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  • 1.
    Agic, Heda
    et al.
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Life through the 'Varanger ice ages': microfossil record of late Neoproterozoic glacial-interglacial units from arctic Norway2018In: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Geological Society of America, 2018, Vol. 50Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The late Neoproterozoic strata in Finnmark (Arctic Norway) provide a good sedimentary record of Neoproterozoic glaciations on the Baltica paleocontinent. The lower Vestertana Group exposed on the Digermulen Peninsula contains two glaciogenic units, the Smalfjord and Mortensnes formations. Chemostratigraphic correlation dated the Smalfjord diamictite to the Marinoan glaciation (650-635 Ma), yet its age was also proposed to be older, per correlation to glacial units in central and southern Scandinavia. The diamictites are bracketing shales and siltstones of the interglacial Nyborg Formation. Stratigraphic, paleontological, and sedimentological data are presented from the interglacial-glacial succession, investigated by the Digermulen Early Life Research Group. Palynological analysis yielded well-preserved organic-walled microfossils (OWM) from the Nyborg Fm., and from fine-grained diamictite matrix in the Mortensnes Fm. via a modified extraction method.

    The interglacial Nyborg Fm. hosts a moderate diversity assemblage of prokaryotic and eukaryotic OWM, as well as acanthomorphic acritarchs such as Ceratosphaeridium, ?Cavaspina, and a novel process-bearing form. Organically preserved, enigmatic multicellular eukaryotic fossils occur in the upper Nyborg Fm. The Mortensens glacial assemblage is less diverse and contains bacterial filaments, leiosphaerids, toroidal forms, and Micrhystridium-type minute acanthomorphs.

    The presence of Doushantuo-Pertatataka type acritarchs in the Nyborg Fm., and small acanthomorphs in the Mortensnes diamictite corroborate an early Ediacaran age for the interglacial-glacial succession on Digermulen. In addition to the trace fossil and body-fossil record of Ediacara-biota in the overlying Stáhpogieddi Formation, the microfossil biostratigraphy suggests Marinoan and Gaskiers glaciation equivalent ages of the Varanger glaciations in Finnmark. Protistan diversity in the succession declined through and following the glaciation, until late Ediacaran.

  • 2.
    Agic, Heda
    et al.
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Moczydłowska, Małgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Novis, Linn K.
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Unusual organic-walled microfossil from the late Neoproterozoic Nyborg Formation, Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway2017In: ISECT 2017, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The late Neoproterozoic Nyborg Formation is exposed in the Tanafjord area, Finnmark, Arctic Norway, on Digermulen and Varanger Peninsulas. The succession is composed of ~400 m of interbedded shales, siltstone and purple to grey sandstone, deposited between Neoproterozoic low latitude glacial deposits. The Nyborg Fm. lies on top of the Smalfjord diamictite, and is overlain by the Mortensnes diamictite (the latter was attributed to both Marinoan (650-635 Ma) and Gaskiers (579 Ma) glaciations) and the Ediacaran-Cambrian Stáhpogieddi Formation. Thus, the Nyborg Fm. represents late Neoproterozoic, probably the last Cryogenian interglacial interval. Presented material was collected in 2014 by members of Digermulen Early Life Research Group, from organic-rich, grey-green shales and siltstones of the Nyborg Mbr. D, uppermost Nyborg Fm. between Árasulluokta and Guvssájohka valleys. Organic-walled microfossils were extracted from shale via standard palynological acetolysis in hydrofluoric acid, and studied via light and scanning electron microscopy. Microfossils from the Nyborg Fm. include Synsphaeridium-type aggregated cells, unbranched bacterial filaments (Polythrichoides and Siphonophycus), sphaeromorph and envelope-bearing acritarchs (leiosphaerids, Stictosphaeridium, Simia), and previously unrecognized aggregated tubular microfossils. These taxa are long-ranging, but common in glacial-interglacial units worldwide, and thus broadly corroborate the Cryogenian age of the Nyborg sediments. The novel fossil, up to 300 μm in size, is a parenchymatous meshwork of interconnected organic-walled tubes that terminate in cup-shaped apices 4-11 µm in diameter. Irregular tube clusters are truncated both in macerates and in thin sections, suggesting post mortem transport. Elemental EDXS analysis indicates that extracted meshwork microfossils are predominantly composed of carbonaceous material and also associated with small amounts of titanium and vanadium. Considering the branching and adjoined body plan of carbonaceous fossil, it was likely multicellular and of eukaryotic affinity. As such, it may represent an important step in the evolution of complex multicellularity and morphological complexity several million years before the appearance of Ediacaran organisms.

