both open-ended interviews with business representatives and on survey material issued to 5000 consumers (1244 answers), the study examines the strength of a consumer – firm relationship. The focal consumer – firm relationship consists in this study of the two constructs “exchange” and “behaviour”. The impact of connected actors on the focal relationship is also a point of interest.

    This study concludes that consumers build a business relationship with a firm through continues interactions where impact from previous and future exchange episodes is of importance. These relationships develop, regardless of whether the relationship is with a firm on the Internet or in a “traditional” store. Another important conclusion is that a consumer can not have a business relationship with a firm prior to an exchange. It is through performing exchanges that consumers form behaviour patterns which lead to a consumer – firm relationship. Also of major interest is that consumers perceives that connected actors have the same impact on the focal business relationship, regardless if the relationship is with a firm on the Internet or in a “traditional” store.

  • 20.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala universitet.
    Recension: Marknadsföring, Människor och Interaktion2014In: Organisation & Samhälle, ISSN 2001-9114, Vol. 2, p. 23-23Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Bengtson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    SAS "New" Business Model2006In: 22nd Industrial Marketing and Purchasing Group Conference: Opening the network New perspectives in industrial marketing and purchasing, 2006, p. 15-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In September 2005 SAS introduced a new business model. Where did the model come from and what influenced it? This paper’s focus is on the making of the model where we study the making of a business model as a dynamic process through time. In concrete terms, traces of today’s model can be found and examined from the SAS group’s embryonic attempts starting in 1946, through the financially good years during the 1980s, to the market re-regulation in contemporary time. During these years several changes have taken part both on the larger air travel market and in SAS´s market practice. We have separated SAS´s history into three era’s, the technological era, the businessman’s airlines era, and the “to serve Europe with air travel” era. Elaborating on the theoretical notion of mutuality between markets and market practice (Cf. Helgesson et. al., 2004), the impact of these practices and of the market infra structure at different points in time are described and their importance for the emergence of the business model discussed. Our findings show that the political efforts to de-regulate the European air travel markets did not automatically change all market practices and thus not the market. The process that followed the de-regulation can better be characterised as a translation process in which a changed market was created, based on an already established network of embedded material and immaterial items, such as booking systems, airplanes and perceptive frames, that had to be taken into consideration.

  • 22.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Brunsson, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Second-hand market prices2014In: Score International Conference on Organizing Markets, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Jaakkola, Elina
    University of Turku.
    Creating Customer Engagement in Low-involvement Industries: An industry-level effort2016In: SERVSIG-2016: The Future of Services in the Heart of Europe, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies. Uppsala universitet.
    Jonas, Julia
    Friedrich-Alexander-Unirversität Erlangen-Nurnberg.
    The role of frontline emplyees in the new experience economy2015In: 23rd International Colloquium on Relationship Marketing (ICRM): Relationship Marketing: Back to the Roots and into the Future / [ed] Johanna Gummerius, Uppsala, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    An integrative perspective of Value-in-Use and Value Proposition2013In: 2013 Naples Forum on Service: Service Dominant logic,Network & Systems Theory and Service Science:Integrating three perspectives for a new service agenda, Uppsala, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Actor, Model, Whatever: Addressing the complexity of understanding heterogeneous actors in the value creating process2009In: Proceedings of The 2009 Naples Forum on Services: Service-Dominant Logic, Service Science, and Network Theory / [ed] Cristina Mele, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie G.
    Mäldardalenshögskola.
    How Resource Interdependencies In Service Systems Shape Actor Roles2014In: AMA SERVSIG 2012, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    IT’s impact on the value creating process and actor identities within the music industry2009In: Proceedings of 3rd KES-AMSTA, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie G.
    The role of institutional-based trust in service ecosystems2016In: SERVSIG-2016: The Future of Services in the Heart of Europe, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie G
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Value Networks: An empirical investigation of Shopping Comparison Engines impact on value-in-use2010In: AMA SERVSIG International Service Research Conference, Porto, Portugal, 17-19 June 2010 / [ed] Patricio, Lia, 2010, p. 142-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Röndell, Jimmie G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies. Mäldardalenshögskola.
    Varey, Richard
    Waikato University, New Zeeland.
    On categorization and the role of shared institutions: the link between value propositions and value-in-social context2014In: 4th Forum on Markets and Marketing, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Sörhammar, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Varey, Richard
    Waikato University.
    Introducing the notion of Participation2012In: Forum on Markets and Marketing 2012 (FMM12) / [ed] Rod Brodie, Auckland, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A truth taken for granted in marketing is that exchange is at its core. Some marketing researcher goes even further and defines marketing as exchange (Bagozzi:1975). Exchange is also found in AMA’s definition of marketing from 2007 as well as in Service-Dominant (S-D) logic’s FP:1 that states “Service is the fundamental basis of exchange” (Vargo&Lusch:2006). Even though S-D logic points out the processual aspects of exchange as “service is exchanged for service” (Vargo&Lusch:2004), there is an inherent notion of giving and receiving in the concept, which indicates a finite game.

