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  • 1. Fredlund, K.
    et al.
    Asp, N.-G.
    Larsson, M.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Sandberg, A.-S.
    Phytate reduction in whole grains of wheat, rye, barley and oats after hydrothermal treatment1997In: Journal of Cereal Science, no 25, p. 83-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Jonsson, Lena
    et al.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nylander, Annica
    Livsmedelskvalitet2014 (ed. 2:1)Book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Jonsson, Lena
    et al.
    Institutionen för mat, hälsa och miljö, Göteborgs universitet.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nylander, Annica
    Institutionen för kostvetenskap, Umeå universitet.
    Livsmedelsvetenskap2007 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En lärobok som tekniskt och kemiskt förklarar varför man ska tillaga på ett visst sätt. Råvaor belyses från sitt ursprung, via kemisk sammansättning till vad som händer under tillagning. Dessutom belyses närings- och miljöaspekter på respektive råvara.

  • 4.
    Kruszewska, Danuta
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology. Department of Medical Microbiology, Dermatology and Infection, Lund University.
    Lan, Jinggang
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology. Department of Medical Microbiology, Dermatology and Infection, Lund University.
    Lorca, Graciela
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology. Department of Medical Microbiology, Dermatology and Infection, Lund University.
    Yanagisawa, Naoko
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology. Department of Medical Microbiology, Dermatology and Infection, Lund University.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology.
    Ljungh, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology. Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology. Department of Medical Microbiology, Dermatology and Infection, Lund University.
    Selection of lactic acid bacteria as probiotic strains by in vitro tests2002In: Microecology and Therapy, ISSN 0720-0536, Vol. 29, p. 37-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lactobacillus strains isolated from the colonic mucosa of healthy individuals (355) and Lactic Acid Bacteria isolated from fermentation of ecologically cultured rye (180) were screened from binding of porcine mucin, expression of cell surface hydrophobicity and binding of collagen, fibronectin, fibrinogen, vitronectin and heparin. Seven strains (L. plantarum, L. paracasei ssp. paracasei, Leuconostoc mesenteroides and pediococcus pentosaceus) were then selected for further studies. These strains all tolerated exposure to 20 % bile for 1 hr and pH 2,5 for 2 hrs, i.e. they have properties enabling them to survive transport through the gastrointestinal (GI) tact to the colon. All strains could utilise inulin or amylopectin as a sole carbon source during in vitro culture. Three strains produced beta-galactosidase, which has been proposed to alleviate symptoms of lactose intolerance. They produced antimicrobial substance(s) with activity against the homologous strain and other gram-positive bacteria. Exposure of Lactoacillus strains to pH 5 for 1 hr induced de novo production of several proteins, five of which cross-reacted with strass proteins. This may protect other surface proteins and adhesins during transport through the GI-tract. Four LAB strains studied transcribed NF-kB to the nucleus of microphage U 937. This induced induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-8) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) by L. paracasei ssp.paracasei F19, L. plantarum 2592 and Pediococcus pentosaceus 16:1(10 up to 7 cell, 24 hrs) produced antioxidants, equivalent to 100 ug vitamin C. Since the availability of antioxidants decreases rostrally in the GI-tract production of antioxidants by colonic bacteria provides a beneficial effect in scavenging free radicals. The selected seven strains have been shown to survive transport to the colonic mucosa, and to have properties which makes them attractive candidates for use as probiotics.

  • 5.
    Lange, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Self-reported food safety knowledge and behaviour among Home and Consumer Studies students2016In: Food Control, ISSN 0956-7135, E-ISSN 1873-7129, Vol. 67, p. 265-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Home and Consumer Studies (HCS) should be a suitable place for food safety education as it includes plenty of practical cooking and is compulsory for all students in the Swedish school system. A study among HCS teachers however reveals shortcomings in food safety teaching. A survey regarding food safety knowledge and behaviour among HCS students in school Year 9 was performed at different schools with a new system to collect questionnaire data. A Student Response System was used at the participating schools. The students were to answer the questions by using a small handheld wireless control, a clicker, in the response program Turning Point 2008. The questionnaire included a total of 26 questions and all questions were shown at PowerPoint slides and read out loud to the students. Some trivial questions were asked at the beginning to ensure the method. A total of 529 students from 18 different schools in different parts of Sweden participated in the survey conducted between September 2013 and January 2014. The survey results were evaluated and analysed using SPSS by performing cross-tabulation and chi-square tests. This study reveals that the students' self-reported food safety knowledge and behaviour are inadequate. Important risk areas need to be highlighted in HCS teaching. Boys reported to be significantly more at risk in terms of food safety regarding the handling of risk foods, reheating and cleaning. Especially for boys who reported seldom cook at home HCS would be extra valuable. This study also indicates the importance of reflection in relation to the hygiene routines which are common in the HCS context. The outcome of this study is that students might leave school without even basic food safety knowledge.

