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  • 1.
    Astell-Burt, Thomas
    et al.
    University of Western Sydney.
    Mitchell, Rich
    University of Glasgow.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Greener neighbourhoods, healthier lives?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2. Astell-Burt, Thomas
    et al.
    Mitchell, Richard
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The association between green space and mental health varies across the lifecourse. A longitudinal study2014In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 68, no 6, p. 578-583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Epidemiological studies on green space and health have relied almost exclusively on cross-sectional designs, restricting understanding on how this relationship could vary across the lifecourse. Methods We used multilevel linear regression to analyse variation in minor psychiatric morbidity over nine annual waves of the British Household Panel Survey (1996-2004). The sample was restricted to residents of urban areas who remained within their neighbourhoods for at least 12 months. The 12-item General Health Questionnaire and confounders were reported for 29 626 male and 35 781 female observations (person-years). This individual-level dataset was linked to a measure of green space availability within each ward of residence. Regression models included age, gender, employment status, household tenure, marital status, education, smoking status and household income. Results When not considering age, green space was associated with better mental health among men, but not women. Interaction terms fitted between age and green space revealed variation in the association between green space and mental health across the lifecourse and by gender. For men, the benefit of more green space emerged in early to mid-adulthood. Among older women, a curvilinear association materialised wherein those with a moderate availability of green space had better mental health. Conclusions These findings illustrate how the relationship between urban green space and health can vary across the lifecourse, and they highlight the need for longitudinal studies to answer why green space may be better for health at some points in the lifecourse than others.

  • 3. Bell, Simon
    et al.
    van Zon, Roland
    Van Herzele, Ann
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Health benefits of nature experience: Implications of practice for research2011In: Forests, trees, and human health / [ed] Nilsson, Kjell, Marcus Sangster, Christos Gallis, Terry Hartig, Sjerp de Vries, Klaus Seeland & Jasper Schipperijn, Dordrecht: Springer , 2011, 1st Edition, p. 183-202Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bowler, Peter A.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kaiser, Florian G.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    A role for ecological restoration work in university environmental education1999In: Journal of Environmental Education, ISSN 0095-8964, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of ecological restoration field work and in-class instruction on students’ ecological behavior, environmental attitudes, and perceptions of restorative qualities in a natural environment were studied in 3 classes of university undergraduates (

  • 5.
    Bringslimark, Tina
    et al.
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norge.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Grindal Patil, Grete
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norge.
    Adaptation to windowlessness: do office workers compensate and does it work?2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6. Bringslimark, Tina
    et al.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Grindal Patil, Grete
    The psychological benefits of indoor plants: A critical review of the experimental literature2009In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 422-433Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People have been bringing plants into residential and other indoor settings for centuries, but little is known about their psychological effects. In the present article, we critically review the experimental literature on the psychological benefits of indoor plants. We focus on benefits gained through passive interactions with indoor plants rather than on the effects of guided interactions with plants in horticultural therapy or the indirect effect of indoor plants as air purifiers or humidifiers. The reviewed experiments addressed a variety of outcomes, including emotional states, pain perception, creativity, task-performance, and indices of autonomic arousal. Some findings recur, such as enhanced pain management with plants present, but in general the results appear to be quite mixed. Sources of this heterogeneity include diversity in experimental manipulations, settings, samples, exposure durations, and measures. After addressing some overarching theoretical issues, we close with recommendations for further research with regard to experimental design, measurement, analysis, and reporting.

  • 7.
    Bringslimark, Tina
    et al.
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB).
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Patil, Grete Grindal
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
    Adaptation to windowlessness: Do office workers compensate for a lack of visual access to the outdoors?2011In: Environment and Behavior, ISSN 0013-9165, E-ISSN 1552-390X, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 469-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    If office workers lack a view to natural features outdoors, do they compensate by bringing plants and pictures of nature indoors? The authors used cross-sectional survey data from 385 Norwegian office workers to investigate whether such compensation occurs. The authors found that workers without windows had roughly five times greater odds of having brought plants into their workspaces than workers with windows, independent of age, gender, type of office, job demands, control over work, and personalization. Windowless workers also had three times greater odds of having brought pictures of nature into their workspaces. The authors consider implications of the findings for environmental design that offers contact with nature to people who spend much of their time indoors.

