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  • 1. Albarran, John
    et al.
    Rosser, Elizabeth
    Bach, Shirley
    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth
    Lundberg, Pranee C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Law, Kate
    Exploring the development of a cultural care framework for European caring science2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 11457-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the development of a cultural care framework that seeks to inform and embrace the philosophical ideals of caring science. Following a review of the literature that identified a lack of evidence of an explicit relationship between caring science and cultural care, a number of well-established transcultural care frameworks were reviewed. Our purpose was to select one that would resonate with underpinning philosophical values of caring science and that drew on criteria generated by the European Academy of Caring Science members. A modified framework based on the work of Giger and Davidhizar was developed as it embraced many of the values such as humanism that are core to caring science practice. The proposed caring science framework integrates determinants of cultural lifeworld-led care and seeks to provide clear directions for humanizing the care of individuals. The framework is offered to open up debate and act as a platform for further academic enquiry.

  • 2. Boonprasabhai, Kobkul
    et al.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Potisupsuk, Chuenjit
    The opinions of university students in Bankok Metropolitan about contraceptive methods and a male pill.2003In: Medical Journal of Scrinakharinwirot, ISSN 0859-3299, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 116-126Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Grandahl, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Paek, Seung Chun
    Mahidol Univ, Dept Soc & Hlth, Salaya Campus, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Grisurapong, Siriwan
    Mahidol Univ, Dept Soc & Hlth, Salaya Campus, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Sherer, Penchan
    Mahidol Univ, Dept Soc & Hlth, Salaya Campus, Bangkok, Thailand..
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Parents' knowledge, beliefs, and acceptance of the HPV vaccination in relation to their socio-demographics and religious beliefs: A cross-sectional study in Thailand2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e0193054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thailand has one of the world's highest prevalence of cervical cancer, mainly caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV infections can successfully be prevented by vaccination, which is available at a cost but not yet implemented in the national vaccination program. Parents play a critical role in deciding whether to vaccinate their child against HPV. Thus, the aim was to examine the association between parents' knowledge, beliefs, and acceptance of the HPV vaccination for their daughters, considering their socio-demographics and religious beliefs. A cross-sectional design was used among three schools in Thailand: Nakorn Phatom province (suburban) and Bangkok (urban). Parents of 9-12-year-old daughters completed the questionnaires, guided by the Health Belief Model. In total, 359 parents completed the questionnaires; of those, 301 were included in the final analyses. The ordinary least squares (OLS) regression analysis showed that background knowledge of HPV and the HPV vaccine was positively related to knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer. For beliefs, knowledge was positively associated with susceptibility (i.e., parents' perceived risk of an HPV infection/related disease), severity, and benefit. However, knowledge was not significantly related to barriers. For acceptance, higher susceptibility and benefit were related to higher acceptance, and greater knowledge was associated with higher acceptance. Thus, we found associations between parents' knowledge, beliefs, and acceptance of the HPV vaccination for their daughters, considering their socio-demographics and religious beliefs. Parents, who reported religion as important, as opposed to those who did not, were more favorable toward the HPV vaccination. Four out of ten mothers had never undergone a cervical cancer screening, but most had accepted previous childhood vaccinations for their daughters. The overall acceptance of the vaccine was high, and we believe our results are promising for future implementation of the HPV vaccination in the national childhood vaccination program in Thailand.

  • 4. Koskinen, Liisa
    et al.
    Kelly, Helene Taylor
    Bergknut, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Muir, Nita
    Olt, Helen
    Richardson, Eileen
    Sairanen, Raija
    De Vlieger, Lily
    European Higher Health Care Education Curriculum: Development of a Cultural Framework2012In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing, ISSN 1043-6596, E-ISSN 1552-7832, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 313-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns the European Curriculum in Cultural Care Project (2005-2009), which aimed at developing a curriculum framework for the enhancement of cultural competence in European health care education. The project was initiated and supported by the Consortium of Institutes in Higher Education in Health and Rehabilitation, whose goal is to nurture educational development and networking among member institutions. The framework is the result of a collaborative endeavor by nine nurse educators from five different European countries. The production of the framework will be described in accordance with the following tenets: developing cultural competence is a continuing process, cultural competence is based on sensitivity toward others, and cultural competence is a process of progressive inquiry. Critique concerning the framework will be presented.

