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  • 1.
    Ahmad, Abdulbaghi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Sofi, MA
    Department of Psychiatry Erbil University Hospital Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan, IQ .
    Sundelin Wahlsten, Viveka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Posttraumatic stress disorder in children after the military operation "Anfal" in Iraqi Kurdistan2000In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 235-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Five years after the military operation “Anfal” in Iraqi Kurdistan, 45 families were randomly selected among the survivors in two displacement camps. The Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms for Children (PTSS-C) and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ) were administered to the oldest child and the caregiver in each family, respectively. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was reported in 87% of children and 60% of their caregivers. While childhood PTSD was only significantly predicted by child trauma score and the duration of captivity, it was neither predicted by maternal PTSD nor did it disappear after the reunion with the PTSD-free father. However, the small sample size makes the results hypotheses rather than conclusive.

  • 2.
    Ahmad, Abdulbaghi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Sundelin Wahlsten, Viveka
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Sofi, MA
    Qahar, JA
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Reliability and validity of a child-specific cross-cultural instrument for assessing posttraumatic stress disorder2000In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 285-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Children (PTSS-C) was developed as a cross-cultural semi-structured interview to diagnose posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to identify PTSD-non-related posttraumatic stress symptoms in children after various traumatic experiences. The psychometric properties were studied in two different child populations in Iraqi Kurdistan (the survivors of the military operation “Anfal”, and the orphans), in a sample of Kurdistanian refugee children in Sweden, and in a comparison sample of Swedish children. The instrument yielded satisfactory internal consistency, high interrater agreement, and excellent validity on cross-validation with the Child Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index (CPTSD-RI) and the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents (DICA) according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV).

  • 3. Bahmanyar, Shahram
    et al.
    Sundstrom, Anders
    Kaijser, Magnus
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Kieler, Hale
    Pharmacological treatment and demographic characteristics of pediatric patients with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Sweden2013In: European Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0924-977X, E-ISSN 1873-7862, Vol. 23, no 12, p. 1732-1738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the pediatric population with ADHD and their pharmacological treatment. Using the Swedish National Patient Register and the Prescribed Drug Register we identified individuals below 19 years of age who were diagnosed or medically treated for ADHD for the first time 2006-2007. The unique patient identifiers were used to link information from the two registers to describe demographic characteristics, hospital care and drug treatments. Logistic regression model estimated the association between age, sex, frequency of hospitalization, diagnosis or treatment for other mental disorders and risk of gap in the treatment. Totally the study included 7931 patients of whom 74% were males. The mean age at first diagnosis was 12 years. Some 84% were medically treated for ADHD and approximately 90% received methylphenidate as the first substance. Combination therapy was rare and the most common combination was methylphenidate and atomoxetine. More than 55% of the patients, which could be followed up for two years after start of treatment, had at least one treatment gap of six months. Older age at diagnosis, lower number of hospitalizations and comorbidity with other mental disorders increased risks of gaps in medication. Approximately one fifth of the patients recorded in the National Patient Register as diagnosed with ADHD did not receive pharmacological treatment. Medication adherence seems to be low, when measured as gaps in treatment.

  • 4.
    Bohman, Hannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Päären, Aivar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Long term follow up of adolescent depression: a population based study2010In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 21-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescent depression is common. Earlier studies indicate that relapses and recurrences are common. But many questions are still unanswered. The aim of the present study has been to follow subjects with adolescent depressions, identified in a population-based study, over a 15-year period. Subjects with adolescent depression (n = 362) and a comparison group (n = 250) were followed in the National Swedish registers.

    The formerly depressed females had significantly more out-patient visits, and a significantly higher proportion (78.4% versus 69.6%) had at least one out-patient visit. Among the males, no significant differences were found as concerns out-patient visits. The formerly depressed females had significantly more in-patient stays (3.6 versus 2.4) and a significantly higher total number of in-patient days (27.4 versus 10.1). A significantly higher proportion had in-patient days due to mental disorders (9.5% versus 4.6%), in particular anxiety disorders (4.9% versus 1.0%). As concerns the males, a significantly higher proportion had in-patient days due to mental disorders (16.5% versus 1.8%), in particular alcohol and drug abuse (7.6% versus 0%).

