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  • 1. Babcock, Loren E.
    et al.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Palaeobiology, taphonomy and stratigraphic significance of the trilobite BUENELLUS from the Sirius Passet Biota, Cambrian of North Greenland2007In: Memoirs of the Association of Australasian Palaeontologists, ISSN 0810-8889, Vol. 34, p. 401-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sirius Passet Biota, collected from the lower Buen Formation (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3), North Greenland, contains one species of trilobite, the nevadiid Buenellus higginsi Blaker, 1988. The species shows considerable morphological variation, especially in exoskeletal width. Many specimens of B. higginsi show some form of exceptionally preserved, non-biomineralised tissue. Structures interpreted as alimentary tracts and probable digestive glands are commonly preserved by silica and limonite. Antennae are rarely preserved, apparently through replication in clay minerals. Tendinous bars in the axial region also seem to be preserved by replication in clay minerals. Mineral-filled gut tracts in B. higginsi suggest they were fluid-filled at the time of burial, and that the species was a non-durophagous predator. Healed injuries, some of which are the result of unsuccessful predaceous attacks, are uncommon in B. higginsi. Other exoskeletons show evidence of post-mortem disruption, perhaps scavenging. Buenellus higginsi, one of the earliest known trilobites from Laurentia, seems to have played an important role in the Sirius Passet ecosystem, serving both as predator on, and prey for, contemporary animals.

  • 2. Botting, Joseph P.
    et al.
    Cardenas, Paco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A Crown-Group Demosponge from the Early Cambrian Sirius Passet Biota, North Greenland2015In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 35-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calibration of the divergence times of sponge lineages and understanding of their phylogenetic history are hampered by the difficulty in recognizing crown versus stem groups in the fossil record. A new specimen from the lower Cambrian (Series 2, Stage 3; approximately 515Ma) Sirius Passet Biota of North Greenland has yielded a diagnostic spicule assemblage of the extant demosponge lineages Haploscleromorpha and/or Heteroscleromorpha. The specimen has disarticulated approximately in situ, but represents an individual sponge that possessed monaxon spicules combined with a range of slightly smaller sigma, toxa and unique spiral morphologies. The combination of spicule forms, together with their relatively large size, suggests that the sponge represents the stem lineage of Haploscleromorpha+Heteroscleromorpha. This is the first crown-group demosponge described from the early Cambrian and provides the most reliable calibration point currently available for phylogenetic studies.

  • 3.
    Botting, Joseph P.
    et al.
    Nanjing Inst Geol & Palaeontol, 39 East Beijing Rd, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.;Natl Museum Wales, Dept Geol, Cathays Pk, Cardiff CF10 3LP, S Glam, Wales..
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Early Cambrian Sponges Of The Sirius Passet Biota, North Greenland2016In: PAPERS IN PALAEONTOLOGY, ISSN 2056-2799, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 463-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sirius Passet Biota of the Buen Formation in North Greenland is one of the key Burgess Shale-type faunas, as it represents the only diverse early Cambrian (Stage 2, Series 3) biota from Laurentia. The sponges are one of the major components of the fauna, although they appear to be much less abundant than arthropods, based on the available collections. At least 13 species are described here, including the new taxa Hamptonia limatula sp. nov., Lenica perversa sp. nov., Saetaspongia procera sp. nov., Constellatispongia canismajorii gen. et sp. nov. and Crassicoactum cucumis gen. et sp. nov. An additional new species, Ratcliffespongia freuchenensis sp. nov., is described from the upper part of the Buen Formation. The assemblage is dominated by a major lineage of protomonaxonids, together with rarer reticulosans and demosponges. Some taxa, such as the anthaspidellid lithistid Fieldospongia bellilineata, were previously known only from Laurentian faunas; others, such as Saetospongia densa, Solactiniella cf. plumata and Lenica unica, were previously recognized from South China and/or Siberia. The described assemblage confirms the cosmopolitan distribution of Cambrian sponges generally, and suggests that the differences between Laurentian and Chinese assemblages are due more to a taxonomic overturn during Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4, than to the geographical separation. Furthermore, crown-group demosponges appear to have occupied shallow-water (perhaps dominantly platform) environments at this time, and may have been much more diversified and widespread than is currently recognized during the early Cambrian.

  • 4. Clausen, Sebastien
    et al.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Middle Cambrian echinoderm remains from the Henson Gletscher Formation of North Greenland2012In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 134, no 3, p. 173-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) echinoderm assemblage is described from the uppermost part of the Henson Gletscher Formation based on disarticulated material. This represents the first detailed echinoderm report from the Cambrian of North Greenland and one of the most diverse for that time. Recovered ossicles include a morphotype continuum between various biserial (brachiolar) and uniserial ("brachial") plates from pelmatozoan feeding appendages along with thecal insertion plates, pelmatozoan holomeric and the oldest known polymeric stem elements and holdfasts. Ambulacral flooring plates from two different edrioasteroids are also described. This assemblage illustrates a high plasticity and disparity in early echinoderm stem and feeding appendages, thereby placing stress on the usual definitions of blastozoans and crinozoans, generally considered as two pelmatozoan subphyla. Along with previous studies, it also raises the question as to how early echinoderms responded to the Agronomic Revolution (Substrate Revolution). Echinoderm remains first appear during Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3, well after the Substrate Revolution had affected the first few centimetres of substrate used by this low-level tiering animals to stabilize themselves. Contrary to previous ideas, it is suggested that echinoderms evolved quickly and in a nonlinear way in response to the abrupt establishment of a mosaic of substrate types during the early Cambrian. Finally, this study highlights the primary importance of disarticulated elements in the elucidation of the early evolution, diversity and disparity of the earliest echinoderms. Such elements are much more common and always appear earlier in the geological record than the complete articulated specimens on which echinoderm studies generally focus despite the taphonomic biases which often characterize their preservation.