  • 5.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Erfarenheter av att vårda personer som lever med HIV/aids: en studie av vietnamesiska familjemedlemmar2016In: Best Practice Infektionmedicin, Vol. 5, no 9, p. 22-25Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Inga undantag2004In: I&M: Invandrare och minoriteter, no 5-6, p. 37-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Meanings and practices of health among married Thai immigrant women in Sweden.1999In: J Transcult Nurs, ISSN 1043-6596, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 31-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Perceptions and experiences of genital mutilation during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum period among Eritrean women in Sweden.2005In: 24th International Human Science Research Conference. Abstract Book., 2005Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 9.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Use of Traditional Herbal Remedies by Thai Immigrant Women in Sweden.2007In: Traveling Cultures and Plants: The Ethnobiology and Ethnopharmacy of Migrations, Berghahn Books, Oxford , 2007, p. 104-121Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 10.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Boonprasabhai, K
    Meanings of good nursing care among Thai female last-year undergraduate nursing students.2001In: J Adv Nurs, ISSN 0309-2402, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 35-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lundberg, Pranee C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Cultural Care of Thai Immigrants in Uppsala: A Study of Transcultural Nursing in Sweden2000In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing, ISSN 1043-6596, E-ISSN 1552-7832, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 274-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to discover and describe the meanings and expressions of cultural care of a group of Thai immigrants in Sweden. Participants included 15 key informants and 24 general informants living in and around the town of Uppsala. The conceptual framework was provided by Leininger’s theory of cultural care diversity and universality. Use was made of the ethnonursing method and the Sunrise Model in the search for multiple and related dimensions that influenced the generic and professional care practices of the Thai immigrants. Four major themes were formulated. Thus, care (a) means family and kinship relationships as expressed in daily life, (b) is expressed in traditional gender roles, (c) means religious beliefs as expressed in the Buddhist worship, and (d) means support of traditional health care practices. These themes support the cultural care theory and also confirm the Sunrise Model.

  • 12.
    Lundberg, Pranee C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Patienten har ordet.2010In: I & M : invandrare & minoriteter, ISSN 1404-6857, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 13-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Tilltron till den svenska sjukvården är stor – även om många invandrade patienter känner sig otrygga i mötet med vårdcentralernas personal. Många anser att de måste ”arbeta hårt” för att bli undersökta och tagna på allvar.

  • 13.
    Lundberg, Pranee C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Bäckström, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Widén, Sarah
    Caregiving to patients who are culturally diverse by Swedish last-year nursing students.2005In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing, ISSN 1043-6596, E-ISSN 1552-7832, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 255-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With Leininger’s theory of cultural care diversity and universality as a framework, the aim of this study was to describe Swedish last-year nursing students’ experiences of caregiving to patients who are culturally diverse. The students participated voluntarily, 107 by completing a questionnaire with open-ended questions and 15 by participating in in-depth semistructured interviews. Three categories of experience were identified by use of qualitative method, namely, cultural awareness, cultural insufficiency, and cultural curiosity. The students were found to be on the level of Leininger’s first phase of transcultural knowledge. It is concluded that cultural sensitivity should be promoted by integrating transcultural concepts into the curricula on all levels of nursing education and by offering special courses on transcultural nursing to nursing students and health care providers.

  • 14.
    Lundberg, Pranee C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Doan, Thoa Thi Kim
    Dinh, Thu Thi Xuan
    Oach, Nhung Kim
    Le, Phong Hoang
    Caregiving to persons living with HIV/AIDS: experiences of Vietnamese family members2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 5-6, p. 788-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To examine the experiences of caregiving among Vietnamese family members of persons living with HIV/AIDS.

    BACKGROUND:

    As the number of persons living with HIV/AIDS increases, the need of family caregivers who can take responsibility for the home care of these persons increases. Vietnam has one of the fastest growing HIV epidemics in Asia.

    DESIGN:

    A descriptive cross-sectional study with quantitative and qualitative methods was used.

    METHODS:

    A purposive sample of 104 family caregivers, both male and female, participated voluntarily by answering a questionnaire of caregiver burden, and 20 of them participated in in-depth interview.

    RESULTS:

    Female caregivers were mainly mothers and wives while male caregivers were mainly husbands, fathers and siblings. The largest group of family caregivers reported moderate to severe burden. There was no difference between genders in total caregiver burden, but there were several differences between older and younger caregivers in some items of caregiver burden. Five categories of experiences emerged: Different types of caregiving to persons living with HIV/AIDS, cultural and religious issues associated with caregiving, keeping secret to avoid stigma and discrimination, lack of knowledge about disease and provision of care, and fear, anxiety and frustration.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Stigma and discrimination should be decreased by providing knowledge to the general public about HIV/AIDS, in particular about ways of transmission and protection. Special knowledge should be given to family caregivers to enable them to give care to persons living with HIV/AIDS at home. This could be done through culturally appropriate training/intervention programmes in which coping methods should be included. Support group interventions should also be carried through. The results obtained can be used as baseline information.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Health care providers should consider gender, age and culture of family members of persons living with HIV/AIDS. Knowledge about HIV/AIDS, provision of care at home and in hospital, and support groups should be developed and implemented.

