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  • 1.
    Agrasada, Grace V.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Kylberg, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Exclusive breastfeeding of low birth weight infants for the first six months: infant morbidity and maternal and infant anthropometry2011In: Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0964-7058, E-ISSN 1440-6047, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 62-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: to report anthropometry and morbidity among term low birth weight infants and anthropometry of their first time mothers during the first six months in relation to breastfeeding practice. Methods: we examined data from a randomized controlled trial in Manila, the Philippines. Of the 204 mothers randomized, 68 mothers received eight postpartum breastfeeding counseling sessions, the rest did not. Maternal and infant anthropometric data at birth, 2, 4 and 6 months were taken. During seven follow-up hospital visits, an independent interviewer recorded feeding data. Results: the 24 infants exclusively breastfed from birth to six months did not have diarrhea compared to 134 partially breastfed (mean 2.3 days) and 21 non-breastfed infants (mean 2.5 days). Partially breastfed and non-breastfed infants compared to exclusively breastfed infants had more frequent, as well as more severe episodes of respiratory infections. At six months, neither overall gain in infant weight, length and head circumferences nor mean maternal weight and body mass index differed significantly between the feeding groups. Conclusions: exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months can be recommended in term low birth weight infants, who were protected from diarrhea, had fewer respiratory infections, required no hospitalization and had catch up growth. Exclusively breastfeeding mothers did not differ from mothers who breastfed partially or those who did not breastfeed with regard to weight changes at six months.

  • 2.
    Agrasada, Grace V
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kylberg, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Postnatal peer counselling on exclusive breastfeeding of low-birthweight infants: a randomized, controlled trial.2005In: Acta Paediatr, ISSN 0803-5253, Vol. 94, no 8, p. 1109-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Diderholm, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lipolysis and Insulin Sensitivity at Birth in Infants Who Are Large for Gestational Age2007In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 120, no 5, p. 958-965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. In addition to neonatal hypoglycemia, infants who are born large for gestational age are at risk for developing obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes later in life. The aim of this study was to investigate glucose production, lipolysis, and insulin sensitivity in infants who were born large for gestational age to mothers without diabetes. The effect of glucagon administration on production of energy substrates was also investigated.

    METHODS. Ten healthy term infants who were born large for gestational age to mothers without diabetes were studied 16 ± 8 hours postnatally after a 3-hour fast. Rates of glucose production and lipolysis were analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry following constant rate infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose and [2-13C]glycerol. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the Homeostasis Assessment Model. In 8 of the infants, the effect of an intravenous injection of 0.2 mg/kg glucagon was also analyzed.

    RESULTS. Plasma glucose and glycerol averaged 3.8 ± 0.5 mmol/L and 384 ± 183 µmol/L, respectively. The glycerol production rate, reflecting lipolysis, was 12.7 ± 2.9 µmol/kg per min. Mean rate of glucose production was 30.2 ± 4.6 µmol/kg per min. Homeostasis Assessment Model insulin sensitivity corresponded to 82% ± 19%, β-cell function to 221% ± 73%, and insulin resistance to 1.3 ± 0.3. After glucagon administration, rate of glucose production increased by 13.3 ± 8.3 µmol/kg per min and blood glucose by 1.4 ± 0.5 mmol/L. Glycerol production decreased from 12.8 ± 3.0 to 10.7 ± 2.9 µmol/kg per min. Mean insulin concentration increased from 10.9 ± 3.0 to 30.9 ± 10.3 mU/L. There was a strong inverse correlation between the decrease in lipolysis and increase in insulin after glucagon administration.

    CONCLUSIONS. Infants who are born large for gestational age show increased lipolysis and a propensity for decreased insulin sensitivity already at birth. The simultaneous increase in plasma insulin correlated strongly with the noted decrease in lipolysis, indicating an antilipolytic effect of insulin in these infants.

  • 4.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Diderholm, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Jonsson, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Forslund, Anders H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Adipokines and their relation to maternal energy substrate production, insulin resistance and fetal size2013In: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, ISSN 0301-2115, E-ISSN 1872-7654, Vol. 168, no 1, p. 26-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The role of adipokines in the regulation of energy substrate production in non-diabetic pregnant women has not been elucidated. We hypothesize that serum concentrations of adiponectin are related to fetal growth via maternal fat mass, insulin resistance and glucose production, and further, that serum levels of leptin are associated with lipolysis and that this also influences fetal growth. Hence, we investigated the relationship between adipokines, energy substrate production, insulin resistance, body composition and fetal weight in non-diabetic pregnant women in late gestation.

    STUDY DESIGN:

    Twenty pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance were investigated at 36 weeks of gestation at Uppsala University Hospital. Levels of adipokines were related to rates of glucose production and lipolysis, maternal body composition, insulin resistance, resting energy expenditure and estimated fetal weights. Rates of glucose production and lipolysis were estimated by stable isotope dilution technique.

    RESULTS:

    Median (range) rate of glucose production was 805 (653-1337)μmol/min and that of glycerol production, reflecting lipolysis, was 214 (110-576)μmol/min. HOMA insulin resistance averaged 1.5±0.75 and estimated fetal weights ranged between 2670 and 4175g (-0.2 to 2.7 SDS). Mean concentration of adiponectin was 7.2±2.5mg/L and median level of leptin was 47.1 (9.9-58.0)μg/L. Adiponectin concentrations (7.2±2.5mg/L) correlated inversely with maternal fat mass, insulin resistance, glucose production and fetal weight, r=-0.50, p<0.035, r=-0.77, p<0.001, r=-0.67, p<0.002, and r=-0.51, p<0.032, respectively. Leptin concentrations correlated with maternal fat mass and insulin resistance, r=0.76, p<0.001 and r=0.73, p<0.001, respectively. There was no correlation between maternal levels of leptin and rate of glucose production or fetal weight. Neither were any correlations found between levels of leptin or adiponectin and maternal lipolysis or resting energy expenditure.

    CONCLUSION:

    The inverse correlations between levels of maternal adiponectin and insulin resistance as well as endogenous glucose production rates indicate that low levels of adiponectin in obese pregnant women may represent one mechanism behind increased fetal size. Maternal levels of leptin are linked to maternal fat mass and its metabolic consequences, but the data indicate that leptin lacks a regulatory role with regard to maternal lipolysis in late pregnancy.

  • 5. Amer-Wåhlin,
    et al.
    van den Berg,
    Berglund,
    Blennow,
    Dahlström,
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hagberg,
    Jonsson,
    Kierkegaard,
    Sjörs, Gunnar
    Sävman,
    Westas,
    Ågren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Asfyxi och neonatal HLR, SFOG2013Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ashish, K. C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Nepal Country Off, United Nations Childrens Fund, Lalitpur, Nepal..
    Wrammert, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Nelin, Viktoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Clark, Robert
    Latter Day St Char, Salt Lake City, UT USA..
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Int Maternal & Child Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Level of mortality risk for babies born preterm or with a small weight for gestation in a tertiary hospital of Nepal2015In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, article id 877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, 15 million babies were born prematurely in 2012, with 37.6 % of them in South Asia. About 32.4 million infants were born small for gestational age (SGA) in 2010, with more than half of these births occurring in South Asia. In Nepal, 14 % of babies were born preterm and 39.3 % were born SGA in 2010. We conducted a study in a tertiary hospital of Nepal to assess the level of risk for neonatal mortality among babies who were born prematurely and/or SGA. Methods: This case-control study was completed over a 15-month period between July 2012 and September 2013. All neonatal deaths that occurred during the study period were included as cases and 20 % of women with live births were randomly selected as referents. Information on potential risk factors was taken from medical records and interviews with the women. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the level of risk for neonatal mortality among babies born preterm and/or SGA. Results: During this period, the hospital had an incidence of preterm birth and SGA of 8.1 and 37.5 %, respectively. In the multivariate model, there was a 12-fold increased risk of neonatal death among preterm infants compared to term. Babies who were SGA had a 40 % higher risk of neonatal death compared to those who were not. Additionally, babies who were both preterm and SGA were 16 times more likely to die during the neonatal period. Conclusions: Our study showed that the risk of neonatal mortality was highest when the baby was born both preterm and SGA, followed by babies who were born preterm, and then by babies who were SGA in a tertiary hospital in Nepal. In tertiary care settings, the risk of mortality for babies who are born preterm and/or SGA can be reduced with low-cost interventions such as Kangaroo Mother Care or improved management of complications through special newborn care or neonatal intensive care units. The risk of death for babies who are born prematurely and/or SGA can thus be used as an indicator to monitor the quality of care for these babies in health facility settings.

