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  • 1.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ekvall, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Kinnefors, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Evaluation of quality of life and symptoms after translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma surgery1997In: The American journal of otology, ISSN 0192-9763, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 421-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study aimed to describe the consequences of acoustic neuroma surgery in terms of symptoms and quality of life.

    STUDY DESIGN:

    This study was a retrospective case review.

    SETTING:

    The surgery was conducted in Uppsala, Sweden.

    PATIENTS:

    A consecutive sample of acoustic neuroma patients operated on between 1988 and 1994.

    INTERVENTION:

    All patients had been operated on with the translabyrinthine technique.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

    A questionnaire was constructed including questions about the surgery and symptoms. The House and Brackmann scale was used for grading facial function and the Brackmann and Bars scale was used for self-assessment of facial function.

    RESULTS:

    Follow-up data were collected by a postal questionnaire sent out and returned by 141 patients, which yielded a 90% response rate. Normal to moderately impaired facial function (House I-III) was evident in 85.2% of patients, although residual facial problems were reported. Most considered hearing to be worse after surgery (80%), and tinnitus was found in 60% of the sample. Balance problems (45%), dizziness (19%), and headache/pain (22%) were also reported. Work ability was affected in 23%, and 37% reported a continued need for medical consultations, mainly because of facial problems and pain. Most (89%) were pleased with the preoperative information.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study showed that few patients with acoustic neuroma had experienced negative social consequences after surgery. Although not linked to the operation, residual symptoms were reported that may necessitate further rehabilitation.

  • 2.
    Diaz de Ståhl, Teresita
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hansson, Caisa M
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    de Bustos, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Mantripragada, Kiran K
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Piotrowski, Arkadiusz
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Benetkiewicz, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Jarbo, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Wiklund, Leif
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Matiesen, Tiit
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Department of Neuroscience.
    Collins, V Peter
    Evans, D Gareth
    Ichimura, Koichi
    Dumanski, Jan P
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    High-resolution array-CGH profiling of germline and tumor-specific copy number alterations on chromosome 22 in patients affected with schwannomas2005In: Human Genetics, Vol. 118, no 35-44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Fisher, James L.
    et al.
    Pettersson, David
    Palmisano, Sadie
    Schwartzbaum, Judith A.
    Edwards, Colin G.
    Mathiesen, Tiit
    Prochazka, Michaela
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Florentzson, Rut
    Harder, Henrik
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Siesjo, Peter
    Feychting, Maria
    Loud Noise Exposure and Acoustic Neuroma2014In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 180, no 1, p. 58-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results from studies of loud noise exposure and acoustic neuroma are conflicting. A population-based case-control study of 451 acoustic neuroma patients and 710 age-, sex-, and region-matched controls was conducted in Sweden between 2002 and 2007. Occupational exposure was based on historical measurements of occupational noise (321 job titles summarized by a job exposure matrix) and compared with self-reported occupational noise exposure. We also evaluated self-reported noise exposure during leisure activity. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. There was no statistically significant association between acoustic neuroma and persistent occupational noise exposure, either with or without hearing protection. Exposure to loud noise from leisure activity without hearing protection was more common among acoustic neuroma cases (odds ratio = 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 2.03). Statistically significant odds ratios were found for specific leisure activities including attending concerts/clubs/sporting events (odds ratio = 1.82, 95% confidence interval: 1.09, 3.04) and participating in workouts accompanied by loud music (odds ratio = 2.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.37, 5.89). Our findings do not support an association between occupational exposure to loud noise and acoustic neuroma. Although we report statistically significant associations between leisure-time exposures to loud noise without hearing protection and acoustic neuroma, especially among women, we cannot rule out recall bias as an alternative explanation.

  • 4.
    Gudjonsson, O
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Bergstrom, M
    Kristjansson, S
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Wu, F
    Nyberg, G
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Fasth, K-J
    Langstrom, B
    Analysis of 76Br-BrdU in DNA of brain tumors after av PET study does not support its use as a proliferation marker2001In: Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Vol. 28, p. 59-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Lundin, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Stillesjö, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Experiences from Auditory Brainstem Implantation (ABI) in four Paediatric Patients2016In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Lundin, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Stillesjö, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Self-Reported Benefit, Sound Perception, and Quality-of-Life in Patients with Auditory Brainstem Implants (ABIs)2016In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 136, no 1, p. 62-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONCLUSION:

    The majority of the patients used their auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) all the time, reporting that he/she would make the decision to receive an implant again if the decision were reconsidered. The findings support that the ABI is a valuable treatment in patients with type 2 neurofibromatosis (NF2) and in children with congenital inner ear and nerve anomalies or cochlear ossification.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To evaluate the patients who underwent ABI implantation in Uppsala during 1993-2013. This study analyzed patients' implant use, perception of environmental sounds, perceived benefit from the implant, and quality-of-life (QoL).