  • 5.
    Conway Morris, Simon
    et al.
    Cambridge, Earth Sciences.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    The earliest annelids: Lower Cambrian polychaetes from the Sirius Passet Lagerstätte, Peary Land, North Greenland2008In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 137-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apart from the Phyllopod Bed of the Burgess Shale (Middle Cambrian) polychaete annelids are practically unknown from any of the Cambrian Lagerstdtten. This is surprising both because their diversity in the Burgess Shale is considerable, while to date the Chengjiang Lagerstatte which is equally impressive in terms of faunal diversity has no reliable records of any annelids. Here we describe, on the basis of about 40 specimens, Phragmochaeta canicularis gen. et sp. nov. from the Lower Cambrian Sirius Passet Lagerstatte of Peary Land, North Greenland. This makes it by far the oldest known polychaete, with a likely age of lower to middle Atdabanian, The body consists of approximately 20 segments, each bearing notochaetae and neurochaetae. The former appeared to have formed a felt-like covering on the dorsum, whilst the neurochaetae projected obliquely to the longitudinal axis. Apart from minor differences in chaetal size at either end there is no other tagmosis. Details of the head are obscure, and presence of palps, tentacles and eyes are conjectural. Jaws appear to have been absent. The gut was straight, and flanked by massive longitudinal musculature. P. canicularis was evidently benthic, propelling itself on the neurochaetae, with the dorsal neurochaetae conferring protection. Its stratigraphic position and generalized appearance are consistent with P. canicularis being primitive, but the phylogenetic relationships within the polychaetes remain problematic, principally because of paucity of relevant morphological information.

  • 6.
    Daley, Allison C.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A possible anomalocaridid from the Cambrian Sirius Passet lagerstätte, North Greenland2010In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 352-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sirius Passet biota of North Greenland is one of the oldest Cambrian lagerstätten, and although it is dominated by non-mineralized arthropods and lobopods, anomalocaridids have never been identified. Based on a single specimen, we herein describe for the first time an appendage with possible anomalocaridid affinities as suggested by an overall gross morphology similar to that of the frontal appendage of Anomalocaris from other localitites. Tamisiocaris borealis n. gen. and n. sp. has an elongated appendage with paired spines along one margin, and differs from the frontal appendage of Anomalocaris in that segment boundaries are absent and ventral spines are relatively long and spineless. These differences may be taphonomic, but the entire surface of the appendage is covered in a fine fabric, making it unlikely that this appendage was originally segmented or sclerotized. The taxon is tentatively placed within Radiodonta, but this systematic placement cannot be confirmed while complete body specimens are lacking.

  • 7. Devaere, Lea
    et al.
    Clausen, Sebastien
    Javier Alvaro, J.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Vachard, Daniel
    Terreneuvian Orthothecid (Hyolitha) Digestive Tracts from Northern Montagne Noire, France; Taphonomic, Ontogenetic and Phylogenetic Implications2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, p. e88583-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    More than 285 specimens of Conotheca subcurvata with three-dimensionally preserved digestive tracts were recovered from the Terreneuvian (early Cambrian) Heraultia Limestone of the northern Montagne Noire, southern France. They represent one of the oldest occurrences of such preserved guts. The newly discovered operculum of some complete specimens provides additional data allowing emendation of the species diagnosis. Infestation of the U-shaped digestive tracts by smooth uniseriate, branching to anastomosing filaments along with isolated botryoidal coccoids attests to their early, microbially mediated phosphatisation. Apart from taphonomic deformation, C. subcurvata exhibits three different configurations of the digestive tract: (1) anal tube and gut parallel, straight to slightly undulating; (2) anal tube straight and loosely folded gut; and (3) anal tube straight and gut straight with local zigzag folds. The arrangement of the digestive tracts and its correlation with the mean apertural diameter of the specimens are interpreted as ontogenetically dependent. The simple U-shaped gut, usually considered as characteristic of the Hyolithida, developed in earlier stages of C. subcurvata, whereas the more complex orthothecid type-3 only appears in largest specimens. This growth pattern suggests a distinct phylogenetic relationship between these two hyolith orders through heterochronic processes.

  • 8.
    Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Frýda, Jiri
    Czech Geological Survey.
    Wagner, Peter
    Department of Paleobiology, Smithsonian Institution.
    Horný, Radvan
    Department of Palaeontology, National Museum, Czech Republic.
    Isakar, Mare
    The Museum of Geology of the University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Stewart, Sarah
    National Museum of Scotland.
    Bertero, Verònica
    CICTERRA-CONICET, Centro de Investigaciones Paleobiológicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina.
    Rohr, David M.
    Department of Earth and Physical Sciences, Sul Ross State University, Alpine, TX 79832, USA.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Blodgett, Robert B.
    2821 Kingfisher Drive, Anchorage, AK 99502, USA.
    Högström, Anette
    Tromsø Universitetsmuseum.
    Biogeography of Ordovician and Silurian gastropods, monoplacophorans and mimospirids2013In: Memoir Geological Society of London, Vol. 38, p. 199-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The biogeographical distribution of Ordovician and Silurian gastropods, monoplacophorans and mimospirids has beenanalysed on a generic level. The dataset contains 334 genera and 2769 species, yielding 1231 records of genera with 2274 occurrencesworldwide. There is a bias towards eastern Laurentia, Baltica and Perunica records. Some 53.1% of the records are Ordovician. The study demonstrates that these molluscs are well suited to being used to improve understanding of Ordovician and Silurian biogeographicalprovinciality. Specific points are that: a Lower Ordovician assemblage is evident in Laurentia; the fauna of the Argentinean Precordillera is Laurentian until the Darriwilian, when taxa are shared with North China; Late Silurian gastropods from the Alexander terrane (SE Alaska) are unknown in Laurentia, but support a rift origin of this terrane from NE Siberia; Perunica, Ibero-Armorica and Morocco cluster together throughout the Ordovician but Perunica and Morocco are closer; Darriwilian–Sandbian deep-water Bohemian taxaoccur in Baltica; a Laurentian–Baltica proximity is unsupported until the Silurian; Siberia clusters with North China and eastern Laurentia during the Tremadocian–Darriwilian; during the Gorstian–Pridoli Siberia clusters with the Farewell and Alexander terranes; North China may have been close to Laurentia and the Argentinean margin of Gondwana; and the affinity of Tarim taxa is problematic.