  • 6.
    Lange, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    'Teaching Young Consumers': food safety in home and consumer studies from a teacher's perspective2014In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 357-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish compulsory school, the subject home and consumer studies (HCS) is an opportunity to create conscious consumers for the future. In Sweden, it has been estimated that half a million cases of foodborne infections occur each year, which has an impact on public health. The numbers of foodborne infections are affected by actions connected to the four Cs in food safety: cooking, cleaning, chilling and cross-contamination. As foodborne infections in many cases are suspected to occur in private households, it is of research interest to study food safety teaching in HCS. The aim of this study was to investigate food safety as a part of HCS education and to provide insights regarding self-reported food safety attitude, knowledge and behaviour among HCS teachers in Swedish compulsory schools. A web-based questionnaire was distributed online in April 2012. A total of 335 teachers across the country participated, representing about one in five HCS teachers in Sweden. A majority of the responding teachers stated food safety as an important part of HCS education. The study indicates that food safety teaching can be done in different ways depending on factors such as working years, formal HCS education and daily routines in the classroom. The food safety routines relevant to a specific learning situation might determine the didactic choices, and thus some other important issues within the framework of the four Cs i.e. cold food storage, heating, storing leftovers, best before date, cooling and cross-contamination might be neglected. When it comes to teaching food safety, there is no guarantee that the four Cs in food safety will be covered. Issues connected to cleaning seemed to occur more frequently in HCS teaching rather than the broader aspects of food safety.

  • 7.
    Lange, Marie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Palojoki, Päivi
    University of Helsinki.
    Göranzon, Helen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Food safety teaching influenced by frames, traditions and subjective selections2017In: International Journal of Home Economics, ISSN 1999-561X, E-ISSN 1999-561X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 79-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, Home and consumer studies (HCS) are mandatory for all students in compulsory school. This means that schools have the possibility to educate all future consumers in Sweden. Qualitative interviews were performed with ten HCS teachers. A thematic content analysis was performed on the transcribed interviews. Three themes were found, which all had the potential to influence the teachers' didactic choices. Frame control includes different frames within the school, for example, budget, lesson time, syllabus, which could imply limitations on the teaching. HCS teaching was characterised by many similarities and routines, which were often performed without reflection, and these were included in the theme Traditional HCS learning environment. The third theme Subjective selections were characterised by the teachers' individual experiences, knowledge and risk perception. The result indicates that important food safety risk areas risked being neglected or minimalised in the HCS teaching due to limiting frames, non-reflective HCS teaching traditions, or the teachers' lack of knowledge and risk awareness. This could have consequences for what is transferred to the students and thereby influence the student's learning process in relation to food safety.

  • 8.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Bakning2014In: Livsmedelsvetenskap / [ed] Annica Nylander, Lena Jonsson, Ingela Marklinder, Margaretha Nydahl, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2:1, p. 351-375Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Baljväxter2014In: Livsmedelsvetenskap / [ed] Annica Nylander, Lena Jonsson, Ingela Marklinder, Margaretha Nydahl, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2:1, p. 139-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    cerealier2014In: Livsmedelsvetenskap / [ed] Nylander, A., Jonsson, L., Marklinder, M. och Nydahl, M., LUND: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2:1, p. 67-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Dags att lägga in årets skörd1996In: Tidskrift För Hälsa, no 9, p. 52-59p. 52-59Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    De små mikroorganismernas storhet en hälsorisk - att förebygga klagomål om matförgiftningar.2015In: Klagandets diskurs: - matforskare reflekterar / [ed] Christina Fjellström, Uppsala universitet , 2015, 1, p. 163-171Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Marklinder, Ingela.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Fermented oatmeal soup qualifies as functional foods.1996In: In Proceedings from the 6:e Nordic Congress in nutrition, Göteborg, Sweden., 1996Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Gott med råg och surdeg1997Other (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    "HOT SPOTS"-hygieniskt kritiska punkter i privata hem: En pilotstudie2000Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Antalet matförgiftningar i Sverige uppskattas vara ca 500.000 per år och man tror att ungefär hälften orsakas i hemmen. Privata hem sorteras in under "enskilda hushåll" och därför gäller inte livsmedelslagen för dessa. Mycket är höljt i dunkel när det gä