    METHOD:

    The NF2-patients (n = 20) comprised the majority of the patients, and there were a few non-NF2 pediatric patients (n = 4). The exclusion criteria included deceased patients (n = 4) and patients with no hearing sensations from the implant, or those with an inactivated ABI (n = 2). The data were collected from a questionnaire survey.

    RESULTS:

    Eleven adult patients and two pediatric patients answered the questionnaires. Eight of the adult patients used their implants 'always'. The two children always used their implants. Hearing problems had the largest negative effect on the QoL. The non-users and the users scored equally on the NFTI-QoL.

  • 7.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Kinnefors, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Gudjonsson, Olafur
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Svedberg, A
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Edfeldt, Lennart
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Hjärnstamsimplantat kan återge hörsel. Behandling av dövhet vid dubbelsidiga akustikusneurinom: Brain stem implant can restore hearing. Treatment of deafness in bilateral acoustic neuroma2007In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 104, no 47, p. 3553-3556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Auditory brain stem implant (ABI) is a method to restore some hearing in patients with bilateral acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) or neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF 2). The ABI device may re-establish some hearing improving patient lip reading, awareness of sound and facilitate speech production after onset of total deafness. Today ABI is an established technique for treatment of deafness in patients with NF 2, with a low complication rate. New indications are inner ear malformations with lacking auditory nerve and severe calcification of the cochlea in children. Additional improvements in technical design and more knowledge about the microanatomy and function of the central auditory pathways, including the cochlear nucleus, will most likely lead to still better results in the near future.

  • 8. Palmisano, Sadie
    et al.
    Schwartzbaum, Judith
    Prochazka, Michaela
    Pettersson, David
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Florentzson, Rut
    Harder, Henrik
    Mathiesen, Tiit
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Siesjo, Peter
    Feychting, Maria
    Role of Tobacco Use in the Etiology of Acoustic Neuroma2012In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 175, no 12, p. 1243-1251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two previous studies suggest that cigarette smoking reduces acoustic neuroma risk; however, an association between use of snuff tobacco and acoustic neuroma has not been investigated previously. The authors conducted a case-control study in Sweden from 2002 to 2007, in which 451 cases and 710 population-based controls completed questionnaires. Cases and controls were matched on gender, region, and age within 5 years. The authors estimated odds ratios using conditional logistic regression analyses, adjusted for education and tobacco use (snuff use in the smoking analysis and smoking in the snuff analysis). The risk of acoustic neuroma was greatly reduced in male current smokers (odds ratio (OR) = 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.23, 0.74) and moderately reduced in female current smokers (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.40, 1.23). In contrast, current snuff use among males was not associated with risk of acoustic neuroma (OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.57, 1.55). The authors' findings are consistent with previous reports of lower acoustic neuroma risk among current cigarette smokers than among never smokers. The absence of an association between snuff use and acoustic neuroma suggests that some constituent of tobacco smoke other than nicotine may confer protection against acoustic neuroma.

  • 9. Pettersson, David
    et al.
    Mathiesen, Tiit
    Prochazka, Michaela
    Bergenheim, Tommy
    Florentzson, Rut
    Harder, Henrik
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Siesjo, Peter
    Feychting, Maria
    Long-term Mobile Phone Use and Acoustic Neuroma Risk2014In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is concern about potential effects of radiofrequency fields generated by mobile phones on cancer risk. Most previous studies have found no association between mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma, although information about long-term use is limited. Methods: We conducted a population-based, nation-wide, case-control study of acoustic neuroma in Sweden. Eligible cases were persons aged 20 to 69 years, who were diagnosed between 2002 and 2007. Controls were randomly selected from the population registry, matched on age, sex, and residential area. Postal questionnaires were completed by 451 cases (83%) and 710 controls (65%). Results: Ever having used mobile phones regularly (defined as weekly use for at least 6 months) was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.18 (95% confidence interval = 0.88 to 1.59). The association was weaker for the longest induction time (10 years) (1.11 [0.76 to 1.61]) and for regular use on the tumor side (0.98 [0.68 to 1.43]). The OR for the highest quartile of cumulative calling time (680 hours) was 1.46 (0.98 to 2.17). Restricting analyses to histologically confirmed cases reduced all ORs; the OR for 680 hours was 1.14 (0.63 to 2.07). A similar pattern was seen for cordless land-line phones, although with slightly higher ORs. Analyses of the complete history of laterality of mobile phone revealed considerable bias in laterality analyses. Conclusions: The findings do not support the hypothesis that long-term mobile phone use increases the risk of acoustic neuroma. The study suggests that phone use might increase the likelihood that an acoustic neuroma case is detected and that there could be bias in the laterality analyses performed in previous studies.

