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  • 1.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 1.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Psykiatri UAS.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Farmakologi 1.
    On the psychobiology of impulsivity2004In: On the psychobiology of personality: Essays in honor of Marvin Zuckerman, Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam , 2004, p. 455-478Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Alaie, Iman
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Philipson, Anna
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Sampaio, Filipa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Moller, Margareta
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Arinell, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Päären, Aivar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Inst KIND, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Ctr Neurodev Disorders,Pediat Neuropsychiat Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study (ULADS)2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 3, article id e024939Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To present the Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study, initiated in Uppsala, Sweden, in the early 1990s. The initial aim of this epidemiological investigation was to study the prevalence, characteristics and correlates of adolescent depression, and has subsequently expanded to include a broad range of social, economic and health-related long-term outcomes and cost-of-illness analyses.

    Participants: The source population was first-year students (aged 16-17) in upper-secondary schools in Uppsala during 1991-1992, of which 2300 (93%) were screened for depression. Adolescents with positive screening and sex/age-matched peers were invited to a comprehensive assessment. A total of 631 adolescents (78% females) completed this assessment, and 409 subsequently completed a 15year follow-up assessment. At both occasions, extensive information was collected on mental disorders, personality and psychosocial situation. Detailed social, economic and health-related data from 1993 onwards have recently been obtained from the Swedish national registries for 576 of the original participants and an age-matched reference population (N=200 000).

    Findings to date: The adolescent lifetime prevalence of a major depressive episode was estimated to be 11.4%. Recurrence in young adulthood was reported by the majority, with a particularly poor prognosis for those with a persistent depressive disorder or multiple somatic symptoms. Adolescent depression was also associated with an increased risk of other adversities in adulthood, including additional mental health conditions, low educational attainment and problems related to intimate relationships.

    Future plans: Longitudinal studies of adolescent depression are rare and must be responsibly managed and utilised. We therefore intend to follow the cohort continuously by means of registries. Currently, the participants are approaching mid-adulthood. At this stage, we are focusing on the overall long-term burden of adolescent depression. For this purpose, the research group has incorporated expertise in health economics. We would also welcome extended collaboration with researchers managing similar datasets.

  • 3.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Michelgård, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Linnman, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fernandez, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Langström, Bengt
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Altered NK1-receptor availability in patients with post traumatic stress disorder2009In: [Biological Psychiatry 2009, 65(8), Suppl. 1, 118S, no. 394], 2009, p. 118S-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after one or more traumatic events causing extreme stress or grave physical harm. The neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor is the primary receptor for substance P (SP); a neuropeptide suggested being involved in anxiety and depression. The present study investigated differences in NK1-receptor availability between PTSD patients and healthy controls, using positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Eleven male refugee patients (age: 41±10) with DSM-IV defined PTSD and nine healthy male control subjects (age: 33±10) were investigated using the PET-tracer [11C]GR205171, supplied by Uppsala Imanet. GR205171 is a highly selective NK1-receptor antagonist. Scans were performed during 60 minutes in the resting state. Parametric images were generated using the graphical reference Patlak method assuming irreversible binding of [11C]GR205171 from 20-60 minutes and having cerebellum as reference region. Exploratory whole brain analyses were performed using the statistical parametric mapping (SPM2) software. Results: PTSD patients had lower [11C]GR205171 binding compared to controls, in frontal cortical clusters encompassing bilaterally insula and left Brodmann area 11, reflecting lower NK1-receptor availability. No areas were found in which PTSD patients had higher [11C]GR205171 binding. Conclusions: This is the first study reporting differences in NK1-receptor availability in PTSD patients relative to controls. A tentative conclusion is that PTSD patients have a down regulation of the NK1-receptor system, which could be either a risk factor or due to emotional trauma processing.

  • 4.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Berman, A. H.
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    A randomised controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: a short-term self-assessment2016In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 213-213Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Berman, A. H.
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Psychiat Res, Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia - a randomised controlled study2016In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 214-214Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Berman, Anne H
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Centrum för psykiatriforskning.
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Auricular Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomised Controlled Study2016In: Sleep Disorders, ISSN 2090-3545, E-ISSN 2090-3553, Vol. 2016, article id 7057282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The most effective nonpharmacological treatment for insomnia disorder is cognitive behavioural therapy-insomnia (CBT-i). However CBT-i may not suit everyone. Auricular acupuncture (AA) is a complementary treatment. Studies show that it may alleviate insomnia symptoms. The aim of this randomised controlled study was to compare treatment effects of AA with CBT-i and evaluate symptoms of insomnia severity, anxiety, and depression. Method. Fifty-nine participants, mean age 60.5 years (SD 9.4), with insomnia disorder were randomised to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Self-report questionnaires, the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale (DBAS-16), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD), were collected at baseline, after treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. A series of linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time between and within the groups. Results. Significant between-group improvements were seen in favour of CBT-i in ISI after treatment and at the 6-month follow-up and in DBAS-16 after treatment. Both groups showed significant within-group postintervention improvements in ISI, and these changes were maintained six months later. The CBT-i group also showed a significant reduction in DBAS-16 after treatment and six months later. Conclusions. Compared to CBT-i, AA, as offered in this study, cannot be considered an effective stand-alone treatment for insomnia disorder.

  • 7.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Centrum för psykiatriforskning.
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Auricular acupuncture versus cognitive behavioural therapy in the discontinuation of hypnotic drug usage and treatment effects of anxiety-, depression and insomnia symptoms2017In: European Journal of Integrative Medicine, ISSN 1876-3820, E-ISSN 1876-3839, Vol. 16, p. 15-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The interest in non-pharmacological interventions for insomnia disorder has increased. The aim was to assess the immediate treatment effects of auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-i) regarding discontinuation of hypnotic usage and symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia.

    Method: Prospective randomised controlled study. Fifty-seven participants (mean age 61 years (SD 8.6)) with insomnia disorder and long-term use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics received group-treatment with AA or CBT-i. Pre- and post-treatment measures included symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia via self-report questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD-A, HAD-D) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Other sleep parameters and hypnotic consumption were measured with a sleep diary. Linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time within and between the groups.

    Results: Seventy-one percent of the AA participants and 84% of the CBT-i participants managed to discontinue their hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Symptoms of anxiety and depression decreased within the AA group (HAD-A (p < 0.05), HAD-D (p < 0.05)) and insomnia symptoms decreased within the CBT-i group (ISI (p < 0.001)). The only between-group difference occurred in ISI (p < 0.001), in favour of CBT-i. According to the within-group sleep diary results, the CBT-i group went to bed later (p < 0.001), fell asleep quicker (p < 0.05), increased their sleep efficiency (p < 0.001) and self-rated sleep quality (p < 0.05) post-treatment.

    Conclusions: Both groups ended/maintained low hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Short-term reductions occurred in the AA group in anxiety and depression symptoms and in the CBT-i group regarding insomnia symptoms.