  • 16.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences.
    Lactic acid-fermented oats and barley for human dietary use: with special reference to Lactobacillus spp. and to nutritional and sensory properties1996Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Nötter och frön2014 (ed. 2:1)Book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Rågsurdegsbröd i Japan - som att äta "Natto" i Sverige!1997Other (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Surdegsmackan i surdegsmecka1996Other (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics. Uppsala universitet.
    Eriksson, Mattias
    Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Uppsala.
    Best-before date: food storage temperatures recorded by Swedish students2015In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 117, no 6, p. 1764-1776Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the food storage temperature in Swedish household refrigerators, to determine whether students use the best-before-date label to determine food edibility, and to examine if the study increased the students' interest and knowledge regarding these issues.

    Design/methodology/approach - In total, 1,812 students, enrolled at 72 Swedish schools, analysed the temperature on different shelves in their family refrigerator using thermometers (Moller-Therm (+0.5/-0.1 degrees C) and instructions provided by their teachers. A questionnaire dealing with the issues of date labelling, food safety, refrigerator storage and food wastage was completed by the teachers.

    Findings - The temperature at the back of middle shelves was coldest (average 4.8 degrees C; SD 3.1). A relatively high proportion of food items were stored at higher temperatures than recommended. The use-by date had been exceeded for 30 per cent of products, but the students did not rate these as inedible. According to the teachers, the investigation increased interest and knowledge among their students of date labelling, food hygiene, refrigerator storage and food waste.

    Research limitations/implications - Thermometers were used to measure air temperature on different shelves in the family refrigerator. Data collection was not controllable, as the students measured without supervision.

    Practical implications - The teachers reported that the study increased interest and knowledge among their students regarding cold food storage.

    Social implications - This way of teaching food safety would meet the aim of generally increasing food safety knowledge in society, which might have a positive impact on public health.

    Originality/value - The use of school-children as data collectors to determine refrigerator temperatures in private homes is a novel approach, which was an efficient way of teaching relevant facts as well as collecting large amounts of data.

  • 21.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Haglund, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Johansson, Lisbeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Influences of lactic acid bacteria on technological, mutritional and sensory properties of barley sour dough bread1996In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 7, no 3-4, p. 285-292Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Johansson, Lisbeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Sour dough fermentation of barley flours with varied content of mixed-linked (1->3), (1->4) ß-D-glucans1995In: Food microbiology (Print), ISSN 0740-0020, E-ISSN 1095-9998, Vol. 12, p. 363-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Johansson, Lisbeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Haglund, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    NagelHeld, B
    Seibel, W
    Effects of flour from different barley varieties on barley sour dough bread1996In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 7, no 3-4, p. 275-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty flours from 16 different barley varieties cultivated in 1990 and 1992, and a Swedish reference flour, were fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum Al to sour doughs. Barley breads (40% barley/60% wheat flour) from each flour type were baked with and without an admixture of barley sour dough in order to investigate how the sour dough admixture would affect the baking properties. A trained panel carried out sensory evaluation by conventional profiling on breads made from three of the barley varieties and the Swedish reference flour, made with and without sour dough admixture. The barley varieties influenced both the sour dough properties and the properties of the barley bread. The PH of bread with sour dough ranged from 4.6 to 4.8 as compared to 5.4 to 5.6 in. bread without sour dough. The acidity of the breads with sour dough ranged from 4.1 to 5.0 mi NaOH/10 g bread crumb as compared to 2.4 to 3.6 in breads without sour dough. In 14 of the twenty bread types an addition of sour dough lowered the bread volume. Breads with a sour dough admixture scored higher for total taste and acidulous taste than breads without sour dough. The beta-glucan content of the flours had no significant influence on the sour dough or the sensory characteristics of the bread, except for the breadcrumb colour. Copyright (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd

  • 24.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Johansson, Lisbeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Haglund, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Nagel-Held, Berd
    Seibel, Wilfried
    Influences of barley sour doughs on baking and sensory properties of bread made from different barley varieties1995In: In Proceedings from "Livsmedel 95", in Göteborg, Sweden., 1995Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    PROBI AB, IDEON, Lund, Sweden.
    Larsson, M
    Fredlund, K
    Sandberg, A S
    Degradation of phytate by using varied sources of phytases in an oat-based nutrient solution fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum strain 299 V1995In: Food microbiology (Print), ISSN 0740-0020, E-ISSN 1095-9998, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 487-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A formula has previously been developed for an oat-based nutrient solution, fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum strain 299 V, to be used as a probiotica for people with a damaged intestinal microflora. Oats are nutritious and rich in minerals, but also contain large amounts of phytate (myoinositol hexaphosphate), which is one of the main inhibitors of absorption of iron and zinc in humans. The effects of phytases of varied sources (malted barley flour, malted oat flour, rye sour dough and of wheat phytase and phytase from Asperigillus niger), on the phytate degradation, acidity, bacterial counts and aroma of the oat-based nutrient solution were studied. The degradation of phytate varied between 100% and 72% of the initial value, depending on the source of phytase added. Malted barley flour and malted oat flour had the same capacity for degrading phytate in oats. The rate of pH decrease, final pH values, acidity, and viable counts of lactic acid bacteria varied in the solutions depending on the source of phytase. The most efficient phytate degradation was achieved by adding phytase from A. niger to the oat-based nutrient solution. However, by using the enzyme, the nutrient solution became bitter tasting and had low counts of lactic acid bacteria. (C) 1995 Academic Press Limited

  • 26.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Laser Reuterswärd, Anita
    Livsmedelsverket.
    Hälsopåstående om ämnen i livsmedel2013In: Näringslära för högskolan: Från grundläggande till avancerad nutrition / [ed] Karin Sjögren Marklund, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, 6, p. 279-288Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Lindblad, M
    Eriksson, LM
    Finnson, AM
    Lindqvist, R
    Home storage temperatures and consumers handling of refrigerated foods in Sweden2004In: Journal of Food Protection, ISSN 0362-028X, E-ISSN 1944-9097, Vol. 67, no 11, p. 2570-2577Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Lindblad, Mats
    Livsmedelsverket.
    Gidlund, Ann
    Livsmedelsverket.
    Olsen, Monica
    Livsmedelsverket.
    Consumers´ability to discriminate aflatoxin-contaminated Brazil nuts2005In: Food Additives and Contaminants, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 56-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of the study were to investigate the extent to which consumers can separate nuts with a high content of aflatoxin from sound nuts, and whether sorting results can be improved by information or whether they are affected by certain factors. A test panel consisting of 100 subjects were asked to crack 300 g Brazil nuts and to sort the nuts into those they considered edible and inedible. the test showed that consumers can, on current bahaviour, discriminate aflatoxin-contaminated Brazil nuts to a signifikant extent. None of the tested factors (such as sex, age, level level of education, ethnic background or knowledge of mycotoxins) had any effects on the probability of exceeding either of the two aflatoxin thresholds.

  • 29.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Cold Food Storage - the 70+ need for Information2008In: IAFP´s Fourth European Symposium on Food Safety, Lisbon, Portugal 19-21 November 2008, 2008, p. 8-8Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Older people (70 years plus) represent a risk category concerning complications with food-borne infections. As part of the project CHANCE, taking place in Austria, Germany, Latvia, Romania, Sweden and United Kingdom (Lifelong Learning Programme of European Union 2007-2009) a pilot study was performed in the urban area of Eriksberg, Uppsala municipality, Sweden. The aim was to understand this target group’s need for information about cold food storage and food handling within the context of understanding and perception of health related messages.

    Methods: Nine individuals aged 72 -93 years were individually asked to purchase certain food items (soft cheese; vacuum-packed, smoked salmon; vacuum-packed, sliced ham) and store them in their own refrigerator using their normal food practices. Subsequently, qualitative interviews were performed. The temperature was then measured in these food items after storage for one night.   Data were qualitatively processed.

