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  • 1. Aoyama, Yuko
    et al.
    Benner, Chris
    Berndt, Christian
    Coe, Neil
    Engelen, Ewald
    Essletzbichler, Jürgen
    Glassman, Jim
    Glückler, Johannes
    Grote, Michael
    Jones, Andrew
    Leichenko, Robin
    Leslie, Deborah
    Lindner, Peter
    Lorenzen, Mark
    Mansfield, Becky
    Murphy, James T.
    Pollard, Jane
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Stam, Eric
    Wòjcik, Dariusz
    Zook, Matthew
    Emerging Themes in Economic Geography: Outcomes of the Economic Geography 2010 Workshop2011In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 87, no 2, 111-126 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Aspers, Patrik
    et al.
    Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, Cologne, and Stockholm University.
    Kohl, Sebastian
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    An Economic Sociological Look at Geography2008In: Economic Sociology : the European Electronic Newsletter, ISSN 1871-3351, E-ISSN 1871-3351, Vol. 9, no 3, 3-16 p.Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 3. Bråtå, Hans Olav
    et al.
    Hagen, Svein Erik
    Hauge, Atle
    Kotro, Tanja
    Orrenmaa, Mikko
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Repo, Petteri
    Users’ role in innovation processes in the sports equipment industry: experiences and lessons2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main objective of this project is to contribute to our knowledge about user-driven innovation and to suggest how knowledge on user-driven innovation may be included in innovation efforts and systems both for the sports equipment industry and for other industries.

    The study is primarily based on case studies of how firms within the Nordic sports equipment and outdoor industry involve users in their innovation efforts. Our studies concentrate on firms producing equipment for winter sport and outdoor recreation. The study builds upon a large number of interviews with firms and key persons as well as extensive analysis of available written material and research literature.

    The results focus on the identification of certain key user groups in the sports equipment innovation cycle: user innovators, professional and sponsored users, enthusiastic amateurs, passionate insiders and chains and retailers. We consider the extent to which these users influence or take part in innovation processes within technical design, visual design, branding and the development of product systems.

    The report concludes with policy recommendations for how firms may take advantage of each user group. In this respect we present some key points and examples on firms’ interaction with users in innovation processes. Other recommendations consider public policy and suggest that public policy ought to encourage firms to take advantage of knowledge held by those groups. In society a large number of user groups exist and public policy ought to stimulate use of their knowledge for a broader purpose, including societal development. Merging user groups in order to stimulate cross sector development, in addition to organising meeting places may be a theme for public policy at the regional level.

  • 4. Hauge, Atle
    et al.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Quality, difference and regional advantage: The case of the winter sports industry2013In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 20, no 4 SI, 385-400 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    his paper addresses the role of quality, difference and differentiation in the value both producers and consumers attach to products and firms. It is argued that analysis of urban andregional competitiveness needs to be complemented by a renewed focus on the vital role thatquality plays in competitiveness as well as an understanding of geographies of product differenceand differentiation. Debates on economic development and resilience need to focus on innovation but also on how through making and providing quality goods and services - that may be based on the latest technologies or equally on age-old craft traditions - firms secure and develop competitive strengths. But since quality is always a value co-constructed in a negotiation between the consumer and producer, processes of identification and differentiation are formative. A case study of two developments in winter sport equipment is used to exemplify an industry in whichquality is both an entry condition as well as a major factor in differentiation and valuation. The case illustrates the roles of producer-led innovation and user-led innovation in equipment innovation; and that the appreciation of products' quality, value and differentiation rests in interactions between producers, intermediaries and led-users in localized and regional settings. Focusing on the geographies of quality and differentiation is suggested to be important not only for firms but also for urban and regional policy. Regional advantage may partly rest upon how actors come together to co-construct notions of quality and difference: notions that can have lasting effects on regional competitiveness.