  • 9.
    Geyer, Gerd
    et al.
    Bayer Julius Maximilians Univ Wurzburg, Lehrstuhl Geodynam & Geomat Forsch, Inst Geog & Geol, D-97074 Wurzburg, Germany..
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Middle Cambrian trilobites from the Ekspedition Brae Formation of North Greenland, with a reappraisal of the genus Elrathina2017In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 91, no 2, p. 265-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The richly fossiliferous Ekspedition Brae Formation of North Greenland yields a typical oligospecific fossil assemblage with well-preserved trilobites, helcionelloids, and lingulate brachiopods. The trilobites include Itagnostus subhastatus new species, Itagnostus sp. cf. I. gaspensis (Rasetti, 1948), Elrathina aphrodite new species, Elrathina athena new species, Elrathina hera new species, and Elrathia groenlandica new species-a fossil assemblage typical of the Bathyuriscus-Elrathina Zone as known from the Cordilleran regions of Laurentia. Excellent preservation allows a detailed assessment of the prosopon and elucidates aspects of the ontogenetic development of Elrathina and Elrathia. An evaluation of Elrathina includes a redescription of its type species, E. cordillerae (Rominger, 1887), based on the type material, and indicates that most specimens collected from the Burgess Shale and previously dealt with as E. cordillerae represent a new species.

  • 10.
    Geyer, Gerd
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John S.
    The Henson Gletscher Formation, North Greenland, and its bearing on the global Cambrian Series 2-Series 3 boundary2011In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 465-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Henson Gletscher Formation of North Greenland yields moderately diverse trilobite faunas which bracket the Cambrian Series 2-Series 3 boundary interval. A number of the trilobite taxa permit correlation into other parts of Laurentia and to other Cambrian continents, thus enhancing correlation within this stratigraphical interval of the traditional Lower-Middle Cambrian boundary. In particular, the occurrence of Ovatoryctocara granulata and O. yaxiensis substantially improves the intercontinental recognition of the O. granulata level, a prime GSSP candidate. In contrast, the level with Oryctocephalus indicus cannot be located in a number of Cambrian continents with sufficient precision, making this level unsuitable for the definition of a GSSP for the base of the Cambrian Series 3 and Stage 5. Further support for the correlation potential of the base of the range of Ovatoryctocara granulata comes from recent carbon isotope studies that indicate a striking negative excursion in sections of South China (ROECE event) that probably coincides with similar excursions in Laurentia. Four new trilobite species are described: Zacanthopsis blakeri sp. nov., Protoryctocephalus arcticus sp. nov., Eoptychoparia pearylandica sp. nov. and Onchocephalus? freucheni sp. nov.

  • 11.
    Geyer, Gerd
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Streng, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Voigt, Sebastian
    Fischer, Jan
    Preusse, Marvin
    A remarkable Amgan (Middle Cambrian, Stage 5) fauna from the Sauk Tanga, Madygen region, Kyrgyzstan2014In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 375-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early Middle Cambrian bituminous coquinoid limestones from a tectonically isolated outcrop in southwestern Kyrgyzstan yield a remarkably diverse fauna, with stem-group cnidarians, trilobites, rhynchonelliformean brachiopods, and other shelly fossils. The fossil site is in the northern foothills of the Turkestan Range and thus forms part of the westernmost extension of the South Tien Shan. The fauna includes two fairly well known trilobite species, Glabrella ventrosa Lermontova, 1940 and Dorypyge richthofeniformis Lermontova, 1940, that provide confident support for an Amgan age of the rocks. New described taxa include the stem-group cnidarian Cambroctoconus kyrgyzstanicus Peel sp. nov., the trilobite Olenoides sagittatus Geyer sp. nov., and the helcionelloid Manasoconus bifrons Peel gen. et sp. nov. Additional fossils within the samples include the trilobites Olenoides sp. A, Kootenia sp., and Pseudoeteraspis? sp.; the rhynchonelliform brachiopods Narynella cf. ferganensis (Andreeva, 1962), Narynella? sp., Austrohedra? sp. nov., and two species of uncertain generic affinity; the tommotiid Tesella sp.; the hyolithelminth Hyolithellus sp.; and the palaeoscolecid Hadimopanella oezgueli Gedik, 1977. Of particular interest is Cambroctoconus kyrgyzstanicus with an octagonal corallum and a sparsely septate calyx.

  • 12.
    Gubanov, Alexander P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Skovsted, Christian B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution.
    Anabarella australis (Mollusca, Helcionelloida) from the Lower Cambrian of Greenland2004In: Geobios, ISSN 0016-6995, E-ISSN 1777-5728, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 719-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Early Cambrian helcionelloid mollusc Anabarella australis is described from North-East Greenland, representing the second occurrence of the species outside of Australia. Other Australian molluscs of this age are known from many localities including North China, Siberia, Altai, Transbaikalia, southern Kazakhstan, Mongolia, eastern Germany and Spain. These records, supported now by A. australis, demonstrate the close proximity of continents in the Early Cambrian.