  • 10.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Boström, Marja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Kinnefors, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Neurokirurgi.
    Engstrand, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Miller, Josef M.
    Lindholm, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Regeneration of human auditory nerve. In vitro/in video demonstration of neural progenitor cells in adult human and guinea pig spiral ganglion2005In: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, Vol. 203, no 1-2, p. 180-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Time lapse video recordings of cultured adult human and guinea pig spiral ganglion (hSG and gpSG) show that mitogen responsive progenitor/stem cells develop in the form of spheres that proliferate and differentiate into mature neurons and glia cells. Neurospheres, cultured with EGF and bFGF showed expression of nestin and incorporation of 5'-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Newly formed BrdU labelled cells were positive for beta-tubulin, and also for GFAP demonstrating that neuronal cells were derived from a dividing population of progenitor cells. Dissociated spheres cultured either with glia cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), induced differentiation of the progenitor cells. Video microscopy showed that neurons develop from subcultured spheres maintained for up to four weeks. Neurons showed fasciculation and migration with a speed of 10-30 microm/h, and some cells had up to 6 mm long neurites coexpressing TrkB and TrkC receptors. Precise dissection suggests that the neurons formed are cochlea-specific. The results suggest that the mammalian auditory nerve has the capability for self-renewal and replacement. Transplantation of progenitor cells together with established means to induce neural differentiation and fiber growth may facilitate strategies for better repair and treatment of auditory neuronal damage.

  • 11.
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Kinnefors, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Ekvall, Lars
    Elektrisk stimulering av hjärnstammen: Behandling av döva med förstörd hörselnerv1996In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 93, no 40, p. 3461-3464Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12. Sennaroğlu, Levent
    et al.
    Colletti, Vittorio
    Lenarz, Thomas
    Manrique, Manuel
    Laszig, Roland
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Göksu, Nebil
    Offeciers, Erwin
    Saeed, Shakeel
    Behr, Robert
    Bayazıt, Yıldırım
    Casselman, Jan
    Freeman, Simon
    Kileny, Paul
    Lee, Daniel J
    Shannon, Robert V
    Kameswaran, Mohan
    Hagr, Abdulrahman
    Zarowski, Andrzej
    Schwartz, Mark S
    Bilginer, Burçak
    Kishore, Ameet
    Sennaroğlu, Gonca
    Yücel, Esra
    Saraç, Sarp
    Ataş, Ahmet
    Colletti, Lilian
    O'Driscoll, Martin
    Moon, In Seok
    Gärtner, Lutz
    Huarte, Alicia
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Mocan, Burçe Özgen
    Atay, Gamze
    Bajin, Münir Demir
    Çınar, Betül Çicek
    Batuk, Merve Özbal
    Yaralı, Mehmet
    Aydınlı, Fatma Esen
    Aslan, Filiz
    Kirazlı, Meltem Cigdem
    Özkan, Hilal Burcu
    Hans, J M
    Kosaner, Julie
    Polak, Marek
    Consensus statement: Long-term results of ABI in children with complex inner ear malformations and decision making between CI and ABI2016In: Cochlear Implants International, ISSN 1467-0100, E-ISSN 1754-7628, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 163-171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Siegbahn, Malin
    et al.
    Lundin, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Olsson, Gun-Britt
    Stillesjö, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Kinnefors, Anders
    Rask-Andersen, Helge
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Auditory Brainstem Implants (ABIs): 20 Years of Clinical Experience in Uppsala, Sweden2014In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 134, no 10, p. 1052-1061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Even though sound perception may be limited after treatment with an auditory brainstem implant (ABI), it provides benefits and should be selectively offered to patients. Importantly the patients must be motivated, given reasonable expectations of outcome and offered long-term rehabilitation with a considerable 'learn to listen' period with the implant device.

    OBJECTIVES:

    To describe the clinical experiences and results of 24 ABI surgeries performed in Uppsala University Hospital between 1993 and 2013.

    METHODS:

    Most patients (n = 20) suffered from neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2); a few patients (n = 4) were paediatric non-NF2 patients. The files were searched for information on the presurgery size of the vestibular schwannoma, whether the patient had undergone gamma knife treatment, the surgical approach, the side effects of the surgery and of the use of the implant, the electrode activation pattern and implant use, and categories of auditory performance (CAP) score.

    RESULTS:

    Our results show that many patients greatly benefited from an ABI, and most of the patients used their implants even though the hearing improvements usually consisted of awareness of surrounding sounds and improved lip-reading. No severe side effects were observed from implant stimulation.

  • 14.
    Silander, Hans
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Neurokirurgi.
    Pellettieri, Luigi
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Neurokirurgi.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Neurokirurgi.
    Montelius, Anders
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Grusell, Erik
    Vallhagen-Dahlgren, C
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Isacsson, U
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Neurokirurgi.
    Moström, Ulf
    Lilja, Anders
    Gal, Guyla
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Blomquist, Erik
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Fractionated, stereotactic proton beam treatment of cerebral arterionvenous malformations.2004In: Acta Neurol Scand, Vol. 109, no 2, p. 85-90Article in journal (Refereed)
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