    Results: The study group were neither aware of the temperature in their refrigerator nor did they know about temperature differences on different shelves, although they did consider themselves to have a sound knowledge of how to handle and store foods.  They expressed confidence in the grocery store and as such did not see the need for information. None of the informants were afraid of food-borne infections and yet a common habit was to taste raw minced meat, thus indicating a risk related optimism. The recorded temperatures of the various foodstuffs also suggested need for extra information.

    Significance: This group seemed to overestimate their own skills concerning cold food storage. Education about food handling was taught in childhood but arguably a need for information about how to handle food today exists. The trust given to their grocery store might contribute to a decrease in their own responsibility, which might be an obstacle concerning accessing further information.

     

  • 30.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Magnusson, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    CHANCE: a healthy lifestyle in terms of food handling and hygiene2013In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 115, no 2-3, p. 223-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to identify knowledge gaps in terms of food handling and hygiene among a population in a selected city district. This study is a part of the project Community Health management to Enhance Behaviour (CHANCE), Life Long Learning programme of European Union 2007-2009). A certain vulnerable group, i.e. older people , were addressed. the study population was recruited by convenience sample. A questionnaire was used to collect data among citizens in a selected city district (n=251). The elderly (71-80+; n=123) were interviewed face to face, while the younger (21-70 years; n= 128) filled in their data on their own.

    One third of the respondents usually measure the temperature in their trefrigerator. However, one third revealed knowledge gaps relating to storage temperature for certain food items. Thirty nine per cent changes dishcloths onece a week. Twenty percent of the elderly usually put raw minced meat into their mouth without reflecting on pathogenic bacteria. There was no significant relation between the fear of food poisioning and tasting minced meat, changing the dishcloth often, or cooling down food properly. These results can be interpreted as a sign of knowledge gaps, indicating a need for imporved health communication.

    The study population consisted of consumers in a selected city district in Uppsala municipality. Therefore the results should not be generalized for Swedes in general. The collected data and the information of knowledge gaps have been used to perform a local health intervention. The results would reveal relevance for a larger nationwide survey that aims to identify knowledge gaps in terms of food handling and and hygiene among Swedish citizens. Data from the present study would be useful in the attempt to implement simple tools at the local level, in order to promote healthy habits among consumers. An innovative principle in the EU project CHANCE is to work from inside out. Studies of consumers´food handling in private homes are lacking in Sweden. the present study is rather unique as it explores private households in terms of food handling and hygiene.

  • 31.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Sweden Community of Eriksberg2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Freytag-Leyer, Barbara
    Fulda university of Applied Sciences.
    Elmfada, Ibrahim
    Universität Vienna.
    Rust, Petra
    Universität Vienna.
    Dangschat, Jens
    Technical University of Vienna.
    Hertzsch, Wencke
    Technical University of Vienna.
    Klotter, Christoph
    Fulda university of Applied Sciences.
    Alisch, Monika
    Fulda university of Applied Sciences.
    Hampshire, Jörg
    Fulda university of Applied Sciences.
    Eglite, Aija
    Agriculture University of Jelgava.
    Pilvere, Irina
    Agriculture University of Jelgava.
    Vintila, Mona
    west University of Timisoara.
    Hackett, Allan
    Liverpool John Moores University.
    Meadows, Mark
    Liverpool John Moores University.
    Richards, Jackie
    Liverpool John Moores University.
    Lybert, Pauline
    Liverpool John Moores University.
    Stevenson, Leo
    Liverpool John Moores University.
    Project CHANCE Community Health Management to Enhance Behaviour: CHANCE2009Report (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Cold food storage - the 70+ Need for Information.2008In: Proceedings at the IAFP´s Fourth Symposium on Food safety 19-21 Nov. 2008, Advancements in Food Safety Lisbon, Portugal, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older people (70 years plus) represent a risk category concerning complications with foodborne infections. As part of the project CHANCE, taking place in Austria, Germany, Latvia, Romania, Sweden and United Kingdom (Lifelong Learning Programme of European Union 2007–2009) a pilot study was performed in the urban area Eriksberg, Uppsala municipality, Sweden. The aim was to understand this target group’s need for information about cold food storage and food handling within the context of understanding and perception of health related messages.

    Methods 

    Nine individuals 72–93 years were individually asked to purchase certain food items(soft cheese; vacuum-packed, smoked salmon; vacuum-packed, sliced ham) and store them in their own refrigerator using their normal food practices. Subsequently, qualitative interviews were performed. The temperature was then measured in these food items after storage for one night. Data were qualitatively processed.