  • 7.
    Austeng, Dordi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Blennow, Mats
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Fellman, Vineta
    Fritz, Thomas
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Hellström, Ann
    Holmgren, Per Ake
    Holmström, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Johansson, Kent
    Kallen, Karin
    Lagercrantz, Hugo
    Laurini, Ricardo
    Lindberg, Eva
    Lundqvist, Anita
    Marsal, Karel
    Nilstun, Tore
    Nordén Lindeberg, Solveig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Norman, Mikael
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Oestlund, Ingrid
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Simic, Marija
    Sjörs, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Stigson, Lennart
    Stjernqvist, Karin
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Tornqvist, Kristina
    Wennergren, Margareta
    Wallin, Agneta
    Westgren, Magnus
    Incidence of and risk factors for neonatal morbidity after active perinatal care: extremely preterm infants study in Sweden (EXPRESS)2010In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 7, p. 978-992Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal morbidity in extremely preterm infants and to identify associated risk factors. Methods: Population based study of infants born before 27 gestational weeks and admitted for neonatal intensive care in Sweden during 2004-2007. Results: Of 638 admitted infants, 141 died. Among these, life support was withdrawn in 55 infants because of anticipation of poor long-term outcome. Of 497 surviving infants, 10% developed severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), 5.7% cystic periventricular leucomalacia (cPVL), 41% septicaemia and 5.8% necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC); 61% had patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and 34% developed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) stage >= 3. Eighty-five per cent needed mechanical ventilation and 25% developed severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Forty-seven per cent survived to one year of age without any severe IVH, cPVL, severe ROP, severe BPD or NEC. Tocolysis increased and prolonged mechanical ventilation decreased the chances of survival without these morbidities. Maternal smoking and higher gestational duration were associated with lower risk of severe ROP, whereas PDA and poor growth increased this risk. Conclusion: Half of the infants surviving extremely preterm birth suffered from severe neonatal morbidities. Studies on how to reduce these morbidities and on the long-term health of survivors are warranted.

  • 8.
    Baylis, Rebecca
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Gradin, Maria
    Hedberg Nyqvist, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    First-time events between parents and preterm infants are affected by the designs and routines of neonatal intensive care units2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 10, p. 1045-1052Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    Early parental bonding with preterm babies is particularly important, and the aim of our study was to explore when parents experienced what they regarded as important events for the first time while their infant was in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

    METHODS:

    The study was part of a longitudinal project on Kangaroo Mother Care at two Swedish university hospitals. The parents of 81 infants completed questionnaires during their infants' hospital stay.

    RESULTS:

    Most parents saw and touched their infants immediately after birth, but only a few could hold them skin to skin or swaddle them. Other important events identified by parents included the first time they performed care giving activities and did so independently, interaction and closeness with the infant, signs of the infant's recovery and integration into the family. The timing of the events depended on the physical design of the NICU, whether parents' could stay with their infant round-the-clock and when they were allowed to provide care under supervision and on their own.

    CONCLUSION:

    The design and routines of the NICU dictated when parents first interacted with their infants. Clinical guidelines that facilitate early contact with preterm babies can help parents to make the transition to their parental role.

  • 9.
    Blomqvist, Ylva Thernström
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Gradin, Maria
    Örebro Medical Centre Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Initiation and extent of skin-to-skin care at two Swedish neonatal intensive care units2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 1, p. 22-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To describe initiation and extent of parents' application of skin-to-skin care (SSC) with their preterm infants at two Swedish neonatal intensive care units.

    METHODS:

    The duration of SSC was recorded in 104 infants' medical charts during their hospital stay, and the parents answered a questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    Both parents were involved in the practice of SSC. Three infants experienced SSC directly after birth, 34 within 1 h, 85 within 24 h and the remaining 19 at 24-78 h postbirth. SSC commenced earlier (median age of 50 min) in infants whose first SSC was with their father instead of with their mother (median age of 649 min: p < 0.001). The earlier the SSC was initiated, the longer the infant was cared for skin-to-skin per day during his/her hospital stay (p < 0.001). The median daily duration of SSC was 403 min.

    CONCLUSION:

    Early initiation of SSC had positive impact on the extent of parents' application of SSC. Even though the infants in this study were cared for skin-to-skin to a high extent, there is a potential for extended use of SSC in this type of hospital setting for reducing separation between infants and parents.

  • 10.
    Brodd, Katarina Strand
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Grönqvist, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Holmström, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Grönqvist, Erik
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Development of smooth pursuit eye movements in very preterm infants: 1. General aspects2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 7, p. 983-991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  To investigate early oculo-motor development in a population-based cohort of very preterm infants.

    Methods:  Early oculo-motor development was prospectively studied by measuring smooth pursuit eye movements at 2 and 4 months corrected age in a population of very preterm infants born in Uppsala County 2004–2007. Eighty-one preterm infants were studied, and 32 healthy term infants constituted the control group.

    Results:  The study group consisted of infants with a mean gestational age of28 + 5 weeks. At 2 and 4 months corrected age, infants born very preterm showed lower gain (p < 0.001) and proportion of smooth pursuit eyemovements (p < 0.001) compared to the control group. The boys showed higher gain of smooth pursuit eye movements at both 2 and 4 months corrected age, compared to girls.

    Conclusions:  Oculo-motor development measured by smooth pursuit eye movements is delayed in very preterm infants at 2 and 4 months corrected age. This might be a risk factor or early indicator of later perceptual and behavioural impairment.

  • 11.
    Brodd, Katarina Strand
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Grönqvist, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Holmström, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Grönqvist, Erik
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Development of Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements in very preterm born infants: 3. Association to perinatal risk factors2012In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 164-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  To investigate the association between perinatal risk factors and neonatal complications and early oculo-motor development in very preterm infants.

    Methods:  Perinatal risk factors were identified, and the potential association with early oculo-motor development was evaluated by measuring smooth pursuit eye movements (SP) at 2 and 4 months' corrected age (CA) in a population of very preterm infants born in Uppsala County 2004-2007 (n = 113).

    Results:  Among the 15 tested factors, eight showed significant association in univariate analysis with lower levels of SP at 4 months' CA, namely administration of prenatal corticosteroids, gestational age, birthweight, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, periventricular leukomalacia, intraventricular haemorrhage >grade 2, and persistent ductus arteriosus. At 2 months' CA, only retinopathy of prematurity >stage 2 was associated with lower levels of SP. When all factors significant in the univariate tests were included in multiple regressions aimed to assess each factor's independent relation to SP, periventricular leukomalacia was the only significant independent factor. When adding 2-5 of the significant factors using multiple regression analysis, the levels of SP became lower.

    Conclusion:  Perinatal risk factors were associated with lower levels of SP. This could be interpreted as delayed or disturbed development of normal oculomotor ability.

  • 12.
    Diderholm, Barbro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Energy substrate production in infants born small for gestational age2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate energy substrate production and its hormonal regulation in infants born small for gestational age.

    Methods: Eleven infants, aged 24.4 ± 5.3 hour, were studied following a fast of 4.0 ± 0.6 hour. Gestational age was 35.4 ± 2.8 weeks and birth weight 1804 ± 472 g (<−2 SD). Rates of glucose production and lipolysis were analyzed using [6,6-2H2]-glucose and [2-13C]-glycerol.

    Results: Plasma levels of glucose and glycerol were 4.1 ± 1.1 mmol . L−1 and 224 ± 79 μmol . L−1, respectively. Glucose appearance averaged 30.3 ± 8.2 and glucose production rate 21.1 ± 6.1 μmol . kg−1 . minutes−1. Glycerol production rate was 5.6 ± 1.6 μmol . kg−1 . minutes−1, correlating strongly to birth weight (r = 0.904, p < 0.001). Of the glycerol produced, 55 ± 22% was converted to glucose, corresponding to 8 ± 3% of the glucose production.

    Conclusions: Even though the infants could produce energy substrates, lipolysis was reduced and the glucose production was in the low end of the normal range compared with infants born appropriate for gestational age. The correlation between glycerol production and birth weight indicates that lipolysis depends on the amount of stored fat. Data on insulin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 support the view that insulin sensitivity in these infants is reduced in the liver but increased peripherally.