  • 5.
    Hauge, Atle
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The Spaces and Places of Swedish Fashion2009In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 4, 529-547 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion companies are involved not only in producing material commodities (clothes), but also in the parallel production of ideas (fashion). The consistent use of outsourcing in the fashion industry means that material production is constantly on the move to low-cost locations. Still high-cost countries have managed to retain a sizable presence in the world of fashion. For firms in such countries, the creation of value and profitability commonly rests on the ability to produce innovative design, brand value, efficient marketing channels, logistics and distribution. Sweden, for instance, plays host to a range of fashion firms: from the multinational giant Hennes & Mauritz to small innovative designers. This creates an interesting strategic problem for firms: why root knowledge intensive functions in Sweden when customers are mainly found in distant export markets? What localized knowledge processes, networks and other factors make these firms keep their home base in Sweden? The article suggests that both spatial proximity and the role of place are important to answering these questions. In conclusion, three main findings are discussed: that the Swedish fashion cluster is not based on high-tech but it is nevertheless knowledge intensive; that fashion has a multifaceted relationship with space and is produced under conditions simultaneously characterized by both localization and globalization; that place does play a distinct role in processes of fashion branding and more generally in the creation of immaterial value.

  • 6.
    Jansson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Constructing Scandinavian design: Cyclical clusters in global circuits2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the notion that the ‘origins’ of cultural products are built up in a dialectical relationship between the products of a cultural cluster and its place. Traditionally, research on cultural agglomerations has posited direct links between products and place: Hollywood films, Paris fashion, Italian design.  It has been thought that regional and industrial success can be at least partly explained by mutual reinforcing effects: the industry adds to the local/regional brand and vice versa. This view, we suggest, is too one dimensional to explain the ‘origins’ of cultural products or to explain how origins embed a place. In particular, we suggest that understandings of connections between cultural products and place must be put in the context of the role ‘cyclical clusters’ in global circuits have in the ongoing constitution and reconstitution of spatial identifiers and brands. The paper uses the example of ‘Scandinavian Design’ which in its 50 year history has become an important identifier and brand used by design, architecture and fashion consumers and industries around the world to imbue cultural products and firms with various intangible values. The paper uses the example to show that: (i) industrial narratives can be crucial to producing imagined geographies of cultural production; and (ii) that such narratives of place have complex geographies that should be understood less in terms of their roots in that place than in terms of their roots in discursive fields played out through cyclical clusters in global circuits. The paper concludes by suggesting that we must go beyond thinking about cultural products ‘origins’ in terms of place-based constructs and instead think about how spatial narratives are constructed in global circuits of overlapping spaces that are timed and arranged in such a way that spaces can be reproduced, reenacted and renewed over time.

  • 7.
    Jansson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Fashioning a Global City: Global City Brand Channels in the Fashion and Design Industries2010In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 44, no 7, 889-904 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper approaches the ways in which fashion and design-based industrial actors contribute to creating images and myths that support global-city status. It is suggested that multi-channel systems of brand building and differentiation exist at regional and local levels, supportive of, and constituted by, cultural industries. The Italian city of Milan is used as a case study to show how the city is an arena where different brand channels are negotiated and formed to service fashion and design branding. For cultural industries, these systems are vital regional sources of advantage and necessary complements to other localized phenomena such as industrial agglomerations and clusters.

  • 8.
    Jansson, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Leva på kultur: preliminära resultat från en studie av kulturella näringar2008Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Lange, Bastian
    et al.
    Humboldt University Berlin.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Suwala, Lech
    Humboldt University Berlin.
    Geographies of field-configuring events2014In: Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsgeographie, ISSN 0044-3751, Vol. 58, no 4, 187-201 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper treats the concept of ‘field-configuring events’ (FCE) and relates it to economic geographical research. The FCE approach attempts to draw attention to the role of events in fields of economic and social action and suggests that events can be important to introducing, structuring, maintaining and configuring new products, industrial standards, cultural artefacts and knowledge categories. The FCE approach has primarily been used to study the actors and networks associated with events such as trade shows, professional gatherings, technology contests, cultural tournaments, industrial exhibitions and business ceremonies: events where actors assemble to reveal novel prod- ucts, develop industry designs, initiate cultural trends, create social networks, and allocate meaning to previously unfamiliar circumstances. In this introductory paper, we identify the main research tra- jectories in FCE and link these to economic geography by identifying some common lines of thinking apparent in economic geography, management and organisational studies. The paper moves on to investigate the nature of the “field”, “configuration” and “events” from a geographic perspective, and to emphasize the role that space and power play as a structuring mechanisms in all three. We conclude that the FCE approach can function as a useful tool for geographical analysis of the increasing fluid and episodic contours of the contemporary space economy.