    Results

    The study group were neither aware of the temperature in their refrigerator nor did they know about temperature differences on different shelves, although they did consider themselves to have a sound knowledge of how to handle and store foods. They expressed confidence in the grocery store and as such did not see the need for information. None of the informants were afraid of food-borne infections and yet a common habit was to taste raw minced meat, thus indicating a risk related optimism. The recorded temperatures of the various foodstuffs also suggested need for extra information.

    Significance

    This group seemed to overestimate their own skills concerning cold food storage. Education about food handling was taught in childhood but arguably a need for information about how to handle food today exists. The trust given to their grocery store might contribute to a decrease in their own responsibility, which might be an obstacle concerning accessing further information.

  • 34.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Persson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Thelin, Erika
    Wiström, Anna
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Low fruit & vegetable consumption and risky food safety behaviour - older people should be included in helth communication2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Amneus, Sandra
    Johansson, Malin
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Health communication in relation to healthy eating among elderly2013In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 28, no SI, p. 281-282Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Jacobsson, Fanny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Lindblom, Marielle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    A simplified health information model increased the level of knowledge regarding "five a day" and food safety in a city district2012In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 114, no 7, p. 910-925Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper was to analyze the effect according to knowledge and behavior, respectively, through a simplified health information model launched in a selected city district.

    Design/methodology/approach – The intervention in this study encompasses information meetings where two educational computer programs highlighting the “five a day” concept, and food hygiene were showcased in conjunction with a group discussion. In total, 92 people living or working in a selected city district participated. The effect of the intervention was determined by means of inquiries (multiple-choice) that were carried out prior to, immediately following, and three weeks after the intervention.

    Findings – A statistically significant improvement in knowledge of the concepts “five a day”, cross-contamination, and recommended storage temperature (for smoked salmon and raw mince meat) was observed, however, no major change in behavior was reported.

    Practical implications – The knowledge improvement suggests that the education programs, in conjunction with discussions, are a useful information model for raising awareness about the notion of “five a day” and food safety. The results of the study make it clear that there are difficulties in getting people to change their behavior, let alone getting them to participate in health education offered locally.

    Originality/value – Intervention projects are a communication tool that may be used in order to increase knowledge and produce behavioral change. The project is working from the inside out, i.e. it examines the needs first and then develops solutions for them.

  • 37.
    Reivell, Gun-Britt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Mjölk och mjölkprodukter2014In: Livsmedelsvetenskap / [ed] Annica Nylander, Lena jonsson, Ingela Marklinder och Margaretha Nydahl, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2:1, p. 277-306Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Saldeen, Tom
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    Wallin, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Effects of a small dose of stable fish oil substituted for margarine in bread on plasma phospholipid fatty acids and serum triglycerides1998In: Nutrition Research, ISSN 0271-5317, E-ISSN 1879-0739, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 1483-1492Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Sandvik, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Kihlberg, Iwona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Lindroos, Anna Karin
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Bread consumption patterns in a Swedish national dietary survey focusing particularly on whole-grain and rye bread2014In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 58, p. 24024-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Bread types with high contents of whole grains and rye are associated with beneficial health effects. Consumer characteristics of different bread consumption patterns are however not well known.

    Objective: To compare bread consumption patterns among Swedish adults in relation to selected socio-demographic, geographic, and lifestyle-related factors. For selected consumer groups, the further aim is to investigate the intake of whole grains and the context of bread consumption, that is, where and when it is consumed.

    Design: Secondary analysis was performed on bread consumption data from a national dietary survey (n=1,435). Respondents were segmented into consumer groups according to the type and amount of bread consumed. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to study how selected socio-demographic, geographic, and lifestyle-related factors were associated with the consumer groups. Selected consumption groups were compared in terms of whole-grain intake and consumption context. Consumption in different age groups was analysed more in detail.

    Results: One-third of the respondents consumed mainly white bread. Socio-demographic, geographic, and healthy-lifestyle-related factors were associated with the bread type consumed. White bread consumption was associated with younger age groups, less education, children in the family, eating less fruit and vegetables, and more candy and snacks; the opposite was seen for mainly whole-grain bread consumers. Older age groups more often reported eating dry crisp bread, whole-grain bread, and whole-grain rye bread with sourdough whereas younger respondents reported eating bread outside the home, something that also mainly white bread eaters did. Low consumers of bread also consumed less whole grain in total.