  • 13.
    Diderholm, Barbro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Department of Medical Sciences. Clinical Chemstry.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lindeberg-Norden, Solveig
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Increased lipolysis in non-obese pregnant women studied in the third trimester.2005In: BJOG, ISSN 1470-0328, Vol. 112, no 6, p. 713-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Engström, Eva
    et al.
    Niklasson, Aimon
    Wikland, Kerstin Albertsson
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hellström, Ann
    The role of maternal factors, postnatal nutrition, weight gain, and gender in regulation of serum IGF-I among preterm infants.2005In: Pediatr Res, ISSN 0031-3998, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 605-10Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 15.
    Eriksson, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Nga, Nguyen T
    Research Institute for Child Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Hoa, Dinh T Phuong
    Hanoi University of Public Health, Vietnam.
    Duc, Duong M
    Hanoi University of Public Health, Vietnam.
    Bergström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Wallin, Lars
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Huy, Tran Q
    Department of Medical Services Administration, Ministry of Health, Nursing office, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Thuy, Nguyen T
    Vietnam-Sweden Uong Bi General Hospital, Uong Bi, Vietnam.
    Do, Tran Thanh
    National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), Ministry of Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Lien, Pham T L
    Research Institute for Child Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
    Ekholm Selling, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Secular trend, seasonality and effects of a community-based intervention on neonatal mortality: follow-up of a cluster-randomised trial in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam2018In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 72, no 9, p. 776-782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Little is know about whether the effects of community engagement interventions for child survival in low-income and middle-income settings are sustained. Seasonal variation and secular trend may blur the data. Neonatal mortality was reduced in a cluster-randomised trial in Vietnam where laywomen facilitated groups composed of local stakeholders employing a problem-solving approach for 3 years. In this analysis, we aim at disentangling the secular trend, the seasonal variation and the effect of the intervention on neonatal mortality during and after the trial.

    Methods: In Quang Ninh province, 44 communes were allocated to intervention and 46 to control. Births and neonatal deaths were assessed in a baseline survey in 2005, monitored during the trial in 2008–2011 and followed up by a survey in 2014. Time series analyses were performed on monthly neonatal mortality data.

    Results: There were 30 187 live births and 480 neonatal deaths. The intervention reduced the neonatal mortality from 19.1 to 11.6 per 1000 live births. The reduction was sustained 3 years after the trial. The control areas reached a similar level at the time of follow-up. Time series decomposition analysis revealed a downward trend in the intervention areas during the trial that was not found in the control areas. Neonatal mortality peaked in the hot and wet summers.

    Conclusions: A community engagement intervention resulted in a lower neonatal mortality rate that was sustained but not further reduced after the end of the trial. When decomposing time series of neonatal mortality, a clear downward trend was demonstrated in intervention but not in control areas.

    Trial registration number: ISRCTN44599712, Post-results.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Nga, Nguyen Thu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Hoa, Dinh P.
    Hanoi School of Public Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Wallin, Lars
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet and Clinical Research Utilization (CRU), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Newborn care and knowledge translation - perceptions among primary health care staff in northern Vietnam2011In: Implementation Science, ISSN 1748-5908, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 6, p. 29-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Nearly four million neonatal deaths occur annually in the world despite existing evidence-based knowledge with the potential to prevent many of these deaths. Effective knowledge translation (KT) could help to bridge this know-do gap in global health. The aim of this study was to explore aspects of KT at the primary healthcare level in a northern province in Vietnam. METHODS: Six focus-group discussions were conducted with primary healthcare staff members who provided neonatal care in districts that represented three types of geographical areas existing in the province (urban, rural, and mountainous). Recordings were transcribed verbatim, translated into English, and analyzed using content analysis. RESULTS: We identified three main categories of importance for KT. Healthcare staff used several channels for acquisition and management of knowledge (1), but none appeared to work well. Participants preferred formal training to reading guideline documents, and they expressed interest in interacting with colleagues at higher levels, which rarely happened. In some geographical areas, traditional medicine (2) seemed to compete with evidence-based practices, whereas in other areas it was a complement. Lack of resources, low frequency of deliveries and, poorly paid staff were observed barriers to keeping skills at an adequate level in the healthcare context (3). CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that primary healthcare staff work in a context that to some extent enables them to translate knowledge into practice. However, the established and structured healthcare system in Vietnam does constitute a base where such processes could be expected to work more effectively. To accelerate the development, thorough considerations over the current situation and carefully targeted actions are required.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Nga, Nguyen Thu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Wallin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Evidence-based practice in neonatal health: knowledge among primary health care staff in northern Viet Nam2009In: Human Resources for Health, ISSN 1478-4491, E-ISSN 1478-4491, Vol. 7, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An estimated four million deaths occur each year among children in the neonatal period. Current evidence-based interventions could prevent a large proportion of these deaths. However, health care workers involved in neonatal care need to have knowledge regarding such practices before being able to put them into action.The aim of this survey was to assess the knowledge of primary health care practitioners regarding basic, evidence-based procedures in neonatal care in a Vietnamese province. A further aim was to investigate whether differences in level of knowledge were linked to certain characteristics of community health centres, such as access to national guidelines in reproductive health care, number of assisted deliveries and geographical location. METHODS: This cross-sectional survey was completed within a baseline study preparing for an intervention study on knowledge translation (Implementing knowledge into practice for improved neonatal survival: a community-based trial in Quang Ninh province, Viet Nam, the NeoKIP project, ISRCTN44599712). Sixteen multiple-choice questions from five basic areas of evidence-based practice in neonatal care were distributed to 155 community health centres in 12 districts in a Vietnamese province, reaching 412 primary health care workers. RESULTS: All health care workers approached for the survey responded. Overall, they achieved 60% of the maximum score of the questionnaire. Staff level of knowledge on evidence-based practice was linked to the geographical location of the CHC, but not to access to the national guidelines or the number of deliveries at the community level. Two separated geographical areas were identified with differences in staff level of knowledge and concurrent differences in neonatal survival, antenatal care and postnatal home visits. CONCLUSION: We have identified a complex pattern of associations between knowledge, geography, demographic factors and neonatal outcomes. Primary health care staff knowledge regarding neonatal health is scarce. This is a factor that is possible to influence and should be considered in future efforts for improving the neonatal health situation in Viet Nam.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Lena
    et al.
    Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Haglund, Bengt
    Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Odlind, Viveca
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kieler, Helle
    Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Health consequences of prophylactic exposure to antenatal corticosteroids among children born late preterm or term2012In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 91, no 12, p. 1415-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To investigate the duration of effects and health consequences of earlier antenatal corticosteroid exposure in infants born late preterm or term. Design. Observational cohort study. Setting. Children born after gestational week 34 in Sweden, 1976-1997, whose mothers were hospitalized for imminent preterm delivery. The children were followed to their 11th birthday. Sample. The cohort consisted of 11 873 infants, of whom 8620 were exposed. Methods. Exposure was estimated at hospital level. Infants born at a hospital practicing antenatal corticosteroid administration were classified as exposed. Estimation of hospital routines was based on questionnaire data, telephone interviews with physicians and pharmacy sales, validated in a random sample of medical records. Logistic regression was used to assess associations with adjustments for pregnancy length, birth year and hospital level. Main outcome measures. Rates and odds ratios of mortality, respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, childhood diabetes, birthweight, length and head circumference for all infants, and for preterm and term infants, respectively. Results. Exposed infants had reduced risks of respiratory distress syndrome (odds ratio 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.35-0.83) and small head circumference (odds ratio 0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.36-0.61), and an increased risk of low Apgar scores (odds ratio 1.40, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.94), most pronounced in infants born after gestational week 37. Conclusions. Infants born after gestational week 34 seem to benefit from earlier antenatal corticosteroid administration, with reduced risks of respiratory distress syndrome. However, the treatment was less beneficial for term infants, because they also had increased risk of low Apgar scores.

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Lena
    et al.
    Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology and Unit of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Haglund, Bengt
    Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology and Unit of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Swede.
    Odlind, Viveca
    Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Altman, Maria
    Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology and Unit of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Kieler, Helle
    Centre for Pharmacoepidemiology and Unit of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Solna Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Perinatal conditions related to growth restriction and inflammation are associated with an increased risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia.2015In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 259-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a frequent chronic lung disease in preterm infants, and we aimed to identify factors associated with this condition in infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS).

    METHODS: This case-control study, using national Swedish data, included 2255 preterm infants, born before 33 gestational weeks. The 667 BPD cases were oxygen dependent at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age, and the 1558 controls only had RDS. Comparisons included perinatal conditions and pharmacological treatments. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated in a conditional logistic regression model, with gestational age as the conditioning term.

    RESULTS: An increased risk of BPD was associated with prelabour preterm rupture of membranes of more than 1 week (3.35, 2.16-5.19), small for gestational age (2.73, 2.11-3.55), low Apgar score (1.37, 1.05-1.81), patent ductus arteriosus (1.70, 1.33-2.18), persistent pulmonary hypertension (5.80, 3.21-10.50), pulmonary interstitial emphysema (2.78, 1.37-5.64), pneumothorax (2.95, 1.85-4.72), late onset infections (2.69, 1.82-3.98), intubation (1.56, 1.20-2.03), chest compressions (2.05, 1.15-3.66) and mechanical ventilation (2.16, 1.69-2.77), but not antenatal corticosteroids.