  • 8. Bringslimark, Tina
    et al.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Patil, Grete Grindal
    Psychological benefits of indoor plants in workplaces: Putting experimental results into context2007In: Hortscience, ISSN 0018-5345, E-ISSN 2327-9834, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 581-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laboratory experiments and quasi-experimental field studies have documented beneficial effects of indoor plants on outcomes such as psychophysiological stress, task performance, and symptoms of ill health. Such studies have taken an interest in the value of indoor plants in work settings, but they typically have not considered how the effects of plants might compare with effects of other workplace characteristics. The present study makes an initial attempt to situate the potential benefits of indoor plants in a broader workplace context. With cross-sectional survey data from 385 Norwegian office workers, we used hierarchical regression analyses to estimate the associations that plants and several often-studied workplace factors have with perceived stress, sick leave, and productivity. Other variables included in our models were gender, age, physical workplace factors (e.g., noise, temperature, lighting, air quality), and psychosocial workplace factors (demands, control, social support). After controlling for these variables, the number of indoor plants proximal to a worker's desk had small but statistically reliable associations with sick leave and productivity. Although small, such associations can have substantial practical significance given aggregation over the large number of office workers over time.

  • 9. Bringslimark, Tina
    et al.
    Patil, Grete Grindal
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The association between indoor plants, stress, productivity and sick leave2008In: Proceedings of the XXVII International Horticultural Congress - IHC2006: International Symposium on Horticultural Practices and Therapy for Human Well-Being, 2008, Vol. 41, no 775, p. 117-121Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Buhrman, Monica
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Syk, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Burvall, Olle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Individualized Guided Internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Chronic Pain Patients with Comorbid Depression and Anxiety: A Randomized Controlled Trial2015In: The Clinical Journal of Pain, ISSN 0749-8047, E-ISSN 1536-5409, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 504-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression and anxiety are commonly seen in patients with chronic pain which affects the patient´s daily life functioning. Although considerable attention has been devoted to explain why depression and anxiety are frequent comorbid with chronic pain, little empirical work has been conducted on interventions that target depression and anxiety and chronic pain. The present study was designed to test an individualized cognitive-behavioral treatment delivered through the internet for persons with chronic pain and emotional distress. A total of 52 patients with chronic pain and depression were included and randomized to either treatment for 8 weeks or to a control group that participated in a moderated online discussion forum. Intent-to-treat analyses showed significant decreases regarding depressive symptoms and pain disability in the treatment group. Results on the primary outcomes of depression and anxiety were in favour of the treatment group. Reductions were also found on pain catastrophizing. One year follow-up showed maintenance of improvements. We conclude that an individualized guided internet-delivered treatment based on cognitive behaviour therapy can be effective for persons with chronic pain comorbid emotional distress.

  • 11.
    Byrka, Katarzyna
    et al.
    Warsaw School of Social Sciences and Humanities.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Kaiser, Florian G.
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Environmental attitude as a mediator of the relationship between in nature and self-reported ecological behavior2010In: Psychological Reports, ISSN 0033-2941, E-ISSN 1558-691X, Vol. 107, no 3, p. 847-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental attitude and ecological behavior were investigated in relation to the use of nature for psychological restoration. Specifically, with survey data from 468 German university students, the role of environmental attitude was investigated as a mediator of the restoration-behavior relationship. Assuming that positive experiences in nature can have a broad influence on environmental attitudes, the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) scale, an attitudinal measure with broad scope, was adopted. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated partial mediation by environmental concern. The study helps to consolidate the restoration theme in the growing literature on positive motivations for ecological behavior.