  • 10. Lundequist, Per
    et al.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Putting Porter into practice? Practices of regional cluster building: evidence from Sweden2002In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 10, no 6, 685-704 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Lundmark, Mats
    et al.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Labour Market Dynamics and the Development of the ICT Cluster in the Stockholm Region2007Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Malmberg, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    (How) Do (Firms in) Clusters Create Knowledge?2005In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 12, no 4, 409-431 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The literature on clusters and cluster building has been rapidly growing both in academic and policy‐making circles. Central to this interest and body of work has been the assumption that location in clusters helps firms to exchange, acquire and generate new knowledge. Since knowledge is increasingly believed to be the basis of firm competitiveness clustered firms and industries will outperform others. This paper sets out to examine the evidence for propositions regarding the knowledge‐enhancing qualities of clusters by reviewing the literature with the expressed intention of examining whether such claims in fact rest upon rigorous and verifiable empirical findings. In order to do this we extract from the theoretical literature on clusters three hypothetical arguments for the knowledge creating and competitiveness generating power of clusters: knowledge in clusters is created through various forms of local inter‐organizational collaborative interaction; knowledge in clusters is created through increased competition and intensified rivalry; knowledge in clusters is created through spillover following from the local mobility and sociability of individuals. The paper goes on to assess and evaluate the number and rigour of empirical cases supporting these types of argument.

  • 13.
    Malmberg, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    On the Role of Global Demand in Local Innovation Processes?2005In: Rethinking Regional Innovation and Change: Path Dependency or Regional Breakthrough?, Springer, New York , 2005, 273-290 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Malmberg, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    True Clusters / A Severe Case of Conceptual Headache2006In: Clusters in Regional Development, London: Routledge , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15. Nielsén, Tobias
    et al.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Sigurdardottir, Margret
    University of Iceland, School of Business.
    Creative Business: 10 Lessons to Help Build a Business Your Way2010Book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Nielsén, Tobias
    et al.
    QNB Volante.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Sigurdardottir, Margret
    University of Iceland.
    Penny for your thoughts: 10 lessons to help you invest in and grow with a creative business2009 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    A Response to Scott2014In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 48, no 4, 579-582 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Power D. A response to Scott, Regional Studies. This paper deals with two main issues. First, it addresses the issue of how we tackle the status of the creative city discourse and how we should understand and react to policy in third-wave cities. Second, it discusses the issue of where we see the lines of stratification and division between people and workers in third-wave cities. This paper responds to some of the suggestions contained in the article by Allen J. Scott in this issue.

  • 18.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    An international and critical perspective on the cultural and creative industries2010Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Behind the music - Profiting from Sound: A Systems Approach to the Dynamics of Nordic Music Industry.2003Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Book review: Cooke, P. and Lazzeretti, L., editors 2008: Creative cities, cultural clusters and local economic development2009In: Progress in Human Geography, ISSN 0309-1325, E-ISSN 1477-0288, Vol. 33, no 6, 866-868 p.Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Creativity and innovation in the Scandinavian design industry2012In: Creativity and Innovation in the Cultural Economy / [ed] Paul Jeffcutt and Andy C Pratt, Seoul: Communication Books , 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Creativity and innovation in the Scandinavian design industry2009In: Creativity and innovation in the cultural economy, London: Routledge , 2009, 200-216 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Cultural industries and responsible design2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Culture, Creativity and Experience in Nordic and Scandinavian Cultural Policy2009In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 15, no 4, 445-460 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines the impact that the 'creative industries' discourse which originated in the UK has had in the Scandinavian and Nordic countries. It is argued that the diversity of the region and the various national policy contexts make it hard to identify any one legacy. The discourse does, however, fit neatly into wider discourses within economic and regional planning that emphasise the roles of cultural and creative activities in industrial transformation and the knowledge economy. It is suggested that despite difficulties defining both 'creative industries' and 'Scandinavia' there is a role for cross-border policies aimed at supporting commercial actors through the exploitation of regional economies of scale and scope.