    CONCLUSION: Growth restriction and inflammation increased the risk of BPD in preterm infants and prelabour preterm rupture of membranes, small for gestational age, low Apgar score or need for resuscitation should raise clinical suspicions.

  • 20.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Family-Centered Care: More than a Good Feeling?2017In: Neonatology, ISSN 1661-7800, E-ISSN 1661-7819, Vol. 112, no 3, p. 301-302Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Fjaertoft, Gustav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Håkansson, L.
    Foucard, T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Venge, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    CD64 (Fcgamma receptor I) cell surface expression on maturing neutrophils from preterm and term newborn infants.2005In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 94, no 3, p. 295-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The expression of CD64 (FcgammaRI) is increased from an almost negligible to a marked level on neutrophils in patients with bacterial infections. CD64 expression on neutrophils might therefore be a potential candidate for the diagnosis of bacterial infections in infants.

    AIM: This study was performed to monitor changes of neutrophil expression of CD64 during the postpartum period to further evaluate the usefulness of this analysis. The possible influence on the expression of this receptor by other factors was also investigated, including respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and preterm rupture of the membranes (PROM).

    METHODS: Cell surface expression of CD64 on neutrophils from preterm and term newborn infants and healthy adults was analysed by flow cytometry. The expression of the other Fcgamma receptors, CD32 and CD16, and the complement receptors CD11b/CD18 and CD35 was also analysed for comparison.

    RESULTS: Neutrophils from preterm newborn infants showed a moderately increased level of CD64 expression that, during their first month of life, was reduced to the level observed on neutrophils from term newborn infants and adults. In contrast, the level of neutrophil expression of CD32 and CD16 was significantly lower in preterm than term newborn infants and adults. Neutrophils from all groups indicated similar levels of CD11b expression, but the expression on neutrophils from newborn infants increased after birth.

    CONCLUSION: Our results showed that neutrophil expression of CD64 is moderately increased in preterm newborn infants at birth. It seems not to be influenced by RDS, PROM or other factors related to preterm birth but by bacterial infection.

  • 22.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Wallin, Lars
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Perinatal and socioeconomic determinants of breastfeeding duration in very preterm infants2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 8, p. 1126-1130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe the impact of prematurity, size at birth, neonatal disorders and the families' socioeconomic status (SES) on breastfeeding duration in mothers of very preterm infants. Methods: Prospective population-based cohort study. Data on breastfeeding, registered in databases in two Swedish counties in 1993-2001, were matched with data from two national registries: the Medical Birth Registry and Statistics Sweden. Mothers of 225 very preterm singleton infants were identified and included. Results: Seventy-nine percent of the mothers breastfed at 2 months, 62% at 4 months, 45% at 6 months, 22% at 9 months and 12% at 12 months. Prematurity, size at birth and neonatal disorders did not show an effect on breastfeeding duration. Being adversely exposed to any of the SES factors (maternal education, unemployment benefit, social welfare and equivalent disposable income in the household) was significantly associated with earlier weaning up to 6 months of infants' postnatal age. Conclusions: This study shows new and noteworthy results concerning breastfeeding duration in mothers of very preterm infants, which was not influenced by degree of prematurity, size at birth or neonatal disorders but was affected by SES. This highlights the need for improved support of socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers, during and after the hospital stay.

  • 23. Gotherstrom, Cecilia
    et al.
    Westgren, Magnus
    Shaw, S. W. Steven
    Astrom, Eva
    Biswas, Arijit
    Byers, Peter H.
    Mattar, Citra N. Z.
    Graham, Gail E.
    Taslimi, Jahan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Fisk, Nicholas M.
    Yeoh, Allen E. J.
    Lin, Ju-Li
    Cheng, Po-Jen
    Choolani, Mahesh
    Le Blanc, Katarina
    Chan, Jerry K. Y.
    Pre- and Postnatal Transplantation of Fetal Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Osteogenesis Imperfecta: A Two-Center Experience2014In: Stem Cells Transnational Medicine, ISSN 2157-6564, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 255-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) can be recognized prenatally with ultrasound. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has the potential to ameliorate skeletal damage. We report the clinical course of two patients with OI who received prenatal human fetal MSC (hfMSC) transplantation and postnatal boosting with same-donor MSCs. We have previously reported on prenatal transplantation for OI type III. This patient was retransplanted with 2.8 x 10(6) same-donor MSCs per kilogram at 8 years of age, resulting in low-level engraftment in bone and improved linear growth, mobility, and fracture incidence. An infant with an identical mutation who did not receive MSC therapy succumbed at 5 months despite postnatal bisphosphonate therapy. A second fetus with OI type IV was also transplanted with 30 x 10(6) hfMSCs per kilogram at 31 weeks of gestation and did not suffer any new fractures for the remainder of the pregnancy or during infancy. The patient followed her normal growth velocity until 13 months of age, at which time longitudinal length plateaued. A postnatal infusion of 10 x 10(6) MSCs per kilogram from the same donor was performed at 19 months of age, resulting in resumption of her growth trajectory. Neither patient demonstrated alloreactivity toward the donor hfMSCs or manifested any evidence of toxicities after transplantation. Our findings suggest that prenatal transplantation of allogeneic hfMSCs in OI appears safe and is of likely clinical benefit and that retransplantation with same-donor cells is feasible. However, the limited experience to date means that it is not possible to be conclusive and that further studies are required.

  • 24.
    Groth, Torgny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Errors in estimating neonatal production of glucose with stable isotopes during2001In: Scand J Clin Lab Invest, Vol. 61, p. 663-680Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Hedberg Nyqvist, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Anderson, G C
    Bergman, N
    Cattaneo, A
    Charpak, N
    Davanzo, R
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ludington-Hoe, S
    Mendoza, S
    Pallás-Allonso, C
    Peláez, J G
    Sizun, J
    Wiström, A M
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    State of the art and recommendations. Kangaroo mother care: application in a high-tech environment2010In: Breastfeeding review : professional publication of the Nursing Mothers' Association of Australia, ISSN 0729-2759, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) was developed in Colombia in the 1970s, two trends in clinical application emerged. In low-income settings, the original KMC modelis implemented. This consists of continuous (24 h/day; 7 days/week) and prolonged mother/parent-infant skin-to-skin contact; early discharge with the infant in the kangaroo position; (ideally) exclusive breastfeeding and, adequate follow up. In affluent settings, intermittent KMC with sessions of one or a few hours skin-to-skin contact for a limited period is common. As a result of the increasing evidence of the benefits of KMC for both infants and families in all intensive care settings, KMC in a high-tech environment was chosen as the topic for the first European Conference on KMC, and the clinical implementation of the KMC modelin all types of settings was discussed at the 7th International Workshop on KMC Kangaroo Mother Care protocols in high-tech Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) should specify criteria for initiation, kangaroo position, transfer to/from KMC, transport in kangaroo position, kangaroo nutrition, parents'role, modification of the NICU environment, performance of care in KMC, and KMCin case of infant instability. CONCLUSION: Implementation of the original KMC method, with continuous skin-to-skin contact whenever possible, is recommended for application in high-tech environments, although scientific evaluation should continue.

  • 26.
    Hedberg Nyqvist, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Surface electromyography of facial muscles during natural and artificial feeding of infants: identification of differences between breast-, cup- and bottle-feeding.2006In: J Pediatr (Rio J), ISSN 0021-7557, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 85-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Hedberg Nyqvist, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Sorell, Annette
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Litmus tests for verification of feeding tube location in infants: evaluation of their clinical use.2005In: J Clin Nurs, ISSN 0962-1067, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 486-95Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Hreinsdottir, Jonina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Brodd, Katarina Strand
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ornkloo, H.
    Department of Psychology, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Holmström, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Ophthalmological outcome and visuospatial ability in very preterm children measured at 2.5 years corrected age2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 12, p. 1144-1149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo investigate the ophthalmological outcome of very preterm children at 2.5years corrected age (CA) and perform a test of visuospatial and cognitive abilities. MethodsA population-based, prospective study (LOVIS study) in Uppsala County, Sweden, comprised 111 very preterm children (<32 w gestational age [GA]) born between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2007. Ophthalmic evaluations were undertaken in 98/109 children (89.9%) alive at 2.5 years. Spatial cognition was investigated with a test of five alternative blocks in 48 preterm and 25 term-born children. ResultsVisual impairment, strabismus or refractive errors, were found in 12% of the children. None of the children were blind in both eyes. Logistic regression analyses revealed significant associations between strabismus and periventricular leucomalacia/intraventricular haemorrhage (OR 9.6, p=0.025) and between refractive errors and severe retinopathy of prematurity (OR 9.8, p=0.011) and GA (OR 0.763, p=0.034). Oval and rectangular blocks were significantly more difficult to insert into a box for preterm than full-term children (p=0.048 and 0.013, respectively). There was a significant correlation between total scores for the five blocks and GA at birth (p=0.035). ConclusionEye and visual problems were found in 12% of the preterm children at 30months CA. Preterm children had difficulties with blocks of complex shapes.