  • 12. Catalano, Ralph
    et al.
    Bruckner, Tim
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Ong, Michael
    Population stress and the Swedish sex ratio2005In: Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, ISSN 0269-5022, E-ISSN 1365-3016, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 413-420Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Catalano, Ralph
    et al.
    Karasek, Deborah
    Gemmill, Alison
    Falconi, April
    Goodman, Julia
    Magganas, Aristotle
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Very low birthweight: Dysregulated gestation versus evolutionary adaptation2014In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 108, p. 237-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much medical literature attributes persistently high rates of very low birthweight (VLBW) to "dysregulated" gestation. We offer the alternative view that natural selection conserved well-regulated, though nonconscious, decisional biology that protects the reproductive fitness of women by spontaneously aborting gestations that would otherwise yield frail infants, particularly small males. Modern obstetric practice, however, converts some fraction of these erstwhile spontaneous abortions into live births of very small infants. We further propose that the nonconscious decisional biology of gestation exhibits preferences also seen in consciously made decisions. We hypothesize that the incidence of VLBW among male infants should vary with the population's self-reported intentions to assume financial risk. We apply time-series modeling to monthly birth counts by sex and weight from the Swedish Medical Birth Registry between January 1993 and December 2010. We gauge risk aversion with monthly data from the Micro Index of the Swedish Consumer Tendency Survey (MISCT). Consistent with our argument that nonconscious decisional biology shares risk aversion with conscious decisions, we find that the incidence of VLBW among male infants in Sweden varies with the population's self-reported intentions to assume financial risk. We find increases above expected odds of a very low weight infant among males born 1 month after increases above expected levels of self-reported risk aversion in the Swedish population. We offer this finding as support for the argument that persistently high rates of VLBW arise, at least in part, from a combination of medical interventions and mechanisms conserved by natural selection to protect reproductive fitness. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 14. Collado, S.
    et al.
    Staats, H.
    Corraliza, J. A.,
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Restorativeenvironments and health2017In: Handbook of Environmental Psychology and Quality of Life Research / [ed] G. Fleury-Bahi, E. Pol., & O. Navarro, Heidelberg: Springer, 2017, p. 127-148Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Dahlkvist, Eva
    et al.
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Sweden Department of Health and Medicine, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Nilsson, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Högberg, Hans
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Skovdahl, Kirsti
    Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Tønsberg, Norway.
    Engström, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Garden greenery and the health of older people in residential care facilities: a multi-level cross-sectional study2016In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 72, no 9, p. 2065-2076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. To test the relationship between greenery in gardens at residential facilities for older people and the self-perceived health of residents, mediated by experiences of being away and fascination when in the garden and the frequency of visitation there. To examine how these indirect effects vary with the number of physical barriers to visiting the garden. Background. Many older people in residential facilities suffer from complex health problems. Access to a green outdoor environment may enable psychological distance, engage effortless attention, encourage more frequent visitation and promote resident health. Design. A multi-level, cross-sectional, correlational design. Methods. Questionnaires were administered June–August, 2011 to convenience samples of residents at 72 facilities for older people with complex healthcare needs. One to 10 eligible residents were sampled during self-motivated garden visits at each facility (n = 290). They reported on their garden experiences and health. Facility staff reported on objective garden characteristics and barriers to access. A serial mediation model was tested with multiple linear regression analysis. Results. The total indirect effect of greenery on self-perceived health was positive and significant. Garden greenery appears to affect health by enhancing a sense of being away, affording possibilities to experience the outdoor environment as interesting and encouraging visitation. Among residents in homes with multiple barriers, only fascination mediated the relationship between greenery and selfperceived health. Conclusion. Ample greenery in outdoor space at residential facilities for older people appears to promote experiences of being away and fascination, more frequent visitation and better health.

  • 16.
    Fransson, Urban
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Leisure home ownership and early death: A longitudinal study in Sweden2010In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People who perform paid work may benefit from psychological restoration afforded by a leisure home and its natural surroundings. This may hinder the development of some forms of life-threatening illness. Using longitudinal register data for 108,114 employed Swedes, we assessed the prospective association between leisure home ownership and death before age 65. Among men, but not among women, leisure home owners had lower odds of early death, after adjustment for sociodemographic and residential characteristics (OR=0.875, 95% CI=0.702-0.980). The results bear on natural environments as health resources, inform debate on urban densification, and broaden the discussion of residence and health.

  • 17.
    Fransson, Urban
    et al.
    Kulturgeografiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Leisure home ownership in relation to death before retirement in Sweden2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Gemmill, Alison
    et al.
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Demog, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Falconi, April
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Sch Publ Hlth, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Karasek, Deborah
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Sch Publ Hlth, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Anderson, Elizabeth
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Sch Publ Hlth, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Catalano, Ralph
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Sch Publ Hlth, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA..
    Do macroeconomic contractions induce or 'harvest' suicides?: A test of competing hypotheses2015In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 69, no 11, p. 1071-1076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Researchers often invoke a mortality displacement or 'harvesting' mechanism to explain mortality patterns, such that those with underlying health vulnerabilities die sooner than expected in response to environmental phenomena, such as heat waves, cold spells and air pollution. It is unclear if this displacement mechanism might also explain observed increases in suicide following economic contraction, or if suicides are induced in persons otherwise unlikely to engage in self-destructive behaviour. Here, we test two competing hypotheses explaining an observed increase in suicides following unemployment-induction or displacement. Methods We apply time series methods to monthly suicide and unemployment data from Sweden for the years 2000-2011. Tests are conducted separately for working age (20-64 years old) men and women as well as older (aged 65 years and older) men and women. Results Displacement appeared among older men and women; an unexpected rise in unemployment predicted an increase in suicides 6 months later, followed by a significant decrease 8 months later. Induction appeared among working age men, but not among working age women; an unexpected rise in unemployment predicted an increase in suicides 4-6 months later. Conclusions Displacement and induction both appear to have operated following unexpected labour market contractions in Sweden, though with different population segments.