  • 13.
    Gubanov, A.P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. PALEOBIOLOGI.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    The Early Cambrian helcionelloid mollusc Anabarella Vostokova.2003In: Palaeontology, Vol. 46, p. 1073-1087Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Horny, R. J.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Carcassonella, a new Lower Ordovician bellerophontiform mollusc, with dorsally located retractor muscle attachments (Class Tergomya)1996In: Bulletin of the Czech Geological Survey, Vol. 71, p. 305-331Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15. Ineson, Jon R.
    et al.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Geological and depositional setting of the Sirius Passet Lagerstatte (Early Cambrian), North Greenland2011In: Canadian journal of earth sciences (Print), ISSN 0008-4077, E-ISSN 1480-3313, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 1259-1281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Early Cambrian Sirius Passet Lagerstatte of North Greenland occurs in marine mudstones (Buen Formation) deposited in a slope environment along the eroded scarp of a pre-existing carbonate platform. The shallow-water platform is represented by dolostones of the Portfjeld Formation (Neoproterozoic - earliest Cambrian), which record a belt of tide-swept subtidal ooid shoals and microbial patch reefs at the outer edge of the platform. Solution features and meteoric cements attest to exposure of the platform, accompanied by fracturing, mass wastage and erosional retreat of the escarpment producing slope talus, and extensive debris sheets and olistoliths in basinal deposits. The marine mud-dominated siliciclastics of the Buen Formation, deposited in slope and shelf environments, record the transgression and onlap of the degraded platform in the Early Cambrian. The Sirius Passet Lagerstatte has yielded an arthropod-dominated fossil assemblage of over 40 species, many showing exceptional preservation of soft tissues; the finely laminated mudstones hosting this fauna accumulated from suspension in a poorly oxygenated slope sub-environment, such as an erosional embayment or abandoned slope gully. Although taphonomic features suggest that the fauna is mainly parautochthonous, some components (e. g., sponges, worms, the halkieriids and certain sightless arthropods) may be truly autochthonous. Comparison of the Sirius Passet locality with the renowned Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale of western Canada reveals similarities in overall depositional and tectonic setting: both accumulated in deep water adjacent to the steep, eroded margins of carbonate platforms - settings that subsequently sheltered the faunas from tectonic and metamorphic obliteration.

  • 16. Ineson, Jon R.
    et al.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Cambrian shelf stratigraphy of North Greenland1997Book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ineson, JR
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. PALEOBIOLOGI.
    Surlyk, F
    Higgins, AK
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Stratigraphy and depositional setting of the Brönlund Fjord and Tavsens iskappe Groups (Lower Cambrian-Lower Ordovician) North Greenland.1994In: Bulletin Grönlands geologiske Undersögelse, Vol. 169, p. 7-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18. Isakar, M.
    et al.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Lower Cambrian helcionelloid molluscs from Estonia2007In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 129, no 3, p. 255-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pleurotomaria? kunda pik, 1926 was correctly referred to the genus Aldanella Vostokova, 1962 more than 30 years ago, although its affinities are still debated. It has been described by several authors as a gastropod on account of its helically coiled shell but it is here referred to the Class Helcionelloida, a group of Cambrian-Ordovician untorted molluscs which are usually bilaterally symmetrical. A sub-sutural, spiral muscle scar trace on the internal mould is described, as is a possible attachment area on the umbilical shoulder. Impressions of a prismatic shell structure are present in the apical region. In the lower Cambrian (proposed Cambrian Series 1) Kestla Member of the Lontova Formation, Aldanella kunda occurs together with Anabarella Vostokova, 1962, another helcionelloid that is also characteristic of Cambrian Series 1 in Siberia. Scenella(?) discinoides Schmidt, 1888 from the slightly younger Tiskre Formation (Cambrian Series 2) was originally assigned to a genus widely interpreted as a mollusc, but this species has been re-interpreted recently as a possible stem group brachiopod.

  • 19.
    Lindström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Shell repair and shell form in Jurassic pleurotomarioid gastropods from England2010In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 85, no 4, p. 541-550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Specimens of the vetigastropods Pleurotomaria Defrance, 1826 and Pyrgotrochus Fischer, 1885, from the Jurassic of England were separated into three morphological groups and surveyed for traces of shell repair. Two measures of shell repair frequencies were calculated: 1) ratio of the number of specimens with at least one repaired injury to the total number of specimens; 2) ratio of the total number of injuries to the total number of specimens in the sample. The Pleurotomaria anglica (Sowerby, 1818) group containing large, high spired trochiform shells showed the lowest repair frequency with 28.8% and 75.3%, respectively. The shell repair frequency in the low spired trochiform Pleurotomaria actinomphala Deslongchamps, 1848 group was 44.4% and 81.0%, respectively. Lastly, the Pyrgotrochus group containing conoidal trochiform shells showed the highest frequency calculated by both methods, 46.2% and 92.3%. Three types of injuries were found in all morphological groups, although in different proportions. Breaks across the entire whorl constitute the majority of repaired injuries in shells of the Pleurotomaria anglica group; in the P. actinomphala group the figure is about 50% and in Pyrgotrochus only 35%. The coniodal shell form and a deep slit in the aperture margin probably proved to be a defensive strategy for Pyrgotrochus, with many fractures terminating at the margin of the slit, whereas Pleurotomaria anglica was protected by its size.

  • 20.
    MORRIS, SC
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    PEEL, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    ARTICULATED HALKIERIIDS FROM THE LOWER CAMBRIAN OF NORTH GREENLAND AND THEIR ROLE IN EARLY PROTOSTOME EVOLUTION1995In: PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON SERIES B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, ISSN 0962-8436, Vol. 347, no 1321, p. 305-358Article in journal (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Articulated halkieriids of Halkieria evangelista sp, nov. are described from the Sirius Passet fauna in the Lower Cambrian Buen Formation of Peary Land, North Greenland. Three zones of sclerites are recognizable: obliquely inclined rows of dorsal palmates

  • 21. Morris, Simon Conway
    et al.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A New Helcionelloid Mollusk from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale, Canada2013In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 87, no 6, p. 1067-1070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burgess Shale-type faunas provide unique insights into the Cambrian "explosion". Their degree of representativeness of Cambrian marine life in general is, however, less easy to establish. One line of evidence is to consider only the skeletal component of a Burgess Shale-type fauna and compare that with a typical Cambrian assemblage. This paper describes a new species of helcionelloid mollusk (Totoralia reticulata n. sp.) from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale of British Columbia. Whilst much rarer than the co-occurring smooth shelled helcionelloid Scenella amii, the strongly costate morphology of Totoralia reinforces comparisons with Cambrian shelly faunas. The extension of the range of Totoralia from Argentina to Canada adds support to the proposed derivation of the Precordillera terrane of Mendoza from Laurentia.