  • 25.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Economic Globalization2001In: Reader’s Guide to the Social Sciences, London: Fitzroy Dearbon , 2001Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Europe’s Creative and Cultural Industries: where are we now?2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Information and Communications Technology and the Integration of European Derivatives Markets2001In: Worlds of E-Commerce: economic, geographical and social dimensions, Chichester: Wiley , 2001Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    IT and institutions in the structuring of European finance: urban impacts2002In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 23, no 2, 335-356 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    L’accès au marché des produits culturels suédois: réflexions depuis la « périphérie »2008In: L'économie culturelle et ses territoires, Presses Universitaires du Mirail, Toulouse , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Mapping of creative and cultural industries clusters:  Results from a study of the European Cluster Observatory2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Priority Sector Report: Creative and Cultural Industries2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    • In 2009, creative and cultural industries fi rms employed a total of 6.4 million persons in 30 European countries.

    • Regions with high concentrations of creative and cultural industries have Europe’s highest prosperity levels.

    • Large urban areas and capital city regions dominate the creative and cultural industries, but some city regionsdo better than others. The super clusters London and Paris stand out, followed by Milan, Madrid, Barcelonaand Rome.

    • The creative and cultural industries are signifi cant generators of intellectual property, in particular copyrights.Regions strong in these industries also tend to have higher levels of patenting.

    • Among the regions of Europe which rank among the top 25 either by population or CCI employment thefollowing cities host an over-representation of the creative and cultural sector: Amsterdam (Noord-Holland),Berlin, Frankfurt (Darmstadt), Brighton (Surrey, E and W Sussex), Budapest (Kozep-Magyarorszag), The Hague(Zuid-Holland), Lisbon, Inner London, Oxford (Berks, Bucks and Oxon), and Stockholm.

    • As a share of the regional labour market, creative and cultural industries account for the largest shares inStockholm, Prague, London and Rome.

    • Most of the regions in the top 25 highest cultural and creative growth regions are small and medium sizedregions.

    • The highest annual employment growth rates in the period 2003/4-2008/9 are found in Cyprus 25.79%,Slovakia 25.60%, Estonia 11.48%, Latvia 9.78%

    • Creative and cultural industries manufacturing and production activities are the most regionally concentrated,and consumer oriented activities such as retail the least regionally concentrated.

    • Further statistical work is needed to measure the true size of the creative and cultural industries. The dataused in this report covers employees but not sole traders (i.e. fi rms with no employees but one active owner)or freelancers.

  • 32.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Rethinking Added Value in the Creative Industries: Combining Theory and Empirical Data2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Social Economy of the Metropolis: Cognitive-Cultural Capitalism and the Global Resurgence of Cities2010In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 44, no 1, 131-132 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Society Building: A Sociological Analysis of Architecture.1995Other (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The ‘cultural industries’ in Sweden: an assessment of the place of the cultural industries in the Swedish economy2002In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 78, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The difference principal: shaping competitive advantage in the cultural product industries.2008In: The Creative industries and Intellectual Property Conference, Dynamics of Institutions and Markets in Europe (DIME) Network of Excellence, Creative Industries Observatory (CIO), Birkbeck College, London, May 22-23 2008, London: DIME , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The difference principal?: shaping competitive advantage in the cultural product industries2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that due to the endless substitution possibilities open to consumers of cultural products, firms’ competitive advantage rests as much upon positionality and differentiation as upon traditional forms of intellectual property such as copyrights and trademarks.

    However, the construction of positionality and differentiation may entail geographies and milieus other than those best suited to the origination and creation of cultural industry artefacts. The paper suggests that existing models of regional growth and innovation systems must be adapted to fit firms and sectors where competitiveness is not only based on traditional types of intellectual property (such as copyrights or patents) but also differential property (such as marketplace positionality). If providing a regional system supportive of differentiation (and market positionality) is important to these firms/industries then we must reappraise our notions of supportive regional conditions. To this end a revised version of the cluster model of regional competitive advantage is presented: one whichattempts to be more tailored to industries where intellectual property and differentiation are the core products.