  • 29. Johnsson, H
    et al.
    Ewald, U
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    The rate of candidaemia in preterm infants born at a gestational age of 23-28 weeks is inversely correlated to gestational age.2004In: Acta Paediatr, ISSN 0803-5253, Vol. 93, no 7, p. 954-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    KC, Ashish
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Wrammert, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Verma, Sheela
    Paropakar Maternity and Women´s Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Aryal, Dhan Raj
    Paropakar Maternity and Women´s Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Clark, Robert
    Latter Day Saints Charity, Salt Lake City, USA.
    Kc, Naresh P
    Ministry of Health and Population, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Vitrakoti, Ravi
    Paropakar Maternity and Women´s Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Baral, Kedar
    Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Patan, Nepal.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Implementing a simplified neonatal resuscitation protocol-helping babies breathe at birth (HBB): at a tertiary level hospital in Nepal for an increased perinatal survival2012In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 159-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Reducing neonatal death has been an emerging challenge in low and middle income countries in the past decade. The development of the low cost interventions and their effective delivery are needed to reduce deaths from birth asphyxia. This study will assess the impact of a simplified neonatal resuscitation protocol provided by Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) at a tertiary hospital in Nepal. Perinatal outcomes and performance of skilled birth attendants on management of intrapartum-related neonatal hypoxia will be the main measurements.

    METHODS:

    The study will be carried out at a tertiary level maternity hospital in Nepal. A prospective cohort-study will include a six-month baseline a six month intervention period and a three-month post intervention period. A quality improvement process cycle will introduce the neonatal resuscitation protocol. A surveillance system, including CCD cameras and pulse oximeters, will be set up to evaluate the intervention.

    DISCUSSION:

    Along with a technique to improve health workers performance on the protocol, the study will generate evidence on the research gap on the effectiveness of the simplified neonatal resuscitation protocol on intrapartum outcome and early neonatal survival. This will generate a global interest and inform policymaking in relation to delivery care in all income settings.Trial registrationISRCTN97846009.

  • 31.
    K.C, Ashish
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Nelin, Viktoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Wrammert, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Vitrakoti, Ravi
    Baral, Geha Nath
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Risk factors for antepartum stillbirth: a case-control study in Nepal2015In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 15, article id 146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Globally, at least 2.65 million stillbirths occur every year, of which more than half are during the antepartum period. The proportion of intrapartum stillbirths has substantially declined with improved obstetric care; however, the number of antepartum stillbirths has not decreased as greatly. Attempts to lower this number may be hampered by an incomplete understanding of the risk factors leading to the majority of antepartum stillbirths. We conducted this study in a tertiary hospital in Nepal to identify the specific risk factors that are associated with antepartum stillbirth in this setting. Methods: This case-control study was conducted between July 2012 and September 2013. All women who had antepartum stillbirths during this period were included as cases, while 20 % of all women delivering at the hospital were randomly selected and included as referents. Information on potential risk factors was taken from medical records and interviews with the women. Logistic regression analysis was completed to determine the association between those risk factors and antepartum stillbirth. Results: During the study period, 4567 women who delivered at the hospital were enrolled as referents, of which 62 had antepartum stillbirths and were re-categorized into the case population. In total, there were 307 antepartum stillbirths. An association was found between the following risk factors and antepartum stillbirth: increasing maternal age (aOR 1.0, 95 % CI 1.0-1.1), less than five years of maternal education (aOR 2.4, 95 % CI 1.7-3.2), increasing parity (aOR 1.2, 95 % CI 1.0-1.3), previous stillbirth (aOR 2.6, 95 % CI 1.6-4.4), no antenatal care attendance (aOR 4.2, 95 % CI 3.2-5.4), belonging to the poorest family (aOR 1.3, 95 % CI 1.0-1.8), antepartum hemorrhage (aOR 3.7, 95 % CI 2.4-5.7), maternal hypertensive disorder during pregnancy (aOR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.5-3.1), and small weight-for-gestational age babies (aOR 1.5, 95 % CI 1.2-2.0). Conclusion: Lack of antenatal care attendance, which had the strongest association with antepartum stillbirth, is a potentially modifiable risk factor, in that increasing the access to and availability of these services can be targeted. Antenatal care attendance provides an opportunity to screen for other potential risk factors for antepartum stillbirth, as well as to provide counseling to women, and thus, helps to ensure a successful pregnancy outcome.

  • 32.
    Kc, Ashish
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). UN Childrens Fund, Nepal Country Off, UN House, Pulchowk, Nepal.
    Wrammert, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Clark, Robert B
    Latter-day Saint Charities, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Inadequate fetal heart rate monitoring and poor use of partogram associated with intrapartum stillbirth: a case-referent study in Nepal2016In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 16, article id 233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Newborns are at the greatest risk for dying during the intrapartum period, including labor and delivery, and the first day of life. Fetal heart rate monitoring (FHRM) and partogram use to track labor progress are evidence-based techniques that can help to identify maternal and fetal risk factors so that these can be addressed early. The objective of this study was to assess health worker adherence to protocols for FHRM and partogram use during the intrapartum period, and to assess the association between adherence and intrapartum stillbirth in a tertiary hospital of Nepal.

    METHODS: A case-referent study was conducted over a 15-month period. Cases included all intrapartum stillbirths, while 20 % of women with live births were randomly selected on admission to make up the referent population. The frequency of FHRM and the use of partogram were measured and their association to intrapartum stillbirth was assessed using logistic regression analysis.

    RESULTS: During the study period, 4,476 women with live births were enrolled as referents and 136 with intrapartum stillbirths as cases. FHRM every 30 min was only completed in one-fourth of the deliveries, and labor progress was monitored using a partogram in just over half. With decreasing frequency of FHRM, there was an increased risk of intrapartum stillbirth; FHRM at intervals of more than 30 min resulted in a four-fold risk increase for intrapartum stillbirth (aOR 4.17, 95 % CI 2.0-8.7), and the likelihood of intrapartum stillbirth increased seven times if FHRM was performed less than every hour or not at all (aOR 7.38, 95 % CI 3.5-15.4). Additionally, there was a three-fold increased risk of intrapartum stillbirth if the partogram was not used (aOR 3.31, 95 % CI 2.0-5.4).

    CONCLUSION: The adherence to FHRM and partogram use was inadequate for monitoring intrapartum progress in a tertiary hospital of Nepal. There was an increased risk of intrapartum stillbirth when fetal heart rate was inadequately monitored and when the progress of labor was not monitored using a partogram. Further exploration is required in order to determine and understand the barriers to adherence; and further, to develop tools, techniques and interventions to prevent intrapartum stillbirth.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN97846009 .

  • 33.
    KC, Ashish
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). UNICEF, Health Section, Nepal.
    Wrammert, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Clark, Robert
    Latter-day Saint Charities, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Vitrakoti, Ravi
    Paropakar Maternity and Women's Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Chaudhary, Pushpa
    Paropakar Maternity and Women's Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Pun, Asha
    UNICEF, Health Section, Nepal.
    Raaijmakers, Hendrikus
    UNICEF, Health Section, Nepal.
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Reducing perinatal mortality in Nepal using Helping Babies Breathe2016In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 137, no 6, article id e20150117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Newborns are at the highest risk of dying around the time of birth, due to intrapartum-related complications. Our study’s objective was to improve adherence to the Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) neonatal resuscitation protocol and reduce perinatal mortality using a quality improvement cycle (QIC) in a tertiary hospital in Nepal.

     

    Methods: The HBB QIC was implemented through a multi-faceted approach, including: the formation of quality improvement teams; development of quality improvement goals, objectives and standards; HBB protocol training; weekly review meetings; daily skill checks; use of self-evaluation checklists; and refresher trainings. A cohort design including a nested case-control study was used to measure changes in clinical outcomes and adherence to the resuscitation protocol through video recording, before and after implementation of the QIC.

     

    Results: The intrapartum stillbirth rate decreased from 9 to 3.2 per thousand deliveries, and first-day mortality from 5.2 to 1.9 per thousand live births after intervention, demonstrating a reduction of about half in the odds of intrapartum stillbirth (aOR=0.46, 95% CI 0.32-0.66) and first-day mortality (aOR=0.51, 95% CI 0.31-0.83). After intervention, the odds of inappropriate use of suction and stimulation decreased by 87% (OR=0.13, 95% CI 0.09-0.17) and 62% (OR=0.38, 95% CI 0.29-0.49), respectively. Prior to intervention, none of the babies received bag-and-mask ventilation within 1 minute of birth, compared to 83.9% of babies after.