  • 22.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A corset-like fossil from the Cambrian Sirius Passet Lagerstätte of North Greenland and its implications for cycloneuralian evolution2010In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 332-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A large (maximum length 80 mm), tubular, corset-like problematic fossil from the early Cambrian (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3) Sirius Passet Lagerstate of North Greenland is interpreted as the lorica of an ancestral loriciferan. In addition to the double circlet of 7 plates composing the lorica, Sirilorica carlsbergi new genus, new species also preserves Up to Six multicuspidate Cuticular denticles that are similar in shape to the pharyngeal teeth of priapulid worms, although their location is suggestive of scalids. Whilst traditionally placed as a sister group Of priapulid worms within Vinctiplicata (Scalidophora), recent molecular sequence data Suggest that loriciferans might be more closely related to nematomorphs. The limited morphological information available from Sirilorica is consistent with this interpretation, placing the Sirius Passet fossil within the total-group of Loricifera, within the Loricifera + Nematomorpha clade.

  • 23.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Dasyclad-like problematic fossils from the lower Cambrian of North Greenland2014In: Palaeontologische Zeitschrift, ISSN 0031-0220, E-ISSN 1867-6812, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 367-374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problematic fossil Kordesphecia nyeboensis gen. et sp. nov. from the lower Cambrian of North Greenland resembles the slightly younger, putative dasycladalean alga Amgaella Korde, 1957 in terms of its spirally arranged rhombic cells and central cavity. It differs in adding new cells through the sequential addition of roofing plates ('shingles') to pre-existing cell rows rather than encrusting lateral branches in dasycladalean fashion, in which character it seems comparable to the contemporaneous Lenaella Korde, 1959) from Siberia of unknown affinity. Kordesphecia is classified as incertae sedis but may be a stem-group dasycladalean.

  • 24.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    First records from Laurentia of some middle Cambrian (Series 3) sponge spicules2017In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 306-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spicules of the sponges Silicunculus Bengtson, Australispongia Dong & Knoll and Thoracospongia Mehl are described from the middle Cambrian (Cambrian Series 3) of North Greenland. The occurrences document the first records from the Cambrian of Laurentia of spicules initially reported from Australia. Obese spicules of Thoracospongia are now known to occur in strata of Cambrian Series 2 (Stage 4, Botoman) to Cambrian Series 3 (Stage 5 and Drumian) age in Australia, northern and southeastern Siberia and in the uppermost Henson Gletscher Formation (Cambrian Series 3, Stage 5) of western Peary Land. Morphologically similar obese spicules from the USA, Jordan, Iran and Sweden suggest an evolutionary trend towards armouring of the outer sponge surface during the middle and late Cambrian. New species described are Silicunculus saaqqutit sp. nov., Thoracospongia lacrimiformis sp. nov.

  • 25.
    Peel, John S.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Mineralized gutfills from the Sirius Passet Lagerstatte (Cambrian Series 2) of North Greenland2017In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 139, no 2, p. 83-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three dimensional preservation of internal moulds of the digestive tract is a characteristic feature of many arthropods and lobopodians from the Sirius Passet Lagerstatte (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3) of North Greenland and reflects widespread early post-mortem mineralization probably facilitated by endogenous bacteria. The mineralization also preserves pre-mortem gutfills of digestive origin, cololites, providing insight into feeding habits within the Sirius Passet biota. The cololites are described in rare specimens of the arthropods Sidneyia? sp. and Pauloterminus, the annelid worm Phragmochaeta and the palaeoscolecidan worms Chalazoscolex and Xystoscolex. Partly digested material includes fragmentary carapaces of the bivalved arthropod Isoxys volucris and shields of the armoured lophotrochozoan Halkieria evangelista, the iconic Sirius Passet fossil. The presence of sediment in cololites from the small available sample suggests that the described arthropods and worms were omnivores.

  • 26.
    Peel, John S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Ineson, Jon R.
    The extent of the Sirius Passet Lagerstatte (early Cambrian) of North Greenland2011In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 535-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ancillary localities for the Sirius Passet biota (early Cambrian; Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3) are described from the immediate vicinity of the main locality on the southern side of Sirius Passet, north-western Peary Land, central North Greenland, where slope mudstones of the Transitional Buen Formation abut against the margin of the Portfjeld Formation carbonate platform. Whilst this geological relationship may extend over more than 500 km east-west across North Greenland, known exposures of the sediments yielding the lagerst tte are restricted to a 1 km long window at the south-western end of Sirius Passet.

  • 27.
    Peel, John S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    McDermott, Patrick D.
    An association of problematic corals, crinoids and parasites from the Sholeshook Limestone Formation (Ordovician) of Wales2016In: Geological Journal, ISSN 0072-1050, E-ISSN 1099-1034, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 212-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coralla of the solitary coral Talfania calicula gen. et sp. nov. from the Upper Ordovician (Ashgill Series; Katian Stage) of Llanddowror, South Wales, UK, are often coiled around crinoid columnals, suggesting a premortem association between some of the corals and living crinoids. Irregularities within the deepest part of the open calice imply infestation of T. calicula by parasitic worms. Talfania calicula is distinguished from contemporaneous rugose corals by its lack of septa within the calice and its systematic position within Zoantharia is unresolved. Pitted calical grooves are interpreted as attachment scars of desmocytes connecting the soft tissues to the exoskeleton. Coral and crinoid remains in the assemblage are bored by postmortem microendoliths.