  • 19. Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen
    et al.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Patil, Grete Grindal
    Martinsen, Egil W.
    Kirkevold, Marit
    A prospective study of group cohesiveness in therapeutic horticulture for clinical depression2011In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 119-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to assess changes in psychological distress and social participation in adults diagnosed with clinical depression during and after participating in a therapeutic horticulture programme, and to investigate if the changes covaried with levels of group cohesiveness during the intervention. An intervention with a single-group design was repeated with different samples in successive years (pooled n = 46). In each year, five groups of 3-7 participants went through the intervention. Data were collected before, twice during, and immediately after a 12-week therapeutic horticulture programme, as well as at 3-months' follow up. Mental health assessments included the Beck Depression Inventory, the State Subscale of Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Positive Affect Scale from the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Therapeutic Factors Inventory Cohesiveness Scale. The analysis of the pooled data confirmed significant beneficial change in all mental health variables during the intervention. Change from baseline in depression severity persisted at 3-months' follow up. Increased social activity after the intervention was reported for 38% of the participants. The groups quickly established strong cohesiveness, and this continued to increase during the intervention. The average level of group cohesiveness correlated positively, but not significantly, with change in all mental health outcome variables.

  • 20. Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen
    et al.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Patil, Grete Grindal
    Martinsen, Egil W.
    Kirkevold, Marit
    Therapeutic horticulture in clinical depression: A prospective study2009In: Research and Theory for Nursing Practice, ISSN 1541-6577, E-ISSN 1945-7286, Vol. 23, p. 312-328Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Patil, Grete Grindal
    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Martinsen, Egil W.
    University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    Kirkevold, Marit
    University of Oslo, Norway and University of Aarhus, Denmark.
    Therapeutic horticulture in clinical depression: a prospective study of active components2010In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 66, no 9, p. 2002-2013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This paper is a report of a study conducted to assess change in depression severity, perceived attentional capacity and rumination (brooding) in individuals with clinical depression during a therapeutic horticulture programme and to investigate if the changes were mediated by experiences of being away and fascination. Background. Individuals with clinical depression suffer from distortion of attention and rumination. Interventions can help to disrupt maladaptive rumination and promote restoration of depleted attentional capacity. Method. A single-group study was conducted with a convenience sample of 28 people with clinical depression in 2009. Data were collected before, twice during, and immediately after a 12-week therapeutic horticulture programme, and at 3-month follow-up. Assessment instruments were the Beck Depression Inventory, Attentional Function Index, Brooding Scale, and Being Away and Fascination subscales from the Perceived Restorativeness Scale. Findings. Mean Beck Depression Inventory scores declined by 4 center dot 5 points during the intervention (F = 5 center dot 49, P = 0 center dot 002). The decline was clinically relevant for 50% of participants. Attentional Function Index scores increased (F = 4 center dot 14, P = 0 center dot 009), while Brooding scores decreased (F = 4 center dot 51, P = 0 center dot 015). The changes in Beck Depression Inventory and Attentional Function Index scores were mediated by increases in Being Away and Fascination, and decline in Beck Depression Inventory scores was also mediated by decline in Brooding. Participants maintained their improvements in Beck Depression Inventory scores at 3-month follow-up. Conclusion. Being away and fascination appear to work as active components in a therapeutic horticulture intervention for clinical depression.

  • 22.
    Gonzalez Thorsen, Marianne
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Grindal Patil, Grete
    Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway.
    Martinsen, Egil W.
    University of Oslo .
    Kirkevold, Marit
    University of Oslo.
    A prospective study of existential issues in therapeutic horticulture for clinical depression2011In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 73-81Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Gärling, T
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Hartig, T
    Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Environmental psychology´s relationship to the environmental (design) professions2000Other (Other scientific)
  • 24. Gärling, Tommy
    et al.
    Krause, Kristina
    Gamble, Amelie
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Emotional well-being and time pressure2014In: PsyCh Journal, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 132-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a conceptual model of how time pressure affects emotional well-being associated with mundane routine activities. A selective review of research in several areas affirms the plausibility of the conceptual model, which posits negative effects on emotional well-being of insufficient time allocated to restorative and other activities instrumental for attaining desirable work, family life, and leisure goals. Previous research also affirms that practicing time management can have indirect positive effects by decreasing time pressure, whereas material wealth can have both negative indirect effects and positive indirect effects by increasing and decreasing time pressure, respectively. Several issues remain to be studied empirically. The conceptual model is a ground for additional, preferably cross-cultural, research.