  • 15.
    Lundberg, Pranee C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Kerdonfag, Petcharat
    Spiritual care provided by Thai nurses in intensive care units2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 7-8, p. 1121-1128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM

    The aim of this study was to explore how Thai nurses in intensive care units of a university hospital in Bangkok provided spiritual care to their patients.

    BACKGROUND

    The function of nursing is to promote health, prevent illness, restore health and alleviate suffering. An holistic approach to this promotion includes spirituality.

    DESIGN

    An explorative qualitative study was used.

    METHOD

    Thirty Thai nurses, selected through purposive sampling with the snowball technique, participated voluntarily. Semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions were carried out, taped-recorded, transcribed verbatim and subjected to content analysis.

    RESULTS

    Five themes related to the provision of spiritual care emerged: giving mental support, facilitating religious rituals and cultural beliefs, communicating with patients and patients' families, assessing the spiritual needs of patients and showing respect and facilitating family participation in care. Several ways of improving the spiritual care were suggested by the nurses.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Spirituality was an important part of the care for the nurses when meeting the needs of their patients and the patients' families. Therefore, nursing education should enhance nurses' understanding and awareness of spiritual issues and prepare them to respond to human spiritual needs.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Nurses should consider spirituality as an important component of holistic care. During their professional career, they should expand their knowledge and understanding of spirituality and develop tools for assessment of spiritual needs.

  • 16.
    Lundberg, Pranee C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rattanasuwan, Orawan
    Experiences of fatigue and self-management of Thai Buddhist cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy2007In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 146-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe (a) the subjective feelings of fatigue of Thai Buddhist cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) and identify possible gender differences, (b) their beliefs about the main cause of fatigue, and (c) their ways of self-management for relief of fatigue. One hundred thirty-three voluntary and randomly selected patients, 55 men and 78 women, completed a questionnaire with a Thai version of the Revised Piper Fatigue Scale. After 1 week of treatment, the largest group (42.1%) of the patients had felt fatigue during the last few hours (from 1 to 5 hours). The patients perceived a mild level of fatigue, but the sensory/cognitive fatigue scores were high. Five categories of beliefs about the main cause of fatigue emerged: (a) receiving RT; (b) feelings of anxiety, depression, and fright/fear; (c) cancer; (d) long travel to hospital and long waiting time for RT; and (e) difficulty with sleep and weak body. For relief of fatigue, 5 categories of self-management emerged: (1) getting moral support from family and friends; (2) practicing religion, reciting prayers, doing merit, and meditating; (3) practicing self-care for symptomatic problems; (4) accepting the situation and doing the best of one's life; and (5) consulting with doctor and nurse. In conclusion, healthcare providers need to be concerned about RT patients' symptoms of fatigue, beliefs about causes of fatigue, and ways of self-management for relief of fatigue. They also need understanding of cultural and religious beliefs to plan holistic care.

  • 17.
    Lundberg, Pranee C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Thrakul, Supunnee
    Religion and self-management of Thai Buddhist and Muslim women with type 2 diabetes2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 13-14, p. 1907-1916Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To report of a qualitative study of how religion affects the self-management of Thai Buddhist and Muslim women with type 2 diabetes. Background The importance of diabetes self-management is well recognised. However, research on such self-management in Thailand is scarce, in particular on the influence of religion on the self-management of Thai Buddhist and Muslim women with type 2 diabetes. Design A descriptive qualitative study was conducted. Methods Purposive convenience sampling was used, and 48 women, 19 Buddhist and 29 Muslim, aged from 28-80years, participated. Data were collected in 2008-09 and analysed by use of manifest and latent content analysis. Results Four themes of the influence of religion on the self-management among Thai women with type 2 diabetes emerged: religion - a way of coping with diabetes, spiritual practice - a help for disease control, spiritual practice - an effort to struggle with everyday life, and support from family - a cultural practice. Conclusions The Buddhist and Muslim women had self-management capabilities that were often related to their religions. However, many of them had poor control of their blood sugar levels and needed assistance. Relevance to clinical practice Reference to religion and spiritual practice can be an effective means of helping diabetes patients better manage their disease and change their lifestyles. Furthermore, family and economic and social environments should be taken into account both in care and in interventions aimed at helping patients cope and empowering them to control their disease.

