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  • 1.
    Carlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linneuniversitetet.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Discrimination in the Rental Market for Apartments2014In: Journal of Housing Economics, ISSN 1051-1377, E-ISSN 1096-0791, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 41-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discrimination in the housing market may create large economic inefficiencies and unfair individual outcomes, but is very difficult to measure. To circumvent the problems with unobserved heterogeneity, most recent studies use the correspondence testing approach (i.e. sending fictitious inquiries to landlords). In this study, we generalize the existing methodology in order to facilitate a test of to what extent the measured degree of discrimination depends on applicant, landlord/apartment, and regional characteristics. To show how this more general methodology can be implemented, we investigate the effects of gender, ethnicity, age, and employment status in the Swedish rental market for apartments. Our results confirm the existence of widespread discrimination against some of the groups, but also show that the degree of discrimination varies substantially with landlord, apartment, and regional characteristics. This heterogeneity highlights the importance of using a broad approach when conducting correspondence studies. Our results also allow us to interpret the nature of discrimination and how it relates to segregation and geographical sorting.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Do Attitudes Expressed in Surveys Predict Ethnic Discrimination?2017In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 1739-1757Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Survey data on people’s reported attitudes towards ethnic minorities are sometimes used as a proxy for ethnic discrimination. However, there is weak empirical evidence of a link between reported attitudes and discrimination. In this article, we use survey data on people’s attitudes towards ethnic minorities combined with a direct measure of ethnic discrimination from a field experiment in the Swedish housing market to re-examine this policy-relevant issue. We find clear evidence of a link between reported attitudes towards ethnic minorities and the extent of ethnic discrimination: in regions where attitudes are more negative, there is more discrimination, and vice versa. Thus, in contrast to most prior studies, our results suggest that reported attitudes may be a useful predictor of ethnic discrimination.

  • 3.
    Carlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Do Reported Attitudes towards Immigrants Predict Ethnic Discrimination?2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reported attitudes towards immigrants are sometimes used as a proxy for ethnic

    discrimination. However, there is little empirical evidence of a link between attitudes and

    discrimination. In this paper, we use survey data on people’s attitudes towards immigrants

    combined with data on ethnic discrimination from a field experiment in the Swedish housing

    market to re-examine this issue. We find clear evidence of a link between reported attitudes

    towards immigrants and the extent of ethnic discrimination at the municipality level. Thus, in

    contrast to most prior studies, our results suggest that reported attitudes may be a useful

    proxy for ethnic discrimination.

  • 4.
    Carlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Ethnic Discrimination in the London Market for Shared Housing2015In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1276-1301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well documented that there exists ethnic discrimination in the regular housing market in European and US cities. However, the existing literature has so far neglected the informal market for shared housing. We use a field experiment to investigate ethnic discrimination in this market. We sent fictitious enquiries with a randomly assigned name signalling a British, Eastern European, Indian, African or Arabic/Muslim background to more than 5000 room advertisers in the Greater London Area. Our main finding is that ethnic discrimination is widespread. We also find that the degree of discrimination depends on the applicant's occupation and the ethnic residential concentration.

  • 5.
    Carlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Linnaeus Univ, Ctr Labour Market & Discriminat Studies, Vaxjo, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    Stockholm Univ, Swedish Inst Social Res, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Job Search Methods and Wages: Are Natives and Immigrants Different?2018In: Manchester School, ISSN 1463-6786, E-ISSN 1467-9957, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 219-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We conduct a survey of newly hired workers in the Swedish labour market to analyse if there are differences between natives and immigrants in the choice of search intensity/methods and in the search method getting the job. We further investigate if the wage and other characteristics of the new job differ depending on the successful search method. We find that immigrants use all search methods more than natives, but they especially rely on informal search. Immigrants are more likely than natives to find a job using informal search through friends and relatives, and these jobs are associated with lower wages.

  • 6.
    Carlsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Riksbanken.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Gottfries, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Product Market Imperfections and Employment Dynamics2013In: Oxford Economic Papers, ISSN 0030-7653, E-ISSN 1464-3812, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 447-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How important is imperfect competition in the product market for employment dynamics? To investigate this, we formulate a model of employment adjustment with search frictions, vacancy costs, hiring costs, and imperfect competition in the product market. From this model, we derive a structural equation for employment that we estimate on firm-level data. We find that product market demand shocks have significant and quantitatively large effects on employment. This supports a model with imperfect competition in the product market. We find no evidence that the level of unemployment in the local labour market has a direct effect on job creation in existing firms. In some specifications, we find evidence of congestion effects, i.e., that hiring is slowed down if there are many vacancies in the local labour market.