     

    Conclusion: The HBB QIC reduced intrapartum stillbirth and first-day neonatal mortality and led to use of suctioning and stimulation more frequently. The HBB QIC requires further testing in primary settings across Nepal.

  • 34.
    K.C, Ashish
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Wrammert, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Clark, Robert
    Latter-day Saint Charities, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
    Gautam, Jageshwor
    Paropakar Maternity and Women's Hospital, Nepal.
    Baral, Gehanath
    Paropakar Maternity and Women's Hospital.
    Baral, Kedar
    Patan Academy of Health Sciences.
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Incidence of intrapartum stillbirth and associated risk factors in tertiary care setting of Nepal: a case-control study2016In: Reproductive Health, ISSN 1742-4755, E-ISSN 1742-4755, Vol. 12, article id 103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Each year, 1.2 million intrapartum stillbirths occur globally. In Nepal, about 50% of the total number of stillbirths occur during the intrapartum period. An understanding of the risk factors associated with intrapartum stillbirth will facilitate the development of preventative strategies to reduce the burden of death. This study was conducted in a tertiary-care setting with the aim to identify the risk factors associated with intrapartum stillbirth.

    Methods: A case-control study was completed from July 2012 to September 2013. All women who had an intrapartum stillbirth during the study period were included as cases, and 20% of women with live births were randomly selected on admission to make up the referent population. Information from the clinical records of case and referent women was retrieved. In addition, interviews were completed with each woman on their demographic and obstetric history.

    Results: During the study period, 4,476 women with live births were enrolled as referents and 136 women with intrapartum stillbirths as cases.  The following factors were found to increase the risk for intrapartum stillbirth: poor familial wealth quintile (Adj OR 1.8, 95% CI-1.1-3.4); less maternal education (Adj OR, 3.2 95% CI-1.8-5.5); lack of antenatal care (Adj OR, 4.8 95% CI 3.2-7.2); antepartum hemorrhage (Adj OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.2); multiple births (Adj. OR-3.0, 95% CI- 1.9-5.4); obstetric complication during the labor period (Adj. OR 4.5, 95% CI-2.9-6.9); lack of fetal heart rate monitoring per protocol (Adj. OR-1.9, 95% CI 1.5-2.4); no partogram use (Adj. OR-2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.1); small weight for gestational age (Adj. OR-1.8, 95% CI-1.2-1.7); premature birth (Adj. OR-5.4, 95% CI 3.5-8.2); and being born premature and with small weight for gestational age (Adj. OR-9.0, 95% CI 7.3-15.5).

    Conclusion: Inadequate Fetal heart rate monitoring and partogram use are risk factors associated with intrapartum stillbirth and increasing the adherence to the interventions that can reduce the risk of intrapartum stillbirth. Preterm birth and small weight for gestational age were the factors that had the highest risk for intrapartum stillbirth, which indicates that adequate antenatal care can improve the health and growth of the baby and prevent premature death.

  • 35.
    KC, Ashish
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). United Nations Childrens Fund UNICEF, UN House, Lalitpur, Nepal.
    Wrammert, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Nelin, Viktoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Clark, Robert
    Latter-day Saint Charities, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Peterson, Stefan Swartling
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Global Health, Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.; School of Public Health, Makerere University, Uganda.; United Nations Children Fund UNICEF, Hlth Sect, Programme Div, United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017 USA.
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Evaluation of Helping Babies Breathe Quality Improvement Cycle (HBB-QIC) on retention of neonatal resuscitation skills six months after training in Nepal2017In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 17, article id 103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Each year 700,000 infants die due to intrapartum-related complications. Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) uses an algorithm to increase knowledge and improve skills on neonatal resuscitation. Implementation of HBB in low-resource clinical settings has shown to reduce intrapartum stillbirths and first-day neonatal mortality. However, there is a lack of evidence on the effect of different HBB implementation strategies to improve and sustain the clinical competency of health workers on bag-and-mask ventilation. This study was conducted to evaluate the impact of multi-faceted implementation strategy for HBB as quality improvement cycle (HBB-QIC) on retention of neonatal resuscitation skills in a tertiary hospital of Nepal.

    Methods: A Time series design was applied. The multi-faceted intervention for HBB-QIC included training, daily bag-and-mask skill checks, preparation for resuscitation before every birth, self-evaluation and peer review on neonatal resuscitation skills and weekly review meetings. Knowledge and skills were assessed through questionnaires, skill checklists, and Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) before implementation of the HBB-QIC, immediately after HBB training, and again at six months. Means were compared using paired t-tests, and associations between skill retention and HBB-QIC components were analyzed using logistic regression analysis.

    Results: 137 health workers were enrolled in the study. Knowledge scores were higher immediately following the HBB training, 16.4  1.4 compared to 12.8  1.6 before (out of 17), and the knowledge was retained six months after the training (16.5  1.1). Bag-and-mask skills improved immediately after the training and were retained six months after the training. The retention of bag-and-mask skills was associated with daily bag-and-mask skill checks, preparation for resuscitation before every birth, use of a self-evaluation checklist, and attendance at weekly review meetings. The implementation strategies with the highest association to skill retention were daily bag-and-mask skill checks (RR-5.1, 95% CI 1.9-13.5) and use of self-evaluation checklists after every delivery (RR-3.8, 95% CI 1.4-9.7).

    Conclusions: Health workers who practiced bag-and-mask skills, prepared for resuscitation before every birth, used self-evaluation checklists and attended weekly review meetings retained their neonatal resuscitation skills. Further studies are required to evaluate HBB-QIC in primary care settings, where the number of deliveries is gradually increasing.

  • 36.
    Lannergård, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Friman, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemial structure and function. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Serum amyloid A (SAA) protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in healthy newborn infants and healthy young through elderly adults2005In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 94, no 9, p. 1198-1202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To determine the levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in different age groups.

    METHODS:

    Serum samples from 70 healthy newborn infants, 80 blood donors and 81 healthy elderly individuals were analysed using a nephelometric method. The 231 samples were grouped as follows: 35 umbilical cords, 35 newborns, 48 young adults, 28 middle-aged adults, and 85 elderly adults.

    RESULTS:

    Serum levels of both SAA and hsCRP were lower in umbilical cords than in the newborns and young, middle-aged and elderly adults (p<0.0001). The SAA and hsCRP levels were comparable in newborns, and young and middle-age adults, but higher in elderly adults (p<0.0001-0.03). SAA (r2=0.159, p<0.0001) and hsCRP (r2=0.059, p<0.0001) were positively correlated with age and to each other (r2=0.385, p<0.0001).

    CONCLUSION:

    Serum levels of SAA and hsCRP in umbilical cord blood are close to the detection limit and lower than in the other age groups investigated. The elderly have generally higher levels than the younger age groups, which require higher decision levels in inflammatory diseases, including infections. In newborns and young and middle-aged adults, the lower decision levels of 10 mg/l for SAA and 5 mg/l for CRP are suggested.

  • 37. Le Blanc, Katarina
    et al.
    Götherström, Cecilia
    Ringdeén, Olle
    Hassan, Moustapha
    Horwitz, Edwin
    Annerén, Göran
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Axelsson, Ove
    Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Nunn, Janice
    Ewald, Uwe
    Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Nordén-Lindeberg, Solveig
    Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Jansson, Monika
    Dalton, Ann
    Åström, Eva
    Westergren, Magnus
    Fetal Mesenchymal Stem-Cell Engraftment in Bone after In Utero Transplantation in a Patient with Severe Osteogenesis Imperfecta2005In: Transplantation, Vol. 79, no 11, p. 1607-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Lidehäll, Anna Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Engman, Mona-Lisa
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sund, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Malm, Gunilla
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lewensohn-Fuchs, Ilona
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Tötterman, Thomas H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Karltorp, Eva
    Cochlear Implant Clinic, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Korsgren, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Eriksson, Britt-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Cytomegalovirus-Specific CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses in Infants and Children2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 135-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common congenital infection causing childhood morbidity. The pathogenetic mechanisms behind long-term sequelae are unclear, but long-standing viremia as a consequence of the inability to convert the virus to a latent state has been suggested to be involved. Whereas primary CMV infection in adults is typically rapidly controlled by the immune system, children have been shown to excrete virus for years. Here, we compare T-cell responses in children with congenital CMV infection, children with postnatal CMV infection and adults with symptomatic primary CMV infection. The study groups included 24 children with congenital CMV infection, 19 children with postnatal CMV infection and 8 adults with primary CMV infection. Among the infants with congenital CMV infection, 13 were symptomatic. T-cell responses were determined by analysis of interferon gamma-production after stimulation with CMV antigen. Our results show that whereas adults display high CMV-specific CD4 T-cell responses in the initial phase of the infection, children younger than 2 years have low or undetectable responses that appear to increase with time. There were no differences between groups with regard to CD8 T-cell function. In conclusion, inadequate CD 4 T-cell function seem to be involved in the failure to get immune control of the CMV infection in children younger than 2 years of age with congenital as well as postnatal CMV infection.