  • 25. Hartig, Terry
    Congruence and Conflict between Car Transportation and Psychological Restoration2007In: Threats from Car Traffic to the Quality of Urban Life: Problems, Causes and Solutions / [ed] Tommy Gärling, Linda Steg, Emerald Group , 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Do Europeans really consider the affordability of prescriptions in their neighbourhoods more important than access to open spaces and parks?: A critical look at the Pfizer Healthy Neighbourhood Survey2004In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 89-93Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Driving Detroit: The Quest for Respect in the Motor City2014In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 231-233Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Forest recreation, psychological restoration, and health: Some experimental and epidemiological findings2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Functional bases for meanings of dwellings: Home, alone?2006In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 216-218Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Green space, psychological restoration, and health inequality2008In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 372, no 9650, p. 1614-1615Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Issues in restorative environments research: Matters of measurement2011In: Psicología ambiental 2011: Entre los estudios urbanos y el análisis de la sostenibilidad: Environmental Psychology 2011: between urban studies and the analysis of sustainability / [ed] Fernández-Ramírez, B., Hidalgo-Villodres, C., Salvador-Ferrer, C. M., & Martos, Méndez, M. J, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Mixed mythical metaphors for meta-analysis2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Population-level restoration phenomena and development of research on restorative environments2012In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 47, no Suppl 1, p. 354-354Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Restoration and restorative environments2012In: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, E-ISSN 1464-066X, Vol. 47, no Suppl 1, p. 354-354Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Restorative effects of nature experience: Theoretical and methodological considerations2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Restorative Environments2017In: Reference Module in Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Psychology, Oxford: Elsevier, 2017, 2Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People inevitably deplete adaptive resources in everyday life. Persistent failure to restore resources that have become depleted will ultimately harm mental and physical health. Restoration proceeds more effectively in some environments than in others, due not only to a relative absence of demands on already depleted resources, but also to environmental characteristics that promote restoration of the depleted resources. Knowledge of the restoration-promoting characteristics of environments can serve people working in diverse fields, from architecture to nature conservation to transportation and urban planning.

  • 37.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Restorative housing environments2012In: The International Encyclopedia of Housing and Home / [ed] Susan J. Smith (Editor-in-Chief),, Oxford: Elsevier, 2012, p. 144-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Teorier om restorativa miljöer - förr, nu och i framtiden2005In: Svensk miljöpsykologi, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2005, p. 265-283Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The restoration perspective: another view of human adaptation2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The restoration perspective in soundscape research2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Three steps to understanding restorative environments as health resources2007In: Open space: People space, London: Taylor & Francis , 2007, p. 163-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Hartig, Terry
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Where best to take a booster break?2006In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0749-3797, Vol. 31, p. 350-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Hartig, Terry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Bringslimark, Tina
    Grindal Patil, Grete
    Restorative environmental design: What, when, where, and for whom?2008In: Biophilic design: the theory, science, and practice of bringing buildings to life, New York: Wiley , 2008, p. 133-151Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Hartig, Terry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Catalano, Ralph
    Cold summer weather, constrained restoration, and very low birth weight in Sweden2013In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 22, p. 68-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In higher latitudes, relatively cold summer weather may constrain outdoor activities that provide relief from chronic stress. Chronic stress can affect human birth outcomes, including the length of gestation and so the birth weight of the infant. We tested the hypothesis that, in Sweden, the odds of very low birth weight (VLBW; < 1500 g) vary inversely with mean monthly temperature for the summer months. We applied time-series modeling methods to nationally aggregated data on singleton births during the 456 months from January, 1973, through December, 2010. We found elevated odds of VLBW among male infants for relatively cold June and August temperatures. Unpleasant weather may figure in stress-related health outcomes, not only as a stressor, but also as a constraint on restoration.