    Among the formerly depressed females there were no significant differences against the comparison group as concerns the proportion of being a mother, number of children per woman, or age at first child. However, a significantly higher proportion of the formerly depressed females had had different, usually mild, disorders related to pregnancy (8.6% versus 0.6%). The children of the women with adolescent depressions were not affected.

  • 5.
    Bohman, Hannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Päären, Aivar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Prognostic significance of functional somatic symptoms in adolescence: a 15-year community-based follow-up study of adolescents with depression compared with healthy peers2012In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 12, p. 90-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    There is a lack of population-based long-term longitudinal research on mental health status and functional physical/somatic symptoms. Little is known about the long-term mental health outcomes associated with somatic symptoms or the temporal relationship between depression and such symptoms. This 15-year study followed up adolescents with depression and matched controls, screened from a population-based sample, who reported different numbers of somatic symptoms.

    Methods

    The total population of 16–17-year-olds in Uppsala, Sweden, was screened for depression in 1991–1993. Adolescents who screened positive and an equal number of healthy controls took part in a semi-structured diagnostic interview. In addition, 21 different self-rated somatic symptoms were assessed. Sixty-four percent of those adolescents participated in a follow-up structured interview 15 years later.

    Results

    Somatic symptoms in adolescence predicted depression and other adult mental disorders regardless of the presence of adolescent depression. In adolescents with depression, the number of functional somatic symptoms predicted, in a dose response relationship, suicidal behavior, bipolar episodes, and psychotic episodes as well as chronic and recurrent depression. Contrary to expectations, the somatic symptoms of abdominal pain and perspiration without exertion better predicted depression than all DSM-IV depressive symptoms. Abdominal pain persisted as an independent strong predictor of depression and anxiety, even after controlling for other important confounders.

    Conclusions

    Somatic symptoms in adolescence can predict severe adult mental health disorders. The number of somatic symptoms concurrent with adolescent depression is, in a stepwise manner, linked to suicidal attempts, bipolar disorders, psychotic disorders, and recurrent and chronic depression. These findings can be useful in developing treatment guidelines for patients with somatic symptoms.

  • 6.
    Bohman, Hannes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Päären, Aivar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Larsson, Marita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Naessén, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Thicker carotid intima layer, thinner media layer and higher intima/media ratio in women with recurrent depressive disorders: a pilot study using non-invasive high frequency ultrasound2010In: World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 1562-2975, E-ISSN 1814-1412, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 71-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Growing evidence indicates that depression is an important risk factor for coronary heart disease. Thus, the aim of the present study has been to investigate if young women with adolescent onset and recurrent depressive disorders have signs of carotid intima and media changes already at the age of 30. Methods. Fifteen subjects with adolescent onset recurrent depressive disorders, mean age 31.5 years, were compared to 20 healthy women with a mean age of 39.6 years. The thickness of carotid artery intima and media was assessed, using non-invasive high-frequency ultrasound (25MHz). Results. The subjects with recurrent depressive disorders had significantly thicker carotid intima, significantly thinner carotid media and significantly higher intima/media ratio despite the fact that they were about 10 years younger than the healthy women. Hypertension, obesity or smoking could not explain the results. Conclusion. Already at the age of 30, subjects with recurrent depressive disorders with adolescent onset do have early signs of carotid intima and media changes, indicating a less healthy artery wall, despite otherwise no clinical signs of cardiovascular disease.

  • 7.
    Danfors, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. neurologi.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. BUP.
    Hartvig, Per
    Hospital Pharmacy.
    Långström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Moulder, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Torstenson, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET.
    Wester, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Watanabe, Yasuyoshi
    Department of Physiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.
    Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tetrahydrobiopterin in the treatment of children with autistic disorder. A double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study2005In: Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0271-0749, E-ISSN 1533-712X, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 485-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twelve children, all boys, aged 4 to 7 years, with a diagnosis of autistic disorder and low concentrations of spinal 6R-l-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (tetrahydrobiopterin) were selected to participate in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. The children received a daily dose of 3 mg tetrahydrobiopterin per kilogram during 6 months alternating with placebo. Treatment-induced effects were assessed with the Childhood Autism Rating Scale every third month. The results showed small nonsignificant changes in the total scores of Childhood Autism Rating Scale after 3- and 6-month treatment. Post hoc analysis looking at the 3 core symptoms of autism, that is, social interaction, communication, and stereotyped behaviors, revealed a significant improvement of the social interaction score after 6 months of active treatment. In addition, a high positive correlation was found between response of the social interaction score and IQ. The results indicate a possible effect of tetrahydrobiopterin treatment.