  • 3.
    Agić, Heda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Univ Calif Santa Barbara, Dept Earth Sci, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    Högström, Anette E. S.
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Arctic Univ Museum Norway, N-9037 Tromso, Norway.
    Moczydlowska, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Jensen, Sören
    Univ Extremadura, Area Paleontol, E-06006 Badajoz, Spain.
    Palacios, Teodoro
    Univ Extremadura, Area Paleontol, E-06006 Badajoz, Spain.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Keele Univ, Sch Geog Geol & Environm, Keele ST5 5BG, Staffs, England;Univ Gottingen, Dept Sedimentol & Environm Geol, Goldschmidtstr 3, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Univ Cape Town, Dept Geol Sci, ZA-7701 Rondebosch, South Africa.
    Höyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Organically-preserved multicellular eukaryote from the early Ediacaran Nyborg Formation, Arctic Norway2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 14659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eukaryotic multicellularity originated in the Mesoproterozoic Era and evolved multiple times since, yet early multicellular fossils are scarce until the terminal Neoproterozoic and often restricted to cases of exceptional preservation. Here we describe unusual organically-preserved fossils from mudrocks, that provide support for the presence of organisms with differentiated cells (potentially an epithelial layer) in the late Neoproterozoic. Cyathinema digermulense gen. et sp. nov. from the Nyborg Formation, Vestertana Group, Digermulen Peninsula in Arctic Norway, is a new carbonaceous organ-taxon which consists of stacked tubes with cup-shaped ends. It represents parts of a larger organism (multicellular eukaryote or a colony), likely with greater preservation potential than its other elements. Arrangement of open-ended tubes invites comparison with cells of an epithelial layer present in a variety of eukaryotic clades. This tissue may have benefitted the organism in: avoiding overgrowth, limiting fouling, reproduction, or water filtration. C. digermulense shares characteristics with extant and fossil groups including red algae and their fossils, demosponge larvae and putative sponge fossils, colonial protists, and nematophytes. Regardless of its precise affinity, C. digermulense was a complex and likely benthic marine eukaryote exhibiting cellular differentiation, and a rare occurrence of early multicellularity outside of Konservat-Lagerstatten.

  • 4.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Lars Roberg och trilobiterna2015In: Geologiskt forum, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 22-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Den 18 juni 1715 försvarades uppsatsen De Fluviatili Astaco ejusque usu medico vid Uppsalauniversitet. Författaren var Lars Roberg ochämnet var kräftdjur av olika slag. Arbetet innehöllen figur och på denna avbildades tre fossil;en krabba och två svanssköldar från trilobiter. Fossil hade aldrig tidigare avbildats i trycktaarbeten i Sverige, och därmed blev Lars Robergför trehundra år sedan den första i Sverige attillustrera fossil, därtill även svenska sådana.

  • 5.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    The Bromell fossil collection at Uppsala University, Sweden: its history and the people behind it2013In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 3-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Remains of 17(th) century cabinets of curiosity collections are held at the Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University, Sweden. Some of the oldest date back to the 1650s, and were included in the collection of Archiater, i.e. physician to the Crown, von Bromell (1679-1731). He is also known for publishing the first series of papers in Sweden to exclusively deal with palaeontology. Throughout his life he acquired specimens by collecting, buying or receiving in exchange to add to those he inherited from his father Olaus Bromelius, a famous botanist and physician. Information on the labels gives a glimpse of his network of friends, colleagues and fellow collectors, such as Kilian Stobaeus, Lars Roberg, Emanuel Swedenborg, Elias Brenner and Johan Dobelius. When Bromell died, his vast collections of books, coins, furniture, conchs, stuffed animals, minerals and fossils were sold off. The minerals and fossils were split up and owned by various persons during the following century. Parts owned by A. Lagerberg between the years 1746 and 1776 were bought in 1796 by Johan Afzelius and donated to Uppsala University at his death. Fossils and minerals earlier described by Bromell were in the care of The Royal Society of Science in Uppsala at least by 1791. Through the Institute of Geology, fossils accumulated over the centuries at Uppsala University eventually came together under the same roof in 1932, under professor Carl Wiman's care at the then newly erected Palaeontology museum building. Today, about 300 fossils from the Bromell collection are preserved at the museum.

  • 6.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Valent, Martin
    Natl Museum, Dept Palaeontol, Cirkusova, Horni Pocernice, Czech Republic.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    An orthothecid hyolith with a digestive tract from the early Cambrian of Bornholm, Denmark2018In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 140, no 1, p. 25-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hyolith assemblage from the early Cambrian of Bornholm, Denmark, shows a higher diversity than contemporary assemblages in Baltoscandia. The most common species in the Green Shales (Laesa Formation, Norretorp Member, Cambrian Stage 3), is Hyolithes [=Hyolithus] (Orthotheca) johnstrupi Holm, 1893. A specimen of this species shows a well-preserved and almost complete digestive tract, folded into an approximately 22mm long chevron-like structure comprised of at least 20 arcuate loops on the ventral side and a flattened, gently sinuous to straight anal tube on the dorsal side. The thin, phosphatic outer shell layer of the conch is crushed under the digestive tract due to compaction while the digestive tract is preserved in three dimensions and appears undisturbed. The shape of the digestive tract is similar to that of the middle Cambrian Guduguwan hardmani (Etheridge) from Australia and the lower Cambrian specimens from Russia described by Mekova & Sysoev. The Danish specimen is probably an adult, lending support to the idea that the orthothecid digestive tract becomes more complex during ontogeny. Hyolithus (Orthotheca) johnstrupi is revised and here referred to Circotheca Sysoev, 1958.

  • 7.
    Cederström, Peter
    et al.
    Axelvoldsvägen 27, SE-241 35 Eslöv, Sweden.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Department of Geology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Helcionelloid molluscs from Cambrian Series 2 strata in Sweden: Composition and stratigraphic implications2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    The tergomyan Mollusc Carcassonnella from the Upper Ordovician of Girvan, Scotland2008In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 51, no Part 3, p. 663-675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tergomyan genus Carcassonnella Horny´ and Peel, 1996 is common in and characteristic of the Mediterranean Province in peri-Gondwanan terranes during the late Tremadoc and Arenig. It is united with other small, slitbearingcyrtonellids in the Carcassonnellidae Horny´ , 1997b, of which Baltiscanella Horny´ , 1997b from the Arenig of the Oslo Region, Norway, and Sarkanella from the Caradoc of the Siljan District, Sweden has been recognized outside the Mediterranean Province. The most inclusive view of the Carcassonnellidae unites Peelerophon Yochelson, 1982, Carcassonnella Horny´ and Peel, 1996, Sarkanella Horny´ , 1997a, Baltiscanella Horny´ , 1997b, and Tachillanella Horny´ , 1997b. Patterns of distribution of genera in the family are obscured, however, by widely different phylogenetic relationships presented in the literature. Here, Carcassonnella multilineata (Reed, 1920) is documented in the upper Whitehouse and Drummuck subgroups of the Girvan district, Midland Valley of Scotland, being the first record of the genus outside peri-Gondwana. Its enigmatic occurrence on the edge of Laurentia is opposed to the occurrence of low latitude benthic faunas in higher latitudes during this time interval (the Boda Event). It is likely, therefore, that the genus spread from the ancient stock found on the Perunican microcontinent as this drifted away from Gondwana in the mid-Caradoc.

  • 9.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Isakar, Mare
    Microgastropods in the Ordovician of Baltoscandia: potentials and prospects2004In: WOGOGOB-2004 Conference materials, 2004Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 10.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Bucaniid gastropods from the Upper Ordovician of Baltica, with a discussion of the Bucaniinae1999In: Palaentology, Vol. 42, p. 149-169Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Bucaniidae (Gastropoda) from the Upper Ordovician of Norway1999In: Norsk Geologisk Tidskrift, Vol. 79, p. 241-258Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Carl Wiman and the foundation of Mesozoic vertebrate palaeontology in Sweden2016In: 5th Triennial Mosasaur Meeting, May 16–20, 2016, Museum of Evolution, Uppsala University, Sweden: A global perspective on Mesozoic marine amniotes / [ed] Kear, B.P., Lindgren, J, & Sachs, S., 2016, p. 7-8Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1908, Carl Wiman of Uppsala University, Sweden, discovered rich horizons with Triassic vertebrate remains in Spitsbergen on Svalbard, Norway. This marked the beginning ofvertebrate palaeontology as a science in Sweden, subsequently developed mainly through the collection and study of non-Swedish fossil remains. Wiman’s accomplishments, resolute personality and a tight network of influential friends and supporters enabled him to becomethe first person in Sweden to hold a university chair in Palaeontology and Historical Geology. He also managed to amass large numbers of unique fossil vertebrate specimens culminating inan extensive Chinese collection of both world famous dinosaurs and Neogene mammalsdeposited at Uppsala University. Joint scientific Sino-Swedish collaboration and a  deliberate Swedish scientific agenda ensured this unprecedented situation in an opportune moment.Governmental support and initiative allowed Uppsala University and Carl Wiman’sPalaeontological Institute to erect a museum building dedicated foremost to the Chinese material, now known as the Lagrelius Collection in recognition of the patron behind Wiman’s ambitious endeavours. In addition, the museum served as a permanent repository for seminal collections of Mesozoic fossils from Svalbard and North America. Collectively, these represent a landmark research and teaching resource that remains of intense scientific interest eventoday.