  • 7.
    Carlsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Sveriges Riksbank.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Gottfries, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Testing Theories of Job Creation: Does Supply Create Its Own Demand?2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although search-matching theory has come to dominate labor economics in recent years, few attempts have been made to compare the empirical relevance of search-matching theory to efficiency wage and bargaining theories, where employment is determined by labor demand. In this paper we formulate an empirical equation for net job creation, which encompasses search-matching theory and a standard labor demand model. Estimation on firm-level data yields support for the labor demand model, wages and product demand affect job creation, but we find no evidence that unemployed workers contribute to job creation, as predicted by search-matching theory.

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Skill Loss, Ranking of Job Applicants and the Dynamics of Unemployment2006In: German Economic Review, ISSN 1465-6485, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 265-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the consequences of skill loss as a result of unemployment in an efficiency wage model with turnover costs and on-the-job search. Firms are unable to differentiate wages and therefore prefer to hire employed searchers or unemployed workers who have not lost human capital. It is shown that if some fundamental factor in the economy changes, this will result in a lengthy adjustment process with substantial long run unemployment effects. Moreover, the model is capable of generating persistence but the amount depends on the duration of the shock itself.

  • 9.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Utrikes födda på den svenska arbetsmarknaden2010In: Vägen till arbete : arbetsmarknadspolitik, utbildning och arbetsmarknadsintegration: bilaga 1-4 till Långtidsutredningen 2011, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2010, p. 243-389Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Gottfries, Nils
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Ranking of job applicants, on-the-job search, and persistent unemployment2005In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 407-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We formulate an efficiency wage model with on-the-job search where wages depend on turnover and employers may use information on whether the searching worker is employed or unemployed as a hiring criterion. We show theoretically that such ranking of job applicants by employment status raises both the level and the persistence of unemployment and numerically that the effects may be substantial. More prevalent ranking in Europe compared to the US (because of more rigid wage structures etc.) could potentially help to explain the high and persistent unemployment in Europe.

  • 11.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Johansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Langenskiöld, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Vad är värst - dålig hälsa, utländsk bakgrund eller 55+?2013In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 14-26Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Johansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Langenskiöld, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Economics. Karolinska Institutet, Medical Management Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics.
    What is the right profile for getting a job?: A stated choice experiment of the recruitment process2017In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 803-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the recruitment behaviour of Swedish employers using data from a stated choice experiment. In the experiment, the employers are first asked to describe an employee who recently and voluntarily left the firm and then to choose between two hypothetical applicants to invite to a job interview or to hire as a replacement for their previous employee. The two applicants differ with respect to characteristics such as gender, age, education, work experience, ethnicity, religious beliefs, family situation, weight, and health, but otherwise have similar characteristics as the previous employee. Our results show that employers prefer not to recruit applicants who are old, non-European, Muslim, Jewish, obese, have several children, or have a history of sickness absence. We also calculate the reduction in wage costs needed to make employers indifferent between applicants with and without these characteristics, and find that wage costs would have to be reduced by up to 50 % for applicants with some characteristics.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Johansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Langenskiöld, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Health Economics.
    What is the Right Profile for Getting a Job? A Stated Choice Experiment of the Recruitment Process2016In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Johansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Langenskiöld, Sophie
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    What is the right profile for getting a job?: A stated choice experiment of the recruitment process2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the recruitment behavior of Swedish employers using data from a stated choice experiment. In the experiment, the employers are first asked to describe an employee who recently and voluntarily left the firm, and then to choose between two hypothetical applicants to invite to a job interview or to hire as a replacement for their previous employee. The two applicants differ with respect to characteristics such as gender, age, education, experience, ethnicity, religious beliefs, family situation, weight, and health. Our results show that employers discriminate against applicants who are old, non-European, Muslim, Jewish, obese, have several children, or have a history of sickness absence. Expressed in wage terms, this discrimination corresponds to a wage reduction of up to 50 percent. Moreover, increasing the firms’ cost of uncertainty in hiring – through more firm co-payment in the sickness benefit system – may reduce hiring, but does not affect the degree of discrimination. Also, there are only small differences in the degree of discrimination between different types of recruiters and firms. Overall, our results suggest that the discrimination, at least partially, should reflect statistical discrimination.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lagerström, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Competition between Employed and Unemployed Job Applicants:: Swedish Evidence2004Report (Other scientific)
  • 16.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lagerström, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Competition between Employed and Unemployed Job Applicants: Swedish evidence2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 108, no 3, p. 373-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use the Swedish Applicant Database to empirically investigate whether being unemployed per se reduces the probability of getting contacted by a firm. All searchers looking for a new job are invited to submit their personal details to this database over the Internet. Since we have access to exactly the same information as the firms, we can minimize the problems associated with unobserved heterogeneity. Our results show that an unemployed applicant faces a lower contact probability than an otherwise identical employed applicant, thus supporting the notion that firms view employment status as a signal for productivity.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lagerström, Jonas
    Detecting Discrimination in the Hiring Process: Evidence from an Internet-based Search Channel2007Report (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 18.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lagerström, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Detecting discrimination in the hiring process: Evidence from an Internet-based search channel2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses data from an Internet-based CV database to investigate how factors which may be used as a basis for discrimination, such as the searchers’ ethnicity, gender, age and employment status, affect the number of contacts they receive from firms. Since we have access to essentially the same information as the firms, we can handle the problems associated with unobserved heterogeneity better than most existing studies of discrimination. We find that, even when we control for other differences, searchers who have non-Nordic names, are old or unemployed receive significantly fewer contacts. Moreover, we find that this matters for the hiring outcome: Searchers who receive more contacts have a higher probability of actually getting hired.