  • 8.
    Hartzell, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Seikkula, Jaakko
    Jyväskylä universitet.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Parents' perception of their first encounter with child and adolescent psychiatry2010In: Contemporary family therapy, ISSN 0892-2764, E-ISSN 1573-3335, ISSN 0892-2764, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 273-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parents who came with their child to Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) for the first time were interviewed 1–2 weeks afterwards in the presence of the child and the therapists. In a grounded theory analysis they revealed uncertainty about their role in the first meeting as well as of future planning. What had been important to them were aspects like communication, sharing perspectives, and the reformulation of problems.

     

  • 9. Hultcrantz, E.
    et al.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Apatiska barn finns: och de har rätt till vård2012In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 109, no 43, p. 1932-1933Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Barn med uppgivenhetssyndrom behöver läkarintyg omgående2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, no 04/01Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Goodman, Anna
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Koupil, Ilona
    School performance and hospital admission due to unipolar depression: a three-generational study of social causation and social selection2012In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 47, no 10, p. 1695-1706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Both "social causation" and "social selection" offer plausible explanations for an association between education and mental health. We aimed to explore these processes in unipolar depression, with a specific focus on school performance and family tradition of education.

    Method

    Grandchildren (N = 28,089, 49% female, aged 13-47 years in 2002) of a cohort born in Uppsala, Sweden, in 1915-1929 were studied in national registers. We obtained data on final grade point average (GPA) in compulsory school, hospitalizations for unipolar depression, grandparental/parental education and other parental social characteristics. Hospitalization in adolescence and adulthood were studied separately, as were hospitalization for depression with or without a lifetime externalizing disorder.

    Results

    Low compulsory school GPA (1-2 SD or > 2 SD below average vs. average GPA) was associated with increased rate of adolescent hospitalization for unipolar depression, both with externalizing comorbidity [hazard ratio (HR) point estimates of 66-80] and without (HR point estimates of 4-6). By contrast, low GPA was only associated with first-time hospitalization in adulthood for the subgroup with externalizing comorbidity (HR point estimates of 4-6). These associations were largely independent of family education and social characteristics. Overall, low parental/grandparental education was not related to increased rates of hospitalization.

    Conclusion

    The association between school performance and hospitalization for depression depended on adolescent hospitalization or externalizing comorbidity, suggesting that disorders with an early onset are decisive. Contrary to the social patterning of many health outcomes, low grandparental/parental education did not appear to increase the rate of hospitalization for unipolar depression in the offspring.

  • 12.
    Khalifa, Najah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Prevalence of the tic disorders and Tourette syndrome in a Swedish school population2003In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 315-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to find the epidemiological distribution of tic disorders and Tourette syndrome (TS) in Swedish school children aged 7 to 15 years. A total population of 4,479 children and their parents were asked to fill in a questionnaire covering both motor and vocal tics. A three-stage procedure was used: screening, interview, and clinical investigation. Two hundred and ninety-seven children (190 males, 107 females) were found to have tics. TS, according to DSM-IV criteria, was found in 0.6% of the total population, another 0.8% had chronic motor tics, and 0.5% had chronic vocal tics. Further, 4.8% of the children had transient tics. All together 6.6% of 7- to 15-year-old children currently had or had experienced some kind tic disorder during the last year. Prevalence of different tic disorders was higher among younger children and in males, and was highly associated with school dysfunction. The prevalence of TS was higher than was previously thought but other tic disorders were more common in this childhood population.

  • 13.
    Khalifa, Najah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders in a total population of children: clinical assessment and background2005In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 94, no 11, p. 1608-1614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe the symptoms, onset, heredity, pre-/perinatal events and socio-economic status in Tourette syndrome (TS) and other tic disorders.

    Methods: From a total population of 4479 children, 25 (0.6%) with TS, 58 (1.3%) with chronic motor/vocal tics (CMVT) and 214 (4.8%) with transient tics (TT) in the last year were found. A three-stage procedure was used: tic screening, telephone interview and clinical assessment. The TS group was compared with 25 children with TT and 25 controls without tics.