  • 8.
    Bergdahl, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Berman, Anne H.
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för klinisk neurovetenskap, Centrum för psykiatriforskning.
    Haglund, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Sleep patterns in a randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia2017In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 28, p. 220-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to objectively examine how sleep patterns were affected in a short- and long-term perspective after auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-i). Sixty participants with insomnia disorders (men/women 9/51; mean age of 60.5 years, (SD 9.4)), were randomized to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Actigraphy recordings were made at baseline, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up. The CBT-i group reduced their time in bed, their actual sleeping time, their sleep latency and their actual time awake. The AA group slept longer, increased their time in bed and decreased their sleep latency post-treatment. The between-groups results differed in wake-up time, rising, time in bed, actual sleep time and actual wake time. The differences were not maintained six months later. In accordance with previous findings the results support the notion that the objective sleep time does not necessarily affect the subjective perception of insomnia.

  • 9.
    Bohman, Hannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Päären, Aivar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Long term follow up of adolescent depression: a population based study2010In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 21-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescent depression is common. Earlier studies indicate that relapses and recurrences are common. But many questions are still unanswered. The aim of the present study has been to follow subjects with adolescent depressions, identified in a population-based study, over a 15-year period. Subjects with adolescent depression (n = 362) and a comparison group (n = 250) were followed in the National Swedish registers.

    The formerly depressed females had significantly more out-patient visits, and a significantly higher proportion (78.4% versus 69.6%) had at least one out-patient visit. Among the males, no significant differences were found as concerns out-patient visits. The formerly depressed females had significantly more in-patient stays (3.6 versus 2.4) and a significantly higher total number of in-patient days (27.4 versus 10.1). A significantly higher proportion had in-patient days due to mental disorders (9.5% versus 4.6%), in particular anxiety disorders (4.9% versus 1.0%). As concerns the males, a significantly higher proportion had in-patient days due to mental disorders (16.5% versus 1.8%), in particular alcohol and drug abuse (7.6% versus 0%).

    Among the formerly depressed females there were no significant differences against the comparison group as concerns the proportion of being a mother, number of children per woman, or age at first child. However, a significantly higher proportion of the formerly depressed females had had different, usually mild, disorders related to pregnancy (8.6% versus 0.6%). The children of the women with adolescent depressions were not affected.

  • 10.
    Bohman, Hannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Päären, Aivar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Prognostic significance of functional somatic symptoms in adolescence: a 15-year community-based follow-up study of adolescents with depression compared with healthy peers2012In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 12, p. 90-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is a lack of population-based long-term longitudinal research on mental health status and functional physical/somatic symptoms. Little is known about the long-term mental health outcomes associated with somatic symptoms or the temporal relationship between depression and such symptoms. This 15-year study followed up adolescents with depression and matched controls, screened from a population-based sample, who reported different numbers of somatic symptoms.

    Methods

    The total population of 16–17-year-olds in Uppsala, Sweden, was screened for depression in 1991–1993. Adolescents who screened positive and an equal number of healthy controls took part in a semi-structured diagnostic interview. In addition, 21 different self-rated somatic symptoms were assessed. Sixty-four percent of those adolescents participated in a follow-up structured interview 15 years later.

    Results

    Somatic symptoms in adolescence predicted depression and other adult mental disorders regardless of the presence of adolescent depression. In adolescents with depression, the number of functional somatic symptoms predicted, in a dose response relationship, suicidal behavior, bipolar episodes, and psychotic episodes as well as chronic and recurrent depression. Contrary to expectations, the somatic symptoms of abdominal pain and perspiration without exertion better predicted depression than all DSM-IV depressive symptoms. Abdominal pain persisted as an independent strong predictor of depression and anxiety, even after controlling for other important confounders.

    Conclusions

    Somatic symptoms in adolescence can predict severe adult mental health disorders. The number of somatic symptoms concurrent with adolescent depression is, in a stepwise manner, linked to suicidal attempts, bipolar disorders, psychotic disorders, and recurrent and chronic depression. These findings can be useful in developing treatment guidelines for patients with somatic symptoms.

  • 11.
    Bohman, Hannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Päären, Aivar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Larsson, Marita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Naessén, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Thicker carotid intima layer, thinner media layer and higher intima/media ratio in women with recurrent depressive disorders: a pilot study using non-invasive high frequency ultrasound2010In: World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 1562-2975, E-ISSN 1814-1412, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 71-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Growing evidence indicates that depression is an important risk factor for coronary heart disease. Thus, the aim of the present study has been to investigate if young women with adolescent onset and recurrent depressive disorders have signs of carotid intima and media changes already at the age of 30. Methods. Fifteen subjects with adolescent onset recurrent depressive disorders, mean age 31.5 years, were compared to 20 healthy women with a mean age of 39.6 years. The thickness of carotid artery intima and media was assessed, using non-invasive high-frequency ultrasound (25MHz). Results. The subjects with recurrent depressive disorders had significantly thicker carotid intima, significantly thinner carotid media and significantly higher intima/media ratio despite the fact that they were about 10 years younger than the healthy women. Hypertension, obesity or smoking could not explain the results. Conclusion. Already at the age of 30, subjects with recurrent depressive disorders with adolescent onset do have early signs of carotid intima and media changes, indicating a less healthy artery wall, despite otherwise no clinical signs of cardiovascular disease.

  • 12. Bowden, CL
    et al.
    Lecrubier, Y
    Bauer, M
    Greil, W
    Sachs, G
    von Knorring, L
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri, UAS.
    Maintenano therapies for classic and other forms of bipolar disorder.2000In: j Affect disord, Vol. 59, no Suppl 1, p. 56-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Cunningham, Janet L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Berglund, Lars
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Agreement between physicians' and patients' ratings on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale2011In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 135, no 1-3, p. 148-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-rating scales developed for monitoring depression severity are potentially informative and cost effective tools. There is an increasing tendency to use the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the self-rating version (MADRS-S) interchangeably.

    Methods: 400 patients with major depressive disorder were included. Concordance between patient and physician ratings was measured by means of repeated MADRS and MADRS-S ratings during a six-month drug trial and one-year follow-up.

    Results: Overall scores from patients and physicians show the same trends and both are sensitive to improvements. Our results, however, show only moderate to good agreement between patient and physician ratings. Intraclass coefficients ranged from 0.47 to 0.75 with highest agreement at week 8.

    Limitations: Generalizability is restricted to outpatients in general practice with moderate to severe depression. MADRS-S and MADRS scale definitions are similar but not identical concerning language and are scaled differently, 0-6 vs. 0-3, respectively, which may have influenced the results. The exclusion criteria restricted the range of values for the item Suicidal thoughts/Zest for life, which may have reduced the correlations.

    Conclusions: MADRS-S is a suitable tool for following patients' symptoms on a regular basis over time and may also be used to compensate for bias in physicians' ratings in drug trials.

  • 14.
    Cunningham, Janet L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wernroth, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Berglund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Predicting disagreement between physicians and patients on depression response and remission2013In: International Clinical Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0268-1315, E-ISSN 1473-5857, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 134-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demographic, personality, and disease-related factors all contribute when patients disagree with physicians on the severity of subjective symptoms. This study aims to create a model, on the basis of patient factors at treatment initiation, for longitudinal prediction of disagreement on treatment response and remission in depressed patients. Four hundred patients with major depressive disorder were studied during a clinical drug trial. Repeated assessments with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the self-rating version (MADRS-S) were used to indicate response or remission. Factors at baseline and week 2 were tested for inclusion in a model for the prediction of discordance on remission and response between patients and physicians at week 8. The models were then tested, in the same population, at weeks 12, 16, and 24. Model AUCs ranged from 0.71 to 0.74 for week 8. The models that were validated at weeks 12, 16, and 24 indicated stability in the predictive value of the models. The risk for longitudinal disagreement in the evaluation of depression treatment response and remission in clinical practice and drug trials can be predicted using factors at study initiation and at week 2.