  • 18.
    Lundberg, Pranee C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Thrakul, Supunnee
    Type 2 diabetes: how do Thai Buddhist people with diabetes practise self-management?2012In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 68, no 3, p. 550-558Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    This paper is a report of a study of how Thai Buddhist people with type 2 diabetes practice self-management.

    Background

    The importance of diabetes self-management is recognized in the literature. However, research on self-care management in Thailand, in particular concerning Buddhist people with type 2 diabetes, is scarce.

    Methods

    A descriptive qualitative study was conducted. Purposive convenience sampling was used, and thirty men and women with diabetes, aged 28–79 years, participated. Data were collected from June to August 2009 and analysed by use of manifest and latent content analysis.

    Findings

    Five themes of self-management among Thai Buddhist people with type 2 diabetes were identified: cultural influence on disease control, Buddhism and Thai culture, struggle for disease control, family support and economy a high priority.

    Conclusion

    Even though the Buddhist people with diabetes had certain self-management capabilities, many had poor control of their blood sugar levels and needed assistance. Reference to Buddhist moderation can be an effective means of helping the people with diabetes better manage their disease and change their lifestyles. In addition to cultural and religious traditions, family, economy and social environment should be taken into account both in the care and in interventions aimed at helping people with diabetes cope and empowering them to control their disease.

  • 19.
    Lundberg, Pranee C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Trieu, T. N. T.
    Breast-feeding attitudes and practices among Vietnamese mothers in Ho Chi Minh City2012In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 252-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to describe breast-feeding attitudes and practices among Vietnamese women in Ho Chi Minh City.

    Design: a descriptive qualitative study was used. The theory of planned behaviour provided the conceptual framework.

    Setting: the Well-baby Clinic, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of a university hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    Participants: 23 voluntary Vietnamese mothers.

    Data collection and analysis: semi-structured in-depth interview with five open-ended questions and observation was used. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data from the interviews and observations were analysed by use of content analysis.

    Findings: five categories of breast-feeding attitudes and practices were identified: breast-feeding best but not exclusive, cultural and traditional beliefs, infant feeding as a learning process, factors influencing decision to breast feed, and intention to feed the child.

    Key conclusion and implications for practice: cultural and traditional beliefs and practices, and socio-economic situation, influenced the Vietnamese mothers' breast feeding. Health-care professionals should consider cultural context and socio-economic issues when preparing infant feeding education and intervention programmes. Appropriate knowledge about cultural values should be included in health-care education in order to provide culturally congruent care to Vietnamese mothers in Vietnam as well as in Western countries.

  • 20.
    Lundberg, Pranee C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Trieu, Thi Ngoc Thu
    Vietnamese women's cultural beliefs and practices related to the postpartum period2011In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 731-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to describe cultural beliefs and practices related to the postpartum period among Vietnamese women in Ho Chi Minh City. DESIGN: a descriptive cross-sectional study using triangulation. SETTING: the Postpartum Clinic, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of a university hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. PARTICIPANTS: 115 Vietnamese women, 95 in the first group and 20 in the second group. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: a questionnaire was used with the first group and a semi-structured in-depth interview was used with the second group. Both groups were subjected to the same four open-ended questions. The data obtained were first analysed separately by use of qualitative content analysis and then cross-checked. FINDINGS: four categories were identified: hygiene, behavioural precautions (lying by a fire, keeping warm after birth, staying indoors and resting in bed, and avoiding house work and sexual activity), dietary precautions, and breast feeding and lactation. KEY CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: traditional beliefs and practices, often beneficial to the women and their babies but sometimes potentially harmful, greatly influenced the Vietnamese women during the postpartum period. Therefore, health-care professionals need to give appropriate information and care to the women and their families while paying due attention to the cultural context. These demands make it imperative that knowledge about cultural values be included in their education, not least in Western countries which have become multicultural.