    Results: The mean age of the first symptoms of TS was significantly lower than the onset of CMVT. All except one with TS had contact with medical services. The tics of children with TS were significantly more severe than the tics of others. Younger age of onset of TS indicated more severe tics. Parents and siblings of children with TS had an increased prevalence of tic disorders, obsessive-compulsive behaviour (OCD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression. Eighty per cent had a first-degree relative with a psychiatric disorder. A non-significant increase with regards to reduced optimality score in the pre-, peri- or neonatal periods was found in children with TS compared to controls. No differences were found concerning socio-economic status.

    Conclusion: Almost all children from a total population with TS have sought help from medical services. An increased prevalence of tics, OCD, depression or ADHD was found in the parents/siblings of children with TS, which draws attention to the importance of thorough investigation of family members.

  • 14.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hypomania spectrum disorder in adolescence: a 15-year follow-up of non-mood morbidity in adulthood2014In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 14, p. 9-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    We investigated whether adolescents with hypomania spectrum episodes have an excess risk of mental and physical morbidity in adulthood, as compared with adolescents exclusively reporting major depressive disorder (MDD) and controls without a history of adolescent mood disorders.

    Methods:

    A community sample of adolescents (N = 2 300) in the town of Uppsala, Sweden, was screened for depressive symptoms. Both participants with positive screening and matched controls (in total 631) were diagnostically interviewed. Ninety participants reported hypomania spectrum episodes (40 full-syndromal, 18 with brief episode, and 32 subsyndromal), while another 197 fulfilled the criteria for MDD without a history of a hypomania spectrum episode. A follow up after 15 years included a blinded diagnostic interview, a self-assessment of personality disorders, and national register data on prescription drugs and health services use. The participation rate at the follow-up interview was 71% (64/90) for the hypomania spectrum group, and 65.9% (130/197) for the MDD group. Multiple imputation was used to handle missing data.

    Results:

    The outcomes of the hypomania spectrum group and the MDD group were similar regarding subsequent non-mood Axis I disorders in adulthood (present in 53 vs. 57%). A personality disorder was reported by 29% of the hypomania spectrum group and by 20% of the MDD group, but a statistically significant difference was reached only for obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (24 vs. 14%). In both groups, the risk of Axis I disorders and personality disorders in adulthood correlated with continuation of mood disorder. Prescription drugs and health service use in adulthood was similar in the two groups. Compared with adolescents without mood disorders, both groups had a higher subsequent risk of psychiatric morbidity, used more mental health care, and received more psychotropic drugs.

    Conclusions:

    Although adolescents with hypomania spectrum episodes and adolescents with MDD do not differ substantially in health outcomes, both groups are at increased risk for subsequent mental health problems. Thus, it is important to identify and treat children and adolescents with mood disorders, and carefully follow the continuing course.

  • 15.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala Univ, Inst Neurovetenskap Barn & Ungdomspsykiatri, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala Univ, Inst Neurovetenskap Barn & Ungdomspsykiatri, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Early risk factors for adult bipolar disorder in adolescents with mood disorders: a 15-year follow-up of a community sample2017In: Bipolar Disorders, ISSN 1398-5647, E-ISSN 1399-5618, Vol. 19, no S1, p. 63-63Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Early risk factors for adult bipolar disorder in adolescents with mood disorders: A 15-year follow-up of a community sample2014In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 363-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  We aimed to outline the early risk factors for adult bipolar disorder (BPD) in adolescents with mood disorders.

    Methods: Adolescents (16-17 years old) with mood disorders (n=287; 90 participants with hypomania spectrum episodes and 197 with major depressive disorder [MDD]) were identified from a community sample. Fifteen years later (at 30-33 years of age), mood episodes were assessed (n=194). The risk of developing BPD (n=22), compared with MDD (n=104) or no mood episodes in adulthood (n=68), was estimated via logistic regression. Adolescent mood symptoms, non-mood disorders, and family characteristics were assessed as potential risk factors.

    Results: Among the adolescents with mood disorders, a family history of BPD was the strongest predictor of developing BPD compared with having no mood episodes in adulthood (OR=5.94; 95% CI=1.11-31.73), whereas disruptive disorders significantly increased the risk of developing BPD compared with developing MDD (OR=2.94; CI=1.06-8.12). The risk that adolescents with MDD would develop adult BPD, versus having no mood episodes in adulthood, was elevated among those with an early disruptive disorder (OR=3.62; CI=1.09-12.07) or multiple somatic symptoms (OR=6.60; CI=1.70-25.67). Only disruptive disorders significantly predicted adult BPD among adolescents with MDD versus continued MDD in adulthood (OR=3.59; CI=1.17-10.97). Only a few adolescents with hypomania spectrum episodes continued to have BPD as adults, and anxiety disorders appeared to increase this risk.