  • 39.
    Lindbäck, Caroline
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    KC, Ashish
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Wrammert, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Vitrakoti, Ravi
    Paropakar Women’s and Maternity Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Poor adherence to neonatal resuscitation guidelines exposed; an observational study using camera surveillance at a tertiary hospital in Nepal2014In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 14, p. 233-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Each year an estimated 10 million newborns require assistance to initiate breathing, and about 900 000 die due to intrapartum-related complications. Further research is required in several areas concerning neonatal resuscitation, particularly in settings with limited resources where the highest proportion of intrapartum-related deaths occur. The aim of this study is to use CCD-camera recordings to evaluate resuscitation routines at a tertiary hospital in Nepal.

    Methods: CCD-cameras recorded the resuscitations taking place and CCD-observational record forms were completed for each case. The resuscitation routines were then assessed and compared with existing guidelines. To evaluate the reliability of the observational form, 50 films were randomly selected and two independent observers completed two sets of forms for each case. The results were then cross-compared.

    Results: During the study period 1827 newborns were taken to the resuscitation table, and more than half of them (53.3%) were noted as not crying prior to resuscitation. Suction was used in almost 90% of newborns brought to the resuscitation table, whereas bag-and-mask ventilation was only used in less than 10%. The chance to receive ventilation with bag-and-mask for a newborn not crying when brought to the resuscitation table was higher for boys (AdjOR 1.44), low birth weight babies (AdjOR 1.68) and babies that were delivered by caesarean section (AdjOR 1.64). The reliability of the observational form varied considerably amongst the different variables analyzed, but was high for all variables concerning the use of bag-and-mask ventilation and the variable whether suction was used or not, all matching in over 91% of the forms.

    Conclusions: CCD camera technique was a feasible method to assess resuscitation practices in this low resource hospital setting. In most aspects, the staff did not adhere to guidelines regarding neonatal resuscitation. The use of bag-and-mask ventilation was inadequate, and suction was given excessively in terms of protocol. Further studies exploring the underlying causes behind the lack of adherence to the neonatal resuscitation guidelines should be conducted.

  • 40. Löfqvist, Chatarina
    et al.
    Engström, Eva
    Sigurdsson, Jon
    Hård, Anna-Lena
    Niklasson, Aimon
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Holmström, Gerd
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Smith, Lois E H
    Hellström, Ann
    Postnatal head growth deficit among premature infants parallels retinopathy of prematurity and insulin-like growth factor-1 deficit.2006In: Pediatrics, ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 117, no 6, p. 1930-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Malmström, B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Västmanland Cty Hosp, Dept Paediat, Västerås, Sweden..
    Nohlert, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Widarsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Västmanland Cty Hosp, Dept Paediat, Västerås, Sweden.; Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Västeras, Sweden..
    Simulation-based team training improved the self-assessed ability of physicians, nurses and midwives to perform neonatal resuscitation2017In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 8, p. 1273-1279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The use of simulation-based team training in neonatal resuscitation has increased in Sweden during the last decade, but no formal evaluation of this training method has been performed. This study evaluated the effect of simulation-based team training on the self-assessed ability of personnel to perform neonatal resuscitation. Methods: We evaluated a full-day simulation-based team training course in neonatal resuscitation, by administering a questionnaire to 110 physicians, nurses and midwives before and after the training period. The questionnaire focused on four important domains: communication, leadership, confidence and technical skills. The study was carried out in Sweden from 2005 to 2007. Results: The response rate was 84%. Improvements in the participants self-assessed ability to perform neonatal resuscitation were seen in all four domains after training (p < 0.001). Professionally inexperienced personnel showed a significant improvement in the technical skills domain compared to experienced personnel (p = 0.001). No differences were seen between professions or time since training in any of the four domains. Personnel with less previous experience with neonatal resuscitation showed improved confidence (p = 0.007) and technical skills (p = 0.003). Conclusion: A full-day course on simulation-based team training with video-supported debriefing improved the participants' self-assessed ability to perform neonatal resuscitation.

  • 42.
    Målqvist, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Thu Nga, Nguyen
    Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Miljoner nyfödda barn dör i onödan2006Report (Other scientific)
  • 43. Naver, Lars
    et al.
    Eriksson, M.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Linde, A.
    Lindroth, M.
    Schollin, J.
    Appropriate prophylaxis with restrictive palivizumab regimen in preterm children in Sweden2004In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 93, no 11, p. 1470-1473Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Palivizumab (Synagis) was registered in Sweden in 1999 for prophylaxis against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in premature infants. The high costs and the limited knowledge of the efficacy of this substance have led to debate about how and when it should be used. National guidelines for the use of palivizumab in Sweden were constructed in the year 2000. The aim of this study was to evaluate the guidelines.

    METHODS: A nation-wide prospective study was conducted during the two RSV seasons of the years 2000-2002. The paediatric departments in Sweden reported the use of palivizumab, the indication for its use, and the number of infants born preterm before 36 wk of gestation and less than 2 y old who were admitted to hospital for RSV infection.

    RESULTS: During the two seasons, 218 (3.8%) children who were born before 36 wk of gestation, and 97 (5.4%) who were born before 33 wk, were hospitalized because of RSV infection. Five children were treated with mechanical ventilation. No death caused by RSV was reported. A total of 390 children were treated with palivizumab, and 16 (4.1%) of those who received prophylactic treatment were admitted to hospital with RSV infection.

    CONCLUSION: We consider the comparatively restrictive Swedish recommendations to be safe and recommend that palivizumab should also be used very restrictively in the future. In our opinion, palivizumab in preterm children could be recommended only for those with chronic lung disease younger than 1 y of age, and with active treatment for their disease.

  • 44.
    Nga, Nguyen T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Eriksson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hoa, Dinh P.
    Johansson, Annika
    Wallin, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Perinatal services and outcomes in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam2010In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 10, p. 1478-1483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: We report baseline results of a community-based randomized trial for improved neonatal survival in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam (NeoKIP; ISRCTN44599712). The NeoKIP trial seeks to evaluate a method of knowledge implementation called facilitation through group meetings at local health centres with health staff and community key persons. Facilitation is a participatory enabling approach that, if successful, is well suited for scaling up within health systems. The aim of this baseline report is to describe perinatal services provided and neonatal outcomes. Methods: Survey of all health facility registers of service utilization, maternal deaths, stillbirths and neonatal deaths during 2005 in the province. Systematic group interviews of village health workers from all communes. A Geographic Information System database was also established. Results: Three quarters of pregnant women had >= 3 visits to antenatal care. Two hundred and five health facilities, including 18 hospitals, provided delivery care, ranging from 1 to 3258 deliveries/year. Totally there were 17 519 births and 284 neonatal deaths in the province. Neonatal mortality rate was 16/1000 live births, ranging from 10 to 44/1000 in the different districts, with highest rates in the mountainous parts of the province. Only 8% had home deliveries without skilled attendance, but those deliveries resulted in one-fifth of the neonatal deaths. Conclusion: A relatively good coverage of perinatal care was found in a Vietnamese province, but neonatal mortality varied markedly with geography and level of care. A remaining small proportion of home deliveries generated a substantial part of mortality.

  • 45.
    Nga, Nguyen Thu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Hoa, Dinh Thi Phuong
    School of Public Health, Hanoi, Vietnam.
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Causes of neonatal death: results from NeoKIP community-based trial in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam2012In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 4, p. 368-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: 

    To ascertain the causes of neonatal death in a province in northern Vietnam and analyse their distribution over age at death, birth weight and place of delivery.

    Methods: 

    Verbal autopsy interviews using a questionnaire derived from WHO standard and adapted to Vietnamese conditions was performed on all neonatal deaths occurring in Quang Ninh province from July 2008 to June 2010. Three experienced paediatricians independently reviewed all verbal autopsy records (233) and assigned a main cause of death. In case of disagreement in the allocation of cause of death, a consensus process was initiated to decide on a final cause.

    Results: 

    Neonatal mortality rate within the study area was 16/1000 (238 neonatal deaths and 14 453 live births) over the study period. Prematurity/low birth-weight (37.8%), intrapartum-related neonatal deaths (birth asphyxia, 33.2%), infections (13.0%) and congenital malformation (6.7%) were the four leading causes of death. Four cases of neonatal tetanus were found. Intrapartum-related deaths dominated in the home delivery group, whereas prematurity was the most prominent cause of death at all facility levels. Most neonatal deaths occurred within the first 24 h after delivery (58.6%).