  • 21.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Gerezgiher, Alganesh
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Experiences from pregnancy and childbirth related to female genital mutilation among Eritrean immigrant women in Sweden2008In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 214-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to explore Eritrean immigrant women's experiences of female genital mutilation (FGM) during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period. Design: qualitative study using an ethnographic approach. Data were collected via tape-recorded interviews. Setting: interviews in the Eritrean women's homes located in and around Uppsala, Sweden. Participants: 15 voluntary Eritrean immigrant women. Data collection and analysis: Semi-structured interview and open-ended questions were used. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and then analysed. Findings: six themes of experiences of FGM among Eritrean women during pregnancy and childbirth were identified. They are (1) fear and anxiety, (2) extreme pain and tong-term complications, (3) health-care professionals' knowledge of circumcision and health-care system, (4) support from family, relatives and friends, (5) de-infibulation, and (6) decision against female circumcision of daughters. Key conclusion and implications for practice: the Eritrean women had experiences of FGM and had suffered from its complications during pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period. Midwives and obstetricians should have competence in managing women with FGM, and they need increased understanding of cultural epistemology in order to be able to provide quality care to these women. At antenatal centres, circumcised women should be advised to deinfibulate before pregnancy. Special courses about anatomical differences should be offered to these women and their husbands. It is also important to inform them about Swedish law, which prohibits all forms of FGM.

  • 22.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Trichorb, K
    Thai Buddhist patients with cancer undergoing radiation therapy: feelings, coping, and satisfaction with nurse-provided education and support.2001In: Cancer Nurs, ISSN 0162-220X, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 469-75Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 23.
    Phoosuwan, Nitikorn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Kasetsart Univ, Fac Publ Hlth, Dept Community Hlth, Chalermphrakiat Sakonnakhon Prov Campus, Muang, Sakon Nakhon, Thailand.
    Eriksson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Lundberg, Pranee C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Antenatal depressive symptoms during late pregnancy among women in a north-eastern province of Thailand: Prevalence and associated factors2018In: Asian Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 1876-2018, E-ISSN 1876-2026, Vol. 36, p. 102-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, depression is prevalent during pregnancy and several factors have been associated with antenatal depressive symptoms (ADS). However, ADS have rarely been investigated in Thailand. This study aimed at exploring the prevalence of ADS and factors associated with these symptoms among Thai women in late pregnancy.

    Methods: A cross-sectional study including 449 women in late pregnancy was carried out. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was used to detect depressive symptoms with a score of 10 points or higher. Socio-demographic characteristics and psychosocial risks were measured in association with ADS. Percentage and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the prevalence of ADS. Odds ratio (OR) and 95%CI were used to determine ADS-related risk factors among women.

    Results: The prevalence of ADS was 46.8% (95%CI 42.3–51.4). Pregnant women aged less than 20 years (OR 2.58, 95%CI 1.14–5.84) and those not having enough money (OR 2.71, 95%CI 1.22–6.05) had an increased risk of ADS. Psychosocial risks related to ADS for women were low psychological well-being (OR 3.12, 95%CI 1.75–5.58), low self-esteem (OR 2.08, 95%CI 1.24–3.49), and low sense of coherence (OR 1.82, 95%CI 1.12–2.95).

    Conclusions: The prevalence of ADS among Thai women in their late pregnancy is high. Socio-demographic characteristics and psychosocial factors are independently associated with ADS. Healthcare providers in Thailand should consider EPDS as a standardised screening tool for ADS and use it at antenatal care clinics. Implementing programs focusing on both pregnant women and their family might increase the prevention of perinatal depression.

  • 24. Sairanen, Raija
    et al.
    Richardson, Eileen
    Kelly, Helene
    Bergknut, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Koskinen, Liisa
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Muir, Nita
    Olt, Helen
    De Vlieger, Lily
    Putting culture in the curriculum: A European project2013In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 118-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale for and the method of designing a framework for a European curriculum to promote intercultural competence in health care students. The background relating to the migration of people into and across Europe is cited as the factor driving the need for such a project. The project group emerged from the European organisation known as COHEHRE (Consortium of Higher Education Institutes in Health and Rehabilitation in Europe). Composed of a group of nurse educators from 5 European countries it charts the process which led them to create a curriculum framework. The completed work is available in the form of a CD-ROM. The paper describes the steps taken to reach the project outcomes over 4 years. The methods of dissemination of the project outcomes are included. The discussion considers the journey of the group towards the outcomes of the project and identifies the need to discover how effective the framework is in achieving the aims of the group. In conclusion it articulates the hope that this work will improve the care which is shown to all recipients of health care whatever their cultural background.

  • 25.
    Widarsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Engström, Gabriella
    Berglund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Parental stress and dyadic consensus in early parenthood among mothers and fathers in Sweden2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 689-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Parental stress can negatively affect the parent-child relationship and reduce the well-being of the whole family. Family disagreement is associated with parental divorce and with psychological problems in children.