    Conclusions: Although most of the identified potential risk factors are likely general predictors of continued mood disorders, disruptive disorders emerged as specific predictors of developing adult BPD among adolescents with MDD.

  • 17.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hypomania spectrum disorders from adolescence to adulthood: a 15-year follow-up of a community sample2012In: European Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0924-977X, E-ISSN 1873-7862, Vol. 22, no S2, p. S277-S277Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Hypomania spectrum disorders from adolescence to adulthood: A 15-year follow-up of a community sample2013In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 145, no 2, p. 190-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a lack of scientific knowledge about the broader spectrum of hypomania in adolescence and the course over time. To investigate this, we used longitudinal data spanning from adolescence to age 31 years.

    Method: A community sample of adolescents (N=2300) was screened for depressive symptoms. Adolescents (16-17 years) with a positive screening and matched controls were interviewed with a structured diagnostic interview. A blinded follow-up assessment was conducted 15 years later, with a structured diagnostic interview covering the age span 19-31 years. Questions about treatment and family history were included.

    Results: Ninety adolescents (16-17 years) with a lifetime hypomania spectrum episode (3.9% of the total sample) were identified: 40 with fullsyndromal, 18 with brief-episode (<4 day), and 32 with subsyndromal (1-2 main symptoms and 1-2 additional symptoms) hypomania. The hypomania symptoms reported by the fullsyndromal and the brief-episode groups were similar, whereas the subsyndromal group per definition reported fewer symptoms. Of the 90 adolescents with a hypomania spectrum episode, 64 (71%) participated in the follow-up interview. Mania in adulthood was reported by 2 (3%), hypomania by an additional 4 (6%), and major depression by 38 (59%). Incidence of mood episodes in adulthood did not differ between the subgroups of hypomania spectrum.

    Limitations: 29% of the participants with hypomania spectrum were lost to follow-up.

    Conclusion: The results indicate that only a small proportion of adolescents with hypomania spectrum episodes continue to have (hypo)mania in adulthood. Thus, maintenance or prophylactic treatment does not seem warranted for this group.

  • 19.
    Päären, Aivar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Bohman, Hannes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Olsson, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Drug prescriptions of adults with adolescent depression in a community sample2012In: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, ISSN 1053-8569, E-ISSN 1099-1557, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 130-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The prescription drugs have, to our knowledge, not been much studied in epidemiological samples with long-term follow-up. Accordingly, our purpose was to analyze the use of prescription drugs in adults with adolescent depression.

    Methods

    A population-based cohort of adolescents (n = 2465) was screened for the presence of depressive symptoms and diagnosed according to a structured interview. Totally, 362 individuals were identified as depressed and compared with 250 non-depressed controls. The prescription drugs were evaluated at the age of 29-31 years from a register kept by the National Health and Welfare Board.

    Results

    The formerly depressed females received significantly more prescription drugs, such as antidepressants, antiepileptics, antibacterials, antimycotics, and antihistamines for systemic use as well as other drugs, compared with controls (15.6 +/- 27.4 vs 8.2 +/- 7.4 recipes, p < 0.001). Formerly depressed males did not differ from controls regarding prescription drugs.

    Conclusions

    The females but not males with adolescent depression subsequently received more prescription drugs than non-depressed peers. Depressed female adolescents received more psychotropic and non-psychotropic drugs later in life compared to the non-depressed. This might be as a result of physical illnesses, different treatment-seeking behaviors, or somatizing reactions.

  • 20.
    Ramklint, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Stålenheim, E. Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Conduct disorder and personality in a forensic psychiatric population2001In: European Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0213-6163, E-ISSN 2340-4469, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 245-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined 61 men at forensic psychiatric investigation. We compared subjects with or without an assessed previous conduct disorder (CD versus non CD). The CD group showed more DSM-HI-R personality disorders, exhibited more repeated violent criminality and more mixed drug abuse. The CD group differed from the non CD group according to specific personality traits assessed by the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP) showing lower scores on the Social desirability and Socialization scale, and higher scores on the Impulsiveness, Monotony avoidance, Verbal aggression, Iritability and Suspicion scales. The CD group had higher psychopathy scores assessed by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R). The results are in accordance with previous findings in juvenile conduct disordered men. They indicate that personality traits are detectable early in life and stable over time influencing behaviours such as criminality and drug abuse.