    Business research in general, and more specifically marketing as a science, has traditionally put a lot of attention to solve the question of how to be the best in a finite game. Hence, deliver value to customers in an exchange (see Porter:1998). The aim, then, for a firm is to collect the perfect bundle of idiosyncratic resources inside the firms four walls (Wernerfelt:1984) which will give the company a sustainable competitive advantage (Barney:1991) in its value deliverance. Guided by Ronald Coase’s (1937) notions on the nature of the firm the winner is the firm who can minimize its costs associated with a market exchange the most. This firm-centric view implicates instrumental sellers acting on passive buyers, it also implicates that each offering is in itself unique. The logic of being a winner of a single finite exchange is also found in micro-economic founded research involving consumers, based on the notion of the economic man (Mill, 1836) and theories on the 4P: s (Kotler:2011, Borden:1964). Hence, at the heart of the exchange concept is the notion of a finite game with winners and losers, all with a focus on value maximisation in each exchange.

    For companies such as Facebook, YouTube, LEGO with their Mindstorm series and Google with their Android operating system, exchange cannot solely explain, frankly speaking, their persistence. On one hand, these are all empirical cases of users as resource integrators that exchange their knowledge and skills with the company as well with other users. On the other, exchange is rather a currency for something more, and that is being able to participate. As an example, people spend over 700 billion minutes per month on Facebook (Facebook:Newsroom). To be able to participate, resource integrators need to contribute which makes the focus rather on an ongoing infinite game, than being exchanged in a finite game. Hence, focusing on participating is to recognize the social phenomenon of people doing/acting together – sharing – and thereby inventing and realizing value-in-use collaboratively over time. 

    Therefore, this conceptual paper has the aim to explain the need for S-D logic’s mindset to reorient from exchange as its theoretical centre, to instead put focus on participation as the foundation for both markets and marketing. We argue in this paper that resource integrators participation in an ongoing infinite game is what forms and shapes both markets and marketing. Hence, to paraphrase Vargo & Lusch FP:1 “Participation is the fundamental basis of service”.

  • 33.
    Varey, Richard
    et al.
    Waikato University, New Zealand.
    Kadirov, Djavlonbek
    Eastern Institute of Technology, New Zealand.
    Sörhammar, David
    Uppsala universitet.
    The Phenomenon of Participating: From apart to win, to playing a part2016In: Social Business, ISSN 2044-4087, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 343-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To better understand behavior in increasingly online social networks from a marketing perspective, we propose transcending the notion of market and so adopt an alternative participatory, communal conceptualization. This is centered on “performative participation” in co-creating value to improve the conditions of the social commons. The focus on participating highlights that more is going on than product-for-money exchange.

    The discussion of the phenomenon of participating considers finite and infinite games, gifting, part-taking, and customer participation. The concept of creative economy is founded in the collaboration paradigm and suggests an economy of contribution that is not fully explained by monetized exchange between buyer and seller. Observable and familiar examples are identified, and we conclude with some implications for marketing practice that might motivate further scholarship.

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