  • 38.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The difference principle? Shaping competitive advantage in the cultural product industries2010In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 92, no 2, 145-158 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues that due to the endless substitution possibilities open to consumers of cultural products, firms’ competitive advantage rests as much upon positionality and differentiation as upon traditional forms of intellectual property such as copyrights and trademarks. However, the construction of positionality and differentiation may entail geographies and milieus other than associated with product origination and creation. The article suggests that existing models of regional growth and innovation systems must, and can, be adapted to fit firms and sectors where competitiveness is not only based on traditional types of intellectual property (such as copyrights or patents) but also differential property (such as marketplace positionality). The idea of regional systems supportive of differentiation (and market positionality) means we must reappraise some of our notions of what constitute supportive regional conditions. To this end a revised version of the cluster model of regional competitive advantage is presented: one which attempts to be more tailored to industries where intellectual property and differentiation are the core products.

  • 39.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The Future in Design: the competitiveness and industrial dynamics of the Nordic design industry2005Report (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 40.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The Immersive Internet: Reflections on the Entangling of the Virtual with Society, Politics and the Economy2013Book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The Nordic ‘Cultural Industries’: a cross-national assessment of the place of the cultural industries in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden2003In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 85B, no 3, 167-180 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper an attempt is made to measure the cultural industries in a cross-national context. The paper starts with a discussion of the definition and delineation of the term the ‘cultural industries’. It is argued that a large range of goods and servi

  • 42.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The Spatial and the Economy2001In: Review of International Political Economy, ISSN 0969-2290, E-ISSN 1466-4526, Vol. 8, no 3, 548-556 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art, and Music Drive New York City, by Elizabeth Currid2009In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 85, no 1, 101-101 p.Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Venture financing the cultural industries2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Voices from the North: New Trends in Nordic Human Geography, edited by Jan Öhman and Kirsten Simonsen2004In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 80, no 4, 415-17 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Power, Dominic
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Working and voting for a world class city? A critical viewpoint on the role of the Corporation of London’s place in London governance2001In: The London Journal, ISSN 0305-8034, Vol. 26, no 2, 51-64 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Power, Dominic
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Aoyama, Yuko
    Conceptualising consumption in Economic Geography2007In: Second Global Conference on Economic Geography, 2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Power, Dominic
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Gustavsson, Niklas
    International Competitiveness and the Experience industries: Visanu (Invest in Sweden Agency – Nutek – Vinnova) Report 2005:152005Report (Other scientific)
  • 49.
    Power, Dominic
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Hallencreutz, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Competitiveness, local production systems and global commodity chains in the music industry: entering the US market2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on the results of interviews with music industry actors in the USA, and several other countries, that examined the industry, distribution and retail structures controlling ‘foreign’ music’s access to the world’s largest music markets. The paper uses the US market in order to demonstrate and trace the principal channels and barriers that determine the conditions of market access for a musical product. It is shown that music distribution channels and retail environments exist in a networked commodity chain dominated by a limited set of oligopolistic global firms. The journey of a foreign musical product to market in the USA is a difficult one through a set of globally interlinked but highly fractured and localised commodity pools and channels. The paper concludes by suggesting that for firms and national industries interested in exporting to the USA understanding the workings of these links between products and consumers is vital. The implications for regional industrial and innovation policy of power over products’ commercial success being ‘located’ largely outside the local production centre are argued to be far-reaching. In summary, the article is premised on the idea that if we are to understand success or failure in music sales and better develop regional production milieus we must first understand those who control the distribution channels and retail environments that sales are made through. In such a task a revised version of the global commodity chain perspective has much to offer researchers and policymakers alike.

  • 50.
    Power, Dominic
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Hallencreutz, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Competitiveness, local production systems and global commodity chains in the music industry: entering the US market2007In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 41, no 3, 377-389 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper traces the principal channels and barriers that determine the conditions of access for musical products entering the US music market. It is shown that music distribution channels and retail environments exist in a networked commodity chain dominated by a limited set of oligopolistic global firms. The journey of a foreign musical product to market in the USA is a difficult one through a set of globally interlinked but highly fractured and localized commodity pools and channels. It is suggested that to understand success or failure in music sales and better develop regional production milieus, one must first understand those who control the distribution channels and retail environments through which sales are made.

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