  • 13.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Carl Wiman and the foundation of Mesozoic vertebrate palaeontology in Sweden2016In: Mesozoic Biotas Of Scandinavia And Its Arctic Territories, Geological Society, 2016, p. 15-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1908, Carl Wiman of Uppsala University, Sweden, discovered rich horizons with Triassic vertebrate remains in Spitsbergen on Svalbard, Norway. This marked the beginning of vertebrate palaeontology as a science in Sweden, subsequently developed mainly through the collection and study of non-Swedish fossil remains. Wiman's accomplishments, resolute personality and a tight network of influential friends and supporters enabled him to become the first person in Sweden to hold a university chair in Palaeontology and Historical Geology. He also managed to amass large numbers of unique fossil vertebrate specimens culminating in an extensive Chinese collection of both world famous dinosaurs and Neogene mammals deposited at Uppsala University. Joint scientific Sino-Swedish collaboration and a deliberate Swedish scientific agenda ensured this unprecedented situation in an opportune moment. Governmental support and initiative allowed Uppsala University and Carl Wiman's Palaeontological Institute to erect a museum building dedicated foremost to the Chinese material, now known as the Lagrelius Collection in recognition of the patron behind Wiman's ambitious endeavours. In addition, the museum served as a permanent repository for seminal collections of Mesozoic fossils from Svalbard and North America. Collectively, these represent a landmark research and teaching resource that remains of intense scientific interest even today.

  • 14.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Early Paleozoic gastropods of Anticosti Island, Gulf of St. Lawrence; outline of project2001In: Geological Association of Canada/Mineralogical Association of Canada Joint Annual Meeting, Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland, May 27-30 2001, 2001, p. 40-Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Eight meeting on the Working Group on Ordovician Geology of Baltoscandia (WOGOGOB 2004)2004Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    False color banding in Platyceras (Gastropoda, Silurian) from Anticosti Island, Quebec: a case of preservational artifacts?2002In: Geological Association of Canada/Mineralogical Association of Canada Joint Annual Meeting.: University of Saskatoon, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, May 27-29, 2002, 2002Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Gastropod biodiversity, biogeography, and ecology of the North Atlantic Region in the Lower Palaeozoic2006In: INYS Workshop, Stockholm 22-24 March. Biodiversity: perspectives from deep time, 2006Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Paleobiologi.
    Gastropods in the Ordovician and Silurian successions on Anticosti island, eastern Canada2006In: Gastropods in the Ordovician and Silurian successions on Anticosti island, eastern Canada. Gastropods in the Ordovician and Silurian successions on Anticosti island, eastern Canada, Vol. 38, No. 7, 2006, p. 402-Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Anticosti Island is located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Quebec, in eastern Canada. Relatively undisturbed Ordovician and Silurian sediments are preserved, with surface exposures ranging from the Ashgill (Rawtheyan) to the Llandovery (Telychian). Depositionally, they represent a shallow marine carbonate environment where Anticosti lies roughly parallel to the ancient shore line.

    Gastropods are an important and prominent faunal component in the Ordovician and Silurian successions, with 58 species described. The current study, which is aimed at revising systematics, biostratigraphy, and biogeography of the gastropod fauna, has recognized several genera and species new to the island. The study is based on several large museum collections, but primarily on the unique material assembled by professor Paul Copper, Laurentian University, Canada.

    Gastropods are found throughout the succession but their spatial distribution and ecological biofacies have yet to be mapped. Gastropod biogeography of Anticosti largely follows a pattern similar to that of trilobites and brachiopods. In the Ordovician Ellis Bay Formation especially, strong affinity with faunas from Baltica and eastern and marginal Laurentia is evident (for instance Tritonophon, Phragmolites, Pterotheca, Brachytomaria, and Arjamannia). Rare specimens of Pilina occur in the La Framboise reefs, a genus otherwise found sparsely in eastern Laurentia and more commonly in Baltica during the late Ordovician; Silurian forms of the genus are missing in Anticosti.

    The Silurian fauna comprises widespread genera like Sphenosphaera and Salpingostoma, while a Phanerotrema species in the Jupiter Formation may be conspecific with forms found in Baltica. However, there is also a conspicuous near absence of otherwise common and widespread Silurian taxa such as Oriostoma and Euomphalopterus, which on Anticosti are only rarely seen in the reefal build-up of the Chicotte Formation. Similar patterns in trilobite distributions have been discussed as a function the pervading biofacies at deposition.