  • 15.
    Danielsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Markström, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Broman, Jan-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus
    Institutionen för Psykologi, Stockholms Universitet.
    Delayed sleep phase disorder in a Swedish cohort of adolescents and young adults: Prevalence and associated factors2016In: Chronobiology International, ISSN 0742-0528, E-ISSN 1525-6073, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1331-1339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A delayed sleep-wake and circadian rhythm often occurs during puberty. While some individuals only develop a delayed sleep phase (DSP), others will fulfill the criteria for the diagnosis of delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). All previous studies have however not separated DSP from DSPD, and, as a result, the prevalence and associated factors are largely unknown for the two conditions individually. We estimated the prevalence of DSP and DSPD in a Swedish cohort of adolescents and young adults. We also investigated associated factors in the two conditions relative to each other and individuals with no delayed sleep phase. A questionnaire regarding sleep patterns, demographics, substance use/abuse, and symptoms of depression, anxiety, worry, and rumination was sent to 1000 randomly selected participants (16–26 years of age) in Uppsala, Sweden (response rate = 68%). DSP was defined as a late sleep onset and a preferred late wake up time. The DSPD diagnosis was further operationalized according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Edition 5 (DSM-5) criteria including insomnia or excessive sleepiness, distress or dysfunction caused by the delayed sleep phase and that the sleep problem had been evident for 3 months. DSP occurred at a frequency of 4.6% and DSPD at a frequency of 4% in the investigated cohort. DSP was more common in males and was associated with not attending educational activity or work, having shift work, nicotine and alcohol use and less rumination. DSPD was equally common in males and females and was associated with not attending educational activity or work and with elevated levels of anxiety. Both DSP and DSPD appear to be common in adolescents and young adults in this Swedish cohort. No educational activity or work was associated with both DSP and DSPD. However, there were also apparent differences between the two groups in shift work, substance use and mental health, relative to persons with no delayed sleep phase. Thus, it seems reasonable to assess DSP and DSPD as distinct entities in future studies.

  • 16. Falkai, P
    et al.
    Wobrock, T
    Lieberman, J
    Glenthoj, B
    Gattaz, WF
    Möller, H-J
    Altamura, AC
    Andreasen, N
    Barnes, T
    Beckmann, H
    Ciprian-Olliver, J
    Crow, T
    David, A
    Davidson, M
    Deakin, B
    Elkis, H
    Farde, L
    Gaebel, W
    Gallhofer, B
    Gerlach, J
    Richard Hirsch, S
    Hojaij, CR
    Jablensky, A
    Jarema, M
    Kane, J
    Kojima, T
    von Knorring, L
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri, UAS.
    Guidelines for biological Treatment of Schizophrenia,: Part 1: Acute Treatment of Schizophrenia and Part 2: Long-term Treatment of Schizophrenia2005In: The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 6, no 132-191Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Fernandez, Manuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Pissiota, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Frans, Örjan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fischer, Håkan
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Brain function in a patient with torture related post-traumatic stress disorder before and after fluoxetine treatment: a positron emission tomography provocation study2001In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 297, no 2, p. 101-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report positron emission tomographic measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in a male patient with war and torture related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during symptom provocation. The subject was exposed to war related sounds before and after treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI; Fluoxetine; Fontex((R))). Therapy reduced PTSD symptoms, provoked anxiety and heart rate. Before treatment trauma reminders resulted in decreased rCBF in the insula, prefrontal, and inferior frontal cortices. Increased activity was evident in the cerebellum, precuneus and supplementary motor cortex. This was normalized after SSRI administration. Prefrontal and cingulate rCBF correlated with heart rate. Hence, the anxiolytic effect of SSRI for PTSD could be mediated by prefrontal and paralimbic cortices. Data suggest that SSRI treatment normalize provocation induced rCBF alterations in areas involved in memory, emotion, attention and motor-control.

  • 18.
    Frick, Andreas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Michelgård Palmquist, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Pissiota, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wallenquist, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fernandez, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Jonasson, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Frans, Örjan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Overlapping expression of serotonin transporters and neurokinin-1 receptors in posttraumatic stress disorder: a multi-tracer PET study2016In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 1400-1407Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The brain serotonergic system is colocalized and interacts with the neuropeptidergic substance P/neurokinin-1 (SP/NK1) system. Both these neurochemical systems have independently been implicated in stress and anxiety, but interactions between them might be crucial for human anxiety conditions. Here, we examined the serotonin and substance P/neurokinin-1 (SP/NK1) systems individually as well as their overlapping expression in 16 patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 16 healthy controls. Participants were imaged with the highly selective radiotracers [(11)C]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile (DASB) and [(11)C]GR205171 assessing serotonin transporter (SERT) and NK1 receptor availability, respectively. Voxel-wise analyses in the amygdala, our a priori-defined region of interest, revealed increased number of NK1 receptors, but not SERT in the PTSD group. Symptom severity, as indexed by the Clinician-administered PTSD Scale, was negatively related to SERT availability in the amygdala, and NK1 receptor levels moderated this relationship. Exploratory, voxel-wise whole-brain analyses revealed increased SERT availability in the precentral gyrus and posterior cingulate cortex of PTSD patients. Patients, relative to controls, displayed lower degree of overlapping expression between SERT and NK1 receptors in the putamen, thalamus, insula and lateral orbitofrontal gyrus, lower overlap being associated with higher PTSD symptom severity. Expression overlap also explained more of the symptomatology than did either system individually, underscoring the importance of taking interactions between the neurochemical systems into account. Thus, our results suggest that aberrant serotonergic-SP/NK1 couplings contribute to the pathophysiology of PTSD and, consequently, that normalization of these couplings may be therapeutically important.

  • 19.
    Haglund, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    van der Meiden, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial oncology and supportive care.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Essen, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial oncology and supportive care.
    Psychiatric care behind locked doors. A study regarding the frequency of and the reasons for locked psychiatric wards in Sweden2007In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 49-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The general aim was to describe the frequency of and the reasons for locked doors at wards within Swedish psychiatric care. A questionnaire was answered by 193 ward managers. The findings demonstrated that 73% (n = 193) of the wards were locked on the day of investigation. Wards were sometimes locked in the absence of committed patients and sometimes open in the presence of committed patients. Wards were more often locked if at least one committed patient was present. Fewer wards for children and adolescents, than for adults and old people, were locked. More wards in the areas of Sweden's three largest cities, than in the rest of the country, were locked. Fourteen categories of reasons for locking wards were generated by a content analysis of answers to an open-ended question. Most answers were categorized as: prevent patients from escaping, legislation, provide patients and others with safety and security, prevent import and unwelcome visits, and staff's need of control. Staff working in psychiatric care ought to reflect upon and articulate reasons for, and decisions about, locking or opening entrance doors, with the limitation of patients' freedom in mind.

  • 20.
    Haglund, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Essen, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Psychiatric wards with locked doors: advantages and disadvantages according to nurses and mental health nurse assistants2006In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 387-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objective. To describe nurses’ and mental health nurse assistants’ perceptions of advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door.