  • 21.
    Ramklint, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Stålenheim, E Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Triiodothyronine (T3) related to adolescent conduct disorder in a forensic psychiatric population2000In: European Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0213-6163, E-ISSN 2340-4469, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he present study evaluates the relatioships between the thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (FT4), in adult life and a history of conduct disorder in 61 men from a forensic psychiatric population. The study population was divided into four groups based on the presence or not of an assessed conduct disorder, as well as a previous child psychiatric contact. The highest T3 values were found in patients with both a previous conduct disorder and a previous child psychiatric contact. There was a positive relationship between conduct disorder and serum levels of FT4. These results may indicate that T3 is a biological marker of aggressive behaviour in children.

  • 22.
    Ramklint, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Child and adolescent psychiatric disorders predicting adult personality disorder: A follow-up study2003In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 23-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to examine associations between childhood and adolescent psychiatric disorders and adult personality disorders in a group of former child psychiatric inpatients. One hundred and fifty-eight former inpatients with a mean age of 30.5 +/- 7.1 years at investigation had their childhood and adolescentAxis I disorders, obtained from their medical records, coded into DSM-IV diagnoses.Personality disorders in adulthood were assessed by means of the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q). The predictive effects of child and adolescentAxis I disorders on adult personality disorders were examined with logistic regression analyses. The odds of adult schizoid, avoidant, dependent, borderline and schizotypalpersonality disorders increased by almost 10, five, four, three and three times, respectively, given a prior major depressive disorder. Those effects were independent of age, sex and other Axis I disorders. In addition, the odds of adult narcissistic and antisocial personality disorders increased by more than six and five times, respectively, given a prior disruptive disorder, and the odds of adult borderline, schizotypal, avoidant and paranoid personality disorders increased between two and three times given a prior substance-related disorder. The results illustrate an association between mental disorders in childhood and adolescence and adultpersonality disorders. Identification and successful treatment of childhood psychiatricdisorders may help to reduce the risk for subsequent development of an adultpersonality disorder.

  • 23.
    Ramklint, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Personality disorders in former child psychiatric patients2002In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 11, p. 289-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present case-control study was undertaken in order to investigate the long-term outcome with respect to personality disorder (PD) symptomatology in former childpsychiatric in-patients as compared to matched controls from the general population. Altogether 359 former patients and 359 controls were invited to participate in the study. Of these, 164 (46%) former patients and 193 (54%) controls approved participation. From these, 137 age and sex-matched pairs with a mean age of 30.7 (SD = 6.8) years were constructed. Adult PD symptomatology was assessed by means of the DSM-IV and ICD-10 PersonalityQuestionnaire (DIP-Q). There were 52 former patients (38%) and 15 controls (10.9%) who fulfilled criteria for at least one DSM-IV self-reported PD. There was a significantly higher prevalence for all specific self-reported PDs in former patients compared to controls. The mean number of disorders was 1.7 (SD = 2.6) in former patients and 0.3 (SD = 0.8) incontrols. Moreover, former patients fulfilled more PD criteria than controls (23 vs. 11; median numbers). The former patients had significantly lower global functioning and more psychosocial problems than the controls. These problems were related to personalitypathology. The results of this study indicate that child psychiatric morbidity seems to increase the risk for adult PD symptomatology. However, the results may be biased by the low participation rate.

  • 24.
    Sundelin Wahlsten, Viveka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Ahmad, Abdlubaghi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Traumatic experiences and post-traumatic stress reactions in children from Kurdistan and Sweden2001In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 90, no 5, p. 563-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the types and scores of traumatic experiences, post-traumatic stress symptom and behavioural disorders among Kurdistanian refugee children in Sweden and a comparative Swedish group. The Harvard-Uppsala Trauma Questionnaire for Children (HUTQ-C), the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder for Children (PTSS-C) and the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) were administered in interview form to 32 children from each sample, controlled for age, gender and trauma levels. No significant differences were found between the 2 samples regarding types of traumatic events, frequencies of post-traumatic stress disorder, post-traumatic stress symptom scores or behavioural problem scores, except in 3 aspects: Kurdistanian children reported more war experience and being lost, while Swedish children presented higher frequencies of leisure-time accidents.