  • 19.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Gastropods of the Lower Silurian (Telychian) Attawapiskat Formation, Akimiski Island, Nunavut, Canada2001In: Canadian Paleontology Conference. Program and Abstracts 11: University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, September 22-24, 2001, 2001, p. 21-Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Gastropods of the Pentland Hills2007In: Silurian fossils of the Pentland Hills, Scotland, The Palaeontological Association, London , 2007, p. 109-122Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Multiple attempted predation in the middle Ordovician gastropod Bucania gracillima1998In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, Vol. 120, p. 27-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Museum of Evolution. Past, Present and Future2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Paleontologins början i Sverige2013In: Litofilen, ISSN 1651-6117, Vol. 1:2013, p. 34-38Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Predation in Palaeozoic gastropods1997In: Lundadagarna. Abstracts: V, 1997, p. 9-Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Sagan om ringen2016In: Hälleflinta, Vol. 1, p. 6-13Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Slemmestad geologisenter1997Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Taimyr vs. Baltica: a preliminary palaeontological report2000In: Abstracts: 24th Nordic Geological Winter Meeting, 3-6 January, Trondheim 2000, 2000Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Tremadoc (early Ordovician) trilobites from Norway1992In: / [ed] Geirsdóttir, Á., Norðdahl, H. & Helgadóttir, G., 1992, p. 34-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Trilobites of the Tremadoc Bjørkåsholmen Formation in the Oslo Region, Norway1999In: Fossils and Strata, Vol. 47, p. 188 pp-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Ahlberg, Per
    Magne, Høyberget
    Redescription of Holmia inusitata (Trilobita) from the Lower Cambrian of Scandinavia2003In: Palaeontology, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 1039-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Mannen som samlade på fossil2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Wiman’s legacy: 100 years of palaeontology in Sweden2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Budd, Graham E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Burlingiid trilobites from the Cambrian of Norway, with a discussion of their affinities and relationships2002In: Palaentology, Vol. 45, p. 1171-1195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four Middle and Upper Cambrian burlingiid trilobites from the Oslo Region, Norway, are described including Burlingia angusta sp. nov. from the Ptychagnostus punctuosus Zone and Schmalenseeia athrotryphe sp. nov. from the lower part of the Lejopyge laevigata Zone. New complete material previously attributed to Schmalenseeia jagoi Whittington is assigned to Burlingia. Cladistic analysis supports the genera Burlingia and Schmalenseeia as currently understood, including the placement of the controversial middle Middle Cambrian Schmalenseeia acutangula Westergård in Schmalenseeia, even though it lacks typical characters of the genus such as the median ridge on the preglabellar field. The analysis also supports burlingiid monophyly, and suggests that Schmalenseeia was derived from a broadly Burlingia-like ancestor, with S. acutangula displaying how the transition may have occurred. The broader relationships of Burlingia remain obscure, although similarities between burlingiids and the arthropod Kleptothule from the Early Cambrian Sirius Passet fauna are discussed: these include overall form, lack of functional hinges in the thorax, and details of the cephalic region. It is unclear whether these similarities represent general progenetic features, are functional convergences or, less likely, represent a genuine relationship.

  • 34.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Carlos Gutierrez-Marco, Juan
    UCM, CSIC, Inst Geociencias, Spain.
    First occurrence of Pterotheca (Gastropoda) from the Silurian (Aeronian) of Spain2017In: Geobios, ISSN 0016-6995, E-ISSN 1777-5728, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 97-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pterotheca hispanica nov. sp. is described from the basal beds (Stimulograptus sedgwickii graptolite Zone) of the Formigoso Fm., in the Cantabrian Zone of the Iberian Massif, north-western Spain. This specialized bellerophontoid gastropod is for the first time recorded in the Silurian of peri-Gondwana; it is the only Aeronian species known so far. Its most closely allied relatives are from higher beds placed in the Telychian of Scotland. Pterotheca is considered a highly derived genus within the Pterothecinae of the Carinaropsidae, with the strongly reduced to absent coiling and the growth of the septum being synapomorphies. In the present work it is shown that not only the apical angle of the septum can be used to distinguish species, but also the relative length and width of the septum. In some cases, the slit may extend as far back as the anterior part of the internal septum. Silurian species were hitherto only found in marginal Laurentian and Eastern Avalonian settings. Pterotheca is absent from central Laurentia and Baltica, where it could be expected to be present based on its wide Ordovician distribution. In the light of this, the occurrence of the genus in the Aeronian of Spain seems difficult to explain, albeit the genus was present in peri-Gondwana prior to the end-Ordovician extinction. The extreme scarcity of described taxa recorded from Avalonia, Baltica and Iberia during the Early Silurian may explain this patchy distribution.