    Background. Psychiatric staff sometimes needs to protect patients from harming themselves or others. To keep the entrance door locked may help staff to achieve this goal. How locked entrance doors at psychiatric wards are experienced by staff, working on these wards, has been investigated to a very limited extent.

    Design. The study was explorative and descriptive.

    Method. Audio taped, semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions about advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door, were conducted with 20 nurses and 20 mental health nurse assistants. Data were analyzed with content analysis.

    Results. A content analysis revealed eight categories of advantages and 18 categories of disadvantages. Most advantages mentioned by nurses and mental health nurse assistants were categorized as providing staff with control over patients, providing patients with a secure and efficient care and protecting patients and staff against ‘the outside’. Most disadvantages mentioned by nurses were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, making patients feel dependent and creating a non-caring environment. Most disadvantages mentioned by mental health nurse assistants were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, causing emotional problems for patients, making staff's power obvious and forcing patients to adapt to other patients’ needs. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants mentioned more disadvantages than advantages and nurses mentioned more disadvantages than mental health nurse assistants.

    Conclusion. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants perceive a number of advantages and disadvantages for themselves, patients and significant others with a locked door at a psychiatric ward. Most of these concern patients’ experiences.

    Relevance to clinical practice. It is important for staff working within psychiatric care to reflect upon the fact that a locked entrance door is connected with a range of negative as well as positive perceptions and to minimize patient and own concerns connected to the locked door.

  • 21. Hasan, A
    et al.
    Falkai, P
    Wobrock, T
    Lieberman, J
    Glenthöj, B
    Gattaz, W F
    Thibaut, F
    Möller, H-J
    Altamura, C
    Andreasen, N
    Barnes, TRE
    Ceylan, ME
    Olliver, JC
    Crow, T
    Danaci, AE
    David, A
    Davidson, M
    Deakin, B
    Elkis, H
    Farde, L
    Gaebel, W
    Gallhofer, B
    Gerlach, J
    Hirsch, SR
    Hojaij, CR
    Hwang, M
    Hwo, HG
    Verniaminov Jablensky, A
    Jarema, J
    Kane, J
    Koijima, T
    Larach, V
    Lieberman, J
    McGorry, P
    Meltzer, H
    Mosolov, S
    Moussaoui, D
    Olie, J-P
    Palha, AP
    Sarandöl, A
    Sato, M
    Sauer, Heinrich
    Schooler, N
    Tanell, B
    von Knorring, L
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Weinberger, D
    Yamawaki, S
    World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia: Part 1: Update 2012 on the acute treatment of schizophrenia and the management of treatment resistance.2012In: The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 318-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry Guidelines for Biological Treatment of Schizophrenia published in 2005. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful and these guidelines are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating people suffering from schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines, a systematic review of the MEDLINE/PUBMED database and the Cochrane Library, in addition to data extraction from national treatment guidelines, has been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A–F; Bandelow et al. 2008b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242). This first part of the updated guidelines covers the general descriptions of antipsychotics and their side effects, the biological treatment of acute schizophrenia and the management of treatment-resistant schizophrenia.

  • 22. Hasan, Alkomiet
    et al.
    Falkai, Peter
    Wobrock, Thomas
    Lieberman, Jeffrey
    Glenthoj, Birte
    Gattaz, Wagner F
    Thibaut, Florence
    Möller, Hans-Jürgen
    World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia, part 2: update 2012 on the long-term treatment of schizophrenia and management of antipsychotic-induced side effects2013In: World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 1562-2975, E-ISSN 1814-1412, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 2-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    These updated guidelines are based on a first edition of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for biological treatment of schizophrenia published in 2006. For this 2012 revision, all available publications pertaining to the biological treatment of schizophrenia were reviewed systematically to allow for an evidence-based update. These guidelines provide evidence-based practice recommendations that are clinically and scientifically meaningful. They are intended to be used by all physicians diagnosing and treating people suffering from schizophrenia. Based on the first version of these guidelines, a systematic review of the MEDLINE/PUBMED database and the Cochrane Library, in addition to data extraction from national treatment guidelines, has been performed for this update. The identified literature was evaluated with respect to the strength of evidence for its efficacy and then categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F) and five levels of recommendation (1-5) ( Bandelow et al. 2008a ,b, World J Biol Psychiatry 9:242, see Table 1 ). This second part of the updated guidelines covers long-term treatment as well as the management of relevant side effects. These guidelines are primarily concerned with the biological treatment (including antipsychotic medication and other pharmacological treatment options) of adults suffering from schizophrenia.

  • 23.
    Holm, Jonas
    et al.
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden..
    Brus, Ole
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, Orebro, Sweden..
    Båve, Ullvi
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Landen, Mikael
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lundberg, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordanskog, Pia
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Ctr Social & Affect Neurosci, Fac Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.;Reg Ostergotland, Dept Psychiat, Linkoping, Sweden..
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Nordenskjöld, Axel
    Orebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden..
    Improvement of cycloid psychosis following electroconvulsive therapy2017In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 405-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The treatment of choice for cycloid psychosis has traditionally been electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), but there is a lack of studies on its effectiveness.

    Aims: The primary aim of this register study was to determine the rates of remission and response after ECT for cycloid psychosis. The secondary aim was to examine possible predictors of outcome.

    Methods: Data were obtained from the National Quality Register for ECT in Sweden. The study population was patients (n=42) who received ECT for acute polymorphic psychotic disorder without symptoms of schizophrenia or for cycloid psychosis between 2011-2015 in 13 hospitals. Remission and response rates were calculated using Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) and -Improvement scores, respectively. Variables with possible predictive value were tested using Chi-square and Fisher's exact test.

    Results: The response rate was 90.5%. The remission rate was 45.2%. Of 42 patients, 40 improved their CGI-S score after ECT (p<0.001). The mean number of ECT treatments was 2.5 for non-responders and 7.0 for responders (p=0.010). The mean number of ECT treatments did not differ significantly between remitters and non-remitters (7.2 vs 6.1, p=0.31). None of the other investigated potential predictors was statistically significantly associated with outcome.

    Conclusions: ECT is an effective treatment for cycloid psychosis. Future studies need to compare the outcome of ECT to that of other treatment strategies. Clinical implications: The high response rate with ECT indicates that cycloid psychosis is a clinically useful diagnosis.

  • 24.
    Isacson, Dag
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Bingefors, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    The impact of depression is unevenly distributed in the population.2005In: Eur Psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 205-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Goodman, Anna
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Koupil, Ilona
    School performance and hospital admission due to unipolar depression: a three-generational study of social causation and social selection2012In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 47, no 10, p. 1695-1706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Both "social causation" and "social selection" offer plausible explanations for an association between education and mental health. We aimed to explore these processes in unipolar depression, with a specific focus on school performance and family tradition of education.

    Method

    Grandchildren (N = 28,089, 49% female, aged 13-47 years in 2002) of a cohort born in Uppsala, Sweden, in 1915-1929 were studied in national registers. We obtained data on final grade point average (GPA) in compulsory school, hospitalizations for unipolar depression, grandparental/parental education and other parental social characteristics. Hospitalization in adolescence and adulthood were studied separately, as were hospitalization for depression with or without a lifetime externalizing disorder.