    Conclusions: Traditional bread consumption structures were observed, as was a transition among young consumers who more often consumed fast food bread and bread outside the home, as well as less rye and whole-grain bread. Target groups for communication strategies and product development of more sensorily attractive rye or whole-grain-rich bread should be younger age groups (18–30 years), families with children, and groups with lower educational levels.

  • 40.
    Sandvik, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Kihlberg, Iwona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Quality perception of bread among Swedish consumers in the light of the carbohydrate debate2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current carbohydrate debate causes difficulties for the consumer to make the right choices in terms of carbohydrate quality, which can lead to the exclusion of bread from the diet. Media has been a major arena for these debates, promoting low carbohydrate diets.

    Rye has many interesting health promoting components such as bioactive components and fibers and has shown to be beneficial on insulinemic response, satiety, and bowel health. An increased consumption of rye bread might promote public health and therefore it is important to elucidate the difference between different kinds of carbohydrates. 

    A positive quality perception is a presumption for consumption. Knowledge about consumer quality perception is important for product development and from a public health perspective, to influence the consumer to make healthy choices. Sensory, and health related factors have shown to be important for the quality perception of bread, and consumers’ use different cues to evaluate the quality before consumption.

    The aim is to study Swedish consumers’ quality perception of bread with focus on soft bread, in the light of the carbohydrate debate. A questionnaire with three sections was developed and piloted. The first section contained questions of consumption behavior for bread and other carbohydrate rich foods. In the second section product cues for choice, health, taste and satiation was elicited by comparison of pictures showing six commercially available soft breads with and without packaging. The third section contained knowledge questions of carbohydrates and the carbohydrate debate. A postal invitation to participate in a web-based questionnaire was sent out to a national simple random sample of 3000 respondents, 18-80 years old. An interesting issue to investigate is if the carbohydrate debate has had an impact on bread consumption. Preliminary results will be presented during the congress. 

  • 41.
    Sandvik, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Kihlberg, Iwona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Consumers’ perception of bread from a health perspective- an exploratory study among a Swedish population2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background For strategies to increase the consumption of healthier bread one aspect to explore is consumers’ quality perceptions of bread from a health perspective. Method Survey, response rate 38 % n=1134. Open-ended questions regarding perceptions of healthy bread were content analyzed. Statistics: Correspondence analysis, Mann-Whitney U test and Chi-square. Findings 1/3 had decreased their intake of bread, mainly to maintain/improve health. 1/5 did not know any bread that they considered healthy. Among respondents who did know healthy bread, 1/3 found it hard to identify. Most frequent descriptions of healthy bread were coarse, fiber, wholegrain, sourdough, dark. Most listed health effects were: good for stomach, fiber content, bowel health and satiating. Discussion Increasing consumers’ awareness of different types of breads contribution to a healthy diet is a challenge. The general health perception of bread was in line with recommendations but cues used may be misleading. Health is a credence quality attribute, but health effects that to some extent can be evaluated by the consumer after consumption are more relevant forming health related quality expectation of bread.

     

  • 42.
    Sandvik, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Kihlberg, Iwona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Sensory and health related characteristics of rye bread in Sweden2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An important factor for healthy eating is the availability of healthy as well as sensory acceptable food. An increased consumption of rye bread would be beneficial from a health promoting perspective. Previous studies in the present project showed that rye, sourdough and whole grain were perceived as very healthy by consumers. The intake of bread, rich in rye was however low, especially among younger consumers who also had a negative expectation towards the taste. The characteristics of rye bread in Sweden are however not well investigated.

    The aim of the present study was to describe sensory and health related characteristics of rye bread in relation product labels.

    Twenty-four rye bread samples were chosen to represent a wide variety of rye bread on the Swedish market. Sensory descriptive analysis was performed with a trained panel (n=11). Total titratable acidity and pH were measured in all samples as well as fluidity index as an indication of glycemic response on a subset of samples (white wheat bread as reference). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the sensory space of the products. Front-of-package (FoP) labelling was compared to the characteristics of the products.

    The bread samples sensory characteristics were described for appearance, smell, texture and flavor. According to the PCA, six main groups of rye bread were identified. The rye content of bread with a FoP rye labelling varied from 20 to 100 %. The pH in bread with a FoP sourdough labelling varied from 4,25-5,3. The fluidity index of a subsample of five bread types varied from 51-97 with white wheat bread as a reference (100).