  • 28.
    Peel, John S.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Stein, Martin
    Kristensen, Reinhardt Mobjerg
    Life Cycle and Morphology of a Cambrian Stem-Lineage Loriciferan2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 8, p. e73583-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cycloneuralians form a rich and diverse element within Cambrian assemblages of exceptionally preserved fossils. Most resemble priapulid worms whereas other Cycloneuralia (Nematoda, Nematomorpha, Kinorhyncha, Loricifera), well known at the present day, have little or no fossil record. First reports of Sirilorica Peel, 2010 from the lower Cambrian Sirius Passet fauna of North Greenland described a tubular lorica covering the abdomen and part of a well developed introvert with a circlet of 6 grasping denticles near the lorica. The introvert is now known to terminate in a narrow mouth tube, while a conical anal field is also developed. Broad muscular bands between the plates in the lorica indicate that it was capable of movement by rhythmic expansion and contraction of the lorica. Sirilorica is regarded as a macrobenthic member of the stem-lineage of the miniaturised, interstitial, present day Loricifera. Like loriciferans, Sirilorica is now known to have grown by moulting. Evidence of the life cycle of Sirilorica is described, including a large post-larval stage and probably an initial larva similar to that of the middle Cambrian fossil Orstenoloricus shergoldii.

  • 29.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A problematic cnidarian (Cambroctoconus; Octocorallia?) from the Cambrian (Series 2-3) of Laurentia2017In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 91, no 5, p. 871-882Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The problematic calcified cnidarian Cambroctoconus is described from the Henson Gletscher Formation (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4-Series 3, Stage 5) of North Greenland, representing the first record from Laurentia of a genus otherwise recently described from China, Kyrgyzstan, and Korea. Internal molds produced by penetrative phosphatization mirror the pervasive pore system of the calice walls and septa. The pore system is compared to the network of gastrodermal solenia that distributes nutrients between polyps and surrounding stolon tissues in present day octocorals. In conjunction with the octagonal form of the individual coralla and eight-fold symmetry of septa, the pore system promotes assignment of Cambroctoconus to the Octocorallia, a basal clade in cnidarian phylogeny. Octocorals ('soft corals') are diverse in present day seas, but have a poor fossil record despite the general development of distinctive calcareous spicules. New taxa: Order Cambroctoconida new; Cambroctoconus koori new species.

  • 30.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Anatase and Hadimopanella selection by Salterella from the Kap Troedsson formation (Cambrian Series 2) of North Greenland2017In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 139, no 1, p. 70-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shells of the agmatan Salterella from the Kap Troedsson Formation (Cambrian Series 2) of North Greenland are filled with cemented grains of authigenic anatase (TiO2) associated with the palaeoscolecidan sclerite Hadimopanella apicata. Selection of the heavy grains, both recognized for the first time in Salterella, added ballast to an organism which was probably motile and lived by selective deposit feeding.

  • 31.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Bromalites from the Cambrian (Series 2 and 3) of North Greenland2015In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 137, no 3, p. 181-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Six assemblages of phosphatized bromalites from the Cambrian (Series 2 and 3) of North Greenland provide added insight into community structure in fossil assemblages otherwise dominated by microscopic skeletonized organisms. The bromalites, picked from acetic acid residues, display a wide range of morphologies, including pellets, segmented rods, wrinkled, smooth and segmented convoluted strings. Most are interpreted as extruded faecal material (coprolites) but moulds from the digestive tract (cololites) are also recognized. Most of the coprolites probably were produced by deposit-feeding invertebrates but rare specimens dominated by carapace fragments of bradoriid? arthropods are coprolites from predators. Zigzag-folded bromalites are interpreted as cololites of orthothecid hyoliths and are also recognized in inequivalent strata in China. Longitudinally wrinkled forms may be cololites of unknown origin. Minute spheres (Arenigiapella) forming one coprolite are interpreted as microcrystalline phosphatic coatings of bacteria. Post-diagenetic boring attributed to endolithic cyanobacteria is widespread.

  • 32.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Failed predation, commensalism and parasitism on lower Cambrian linguliformean brachiopods2015In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 149-163Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disarticulated valves of the linguliformean brachiopod Botsfordia from the early Cambrian (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4) Kap Troedsson Formation of North Greenland preserve repaired injuries resulting from failed predatory attacks. Durophagous strategies include peeling and crushing of the shells; rare borings also occur. Premortem commensal epibionts etched circular attachment scars on the shell exterior near the margins. Parasitic epibionts attached inside the commissure produced globose callosities and V-shaped invaginations in the growing margin. Comparison with epibiont-bearing assemblages of the brachiopod Diandongia from the Chengjiang and Guanshan Lagerstatten of China promotes recognition of a widely distributed Botsfordiid Community in soft-bottom environments during the early Cambrian.

  • 33.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Feeding behaviour of a new worm (Priapulida) from the Sirius Passet Lagerstatte (Cambrian series 2, stage 3) of North Greenland (Laurentia)2017In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 795-805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Singuuriqia simoni gen. et sp. nov. represents the first record of a priapulid worm from the Sirius Passet Lagerstatte (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3) of North Greenland (Laurentia). It is defined by an unusually broad, longitudinally folded, foregut which tapers through the pharynx towards the anterior mouth; posteriorly, the same longitudinal folding is evident in the narrow gut. The slender, smooth, trunk in the unique specimen passes anteriorly into an oval proboscis which culminates in a smooth, extensible, pharynx with pharyngeal teeth. The capacity for substantial expansion of the foregut permitted rapid ingestion of food prior to digestion at leisure. Cololites suggest both carnivorous and deposit feeding behaviour, indicating that Singuuriqia, like the present day Priapulus, was probably omnivorous.

  • 34.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Molaria (Euarthropoda) from the Sirius Passet Lagerstatte (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 3) of North Greenland2017In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 92, no 2, p. 133-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A second species of the characteristic Burgess Shale euarthropod Molaria Walcott, 1912 is described from the Sirius Passet Lagerstatte of North Greenland, thus extending its range from Cambrian Series 3 (Stage 5) back into Series 2 ( Stage 3). Molaria steini sp. nov. differs from the type species, M. spinifera Walcott, 1912, in having 9 trunk tergites and lacking an elongate connecting segment between the trunk and the jointed telson. Exopod setal fringes are similar to those in the artiopod Emeraldella Walcott, 1912 from the Burgess Shale but other details of limbs remain obscure.