    Results

    Low compulsory school GPA (1-2 SD or > 2 SD below average vs. average GPA) was associated with increased rate of adolescent hospitalization for unipolar depression, both with externalizing comorbidity [hazard ratio (HR) point estimates of 66-80] and without (HR point estimates of 4-6). By contrast, low GPA was only associated with first-time hospitalization in adulthood for the subgroup with externalizing comorbidity (HR point estimates of 4-6). These associations were largely independent of family education and social characteristics. Overall, low parental/grandparental education was not related to increased rates of hospitalization.

    Conclusion

    The association between school performance and hospitalization for depression depended on adolescent hospitalization or externalizing comorbidity, suggesting that disorders with an early onset are decisive. Contrary to the social patterning of many health outcomes, low grandparental/parental education did not appear to increase the rate of hospitalization for unipolar depression in the offspring.

  • 26.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Svensson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Svedberg, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Anderberg, Ulla Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    The role of life events in social phobia2007In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 207-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate the relationship between life events and social phobia. An inventory assessing life events during childhood, adulthood as well as life events experienced in relation to the onset of the disorder was administrated to 30 subjects with a DSM-IV diagnosis of social phobia. They were recruited by announcement and diagnosed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV for axes I and II disorders. Seventy-five controls were selected by matching age and gender from the local population register. Individuals with social phobia reported significantly more life events during childhood and more life events with negative impact during the social phobia debuting year. Conversely, they described fewer events in the adult life than the controls. Close relatives with disabling conditions in the childhood, conflicts with wife/husband/cohabitant and divorces or similar were significantly more common in the debuting year in social phobic group. In adult life, the healthy individuals described significantly more often increased authority at work. A gender-specific analysis revealed significantly more experiences of a death of a relative/close friend during the year before the social phobia debut and significantly more negative life events in the women's adult life. In summary, the present results support that life events have a role in social phobia that may be gender influenced.

  • 27.
    Michelgård, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Winqvist, I M
    Fernandez, M
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Långström, B
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Appel, L
    Altered serotonin transporter function in post traumatic stress disorder2007In: Biological Psychiatry, 2007, p. 98-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Motilla Hoppe, Johanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Linnman, Clas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Appel, Lieuwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Jonasson, My
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lubberink, Mark
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Långström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC, Organic Chemistry.
    Frans, Örjan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Fredriksson, M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Association between amygdala neurokinin-1 receptor availability and anxiety-related personality traits2018In: Translational Psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 168-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal studies indicate that substance P (SP) and its preferred neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor modulate stress and anxiety-related behavior. Alterations in the SP-NK1 system have also been observed in human anxiety disorders, yet little is known about the relation between this system and individual differences in personality traits associated with anxiety propensity and approach-avoidance behavior, including trait anxiety, neuroticism, and extraversion. Exploring this relation could provide important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of human anxiety and the etiology of anxiety disorders, as anxious traits are associated with increased susceptibility to develop psychopathological conditions. Here we examined the relationship between central NK1 receptor availability and self-rated measures of trait anxiety, neuroticism, and extraversion. The amygdala was chosen as the primary region of interest since this structure has been suggested to mediate the effect of the SP-NK1 system on anxiety. Anxious traits and NK1 receptor availability, determined with positron emission tomography and the radiotracer [11C]GR205171, were measured in 17 healthy individuals. Voxel-wise analyses showed a significant positive correlation between bilateral amygdala NK1 receptor availability and trait anxiety, and a trend in similar direction was observed for neuroticism. Conversely, extraversion was found to be negatively associated with amygdala NK1 receptor availability. Extraversion also correlated negatively with the NK1 measure in the cuneus/precuneus and fusiform gyrus according to exploratory whole-brain analyses. In conclusion, our findings indicate that amygdala NK1 receptor availability is associated with anxiety-related personality traits in healthy subjects, consistent with a modulatory role for the SP-NK1 system in human anxiety.

  • 29.
    Nordanskog, Pia
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Hulten, Martin
    Lund Univ, Fac Med, Dept Clin Sci, Psychiat Neuromodulat Unit, Lund, Sweden..
    Landen, Mikael
    Gothenburg Univ, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lundberg, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Northern Stockholm Psychiat, Sect Affect Disorders, Stockholm, Sweden..
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Nordenskjöld, Axel
    Univ Orebro, Fac ofMedicine & Hlth, Dept Psychiat, SE-70182 Orebro, Sweden..
    Electroconvulsive Therapy in Sweden 2013 Data From the National Quality Register for ECT2015In: Journal of ECT, ISSN 1095-0680, E-ISSN 1533-4112, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 263-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) varies across countries. The aim of this study was to describe and explore the use of ECT in Sweden in 2013. Methods The Swedish mandatory patient register of the National Board of Health and Welfare includes information on diagnoses and treatments, including ECT. All 56 hospitals that provide ECT in Sweden also report to the nonmandatory national quality register for ECT, which contains information on patient and treatment characteristics. In this study, we combined data from both registers. In addition, all hospitals responded to a survey concerning equipment and organization of ECT. Results We identified 3972 unique patients who received ECT in Sweden in 2013. This translates into 41 ECT-treated individuals per 100,000 inhabitants. Of these patients, 85% opted to participate in the quality register. The median age was 55 years (range, 15-94 years), and 63% were women. The indication was depression in 78% of the treatment series. Of 4 711 hospitalized patients with severe depression, 38% received ECT. The median number of treatments per index series was 7. Unilateral treatment was used in 86% of the series. Conclusions In Sweden, ECT is used at a relatively high rate as compared with other western countries, and the rate was unchanged from the last survey in 1975. However, there is room for improvement in the specificity of use and availability of ECT for disorders where ECT is considered a first-line treatment.

  • 30. Nordenskjold, Axel
    et al.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ljung, Tomas
    Carlborg, Andreas
    Brus, Ole
    Engstrom, Ingemar
    Continuation Electroconvulsive Therapy With Pharmacotherapy Versus Pharmacotherapy Alone for Prevention of Relapse of Depression A Randomized Controlled Trial2013In: Journal of ECT, ISSN 1095-0680, E-ISSN 1533-4112, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 86-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The primary aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that relapse prevention with continuation electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) plus pharmacotherapy is more effective than pharmacotherapy alone after a course of ECT for depression. Methods: A multicenter, nonblinded, randomized controlled trial with 2 parallel groups was performed from 2008 to 2012 in 4 hospitals in Sweden. Patients eligible had unipolar or bipolar depression and had responded to a course of ECT. The patients (n = 56) were randomly assigned (1: 1) to receiving either 29 treatments of continuation ECT with pharmacotherapy or pharmacotherapy alone for 1 year. The pharmacotherapy consisted of antidepressants (98%), lithium (56%), and antipsychotics (30%). The main outcome was relapse of depression within 1 year. Relapse was defined as 20 or more points on the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale or inpatient psychiatric care or suicide or suspected suicide. All 56 patients randomized were analyzed according to an intention to treat analysis. Results: Sixty-one percent of the patients treated with pharmacotherapy versus 32% of the patients treated with ECT plus pharmacotherapy relapsed within 1 year (P = 0.036). The Cox proportional hazard ratio was 2.32 (1.03-5.22). Cognitive function and memory measures were stable for patients without relapse in both groups. One suspected suicide and 3 suicide attempts by intoxication occurred, all in the pharmacotherapy-alone group. Conclusions: The post-ECT relapse rates were substantial in both treatment groups with a statistically significant advantage for combined treatment with pharmacotherapy and continuation ECT. Further studies are needed to define indications for continuation ECT, pharmacotherapy, and their combination.

  • 31. Nordenskjöld, A
    et al.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Brus, O
    Engström, I
    Predictors of regained occupational functioning after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients with major depressive disorder: A population based cohort study2013In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 67, no 5, p. 326-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims:

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the rate of regained occupational functioning among patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for major depression and to define predictors of time to regained occupational functioning.

    Methods:

    A nested cohort study was performed of patients treated by ECT for unipolar major depressive disorder registered in the Quality register for ECT and in the Swedish Social Insurance Agency registry. Predictive values of single clinical variables and their relative importance were tested with Cox regression analysis.

    Results:

    394 patients were identified. Of those, 266 were on non-permanent sick leave and 128 on disability pension during ECT. Within 1 year post-ECT, 71% of the patients with non-permanent sick leave regained occupational functioning. Factors independently associated with a statistically significant increased time to regained occupational functioning were longer duration of sick leave pre-ECT, milder depression pre-ECT, less complete improvement with ECT, benzodiazepine treatment after ECT and co-morbid substance dependence.

    Conclusions:

    A large proportion of the patients do not return to work within several months post-ECT. Paradoxically, patients with more severe depression pre-ECT had a reduced time to regained occupational functioning, indicating a larger effect in this patients group of the treatment. Moreover, the period with sick leave compensation might be reduced if ECT is initiated within the first 3 months of sick leave.

    Clinical implications:

    Most patients on non-permanent sick leave regain occupational functioning after ECT. However, it usually takes a few months even in symptomatically improved patients.

  • 32. Nordenskjöld, Axel
    et al.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Engström, Ingemar
    Predictors of the short-term responder rate of Electroconvulsive therapy in depressive disorders - a population based study2012In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 12, p. 115-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of the present study is to investigate the responder rate of Electroconvulsive therapy, ECT, in clinical routine work and to define clinical characteristics predictive of response to ECT. The main hypothesis is that the responder rate of ECT might be lower in clinical routine than in controlled trials. Methods: This is a population-based study of all patients (N = 990) treated with ECT for depressive disorders, between 2008-2010 in eight hospitals in Sweden. Patients with Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scores of 1 or 2 (much improved) within one week after ECT were considered responders to ECT. The predictive values of single clinical variables were tested by means of chi-squared tests and the relative importance was tested in a logistic regression analysis. Results: The responder rate was 80.1%. A higher proportion of older patients (>50 years) responded (84.3% vs. 74.2%, p < 0.001). Psychotically depressed patients responded better (88.9% vs. 81.5% for severely depressed and 72.8% for mildly depressed, p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in responder rates between patients suffering from bipolar, first or recurrent major depressive syndromes, or a depressive episode of schizoaffective disorder. Patients with personality disorder had a lower responder rate (66.2% vs. 81.4%, p < 0.001). Also, outpatients had a lower responder rate (66.3%) compared to inpatients (83.4%, p < 0.001). In the logistic regression analysis, inpatient status, psychotic symptoms, absence of schizoaffective disorder and older age were independent factors associated with response to ECT. Conclusions: This study focuses exclusively on the short term responder rate with ECT in clinical practice. Similarly to results from controlled trials a high responder rate is reported. Older patients, more severely ill patients, psychotically ill patients and patients without personality disorders had the highest responder rates. Inpatients may have better outcome with ECT than outpatients.

  • 33. Nordenskjöld, Axel
    et al.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Engström, Ingemar
    Predictors of time to relapse/recurrence after electroconvulsive therapy in patients with major depressive disorder: a population-based cohort study2011In: Depression Research and Treatment, ISSN 2090-1321, E-ISSN 2090-133X, Vol. 2011, p. Art. id:470985-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of the study is to define predictors of relapse/recurrence after electroconvulsive therapy, ECT, for patients with major depressive disorder.

    Methods

    A study of all patients (n = 486) treated by means of ECT for major depressive disorder was performed. The data were derived from a regional quality register in Sweden. Psychiatric hospitalisation or suicide was used as a marker for relapse/recurrence.

    Results

    The relapse/recurrence rate within one year after ECT was 34%. Factors associated with increased risk of relapse/recurrence included comorbid substance dependence and treatment with benzodiazepines or antipsychotics during the follow-up period.

    Conclusions

    Within the first years after ECT, relapses/recurrences leading to hospitalisation or suicide are common. Treatment with lithium might be beneficial, while benzodiazepines, antipsychotics, or continuation ECT does not seem to significantly reduce the risk of relapse/recurrence.

  • 34.
    Palmquist, Åsa Michelgård
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Frick, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fernandez, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Furmark, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Åhs, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Serotonin Transporter Binding in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Measured with [11c]-DASB2014In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 75, no 9, p. 357S-357SArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Pissiota, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Frans, Örjan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fernandez, Manuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, University hospital.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, University hospital.
    Fischer, Håkan
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neurofunctional correlates of posttraumatic stress disorder: a PET symptom provocation study2002In: European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, ISSN 0940-1334, E-ISSN 1433-8491, Vol. 252, no 2, p. 68-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SUMMARY: Patients with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) show altered cognitive and affective processing and symptomatic responding following exposure to trauma reminders. Previous symptom provocation studies using brain imaging have involved Vietnam veterans. In this study neural correlates were investigated in patients with PTSD resulting from trauma in more recent war zones. (15)Oxygen water and positron emission tomography were used to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with war- and combat-related chronic PTSD during exposure to combat and neutral sounds. Self-reports and heart rate confirmed symptomatic responding during traumatic stimulation. The war-related condition, as compared to the neutral, increased rCBF in the right sensorimotor areas (Brodmann areas 4/6), extending into the primary sensory cortex (areas 1/2/3), and the cerebellar vermis. RCBF also increased in the right amygdala and in the periaqueductal gray matter adjacent to the pons. During provocation rCBF was lowered in the right retrosplenial cortex (areas 26/29/30 extending into area 23). Symptom provocation in PTSD promote sensorimotor, amygdaloid and midbrain activation. We conclude that perceptually induced symptom activation in PTSD is associated with an emotionally determined motor preparation and propose that subcortically initiated rather than cortically controlled memory mechanisms determine this pattern.

  • 36.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hypomania spectrum disorder in adolescence: a 15-year follow-up of non-mood morbidity in adulthood2014In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 14, p. 9-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    We investigated whether adolescents with hypomania spectrum episodes have an excess risk of mental and physical morbidity in adulthood, as compared with adolescents exclusively reporting major depressive disorder (MDD) and controls without a history of adolescent mood disorders.

    Methods:

    A community sample of adolescents (N = 2 300) in the town of Uppsala, Sweden, was screened for depressive symptoms. Both participants with positive screening and matched controls (in total 631) were diagnostically interviewed. Ninety participants reported hypomania spectrum episodes (40 full-syndromal, 18 with brief episode, and 32 subsyndromal), while another 197 fulfilled the criteria for MDD without a history of a hypomania spectrum episode. A follow up after 15 years included a blinded diagnostic interview, a self-assessment of personality disorders, and national register data on prescription drugs and health services use. The participation rate at the follow-up interview was 71% (64/90) for the hypomania spectrum group, and 65.9% (130/197) for the MDD group. Multiple imputation was used to handle missing data.

    Results:

    The outcomes of the hypomania spectrum group and the MDD group were similar regarding subsequent non-mood Axis I disorders in adulthood (present in 53 vs. 57%). A personality disorder was reported by 29% of the hypomania spectrum group and by 20% of the MDD group, but a statistically significant difference was reached only for obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (24 vs. 14%). In both groups, the risk of Axis I disorders and personality disorders in adulthood correlated with continuation of mood disorder. Prescription drugs and health service use in adulthood was similar in the two groups. Compared with adolescents without mood disorders, both groups had a higher subsequent risk of psychiatric morbidity, used more mental health care, and received more psychotropic drugs.

    Conclusions:

    Although adolescents with hypomania spectrum episodes and adolescents with MDD do not differ substantially in health outcomes, both groups are at increased risk for subsequent mental health problems. Thus, it is important to identify and treat children and adolescents with mood disorders, and carefully follow the continuing course.

  • 37.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala Univ, Inst Neurovetenskap Barn & Ungdomspsykiatri, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala Univ, Inst Neurovetenskap Barn & Ungdomspsykiatri, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Early risk factors for adult bipolar disorder in adolescents with mood disorders: a 15-year follow-up of a community sample2017In: Bipolar Disorders, ISSN 1398-5647, E-ISSN 1399-5618, Vol. 19, no S1, p. 63-63Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Early risk factors for adult bipolar disorder in adolescents with mood disorders: A 15-year follow-up of a community sample2014In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 363-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  We aimed to outline the early risk factors for adult bipolar disorder (BPD) in adolescents with mood disorders.

    Methods: Adolescents (16-17 years old) with mood disorders (n=287; 90 participants with hypomania spectrum episodes and 197 with major depressive disorder [MDD]) were identified from a community sample. Fifteen years later (at 30-33 years of age), mood episodes were assessed (n=194). The risk of developing BPD (n=22), compared with MDD (n=104) or no mood episodes in adulthood (n=68), was estimated via logistic regression. Adolescent mood symptoms, non-mood disorders, and family characteristics were assessed as potential risk factors.

    Results: Among the adolescents with mood disorders, a family history of BPD was the strongest predictor of developing BPD compared with having no mood episodes in adulthood (OR=5.94; 95% CI=1.11-31.73), whereas disruptive disorders significantly increased the risk of developing BPD compared with developing MDD (OR=2.94; CI=1.06-8.12). The risk that adolescents with MDD would develop adult BPD, versus having no mood episodes in adulthood, was elevated among those with an early disruptive disorder (OR=3.62; CI=1.09-12.07) or multiple somatic symptoms (OR=6.60; CI=1.70-25.67). Only disruptive disorders significantly predicted adult BPD among adolescents with MDD versus continued MDD in adulthood (OR=3.59; CI=1.17-10.97). Only a few adolescents with hypomania spectrum episodes continued to have BPD as adults, and anxiety disorders appeared to increase this risk.

    Conclusions: Although most of the identified potential risk factors are likely general predictors of continued mood disorders, disruptive disorders emerged as specific predictors of developing adult BPD among adolescents with MDD.

  • 39.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hypomania spectrum disorders from adolescence to adulthood: a 15-year follow-up of a community sample2012In: European Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0924-977X, E-ISSN 1873-7862, Vol. 22, no S2, p. S277-S277Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hypomania spectrum disorders from adolescence to adulthood: A 15-year follow-up of a community sample2013In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 145, no 2, p. 190-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a lack of scientific knowledge about the broader spectrum of hypomania in adolescence and the course over time. To investigate this, we used longitudinal data spanning from adolescence to age 31 years.

    Method: A community sample of adolescents (N=2300) was screened for depressive symptoms. Adolescents (16-17 years) with a positive screening and matched controls were interviewed with a structured diagnostic interview. A blinded follow-up assessment was conducted 15 years later, with a structured diagnostic interview covering the age span 19-31 years. Questions about treatment and family history were included.

    Results: Ninety adolescents (16-17 years) with a lifetime hypomania spectrum episode (3.9% of the total sample) were identified: 40 with fullsyndromal, 18 with brief-episode (<4 day), and 32 with subsyndromal (1-2 main symptoms and 1-2 additional symptoms) hypomania. The hypomania symptoms reported by the fullsyndromal and the brief-episode groups were similar, whereas the subsyndromal group per definition reported fewer symptoms. Of the 90 adolescents with a hypomania spectrum episode, 64 (71%) participated in the follow-up interview. Mania in adulthood was reported by 2 (3%), hypomania by an additional 4 (6%), and major depression by 38 (59%). Incidence of mood episodes in adulthood did not differ between the subgroups of hypomania spectrum.

    Limitations: 29% of the participants with hypomania spectrum were lost to follow-up.

    Conclusion: The results indicate that only a small proportion of adolescents with hypomania spectrum episodes continue to have (hypo)mania in adulthood. Thus, maintenance or prophylactic treatment does not seem warranted for this group.

  • 41.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Drug prescriptions of adults with adolescent depression in a community sample2012In: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, ISSN 1053-8569, E-ISSN 1099-1557, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 130-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The prescription drugs have, to our knowledge, not been much studied in epidemiological samples with long-term follow-up. Accordingly, our purpose was to analyze the use of prescription drugs in adults with adolescent depression.

    Methods

    A population-based cohort of adolescents (n = 2465) was screened for the presence of depressive symptoms and diagnosed according to a structured interview. Totally, 362 individuals were identified as depressed and compared with 250 non-depressed controls. The prescription drugs were evaluated at the age of 29-31 years from a register kept by the National Health and Welfare Board.

    Results

    The formerly depressed females received significantly more prescription drugs, such as antidepressants, antiepileptics, antibacterials, antimycotics, and antihistamines for systemic use as well as other drugs, compared with controls (15.6 +/- 27.4 vs 8.2 +/- 7.4 recipes, p < 0.001). Formerly depressed males did not differ from controls regarding prescription drugs.

    Conclusions

    The females but not males with adolescent depression subsequently received more prescription drugs than non-depressed peers. Depressed female adolescents received more psychotropic and non-psychotropic drugs later in life compared to the non-depressed. This might be as a result of physical illnesses, different treatment-seeking behaviors, or somatizing reactions.

  • 42.
    Ramklint, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Stålenheim, E. Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Conduct disorder and personality in a forensic psychiatric population2001In: European Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0213-6163, E-ISSN 2340-4469, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 245-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined 61 men at forensic psychiatric investigation. We compared subjects with or without an assessed previous conduct disorder (CD versus non CD). The CD group showed more DSM-HI-R personality disorders, exhibited more repeated violent criminality and more mixed drug abuse. The CD group differed from the non CD group according to specific personality traits assessed by the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP) showing lower scores on the Social desirability and Socialization scale, and higher scores on the Impulsiveness, Monotony avoidance, Verbal aggression, Iritability and Suspicion scales. The CD group had higher psychopathy scores assessed by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R). The results are in accordance with previous findings in juvenile conduct disordered men. They indicate that personality traits are detectable early in life and stable over time influencing behaviours such as criminality and drug abuse.