    Conclusion: 

    A high proportion of deaths due to prematurity and intrapartum-related causes, calls for improvements of delivery care and resuscitation practices at health facilities.

  • 46.
    Nga, Nguyen Thu
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Målqvist, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Eriksson, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Hoa, Dinh Phuong
    Hanoi School of Public Health.
    Selling, Katarina Ekholm
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Johansson, Annika
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institution.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Effect of Facilitation of Local Maternal-and-Newborn Health Groups on Continuum of Perinatal Care: Results from the NeoKIP Trial in Northern Vietnam2012In: American Journal of Public Health, ISSN 0090-0036, E-ISSN 1541-0048Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Continuum of maternal, delivery and newborn is a prerequisite for improved neonatal health and survival. This requires involvement from households, health system, and the society as a whole. In a community-based trial using facilitation of local perinatal health stakeholder groups in northern Vietnam neonatal mortality was reduced (NeoKIP trial; ISRCTN44599712). In this report we analyse the effect by the intervention on continuum of anternal, delivery, and newborn care. We also assess in perinatal health knowledge among primary health care staff in the area that could be associated with the intervention.

    Methods:

    The trial had a cluster-randomised design; 44 communes in Quang Ninh province were allocated to intervention and 46 to control. Laywomen recruited from Women’s Union facilitated monthly meetings during 3 years in groups composed by staff from health centres and key persons in the communes. A problem-solving approach was employed. Births and neonatal deaths were monitored. A sample of 6% all live births was randomly selected each month to represent the entire birth cohort. Mothers of these newborns were interviewed at home 8-10 weeks after delivery. Information was collected on use of antenatal, delivery, and postpartum health services. Primary healthcare staff was also interviewed assessing their knowledge on newborn care before and after the intervention. Results were compared between intervention and control communes.

    Results:

    Of the 22 377 live births occurring in the study area during the three years of trial, 1338 (5.9%) were randomly selected for home interview with the mothers. In total, 1243 interviews with mothers of surviving neonates were completed in intervention and control communes. Intervention and control areas were comparable in social characteristics. Coverage differed between intervention and control communes regarding antenatal care (difference 8.7 percent units, 95%CI 5.0-12.6) and most of its included service components, birth preparedness (difference 3.6 percent units, 0.2-7.0) and institutional delivery (difference 3.8, 0.3-7.4). Primary healthcare staff’s knowledge on newborn care also increased in intervention communes while there was no change in control communes.

    Conclusions:

    A community-based participatory intervention by facilitation of local stakeholder groups that resulted in decreased neonatal mortality was linked to small positive differences in continuum of maternal and neonatal care and in primary healthcare staff’s knowledge on newborn care. This may reflect the process of change in utilization of services and performance of services that ultimately lowered neonatal mortality in the area.

  • 47.
    Nielsen, Elisabet I.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Sandström, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Honore, Per Hartvig
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Friberg, Lena E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Developmental Pharmacokinetics of Gentamicin in Preterm and Term Neonates: Population Modelling of a Prospective Study2009In: Clinical Pharmacokinetics, ISSN 0312-5963, E-ISSN 1179-1926, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 253-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objective:

    Preterm and term newborn infants show wide interindividual variability (IIV) in pharmacokinetic parameters of gentamicin. More extensive knowledge and use of predictive covariates could lead to faster attainment of therapeutic concentrations and a reduced need for concentration monitoring. This study was performed to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in preterm and term neonates and to identify and quantify relationships between patient characteristics and IIV. A secondary aim was to evaluate cystatin C as a marker for gentamicin clearance in this patient population.

    Methods:

    Data were collected in a prospective study performed in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Population pharmacokinetic modelling was performed using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling (NONMEM) software. Bodyweight was included as the primary covariate according to an allometric power model. Other evaluated covariates were age (postmenstrual age, gestational age [GA], postnatal age [PNA]), markers for renal function (serum creatinine, serum cystatin Q and concomitant medication with cefuroxime, vancomycin or indometacin. Covariate-parameter relationships were explored using a stepwise covariate model building procedure. The predictive performance of the developed model was evaluated using an independent external dataset for a similar patient population.

    Results:

    Sixty-one newborn infants (GA range 23.3-42.1 weeks, PNA range 0-45 days) were enrolled in the study. In total, 894 serum gentamicin samples were included in the analysis. The concentration-time profile was described using a three-compartment model. Gentamicin clearance increased with the GA and PNA (included in a nonlinear fashion). The GA was also identified as having a significant influence on the central volume of distribution, with a preterm neonate having a larger central volume of distribution per kilogram of bodyweight than a term neonate. Cystatin C and creatinine were not correlated with gentamicin clearance in this study population. The external dataset was well predicted by the developed model.

    Conclusion:

    Bodyweight and age (GA and PNA) were found to be major factors contributing to IIV in gentamicin clearance in neonates. Based on these data, cystatin C and serum creatinine were not correlated with gentamicin clearance and therefore not likely to be predictive markers of renal function in this patient population. Based on predictions from the developed model, preterm neonates do not reach targeted peak and trough gentamicin concentrations after a standard dosage regimen of 4mg/kg given once daily, suggesting a need for higher loading doses and prolonged dosing intervals in this patient population.

  • 48.
    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Anderson, G. C.
    Bergman, N.
    Cattaneo, A.
    Charpak, N.
    Davanzo, R.
    Ewald, U.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ibe, O.
    Ludington-Hoe, S.
    Mendoza, S.
    Pallas-Allonso, C.
    Ruiz Pelaez, J. G.
    Sizun, J.
    Widstrom, A-M
    Towards universal Kangaroo Mother Care: recommendations and report from the First European conference and Seventh International Workshop on Kangaroo Mother Care2010In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 6, p. 820-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The hallmark of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) is the kangaroo position: the infant is cared for skin-to-skin vertically between the mother's breasts and below her clothes, 24 h/day, with father/substitute(s) participating as KMC providers. Intermittent KMC (for short periods once or a few times per day, for a variable number of days) is commonly employed in high-tech neonatal intensive care units. These two modalities should be regarded as a progressive adaptation of the mother-infant dyad, ideally towards continuous KMC, starting gradually and progressively with intermittent KMC. The other components in KMC are exclusive breastfeeding (ideally) and early discharge in kangaroo position with strict follow-up. Current evidence allows the following general statements about KMC in affluent and low-income settings: KMC enhances bonding and attachment; reduces maternal postpartum depression symptoms; enhances infant physiologic stability and reduces pain, increases parental sensitivity to infant cues; contributes to the establishment and longer duration of breastfeeding and has positive effects on infant development and infant/parent interaction. Therefore, intrapartum and postnatal care in all types of settings should adhere to a paradigm of nonseparation of infants and their mothers/families. Preterm/low-birth-weight infants should be regarded as extero-gestational foetuses needing skin-to-skin contact to promote maturation. Conclusion: Kangaroo Mother Care should begin as soon as possible after birth, be applied as continuous skin-to-skin contact to the extent that this is possible and appropriate and continue for as long as appropriate.

  • 49.
    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Anderson, G. C.
    Bergman, N.
    Cattaneo, A.
    Charpak, N.
    Davanzo, R.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ludington-Hoe, S.
    Mendoza, S.
    Pallas-Allonso, C.
    Pelaez, J. G.
    Sizun, J.
    Widström, A.-M.
    State of the art and recommendations. Kangaroo mother care: application in a high-tech environment2010In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 99, no 6, p. 812-819Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) was developed in Colombia in the 1970s, two trends in clinical application emerged. In low income settings, the original KMC model is implemented. This consists of continuous (24 h/day, 7 days/week) and prolonged mother/parent-infant skin-to-skin contact; early discharge with the infant in the kangaroo position; (ideally) exclusive breastfeeding; and, adequate follow-up. In affluent settings, intermittent KMC with sessions of one or a few hours skin-to-skin contact for a limited period is common. As a result of the increasing evidence of the benefits of KMC for both infants and families in all intensive care settings, KMC in a high-tech environment was chosen as the topic for the first European Conference on KMC, and the clinical implementation of the KMC model in all types of settings was discussed at the 7th International Workshop on KMC. Kangaroo Mother Care protocols in high-tech Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) should specify criteria for initiation, kangaroo position, transfer to/from KMC, transport in kangaroo position, kangaroo nutrition, parents' role, modification of the NICU environment, performance of care in KMC, and KMC in case of infant instability. Conclusion: Implementation of the original KMC method, with continuous skin-to-skin contact whenever possible, is recommended for application in high-tech environments, although scientific evaluation should continue.

  • 50.
    Nyqvist, KH
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Sjoden, PO
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ewald, U
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    The development of preterm infants' breastfeeding behavior1999In: Early Hum Dev, Vol. 55, p. 247-Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 63
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