  • 35.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Fortey, Richard A.
    Natural History Museum, London.
    Stratigraphy and trilobite biofacies of the Late Ordovician (Katian) of the Taimyr Peninsula, Arctic Russia2018In: International Conference on Arctic Margins, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The thick Late Ordovician (Katian) succession on the Taimyr Peninsula, Arctic Russia is divided into three regions showing a transition from a southern carbonate dominated facies, a central transitional facies, and a siliciclastic dominated northern facies. All regions are rich in trilobites but hitherto only the southern fauna was described. New collections have been added to this and allow a division into two very different biofacies for the Katian succession. Black limestone and shales have taxa similar to those of the peripheral Laurentian Scoto-Appalachian belt (Ampyxella, Ampxyina, Failleana, Pararemopleurides, Raymondella, Remopleurides, Robergia, Stygina, Taimyraspis, Telephina, and Toernquistia), and is termed the raphiophorid association. Further subdivisions may be possible, but the small number of new collections does not allow this at the moment. From shelf limestone a contrasting fauna contains monorakine trilobites (Carinopyge, Ceratevenkaspis, Elasmaspis, Evenkaspis, and Monorakos) endemic to the Siberian platform. Trilobites such as isotelines, Calyptaulax, Xylabion, and Cheirurus otherwise typical of inshore Laurentia co-occur with this fauna. This biofacies is termed the monorakine-cheirurid-illaenid association. Our results show that the Taimyr Peninsula, as an open shelf marginal to the Siberian Platform, typically would have the endemic monorakine-cheirurid-illaenid association, while similar conditions to those on the eastern fringes of the Iapetus Ocean permitted a short lived establishment of comparable faunas of the raphiophorid association.

  • 36.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Current oriented nautiloids from the O/S boundary at Osmundsberget, Siljan District, Dalarna, Sweden2007In: Lundadagarna i Historisk Geologi & Paleontologi X, Abstracts with Programme, 19, 2007, p. 44-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Mass concentration of nautiloids and associated fauna in the Late Ordovician at Osmundsberget, Siljan District, Dalarna, Sweden2007In: WOGOGOB 2007, 9th meeting of the WOrking Group on Ordovician Geology Of Baltoscandia: Fieldguide and Abstracts, 2007, p. 110-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Frýda, Jiri
    Czech Geological Survey, Czech Republic.
    Biogeography of Ordovician – Devonian tergomyans and gastropods: outline of project.2009In: Absolutely final meeting of IGCP 503: Ordovician palaeogeography and palaeoclimate - Copenhagen 2009 - August 31 – September 4, Copenhagen: Geological Museum, Natural History Museums , 2009, p. 7-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyses of distribution and occurrences of both trilobites and brachiopods have been pivotal for the current understanding of Lower Palaeozoic biogeography. A fruitful coupling with palaeomagnetic studies has recently produced highly accurate palaeomaps for the Ordovician and Silurian. Tergomyan molluscs and gastropods represent abundant and diverse marine benthos with a huge potential for further detailing of Lower Palaeozoic biogeography. In the present project we aim at analysis of Ordovican – Devonian members of these groups, on a stage by stage level. The analysis will be at the generic level, because very few species seem to be common between the various palaeo terranes. This is especially true for the Ordovician. Although a number of important contributions on diversity and distribution exist, these molluscs have never been subjected to a large-scale numerical analysis. In the literature, Ordovican taxa such as Peelerophon (Tergomya), Tritonophon (Gastropoda), and the widespread macluritid gastropods have been recognized as useful for biogeographical studies. For Silurian, and particularly Devonian taxa, a much better understanding of biogoeographical distribution exists. Devonian gastropods have for instance been used to formalize distinct biogeographical realms. The current project involves several experts, with the two authors as principal coordinators.

  • 39.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Frýda, Jiri
    Czech Geological Survey.
    Wagner, Peter
    Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution.
    Horný, Radvan
    Department of Palaeontology, National Museum, Czech Republic.
    Isakar, Mare
    The Museum of Geology of the University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Stewart, Sarah
    National Museum of Scotland.
    Bertero, Verònica
    CICTERRA-CONICET, Centro de Investigaciones Paleobiológicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina.
    Rohr, David M.
    Department of Earth and Physical Sciences, Sul Ross State University, Alpine, TX 79832, USA.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Blodgett, Robert B.
    2821 Kingfisher Drive, Anchorage, AK 99502, USA.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Biogeography of Ordovician and Silurian gastropods, monoplacophorans and mimospirids2013In: Memoir Geological Society of London, Vol. 38, p. 199-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biogeographical distribution of Ordovician and Silurian gastropods, monoplacophorans and mimospirids has beenanalysed on a generic level. The dataset contains 334 genera and 2769 species, yielding 1231 records of genera with 2274 occurrencesworldwide. There is a bias towards eastern Laurentia, Baltica and Perunica records. Some 53.1% of the records are Ordovician. The study demonstrates that these molluscs are well suited to being used to improve understanding of Ordovician and Silurian biogeographicalprovinciality. Specific points are that: a Lower Ordovician assemblage is evident in Laurentia; the fauna of the Argentinean Precordillera is Laurentian until the Darriwilian, when taxa are shared with North China; Late Silurian gastropods from the Alexander terrane (SE Alaska) are unknown in Laurentia, but support a rift origin of this terrane from NE Siberia; Perunica, Ibero-Armorica and Morocco cluster together throughout the Ordovician but Perunica and Morocco are closer; Darriwilian–Sandbian deep-water Bohemian taxaoccur in Baltica; a Laurentian–Baltica proximity is unsupported until the Silurian; Siberia clusters with North China and eastern Laurentia during the Tremadocian–Darriwilian; during the Gorstian–Pridoli Siberia clusters with the Farewell and Alexander terranes; North China may have been close to Laurentia and the Argentinean margin of Gondwana; and the affinity of Tarim taxa is problematic.

