uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 24 of 24
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Grigorjev, Piret
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Niit, Ellen
    Paldre, Leho
    Sak, Kristi
    Veismann, Ann
    Kihnu murde assimileerumise mustreid Manilaiul [The patterns of assimilation of Kihnu dialect on Manilaid]1997In: Pühendusteos Huno Rätsepale, ISSN 9985-4-0019-4, 1406-0183, p. 26-44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Hakulinen, Auli
    et al.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Lindström, Jan
    kuule, kule, hördu — projicerande praktiker i finska, estniska och svenska samtal2003In: Grammatik och Samtal: Studier till minne av Mats Eriksson / [ed] Bengt Nordberg, Institutionen för nordiska språk, Univ.: Uppsala , 2003, p. 199-218Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Clause combining and sequenced actions: the Estonian complementizer and pragmatic particle et2008In: Crosslinguistic Studies of Clause Combining.: The multifunctionality of conjunctions / [ed] Ritva Laury, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins , 2008, p. 125-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The usage patterns of the Estonian complementizer et in sequentially embedded actions show that it functions as an evidential particle. In oral as well as Internet interaction, clause-initial et attributes upcoming content to the previous speaker/writer and thereby incorporates another voice. Clause-combining with et is thus a common achievement of the participants performing sequenced actions in real time. The development of this complementizer and evidential from an original deictic item most probably started in reported speech, where the recurrent repetition of et may have resulted in the incorporation of the last instance into the following clause.

  • 4.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Collaborating towards Coherence: Lexical Cohesion in English Discourse. Sanna-Kaisa Tanskanen2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 1071-1073Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Colloquial Estonian2004In: Estonian Language, Estonian Academy Publishers, Tallinn , 2004, p. 342–378-Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 6.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Compromising progressivity: 'No'-prefacing in estonian2012In: Pragmatics: Quarterly Publication of the International Pragmatics Association, ISSN 1018-2101, E-ISSN 2406-4238, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 119-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Negative polar particles have generally been characterized as items for expressing disagreement or responding negatively to polar questions. What has been lacking in these accounts is attention to embodied activities. This paper studies the usage of the Estonian negative particle ei as a preface in real-time activities, showing that it halts the ongoing action, often for the sake of achieving intersubjective understanding and establishing epistemic authority. The paper shows how other matters besides logic and truth-conditions define the meaning of the negative particle. Analysis of linguistic function demands transgressing the boundaries of language and scrutiny of co-present interaction in its temporal emergence. The paper argues that several discourse functions of ei are also more accurately described from the vantage point of its usage in multimodal face-to-face settings than from the logical properties that the item happens to display in limited sequential contexts after yes/no interrogatives.

  • 7.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Construction of identity in the Estonian refugee community in Sweden2010In: Journal of Baltic Studies, ISSN 0162-9778, E-ISSN 1751-7877, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 177-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social constructionist approaches underline that identity is constantly negotiated. It emerges in everyday actions and behavioral patterns, fleeting comments by the participants in the social events. Values and attitudes are promoted and confronted. This paper studies membership categorization and pragmatic code-switching in the Swedish Estonian refugee community, demonstrating the fragile balance between the ‘Estonian’ and the ‘Swedish’. The speakers orient to Estonian Estonian as the target variety, while frequently using Swedish for sense-making. The analysis is based on audio and video recordings of Swedish Estonian club activities and research interviews. 

  • 8.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Eestikeelse telefonivestluse erijooned [Särdrag i estniska telefonsamtal]2011In: Keel ja Kirjandus, ISSN 0131-1441, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 389-391Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Estnisk invandraridentitet bland flyktingar, 60 år senare.2006In: Vandring och Förvandling. Förflyttning, förändring, framtid.: Humanistdagarna 2004, 2006Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 10.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    From discourse pattern to epistemic marker: Estonian (ei) tea 'don't know'.2006In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 173–200-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    In contemporary informal Estonian, the negative verb form ei tea ‘don’t know’ has become a routinized part of generic questions, in which the agent is left unexpressed. This pattern is in accordance with the general impersonal and reference-avoiding style of conversing in Estonia. The study outlines a continuum of synchronic usages from the original expressions sa ei tea ‘you don’t know’ and ma ei tea ‘I don’t know’ to the epistemic usages of (ei) tea, which are specifically tied to the speech act of questioning. The data is interactional and the analysis relies on the interpretation of (ei) tea-questions by the participants themselves, following the methodology of conversation analysis. It is demonstrated that the development of (ei) tea displays phonological and semantic erosion, pragmatic strengthening, subjectification, and decategorialization. Thus, grammaticalization theory is here combined with interactional linguistics in order to display the emergence of a grammatical structure from a discourse pattern.

  • 11.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Informatsioonikäsitluse partikkel ahah telefonivestlustes [The particle of information management ahah in Estonian phone conversations]1999In: Emakeele seltsi aastaraamat 1997, ISSN 9985-9007-7-4, Vol. 43, p. 34-56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Internal development and borrowing of pragmatic particles: the Estonian vaata/vat 'look', näed 'you see' and vot.2008In: Finnisch-Ugrische Mitteilungen, ISSN 0341-7816, Vol. 30/31, p. 23-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper compares the pragmatic usage patterns of the Estonian particles vaata/vat ‘look’, näed ‘you see’ and vot in interaction. The two first of these have most probably developed language-internally — the frequent usage of a particular verb form in a specific function has resulted in its grammaticalization as a particle. Näed is predominantly an evidential particle and vaata/vat an explanatory and focusing particle. The particularized forms may be phonologically assimilated or shortened and they do not behave as predicates. No arguments can be attached to them and they have acquired new functions that instead concern text structure and interaction. The Russian loanword vot, on the other hand, has been stigmatized in Estonian linguistics and instead, the literary form vaat has been officially promoted. The present article shows why this is a mistake. The particle vot may occasionally fulfill the same functions as näed and vaata/vat but it also displays completely idiosyncratic interactional functions, such as topic closure and handing over the turn to the interlocutor who can then introduce a new topic or alternatively a closure of the conversation. The nature of these efficacious particles can only be revealed in conversational sequences and for their adequate analysis one has to account for the dynamics of interaction.