  • 45.
    Hartig, Terry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Catalano, Ralph
    Ong, Michael
    Cold summer weather, constrained restoration, and the use of antidepressants in Sweden2007In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 107-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Constraint of restorative activities prolongs chronic stress and may exacerbate depressive symptoms. Treating unseasonable weather as an ecological constraint on restorative activities in outdoor settings, we investigated the relationship between cold summer temperatures and the dispensation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in Sweden. We obtained nationally aggregated data on defined daily doses of SSRIs dispensed monthly from 1991 through 1998. We analyzed the data using autoregressive, integrated, moving average time-series modeling methods. Dispensation of SSRIs correlated negatively with monthly mean temperature for July, the peak vacation period. The association held for both men and women, net of trends, seasonality, and other statistical controls. The constrained restoration hypothesis augments response style, restricted activity and seasonality explanations for depression. The study provides a novel perspective on green spaces and other outdoor settings as mental health resources.

  • 46.
    Hartig, Terry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Catalano, Ralph
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Sch Publ Hlth, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Ong, Michael
    Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research.
    Syme, S. Leonard
    Univ Calif Berkeley, Sch Publ Hlth, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA.
    Vacation, collective restoration, and mental health in a population2013In: Society and Mental Health, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 221-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vacations enable people to help one another, spend time together in pleasant contexts, and renew relational resources. Reasoning that these shared activities spread social and psychological benefits through social networks, we hypothesized that increase in the number of vacationing workers engenders nonlinear decline in psychological distress at the population level. We applied time-series methods to aggregate data on monthly dispensation of antidepressants to the Swedish population for the 147 months starting January 1993. We obtained the data from the pharmacy corporation allied with the national health care system and from governmental sources. Dispensation of antidepressants declined logarithmically with increase in the number of vacationing workers, for men and women alike. The associations held among people beyond retirement age as well as people of working age, further evidence that vacation benefits spread beyond vacationing workers. The results bear on the social regulation of time for restoration as a general determinant of population health

  • 47.
    Hartig, Terry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Cooper Marcus, Clare
    Healing gardens - Places for nature in healthcare /invited essay/2006In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 368, no Supplement 1 December, p. S36-S37Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Hartig, Terry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Fransson, Urban
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Housing tenure and early retirement for health reasons in Sweden2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 472-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To assess the association between housing tenure and early retirement for health reasons in Sweden with a view to psychosocial vs. material values of home ownership. Methods: The data come from linked registers that cover all people resident in Sweden during 1990-2000. The study population consists of 449,233 people aged 40-63 years in 1997. Of these, 19,350 retired early for health reasons in 1998-99. The remaining 429,883 continued their employment without extended sick leave or income decline. None moved during 1990-2000. We calculated the odds of early retirement for four forms of juridical relationship to one's housing ( private owner; part owner in a cooperative; private rental; rental from a public housing company), for men and women separately, controlling for age, education, employment income, household disposable income, region, foreign birth, and housing type. Results: Men in cooperative ownership had lower odds of early retirement than those in the three other tenure forms, for which the odds were similar. Among women, public and private renters had similar odds of early retirement, which were higher than those of women in private or cooperative ownership. For both genders, inclusion of housing type in the model after housing tenure explained little additional variance. Conclusions: The odds of early retirement for health reasons varied across different housing tenure forms in Sweden in 1998-99. The pattern of associations differed as a function of gender. Home ownership appears to involve health resources independent of basic sociophysical factors captured with differences in housing type.

  • 49.
    Hartig, Terry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Fransson, Urban
    Leisure home ownership, access to nature, and health: A longitudinal study of urban residents in Sweden2009In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 82-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can societies ensure urban residents' access to health-promoting green spaces while also pursuing the benefits of densification? Evidence of a relationship between leisure home ownership and health can inform efforts to resolve this dilemma. Using longitudinal register data, we assessed the prospective association between ownership of a leisure home and early retirement for health reasons among 42 588 adults residing in high-density Swedish urban municipalities. The research design included controls for 'drift' of unhealthy people into particular residential circumstances, and other potential alternative explanations for the association of focal interest. After adjustment for age, socioeconomic position, and type of primary housing, logistic regression analysis revealed that men with a leisure home had lower odds of early retirement for health reasons than men who did not own a leisure home. Among women, leisure home ownership interacted with socioeconomic position; in contrast to nonowners, women who owned a leisure home had higher odds of early retirement for health reasons if they also had higher levels of education and employment income. The associations we have uncovered provide additional insight on the relationship between access to natural environments and health, and they warrant consideration in efforts to resolve the densification dilemma.

  • 50.
    Hartig, Terry
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Fransson, Urban
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Amcoff, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Multiple residence and health: Leisure home ownership as compensation2010Conference paper (Other academic)
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