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lagerström, Jonas
    Åbo Akademi.
    Detecting discrimination in the hiring process: evidence from an Internet-based search channel2012In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 537-563Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article uses data from an Internet-based CV database to study how job searchers’ ethnicity, employment status, age, and gender affect how often they are contacted by firms. Since we know which types of information that are available to the recruiting firms, we can handle some of the problems with unobserved heterogeneity better than many existing discrimination studies. We find that searchers who have non-Nordic names, are unemployed or old get significantly fewer firm contacts. Moreover, this matters for the hiring outcome: searchers who get more contacts have a higher probability of getting hired.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lagerström, Jonas
    Diskriminering i anställningsprocessen: Resultat från en Internet-baserad sökkanal2007Report (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 21.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lagerström, Jonas
    Åbo Akademi.
    The determinants and some consequences of unemployed workers’ wage demands2012In: Labour, ISSN 1121-7081, E-ISSN 1467-9914, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 208-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the determinants and consequences in the early stages of the hiring process of unemployed workers’ wage demands using direct data on workers’ wage requests. We show that most unemployed workers want a wage close to their previous wage, and thus much more than they get in unemployment benefits. However, some groups, such as women, tend to demand lower wages. Moreover, we find that workers with high wage demands are contacted by firms less often than otherwise similar workers with lower wage demands. Thus, our results suggest that too high wage demands may contribute to high unemployment.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lagerström, Jonas
    Åbo Akademi.
    The labor market consequences of gender differences in job search2012In: Journal of Labor Research, ISSN 0195-3613, E-ISSN 1936-4768, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 303-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses data from an Internet-based CV database to investigate if women are more restrictive than men in their choice of search area, and if this is of importance in the early stages of the hiring process. We show that women are less likely to search in the metropolitan areas or far away fromwhere they currently live. Moreover, our results indicate that these differences are important: Female searchers get fewer firm contacts, and we show that this is to a large extent explained by their more restrictive search area. When we include controls for the searchers search area, the negative gender effect disappears. However, the results differ somewhat across subgroups: For highly skilled women the search area is important, but there remains an unexplained negative gender effect. Our results suggest that gender differences in job search may be important to consider in studies of gender differences in labor market outcomes.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lagerström, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Väljer företag bort arbetslösa jobbsökande?2004Report (Other scientific)
  • 24.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lagerström, Jonas
    Väljer företag bort arbetslösa jobbsökande?2007In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 31-41Article in journal (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 25.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    Linnéuniversitetet .
    Do Employers Use Unemployment as a Sorting Criterion When Hiring? Evidence from a Field Experiment2014In: The American Economic Review, ISSN 0002-8282, E-ISSN 1944-7981, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 1014-1039Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The stigma associated with long-term unemployment spells could create large inefficiencies in labor markets. While the existing literature points toward large stigma effects, it has proven difficult to estimate causal relationships. Using data from a field experiment, we find that long-term unemployment spells in the past do not matter for employers' hiring decisions, suggesting that subsequent work experience eliminate this negative signal. Nor do employers treat contemporary short-term unemployment spells differently, suggesting that they understand that worker/firm matching takes time. However, employers attach a negative value to contemporary unemployment spells lasting at least nine months, providing evidence of stigma effects.

  • 26.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Stadin, Karolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    The Determinants of Hiring in Local Labor Markets: The Role of Demand and Supply Factors2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the determinants of hiring. We use the search-matching model with imperfect competition in the product market from Carlsson, Eriksson and Gottfries (2011) to derive an equation for total hiring in a local labor market, and estimate it on Swedish panel data. When product markets are imperfectly competitive, product demand shocks have a direct effect on employment. Our results show that product demand is important for hiring. Moreover, we show that conventional measures of vacancies do not fully capture the effect of product demand on hiring. Finally, we show that the number of unemployed workers has a positive effect on hiring as predicted by search-matching models.

1 - 26 of 26
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