  • 40.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Hogstrom, Anette E. S.
    Frisk, Åsa M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Martma, Tonu
    Kaljo, Dimitri
    Kroger, Bjorn
    Parnaste, Helje
    Terminal Ordovician stratigraphy of the Siljan district, Sweden2015In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 36-56Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integration of new isotopic data and earlier biostratigraphic information from eight sections through the terminal Ordovician (Pirgu and Porkuni stages) of the Siljan district, Sweden, allows a more precise correlation of sections in terms of biostratigraphy and carbon isotope dating. Four levels with positive delta C-13 excursions are identified (from bottom) - the Moe, an unnamed excursion, Paroveja and Hirnantian Carbon Isotope Excursion (HICE). The delta C-13 values through the Boda Limestone are 1-2 parts per thousand higher than usual in Baltica, only the values for the HICE remains within what is expected. Background values increase from 1.5 parts per thousand in the bottom of the core of the Boda Limestone up to 3 parts per thousand in the top of it. The HICE is identified in five of eight sections and the main peak falls according to inferred correlation within the Metabolograptus persculptus Biozone, at or close to the Hindella beds in the Upper Boda Member. The late Katian (Pirgu) age of Holorhynchus in the Siljan district is clear and its co-occurrence with the chitinozoan Belonechitina gamachiana in Estonia supports a Katian age for this zone. The base of the Ozarkodina hassi Biozone may occur within units B-C of the Upper Boda Member and in the upper part of the Loka Formation and most likely is correlated with the M. persculptus Biozone. The Hirnantia-Dalmanitina faunas reported from the lowermost part of the Loka Formation and units B-D of the Upper Boda Member seem to range through all the Hirnantian, but detailed morphological studies allow to distinguish an older (=extraordinarius) and a younger (=persculptus) fauna.

  • 41.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Holmer, Lars E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Ceratopygekalken - den “ordoviciska explosionens” förstenade rester2000Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Hybertsen, Frida
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Jensen, Sören
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Høyberget, Magne
    Rennesveien 14, N-4513 Mandal, Norway.
    Meinhold, Guido
    Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum der Universität Göttingen, Germany.
    Taylor, Wendy L.
    Department of Geological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.
    Agic, Heda
    Department of Earth Science, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA.
    Palacios, Teodor
    Área de Paleontología, Universidad de Extremadura, Avenida de Elvas s/n, Badajoz, Spain.
    Distribution of Sabellidites (Annelida?) in the Ediacaran-Cambrian succession on the Digermulen Peninsula, Arctic Norway2018In: 5th International Palaeontological Conference, 2018, p. 321-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E. S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Shell repair following failed predation in two Upper Ordovician brachiopods from central Sweden2000In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, Vol. 122, p. 307-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shell repair is reported in two dorsal valves of the brachiopod Strophomena? arachnoidea Lindstrom, 1880 from the lower Ashgill Fjacka Formation of the Siljan district, Dalarna. The most severe case displays a large wedge-shaped injury that cuts back abou