    According these results, the next step is to investigate the consumers’ drivers of rye bread liking.

     

  • 43.
    Sandvik, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Kihlberg, Iwona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Consumers' health-related perceptions of bread - Implications for labeling and health communication.2018In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 121, p. 285-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a wide variety of commercial bread types and the present study identifies potential pitfalls in consumer evaluations of bread from a health perspective. The aim is to describe consumers' health-related perceptions of bread by exploring which health-related quality attributes consumers associate with bread and whether there are differences with regard to age, gender and education level. A postal and web-based sequential mixed-mode survey (n = 1134, 62% responded online and 38% by paper) with open-ended questions and an elicitation task with pictures of commercial breads were used. Responses were content analyzed and inductively categorized. Three fourths (n = 844) knew of breads they considered healthy; these were most commonly described using terms such as "coarse," "whole grain," "fiber rich," "sourdough," "crisp," "less sugar," "dark," "rye," "seeds," "a commercial brand," "homemade" and "kernels." The breads were perceived as healthy mainly because they "contain fiber," are "good for the stomach," have good "satiation" and beneficial "glycemic properties." The frequency of several elicited attributes and health effects differed as a function of age group (18-44 vs. 45-80 years), gender and education level group (up to secondary education vs. university). Difficulties identifying healthy bread were perceived as a barrier for consumption especially among consumers with a lower education level. Several of the health effects important to consumers cannot be communicated on food packages and consumers must therefore use their own cues to identify these properties. This may lead to consumers being misled especially if a bread is labeled e.g., as a sourdough bread or a rye bread, despite a low content.

  • 44.
    Sandvik, Pernilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Næs, Tormod
    Nofima AS, Raw Materials and Process Optimization, Ås, Norway; University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Fredriksberg, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kihlberg, Iwona
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Different liking but similar healthiness perceptions of rye bread among younger and older consumers in Sweden2017In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 61, p. 26-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rye breads, especially those with a chewy texture and sour flavor, have shown several health benefits but their consumption is lower among younger consumers than older. This study explores liking of commercial rye bread in younger and older consumers in relation to socio-demographics, childhood bread-eating habits and food choice motives. Further, sensory attributes are explored in relation to the consumers’ concepts of a rye bread and healthiness in bread.

    Nine commercial rye breads, previously profiled by descriptive sensory analysis were tasted by 225 younger (18–44 years) and 173 older (45–80 years) consumers. Internal preference mappings by principal component regression for each age group showed low liking for rye bread with a chewy texture and sour flavor in the younger consumer group. Based on the preference mappings, the age groups were separately clustered. Associations between clusters and background variables were studied using discriminant partial least squares regression. Liking of rye bread with a chewy texture and sour flavor in the younger consumer group was associated with e.g., more education, females, childhood bread consumption and the food choice motive health. In the older consumer group, it was related to e.g., more education and childhood bread consumption. Partial least squares regression 1 showed that the combination of sensory attributes such as a light color and soft texture led to the perception of bread being less healthy and not a rye bread, and a dark brown color, chewy texture, sour and bitter flavor to the perception of a healthier bread and rye bread.

  • 45. Vintila, Mona
    et al.
    Marklinder, Ingela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Maragertha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Istrat, Daniala
    West University of Timosara.
    Kuglis, Amalia
    West University of Timosara.
    Health awareness and behavour of the elderly: between needs and reality: A comparative study2009In: Romanian Journal of Applied Psychology, ISSN 1454-8062, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 81-87Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social factors such as social cohesion, the role of the voluntary services and social engagement cannot be influenced by traditional preventive and health promotion initiatives. There is a need for innovative strategies in health promotion. Taking account of the variety of approaches observable in European countries, the idea has arisen of starting a multinational project to develop new solutions to the problem of implementing healthy lifestyles in the local communities of different countries. The project involves 10 partners from six countries: Germany, Great Britain, Sweden, Austria, Latvia and Romania. The following results present an analysis of some comparative data of the Swedish and Romanian communities. Attitudes about health and behavior in terms of maintaining health are very different in Romania and Sweden. These differences very likely reflect the level of information on health, nutrition, physical activity and sources of information. The study highlighted some differences in the eating habits of the two groups of subjects.

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