  • 35.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Olenelloid trilobites from Cambrian Series 2 of Devon Island, Nunavut, Arctic Canada2011In: Canadian journal of earth sciences (Print), ISSN 0008-4077, E-ISSN 1480-3313, Vol. 48, no 11, p. 1471-1482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four species of olenelloid trilobites characterized by advanced or robust genal spines are described from the lower Cambrian Rabbit Point Formation (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4) of eastern Devon Island, representing the most diverse assemblage of olenelloids yet described from Arctic Canada. New taxa: Bristolia kurtzi n. sp., Paranephrolenellus cowiei n. sp., Siciliolenellus fritzi n. gen. and n. sp.

  • 36.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Operculum Regeneration Following Failed Predation in the Silurian Gastropod Oriostoma2015In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 229-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regeneration of the calcareous rigiclaudent operculum following severe, non-lethal, predatory attacks is described in two specimens of the characteristic Silurian gastropod Oriostoma from the English Midlands. This is the first record of the regeneration of opercula in Palaeozoic gastropods and of opercula conjoined with shells that have been repaired after significant, failed, durophagous attacks. In one specimen, a series of repaired injuries culminates in a repaired aperture closed by the operculum. In the second specimen, new shell growth has failed to recover the full extent of the original broken whorl, and the new aperture and operculum, though well developed, are smaller than the originals. Both opercula are unusually thin centrally when compared to other, strongly domed, Oriostoma opercula.

  • 37.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Scaphopodization in Palaeozoic molluscs2006In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 1357-1364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship of a variety of problematic Early Palaeozoic fossils to the true scaphopods (Late Palaeozoic-Recent) is clarified by the recognition that a trend towards the development of a tubular shell is a recurrent theme within Palaeozoic benthic molluscs. This trend is here termed scaphopodization and can be recognized already in the Cambrian in helcionelloids such as Yochelcionella and Eotebenna. The problematic Early Palaeozoic tubular fossils Janospira, Jinonicella and Rhytiodentalium are interpreted as pseudo-scaphopod derivatives of the apparently exogastric ribeirioid rostroconchs. The direction of coiling of the protoconch indicates that they are not closely related to the true scaphopods, which were derived from endogastric concocardioidean rostroconchs in the Devonian or Carboniferous. Scaphopods show a comparable underlying morphological blueprint to these conocardioideans, but they represent a distinct stream-lining to the infaunal habitat.

  • 38.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Systematics and biogeography of some early Cambrian (Series 2) bradoriids (Arthropoda) from Laurentia (Greenland)2017In: Canadian journal of earth sciences (Print), ISSN 0008-4077, E-ISSN 1480-3313, Vol. 54, no 9, p. 961-972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bradoriid arthropods are described from the Kap Troedsson and Henson Gletscher formations of North Greenland and the Bastion Formation of North-East Greenland (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4). Hipponicharion skovstedi n. sp. and Beyrichona avannga n. sp. represent species of genera originally described from Avalonia (New Brunswick) that are characteristic of middle-latitude assemblages in the early Cambrian. They are described for the first time from low-latitude environments in the early Cambrian of Laurentia where they occur together in a middle to upper carbonate ramp succession. Navarana n. gen. is proposed for a rare hipponicharionid currently known only from North Greenland.

  • 39.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    The coral Cothonion from the lower Cambrian of North Greenland2011In: Alcheringa, ISSN 0311-5518, E-ISSN 1752-0754, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 405-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Originally described from the Coonigan Formation of New South Wales, Australia, a second occurrence of the operculate coral Cothonion sympomatum is here described from the Paralledal Formation of North Greenland. Both finds are of late early Cambrian age, Series 2, Stage 4 in the emerging fourfold classification of the Cambrian. The new find supports widespread distribution patterns seen in early Cambrian Small Shelly Fossils, although associated trilobites belong to traditional redlichiid (Australia) and olenellid (Greenland) realms, respectively.

  • 40.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    The oldest pelmatozoan encrusted hardground and holdfasts from Laurentia (Cambrian Series 2-3)2017In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 139, no 3, p. 195-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disarticulated discoidal holdfasts and holomeric columnals from the Henson Gletscher Formation (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4) of North Greenland represent the oldest evidence in Laurentia of colonization of hard grounds by pelmatozoans. Additional occurrences are also reported from the uppermost Henson Gletscher Formation (Cambrian Series 3, Stage 5) and from the Fimbuldal Formation (Cambrian Series 3, Drumian Stage), while hardgrounds encrusted with abundant pelmatozoan holdfasts are described from the Holm Dal Formation (Cambrian Series 3, Guzhangian Stage). The North Greenland occurrence in Stage 4 (Ovatoryctocara granulata assemblage) correlates precisely with finds of similar holdfasts in the Brache a Micmacca Member (Marocconus notabilis Biozone) in Morocco, suggesting the simultaneous appearance of encrusting pelmatozoans in Laurentia and western Gondwana.

  • 41.
    Peel, John Stuart
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution.
    Berg-Madsen, Vivianne
    Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    EOBUCANIA (Mollusca) from the Furongian (late Cambrian) of Sweden2007In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 129, no Part 3, p. 235-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The isometrically coiled mollusc Eobucania Kobayashi, 1955 is described from the Peltura scarabaeoides Zone (Furongian; late Cambrian) of Kinnekulle, southern Sweden, representing the oldest record of the genus and the first from the Cambrian of Sweden. While originally described from the Lower Ordovician strata within the McKay Group of British Columbia, Canada, additional species of Eobucania have been reported from the Lower Ordovician of Mexico, France and the Czech Republic, and ostensibly from the Lower Devonian of China. Eobucania has been widely interpreted as a bellerophontoidean gastropod, but placement within the monoplacophoran Class Tergomya is possible.