  • 44.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Locality descriptions, the Siljan District: WOGOGOB 2007. 9th meeting of the Working Group on Ordovician Geology of Baltoscandia. Field guide and Abstracts2007In: Sveriges Geologiska Undersökning, Rapporter och Meddelanden, ISSN 0349-2176, Vol. 128, p. 52-58Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Ordovician of the Siljan District, Sweden2007In: Sveriges Geologiska Undersökning, Rapporter och Meddelanden, ISSN 0349-2176, no 128, p. 7-26Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Högström, Anette E.S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Paleobiologi.
    Trilobittens nye klær2002Other (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Högström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Gastropods and tergomyans from the Upper Ordovician (Viru–Harju) of the Fågelsång area, Scania, southern Sweden2013In: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 295-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A diverse tergomyan and gastropod assemblage is described from the Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP)section of the Sandbian Stage, Upper Ordovician, in the Fågelsång area, Scania, southern Sweden. Deep water graptolitic mudstone and shale comprise the succession, and previously only one gastropod species was known. The new material spans the Sularp Formation through the Lindegård Mudstone (Nemagraptus gracilisDicellograptus complanatus biozones). Fourteen species are described: two tergomyan, five bellerophontoid gastropods, and seven anisostrophically coiled gastropods.Three species are new: Peelerophon hodites, Tetranota scanica and Lophospira sandbiana. Three taxa (Tritonophon subtrilobatus,Tetranota scanica and Holopea mobergi) are found high in the Lindegård Mudstone (Vormsi–Pirgu stages). Cyrtodiscus, Peelerophon and Tritonophon are recorded for the first time in Baltoscandia. Some taxa may have been transportedfrom shallower water settings, whereas species of Peelerophon, Joleaudella, Mestoronema and Sinuites may have been partof the local benthos. Except for Bucania erratica, no species are shared with the fauna of the coeval Dalby Limestone in Sweden. Deaechospira elliptica, common in the Dalby Limestone, is not recorded at Fågelsång, although two closely relatedspecies are found (Deaechospira rotunda and Deaechospira? sp.). The Fågelsång assemblage has more in common with the older to coeval fauna of the Elnes and Arnestad formations in the Oslo Region, Norway (e.g. sharing Joleaudella, Sinuites, Mestoronema and Pararaphistoma). The Sandbian fauna of Fågelsång includes peri-Gondwanan taxa, e.g. Cyrtodiscus,Peelerophon and Deaechospira. Nevertheless, cluster analysis reveals that the faunas of Baltica and Laurentia were most similar, whereas faunas from Perunica and Baltica remained distinct and separated during the Darriwilian–Sandbian. The few similarities may result from spread of a temperate fauna supplementing rather than replacing taxa in deep water assemblages.The main Fåagelsång assemblage coincides both with the Baltoscandian Middle Caradoc Faunal Turnover and the Gutenberg Carbon Isotope Excursion.

  • 48.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Högström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Tergomyans, gastropods, and biogeography in the Upper Ordovician of the Fågelsång district, southern Sweden2009In: Absolutely final meeting of IGCP 503: Ordovician palaeogeography and palaeoclimate - Copenhagen 2009 - August 31 – September 4, Copenhagen: Geological Museum, Natural History Museums , 2009, p. 24-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the Ordovician, deep-water graptolitic mudstone and shale formed in what is now the classical succession at Fågelsång, southern Sweden. Previously, only one gastropod species was described from the succession, but during this study diverse tergomyan and gastropod assemblages have been recognized both from outcrop and drill-core collections. The material spans the Sularp Shale through the Lindegård Mudstone (Nemagraptus gracilis − Dicellograptus complanatus Zones; Sandbian − Katian, Viru − Harju regional stages). Altogether 14 species are described; two tergomyan, five bellerophontoid gastropods, and six anisostrophically coiled gastropods. Three taxa (Tritonophon, Tetranota and Holopea) are found in the Lindegård mudstone. The first record of Tritonophon in the Ordovician of Baltoscandia occurs in the Fågelsång and nearby Röstånga area. The remaining taxa are from the Sularp, Skagen, and Mossen formations. Specimens may have been transported into the area from shallower settings, while species of Peelerophon, Cyrtodiscus, Joleaudella, and Sinuites, are interpreted as having been part of the local benthos. With the exception of Bucania and Deaechospira, no other taxa are common to the hitherto described gastropod fauna of the coeval Dalby Limestone in other parts of Sweden. The Fågelsång assemblages have more in common with the slightly older or coeval fauna of the Elnes to Arnestad formations in the Oslo Region (e.g. Joleaudella, Sinuites, Mestoronema, Pararaphistoma). The Sandbian taxa show similarities with peri-Gondwanan faunas (e.g. Peelerophon, Cyrtodiscus). Both Peelerophon and Cyrtodiscus are for the first time recorded from Baltoscandia. The hitherto endemic Baltoscandian taxon Deaechospira may also be recognized in Bohemia and Morocco.

  • 49.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Universität Zürich, Paläontologisches Institut und Museum, Zürich.
    Upper Ordovician gastropods of the Fågelsång area, Southern Sweden2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Högström, Anette
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Frisk, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Martma, Tõnu
    Institute of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology.
    Kaljo, Dimitri
    Institute of Geology at Tallinn University of Technology.
    Siljan revisited; regional stratigraphy of the Upper Ordovician Boda mounds2009In: Lundadagarna i Historisk Geologi och paleontology XI, 11-12 March, 2009, Abstracts with programme, 2009, p. 13-Conference paper (Other academic)
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