    AIMS: The aim was to examine perceived parental stress and draw comparisons among mothers and among fathers, in relation to educational level, parental experience, existence of a parental role model and sense of coherence. The aim was also to examine perceived dyadic consensus and its association with perceived parental stress within couples.

    METHODS: Questionnaires were completed by 320 mothers and 315 fathers at 1 week and 18 months post-partum. The Swedish Parenthood Stress Questionnaire, the Sense of Coherence Scale and the Dyadic Consensus Subscale were used.

    RESULTS: Low education, lack of a role model and poor sense of coherence promoted stress in mothers in the subareas social isolation and spouse relationship problems, while lack of a role model and poor sense of coherence promoted stress in fathers in the subarea social isolation. Furthermore, parental experiences promoted stress among mothers in the subarea incompetence while this was not seen among fathers. Mothers perceived a higher level of dyadic consensus than fathers in the items recreational activities, friends, aims and life goals, time spent together, and decisions regarding career and personal development. Household tasks was the only item where fathers perceived a higher level of dyadic consensus than mothers. Additionally, there were associations between perceived parental stress and dyadic consensus in several items and in the total score.

    CONCLUSIONS: To promote parents' health and family stability, health professionals should consider factors affecting stress and stress reactions, and take gender roles into account.

  • 26.
    Widarsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Engström, Gabriella
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Kerstis, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Edlund, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Parental stress in early parenthood among mothers and fathers in Sweden2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 839-847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Parental stress affects parenting behaviour and the quality of dyadic parent–child interactions. Mothers generally show higher parental stress than fathers.

    Aims

    Our aims were to assess the perceived level of parental stress in early parenthood and examine the differences between mothers and fathers within couples in relation to their levels of education, parental experience, existence of a parental role model and sense of coherence.

    Methods

    In total, 307 mothers and 301 fathers of 18-month-old children answered the Swedish Parenthood Stress Questionnaire (SPSQ); and 318 mothers and 311 fathers answered the Sense of Coherence (SOC-3) scale; 283 couples answered both the SPSQ and SOC-3.

    Results

    Mothers perceived higher levels of stress than fathers in the sub-areas incompetence (p < 0.001), role restriction (p < 0.001), spouse relationship problems (p = 0.004) and health problems (p = 0.027), and in total (p = 0.001). In contrast, fathers perceived higher stress than mothers in the sub-area social isolation (p < 0.001). When the data were stratified with respect to education, parental experience, existence of a parental role model and sense of coherence, significant results were observed in some of these sub-areas.

    Conclusions

    Mothers and fathers experience stress in different areas during their early parenthood. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the differences in stress that exist between mothers and fathers, so that parents can be adequately prepared for parenthood and avoid parental stress.

  • 27.
    Widarsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Engström, Gabriella
    Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL,.
    Tyden, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Lundberg, Pranee
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Hammar, Lena Marmstål
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    “Paddling upstream”: Fathers' involvement during pregnancy as described by expectant fathers and mothers2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 7-8, p. 77p. 1059-1068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To describe the perspectives of expectant mothers and fathers on fathers' involvement during pregnancy.

    Background

    Becoming a father is a major life event and paternal involvement during pregnancy has a positive influence on the family. However, research into both expectant mothers' and fathers' perspectives on fathers' involvement during pregnancy is relatively scarce.

    Design

    A descriptive qualitative study was used.

    Methods

    Thirty expectant parents (20 women and 10 men) were interviewed either as part of one of four focus groups or in an individual interview. Qualitative content analysis was performed on the interview transcripts.

    Results

    A theme of 'Paddling upstream' emerged as an expression of the latent content of the interviews concerning perspectives on fathers' involvement. Five sub-themes described the manifest content: trying to participate, trying to be understanding, trying to learn, trying to be a calming influence and trying to find a balanced life. Expectant parents suggested several ways to improve fathers' involvement and to meet parents' need for shared involvement.

    Conclusion

    Expectant mothers and fathers wanted the father to be more involved in the pregnancy. Although fathers attempted different strategies, they did not always perceive what was expected of them and encountered many barriers as they tried to navigate through this unique experience. The best support for the father was the mother. Expectant parents wanted their healthcare to include the father more thoroughly and to focus on the whole family.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Prenatal care professionals can overcome barriers that prevent paternal involvement. Although fathers are not able to engage in the pregnancy on the same level as the mother, we suggest that their specific needs also be recognised through an increased awareness of gender norms in healthcare.

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