  • 42.
    Peel, John Stuart
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Jeppsson, Lennart
    The problematic fossil Jinonicella from the Lower Silurian of Gotland.2006In: GFF, Vol. 128, no 1, p. 39-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Peel, John Stuart
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Skovsted, Christian B
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Problematic cap-shaped fossils from the Lower Cambrian of North-East Greenland2005In: Paläontologische zeitschrift, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 463-472Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Peel, John Stuart
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Streng, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    A new middle Cambrian bradoriid arthropod from Greenland and western Canada2015In: Journal of Paleontology, ISSN 0022-3360, E-ISSN 1937-2337, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 96-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circum-Laurentian middle Cambrian (Cambrian Series 3) deposits in Greenland and British Columbia yield a new hipponicharionid bradoriid arthropod, Flumenoglacies n. gen., characterized by a comarginal, ramp-like structure which is crested by a continuous lobe. The narrow lobe is the result of the medial fusion of anterior and posterior lobes, seemingly a recurrent theme in hipponicharionid evolution. The type species, F. groenlandica n. sp., is described from the Ekspedition Brae Formation (Drumian Stage) of Peary Land but the description of two unnamed species from slightly older middle Cambrian strata of the Stephen Formation of British Columbia provides additional evidence for the wide distribution of Small Shelly Faunas during the Cambrian.

  • 45.
    Siveter, DJ
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Williams, M
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    J. S.,
    Bradoriida (Arthropoda) from the early Cambrian of North Greenland1996In: Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol. 86, p. 113-121Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Skovsted, Christian B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Paleobiologi.
    Peel, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. paleobiologi.
    Atkins, Christian J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. paleobiologi.
    The problematic fossil Triplicatella from the Early Cambrian of Greenland, Canada, and Siberia.2004In: Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 41, p. 1273-1283Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Slater, Ben
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Willman, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Budd, Graham E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Music and Museums, Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Widespread preservation of small carbonaceous fossils (SCFs) in the early Cambrian of North Greenland2018In: Geology, ISSN 0091-7613, E-ISSN 1943-2682, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 107-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early Cambrian (ca. 518 Ma) Sirius Passet Lagerstätte of North Greenland is one of the most celebrated sites bearing fossils of soft-bodied organisms, and provides key insights into the Cambrian explosion of animal life. Unlike the younger Burgess Shale (508 Ma), the Sirius Passet biota does not preserve original carbonaceous material because of its history of metamorphic heating. Nearby sediments from within the same formation, however, have escaped the worst effects of thermal alteration. We report an entirely new diversity of metazoan remains preserved in a Burgess Shale–type fashion from sediments throughout the Buen Formation, in the form of small carbonaceous fossils (SCFs). The assemblages include the oldest known pterobranch hemichordates, diverse cuticular spines of scalidophoran worms, demineralized trilobite cuticle, bivalved arthropods (Spinospitella-like and Isoxys-like forms), protoconodonts, and a variety of less phylogenetically constrained metazoan and protistan forms. Together these SCFs capture exceptional microanatomical details of early Cambrian metazoans and offer new insights into taphonomic pathways at Sirius Passet and the nature of Burgess Shale–type preservation.

  • 48. Stein, Martin
    et al.
    Budd, Graham E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Harper, David A. T.
    Arthroaspis n. gen., a common element of the Sirius Passet Lagerstatte (Cambrian, North Greenland), sheds light on trilobite ancestry2013In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 13, p. 99-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exceptionally preserved Palaeozoic faunas have yielded a plethora of trilobite-like arthropods, often referred to as lamellipedians. Among these, Artiopoda is supposed to contain taxa united by a distinctive appendage structure. This includes several well supported groups, Helmetiida, Nektaspida, and Trilobita, as well as a number of problematic taxa. Interrelationships remain unclear, and the position of the lamellipedian arthropods as a whole also remains the subject of debate. Results: Arthroaspis bergstroemi n. gen. n. sp., a new arthropod from the early Cambrian Sirius Passet Lagerstatte of North Greenland shows a striking combination of both dorsal and ventral characters of Helmetiida, Nektaspida, and Trilobita. Cladistic analysis with a broad taxon sampling of predominantly early Palaeozoic arthropods yields a monophyletic Lamellipedia as sister taxon to the Crustacea or Tetraconata. Artiopoda is resolved as paraphyletic, giving rise to the Marrellomorpha. Within Lamellipedia, a clade of pygidium bearing taxa is resolved that can be shown to have a broadly helmetiid-like tergite morphology in its ground pattern. This morphology is plesiomorphically retained in Helmetiida and in Arthroaspis, which falls basally into a clade containing Trilobita. The trilobite appendages, though similar to those of other lamellipedians in gross morphology, have a unique outward rotation of the anterior trunk appendages, resulting in a 'hard wired' lateral splay, different to that observed in other Lamellipedia. Conclusions: The combination of helmetiid, trilobite, and nektaspid characters in Arthroaspis gives important hints concerning character polarisation within the trilobite-like arthropods. The distinctive tergite morphology of trilobites, with its sophisticated articulating devices, is derived from flanged edge-to-edge articulating tergites forming a shield similar to the helmetiids, previously considered autapomorphic for that group. The stereotypical lateral splay of the appendages of lamellipedians is a homoplastic character shown to be achieved by several groups independently.

  • 49.
    Stockfors, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Endolithic Cyanobacteria from the Middle Cambrian of North Greenland2005In: GFF, Vol. 127, no 3, p. 179-185Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Stockfors, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Peel, John Stuart
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences. Uppsala University, Museums etc., Museum of Evolution. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology.
    Euendoliths and cryptoendoliths within late Middle Cambrian brachiopod shells from North Greenland2005In: GFF, Vol. 127, no 3, p. 187-194Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 52
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