  • 43.
    Ramklint, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Stålenheim, E Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Triiodothyronine (T3) related to adolescent conduct disorder in a forensic psychiatric population2000In: European Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0213-6163, E-ISSN 2340-4469, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he present study evaluates the relatioships between the thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (FT4), in adult life and a history of conduct disorder in 61 men from a forensic psychiatric population. The study population was divided into four groups based on the presence or not of an assessed conduct disorder, as well as a previous child psychiatric contact. The highest T3 values were found in patients with both a previous conduct disorder and a previous child psychiatric contact. There was a positive relationship between conduct disorder and serum levels of FT4. These results may indicate that T3 is a biological marker of aggressive behaviour in children.

  • 44.
    Ramklint, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, AL
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Screening Inventory - Retrospect (CAPSI-R): a questionnaire for adults concerning child and adolescent mental disorders.2002In: European Psychiatry, Vol. 17, p. 61-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Ramklint, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Child and adolescent psychiatric disorders predicting adult personality disorder: A follow-up study2003In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 23-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to examine associations between childhood and adolescent psychiatric disorders and adult personality disorders in a group of former child psychiatric inpatients. One hundred and fifty-eight former inpatients with a mean age of 30.5 +/- 7.1 years at investigation had their childhood and adolescentAxis I disorders, obtained from their medical records, coded into DSM-IV diagnoses.Personality disorders in adulthood were assessed by means of the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q). The predictive effects of child and adolescentAxis I disorders on adult personality disorders were examined with logistic regression analyses. The odds of adult schizoid, avoidant, dependent, borderline and schizotypalpersonality disorders increased by almost 10, five, four, three and three times, respectively, given a prior major depressive disorder. Those effects were independent of age, sex and other Axis I disorders. In addition, the odds of adult narcissistic and antisocial personality disorders increased by more than six and five times, respectively, given a prior disruptive disorder, and the odds of adult borderline, schizotypal, avoidant and paranoid personality disorders increased between two and three times given a prior substance-related disorder. The results illustrate an association between mental disorders in childhood and adolescence and adultpersonality disorders. Identification and successful treatment of childhood psychiatricdisorders may help to reduce the risk for subsequent development of an adultpersonality disorder.

  • 46.
    Ramklint, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Personality disorders in former child psychiatric patients2002In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 11, p. 289-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present case-control study was undertaken in order to investigate the long-term outcome with respect to personality disorder (PD) symptomatology in former childpsychiatric in-patients as compared to matched controls from the general population. Altogether 359 former patients and 359 controls were invited to participate in the study. Of these, 164 (46%) former patients and 193 (54%) controls approved participation. From these, 137 age and sex-matched pairs with a mean age of 30.7 (SD = 6.8) years were constructed. Adult PD symptomatology was assessed by means of the DSM-IV and ICD-10 PersonalityQuestionnaire (DIP-Q). There were 52 former patients (38%) and 15 controls (10.9%) who fulfilled criteria for at least one DSM-IV self-reported PD. There was a significantly higher prevalence for all specific self-reported PDs in former patients compared to controls. The mean number of disorders was 1.7 (SD = 2.6) in former patients and 0.3 (SD = 0.8) incontrols. Moreover, former patients fulfilled more PD criteria than controls (23 vs. 11; median numbers). The former patients had significantly lower global functioning and more psychosocial problems than the controls. These problems were related to personalitypathology. The results of this study indicate that child psychiatric morbidity seems to increase the risk for adult PD symptomatology. However, the results may be biased by the low participation rate.

  • 47.
    Ssegonja, Richard
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Alaie, Iman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Philipson, Anna
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Lars
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    Sampaio, Filipa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Möller, Margareta
    Orebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Fac Med & Hlth, Orebro, Sweden.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP. Murdoch Childrens Res Inst, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Langenskiöld, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Learning Informat Management & Eth LIME, Stockholm, Sweden.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Karolinska Inst Kind, Ctr Neurodev Disorders, Pediat Neuropsychiat Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social medicine/CHAP.
    Depressive disorders in adolescence, recurrence in early adulthood, and healthcare usage in mid-adulthood: A longitudinal cost-of-illness study2019In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 258, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Depression in adolescence is associated with increased healthcare consumption in adulthood, but prior research has not recognized the heterogeneity of depressive disorders. This paper investigated the additional healthcare usage and related costs in mid-adulthood for individuals with adolescent depression, and examined the mediating role of subsequent depression in early adulthood.

    Methods: This study was based on the Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study, initiated in Sweden in the early 1990s. Depressive disorders were assessed in adolescence (age 16-17) and early adulthood (age 19-30). Healthcare usage and related costs in mid-adulthood (age 31-40) were estimated using nationwide population-based registries. Participants with specific subtypes of adolescent depression (n = 306) were compared with matched non-depressed peers (n = 213).

    Results: Women with persistent depressive disorder (PDD) in adolescence utilized significantly more healthcare resources in mid-adulthood. The association was not limited to psychiatric care, and remained after adjustment for individual and parental characteristics. The total additional annual cost for a single age group of females with a history of PDD at a population level was estimated at 3.10 million USD. Depression recurrence in early adulthood mediated the added costs for psychiatric care, but not for somatic care.

    Limitations: Primary health care data were not available, presumably resulting in an underestimation of the true healthcare consumption. Estimates for males had limited precision due to a relatively small male proportion.

    Conclusions: On a population level, the additional healthcare costs incurred in mid-adulthood in females with a history of adolescent PDD are considerable. Early treatment and prevention should be prioritized.

  • 48.
    Ståleheim, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Penayo, Ulises
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bakall, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Eriksson, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hedlund, Mathilde
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lindström, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    de Severin, Aurora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Szmidt, Malgorzata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Werner, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Odiagnostiserade depressioner finns överallt i vården: Somatisk öppen och sluten vård och primärvård i Uplland screenad2003In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 100, no 36, p. 2760-2763Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En större undersökning av depressionsförekomsten inom somatisk öppen och sluten vård samt inom pri- märvården genomfördes under våren 2002 i Uppland under namnet »Depression screening day«.

    52 av 267 patienter hade en depressionsdiagnos känd inom rutinsjukvården. I samband med undersökning- en upptäcktes ytterligare 40 patienter som hade en de- pression.

    En del av de nyupptäckta depressionerna var av lätta- re slag, men knappt 40 procent var av sådan svårig- hetsgrad att de enligt gällande rekommendationer från Läkemedelsverket skulle motivera behandling.

    Inga signifikanta skillnader i svårighetsgrad förelåg mellan patienter diagnostiserade inom rutinsjukvår- den och patienter diagnostiserade i samband med en screeningundersökning. Det tycks således inte främst vara specifika karakteristika hos de depressiva syndro- men som avgör om patienten diagnostiseras inom ru- tinsjukvården eller inte.

  • 49.
    von Knorring, L
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri, UAS.
    Fredriksson, M
    Pettersson, A
    Behov av randomiserade kontrollerade studier av psykodynamisk psykoterapi.2006In: Läkartidningen, Vol. 103, p. 563-564Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 50.
    von Knorring, L
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. psykiatri.
    Fredriksson, M
    Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Pettersson, A
    Slutsatserna kvarstår om psykodynamiska metoder vid ångest2001In: Läkartidningen, Vol. 102, p. 3927-Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
12 1 - 50 of 56
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