    Conclusion: This study supports the assumption that children differ from adults by showing more similarities than differences regarding traumatic experiences and post-traumatic stress reactions, after being exposed to an equivalent number of reported traumatic events. The refugee children's stay in Sweden can be considered as a healing factor.

  • 25.
    Sundelin Wahlsten, Viveka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Ahmad, Abdulbaghi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Do Kurdistanian and Swedish parents and children differ in their rating of competence and behavioural problems?2002In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 279-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    This paper investigates child self-rating of behavioural problems and competence as compared with their parents' ratings, in comparative samples of Kurdistanian refugee children in Sweden and a group of Swedish children.

    Method

    Kurdistanian and Swedish comparative samples composed of 32 children each matched in age, sex and trauma level, in the same community, and their parents. Among a large battery of instruments, the child behavioural checklist (CBCL) was used in separate interviews with parents and their children.

    Results

    When compared to the children's self-reported problems scores, the Swedish parents reported significantly lower scores than their children, compared to the Kurdistanian refugee parents.

    Conclusion

    Regardless of cultural backgrounds, there were more similarities than differences in the children's reporting of their behavioural problems and competence. The discrepancy between the Swedish parents' estimation of their children's behavioural problems and the children's self-reported behavioural problems could be an effect of the individualistic nature of Swedish society compared with the more collective nature of Kurdistanian culture. However, the results should be considered hypothesis generating rather than conclusive.

  • 26.
    Sundelin Wahlsten, Viveka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Ahmad, Abdulbaghi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Traumatic experiences and posttraumatic stress reactions in children and their parents from Kurdistan and Sweden2001In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 395-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was conducted to assess trauma scores and posttraumatic stress symptoms among Kurdistanian refugee children and their parents in Sweden and a comparable group of Swedish children and their parents. Comparative Kurdistanian and Swedish samples composed of 32 children each and their parents were interviewed by means of a specially devised trauma instrument (HUTQ-C), to identify traumatic events and to measure trauma scores, and with (PTSS-C) and (HTQ) to diagnose posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) among children and adults, respectively. Although Kurdistanian parents reported considerably more traumatic events than Swedish parents, children in both samples showed more similarities than differences, both with regard to types and levels of traumatic events. Kurdistanian parents showed higher PTSD frequencies than Swedish parents. However, these differences proved to be significant with regard to both the mother's and the father's lifetime and current PTSD symptom scores. Kurdistanian parents have experienced more war traumas and differ with regard to trauma exposure and its consequences when compared with Swedish parents. Children from the two samples showed more similarities than differences with regard to reported trauma and PTSD-related symptoms. These results underline the significance of child-specific factors in trauma and PTSD.

  • 27.
    Thurfjell, Barbro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Eliasson, Mona
    Swenne, Ingemar
    Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Engström, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Perceptions of gender ideals predict outcome of eating disorders in adolescent girls.2006In: Eat Disord, ISSN 1064-0266, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 287-304Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Thurfjell, Barbro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Eliasson, Mona
    Swenne, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Engström, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Perceived and individual ideals of gender in Swedish adolescents with and without an eating disorder2006In: Eating Disorders, ISSN 1064-0266, E-ISSN 1532-530X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 55-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three open-ended questions based on Steiner-Adair (1986) were used to study gender concepts in relation to ideals in adolescent boys and girls and eating-disordered girls. The answers were coded according to themes emanating from the collected data and not predetermined. Dichotomous differences were found between the genders regarding perceived ideals of body size, but clinical and nonclinical girls perceived ideals of society and media similarly. Individual gender concepts differed substantially from the perceived ideals, and were most often focused on lifestyle and life conditions. However, the clinical girls were somewhat more likely to emphasize appearance and loving relationships.

  • 29.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Barnpsykiatri2012In: Hjärnan / [ed] Lars Olsson och Anna Josephson, Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet University Press , 2012, 2 reviderad, p. 239-256Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    von Knorring, Anne-Liis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Psykisk ohälsa hos barn och ungdomar2012 (ed. 1:1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 30 of 30
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