  • 13.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Keelekontakt ja pragmaatika. [Language contact and pragmatics.]2006In: Teoreetiline keeleteadus Eestis II., 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Keelendid et ja nii et vestluses [The linguistic units et and nii et in conversation]2000In: Keel ja Kirjandus, ISSN 0131-1441, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 344-358Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Käskiv kõneviis nõustuvas voorus ja vastuste tüpoloogia [Imperative in complying turns and the typology of answers]2009In: Emakeele seltsi aastaraamat, ISSN 0206-3735, Vol. 54, p. 94-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imperative has traditionally been treated as a grammatical feature characteristic of first pair parts in adjacency pairs, expressing orders, requests, challenges, and demands. These actions make relevant compliance as the next action. In a number of languages, however, among them in Estonian, imperative is also used in second pair parts. It occurs as a response to a proposal that is expressed in first person but implies collaboration on behalf of the recipient. As a rule, the verb from the first pair part of the adjacency pair (proposal) is repeated in the complying imperative response. The sequence proposal in 1st person – compliance in 2nd person imperative constitutes a grammatical configuration that results form the particular interactional goals of the speakers. Without taking into consideration the specifics of social actions and their sequencing the configuration is impossible to characterize, as the syntax of the proposals varies.

    As an alternative to the generic response with particle jaa/jah, a verb repeat is a more independent action that enhances the social and deontic force of the answer. By complying with a verb, the speaker makes a stronger commitment to the proposed activity.

    Verb repeats, albeit not in the imperative, are also possible as responses to proposals in other persons in Estonian. In addition, they occur as responses to yes/no questions. The latter pattern has been described as a typological feature in world’s languages. It seems that the possibility of imperative responses co-occurs with verb repeat responses to questions. In varieties of Estonian that have been in close contact with languages that do not reuse verbs in the same way, such as Swedish, verbs are instead replaced with ’do’ in the second pair part.

    The study is based on spoken language corpora.

  • 16.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Pragmatics of the Estonian heritage speakers in Sweden2011In: Finnisch-Ugrische Mitteilungen, ISSN 0341-7816, Vol. 35, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Pro-forms as projective devices in interaction2011In: Discourse processes, ISSN 0163-853X, E-ISSN 1532-6950, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 404-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cataphoric pronouns have been characterized as being co-referential with a word that comes later. Considering that talk is produced in real time, with little benefit of knowing what is yet to come, participants understand cataphoric pro-forms to be projecting more talk. Projection is a crucial interactive resource, as it enables speakers to align with the ongoing talk and to initiate subsequent contributions in a timely manner. The study looks at how Estonian pro-forms are systematically used to project either a word (phrase) or a clause in interaction. The patterns discussed are not universal and it will be suggested that projecting word (phrases) with pro-forms is a characteristic of a non-prepositional language with no articles, and that pro-form projection can be especially useful in a free word order language. As many pro-forms do not end up with a co-referential word, projection provides a better account of their function. The paper underlines the necessity of studying grammar as a temporal phenomenon.

  • 18.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Sina-teie tähenduse määrab olukord [The meaning of singular and plural  address depends on the situation]2008Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Suhtluskeele uurimine partiklistunud verbivormide näitel2005In: Keel ja Kirjandus, Vol. 48, no 7-8, p. 535-548Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Terminally rising pitch contours of response tokens in Estonian2003In: Crossroads of Language, Interaction, and Culture, Vol. 5, p. 49–65-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    The contemporary pragmatics of the Estonian clause combiner and particle ega2011In: Congressus XI Internationalis Fenno-Ugristarum. Piliscsaba 9-14.8.10. pars VI. / [ed] Sándor Csúcs, Nóra Falk, Viktória Tóth, Gábor Zaicz, Piliscsaba: Reguky Társaság , 2011, p. 197-205Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Finno-Ugric Languages.
    The deictic nii 'so, in this way' in interaction.2005In: From Utterance to Uttering and vice versa: Multidisciplinary views on deixis, Tartu: Tartu university press , 2005, p. 109–126-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Finno-Ugric Languages.
    Tracing grammaticalization of oota 'wait' in Estonian conversation2001In: Papers in Estonian Cognitive Linguistics, p. 119-144Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Keevallik, Leelo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Üldküsimuse lihtvastuste funktsioonid [The functions of simple answers to yes/no questions]2009In: Keel ja Kirjandus, ISSN 0131-1441, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 33-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two typologically different systems are used in the answer formats to yes-no questions in Estonian, particles and echo-responses. They can be implemented separately as well as in combinations with each other or other particles. The paper studies the grammatical, pragmatic and interactional factors that affect the choice of the answer format. It depends on the pragmatic focus of the question, its polarity, as well as the polarity of the answer, and the action that is carried out by the answer. At the same time, the speaker displays her understanding of the action-import of the question in the answer and may provide subtle criticism on its design. This affects the opportunities for further development of the conversation.

1 - 24 of 24
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf