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  • 1.
    Abramenkovs, Andris
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Nilsson, Sten
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    The α-emitter Ra-223 induces clustered DNA damage and significantly reduces cell survivalManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical Xofigo (Radium-223 dichloride) has demonstrated both extended survival and palliative effects in treatment of bone metastases in patients with prostate cancer. The alpha-particle emitter Ra-223, administered as Ra-223 dichloride, targets regions undergoing active bone remodeling and strongly binds hydroxyapatite found in bone. However, the mechanisms mediating toxicity and properties of Ra-223 binding to hydroxyapatite are not fully understood. In the current study, we show that the alpha-particles originating from the Ra-223 decay chain produce a track-like distribution of the DNA damage response proteins 53BP1 and ɣH2AX and induce high amounts of clustered DNA double-strand breaks in prostate cancer cell nuclei. The Ra-223 treatment inhibited growth of prostate cancer cells, grown in 2D- and 3D- models in vitro, independent of prostate cancer cell type and androgen receptor variant 7 (ARv7) expression. The rapid binding with a high affinity of Ra-223 to bone structures was verified in an in silico assay (KD= 19.2 ± 6.5 e-18) and almost no dissociation was detected within 24 hours. Importantly, there was no significant uptake of Ra-223 in cells. Further, we demonstrate the importance of the local dose-distribution of this treatment; there was more than 100-fold increase in cell killing when Ra-223 was attached to the bone-like hydroxyapatite structure, compared to when the radioactivity was distributed in the cell growth media. However, independent of the exposure condition, the high cell killing efficacy of the Ra-223 was attributed to the clustered DNA damaged sites induced by the released α-particles.

  • 2.
    Abramenkovs, Andris
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Ra223 induced clustered DNA damage reduces cell survival independently of androgen receptor variant 7 expression2018In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 45, p. S634-S635Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Abramenkovs, Andris
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Measurement of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Using Flow Cytometry Provides a Reliable Estimate of DNA Repair Capacity2017In: Radiation Research, ISSN 0033-7587, E-ISSN 1938-5404, Vol. 188, no 6, p. 597-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncontrolled generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cells is regarded as a highly toxic event that threatens cell survival. Radiation-induced DNA DSBs are commonly measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, microscopic evaluation of accumulating DNA damage response proteins (e.g., 53BP1 or gamma-H2AX) or flow cytometric analysis of gamma-H2AX. The advantage of flow cytometric analysis is that DSB formation and repair can be studied in relationship to cell cycle phase or expression of other proteins. However, gamma-H2AX is not able to monitor repair kinetics within the first 60 min postirradiation, a period when most DSBs undergo repair. A key protein in non-homologous end joining repair is the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Among several phosphorylation sites of DNA-dependent protein kinase, the threonine at position 2609 (T2609), which is phosphorylated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) or DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit itself, activates the end processing of DSB. Using flow cytometry, we show here that phosphorylation at T2609 is faster in response to DSBs than gamma-H2AX. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis of T2609 resulted in a better representation of fast repair kinetics than analysis of gamma-H2AX. In cells with reduced ligase IV activity, and wild-type cells where DNA-dependent protein kinase activity was inhibited, the reduced DSB repair capacity was observed by T2609 evaluation using flow cytometry. In conclusion, flow cytometric evaluation of DNA-dependent protein kinase T2609 can be used as a marker for early DSB repair and gives a better representation of early repair events than analysis of gamma-H2AX.

  • 4.
    Abramenkovs, Andris
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Removal of heat-sensitive clustered damaged DNA sites is independent of double-strand break repair2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, article id e0209594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious lesions that can arise in cells after ionizing radiation or radiometric drug treatment. In addition to prompt DSBs, DSBs may also be produced during repair, evolving from a clustered DNA damaged site, which is composed of two or more distinct lesions that are located within two helical turns. A specific type of cluster damage is the heat-sensitive clustered site (HSCS), which transforms into DSBs upon treatment at elevated temperatures. The actual lesions or mechanisms that mediate the HSCS transformation into DSBs are unknown. However, there are two possibilities; either these lesions are transformed into DSBs due to DNA lesion instability, e.g., transfer of HSCS into single-strand breaks (SSBs), or they are formed due to local DNA structure instability, e.g., DNA melting, where two SSBs on opposite strands meet and transform into a DSB. The importance of these processes in living cells is not understood, but they significantly affect estimates of DSB repair capacity. In this study, we show that HSCS removal in human cells is not affected by defects in DSB repair or inhibition of DSB repair. Under conditions where rejoining of prompt DSBs was almost completely inhibited, heat-sensitive DSBs were successfully rejoined, without resulting in increased DSB levels, indicating that HSCS do not transfer into DSB in cells under physiological conditions. Furthermore, analysis by atomic force microscopy suggests that prolonged heating of chromosomal DNA can induce structural changes that facilitate transformation of HSCS into DSB. In conclusion, the HSCS do not generate additional DSBs at physiological temperatures in human cells, and the repair of HSCS is independent of DSB repair.

  • 5.
    Blomgren, Jan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Neutron Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Neutron Research, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Lindborg, Lennart
    Golnik, Natalia
    Jones, Dan
    Schuhmacher, Helmut
    Spurny, Frantisek
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Progress in Dosimetry of Neutrons and Light Nuclei2007In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 126, no 1-4, p. 1-2Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Developmental effects of fractionated low-dose exposure to gamma radiation on behaviour and susceptibility of the cholinergic system in mice2016In: International Journal of Radiation Biology, ISSN 0955-3002, E-ISSN 1362-3095, Vol. 92, no 7, p. 371-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To investigate whether neonatal exposure to fractionated external gamma radiation and co-exposure to radiation and nicotine can affect/exacerbate developmental neurotoxic effects, including altered behavior/cognitive function and the susceptibility of the cholinergic system in adult male mice. Materials and methods: Neonatal male Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice were irradiated with one 200 mGy fraction/day and/or exposed to nicotine (66 μg/kg b.w.) twice daily on postnatal day (PND) 10, 10–11, 10–12 or 10–13 (nicotine only). At 2 months of age the animals were tested for spontaneous behavior in a novel home environment, habituation capacity and nicotine-induced behavior. Results: Fractionated irradiation and co-exposure to radiation and nicotine on three consecutive days disrupted behavior and habituation and altered susceptibility of the cholinergic system. All observed effects were significantly more pronounced in mice co-exposed to both radiation and nicotine. Conclusions: The fractionated irradiation regime affects behavior/cognitive function in a similar manner as has previously been observed for single-dose exposures. Neonatal co-exposure to radiation and nicotine, during a critical period of brain development in general and cholinergic system development in particular, enhance these behavioral defects suggesting that the cholinergic system can be a target system for this type of developmental neurotoxic effects.

  • 7.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Low Dose Neonatal Co-exposure to Radiation and Ketamine Negatively Influences Cognition and Alters Neuroprotein Levels in theAdult Mouse2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Neonatal exposure to a moderate dose of ionizing radiation causes behavioural defects and altered levels of tau protein in mice2014In: Neurotoxicology, ISSN 0161-813X, E-ISSN 1872-9711, Vol. 45, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medical use of ionizing radiation (IR) has great benefits for treatment and diagnostic imaging, butprocedures as computerized tomography (CT) may deliver a significant radiation dose to the patient.Recently, awareness has been raised about possible non-cancer consequences from low dose exposure toIR during critical phases of perinatal and/or neonatal brain development.In the present study neonatal NMRI mice were whole body irradiated with a single dose of gammaradiation (0; 350 and 500 mGy) on postnatal day 10 (PND 10). At 2 and 4 months of age, mice of bothsexes were observed for spontaneous behaviour in a novel home environment. The neuroproteinsCaMKII, GAP-43, synaptophysin and total tau in male mouse cerebral cortex and hippocampus wereanalysed 24 h post-irradiation and in adults at 6 months of age exposed to 0 or 500 mGy on PND 10.A significantly dose-response related deranged spontaneous behaviour in 2- and 4-month-old micewas observed, where both males and females displayed a modified habituation, indicating reducedcognitive function. The dose of 350 mGy seems to be a tentative threshold. Six-month-old male miceshowed a significantly increased level of total tau in cerebral cortex after irradiation to 500 mGy compared to controls. This demonstrates that a single moderate dose of IR, given during a defined criticalperiod of brain development, is sufficient to cause persistently reduced cognitive function. Moreover, anelevation of tau protein was observed in male mice displaying reduced cognitive function.

  • 9.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Sundell-Bergman, S.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Soil & Environm, Umea, Sweden.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Effects on adult cognitive function after neonatal exposure to clinically relevant doses of ionising radiation and ketamine in mice2018In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 546-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Radiological methods for screening, diagnostics and therapy are frequently used in healthcare. In infants and children, anaesthesia/sedation is often used in these situations to relieve the patients' perception of stress or pain. Both ionising radiation (IR) and ketamine have been shown to induce developmental neurotoxic effects and this study aimed to identify the combined effects of these in a murine model. Methods: Male mice were exposed to a single dose of ketamine (7.5 mg kg(-1) body weight) s.c. on postnatal day 10. One hour after ketamine exposure, mice were whole body irradiated with 50-200 mGy gamma radiation (Cs-137). Behavioural observations were performed at 2, 4 and 5 months of age. At 6 months of age, cerebral cortex and hippocampus tissue were analysed for neuroprotein levels. Results: Animals co-exposed to IR and ketamine displayed significant (P <= 0.01) lack of habituation in the spontaneous behaviour test, when compared with controls and single agent exposed mice. In the Morris Water Maze test, co-exposed animals showed significant (P <= 0.05) impaired learning and memory capacity in both the spatial acquisition task and the relearning test compared with controls and single agent exposed mice. Furthermore, in co-exposed mice a significantly (P <= 0.05) elevated level of tau protein in cerebral cortex was observed. Single agent exposure did not cause any significant effects on the investigated endpoints. Conclusion: Co-exposure to IR and ketamine can aggravate developmental neurotoxic effects at doses where the single agent exposure does not impact on the measured variables. These findings show that estimation of risk after paediatric low-dose IR exposure, based upon radiation dose alone, may underestimate the consequences for this vulnerable population.

  • 10.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Coexposure to gamma-radiation and nicotine during a critical period of neonatal brain development can excarebate cognitive defects in adult mice2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Cognitive defects and tau protein alterations in adult mice following neonatal low dose co-exposure to radiation and ketamine2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Exposure to a single dose of ionising radiation during brain development can cause cognitive defects and increased levels of tau in mice2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ionising radiation (IR) is widely used in the medical field for treating tumours, including tumours in the central nervous system, and for imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT). There is a lack of knowledge and increasing concern about effects and consequences from low dose exposure during critical phases of perinatal and/or neonatal brain development compared to prenatal irradiation. It is known that IR causes neurotoxicological and neurobehavioural defects in mammals. Further, an epidemiological study has suggested that low doses of IR to the human brain during infancy can have a negative effect on cognitive abilities in adulthood. The rapid brain growth spurt (BGS) occurs in humans as well as mice. In humans the BGS starts during the third trimester of pregnancy and continues throughout the first two years of life. In mouse and rat the BGS is neonatal, spanning the first 3-4 weeks of life. The BGS is characterized by maturation of axonal and dendritic outgrowth, establishment of neural connections and acquisition of many new motor and sensory abilities. By using the neonatal mouse as an animal model we are able to study the effect of IR during early periods of brain development and which consequences it has for the adult animal. Disturbances in development caused by nicotine, MeHg, PCBs and PBDEs have previously been shown to alter adult spontaneous behaviour and/or neuroprotein levels in mice.

    Neonatal NMRI male mice were irradiated (0; 0.35 and 0.5 Gy) at one single occasion on postnatal day 10. Mice serving as controls were placed in plastic dishes for a time-period corresponding to the irradiation. Spontaneous behaviour was tested in a novel home environment at 2- and 4-months of age and parameters observed were locomotion, rearing and total activity. Analyses of important neuroprotein levels were performed on 6-month-old control and 0.5 Gy irradiated mice.

    Spontaneous behaviour test (locomotion, rearing, total activity revealed a significantly deranged behaviour in 2- and 4-month old mice irradiated with 0.35 or 0.5 Gy in a dose-response related manner, when compared to controls. The behavioural alterations were manifested as a reduced activity during at the beginning of the observational period and a higher activity at the end of the observational period. Analyses of the neuroprotein tau, which in human medicine is used as a biomarker for Alzheimer’s disease, showed a significantly higher level in mice irradiated with 0.5 Gy compared to controls. This demonstrates that a single dose of gamma radiation, given at a defined critical time period during brain development, is sufficient to cause persistently reduced cognitive functions and increased levels of tau in mice.   

  • 13.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Gordh, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Ketamine interacts with low dose ionizing radiaiton during brain development to impair cognitive function in mouse2016In: Anesthesiology, ISSN 0003-3022, E-ISSN 1528-1175Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Claesson, Anna Kristina
    et al.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    Elmroth, Kecke
    Relative biological effectiveness of the alpha-particle emitter At-211 for double-strand break induction in human fibroblasts2007In: Radiation Research, ISSN 0033-7587, E-ISSN 1938-5404, Vol. 167, no 3, p. 312-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to quantify and to determine the distribution of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells irradiated in vitro and to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the alpha-particle emitter (211)At for DSB induction. The influence of the irradiation temperature on the induction of DSBs was also investigated. Human fibroblasts were irradiated as intact cells with alpha particles from (211)At, (60)Co gamma rays and X rays. The numbers and distributions of DSBs were determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with fragment analysis for separation of DNA fragments in sizes 10 kbp-5.7 Mbp. A non-random distribution was found for DSB induction after irradiation with alpha particles from (211)At, while irradiation with low-LET radiation led to more random distributions. The RBEs for DSB induction were 2.1 and 3.1 for (60)Co gamma rays and X rays as the reference radiation, respectively. In the experiments studying temperature effects, nuclear monolayers were irradiated with (211)At alpha particles or (60)Co gamma rays at 2 degrees C or 37 degrees C and intact cells were irradiated with (211)At alpha particles at the same temperatures. The dose-modifying factor (DMF(temp)) for irradiation of nuclear monolayers at 37 degrees C compared with 2 degrees C was 1.7 for (211)At alpha particles and 1.6 for (60)Co gamma rays. No temperature effect was observed for intact cells irradiated with (211)At. In conclusion, irradiation with alpha particles from (211)At induced two to three times more DSB than gamma rays and X rays.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Soil & Environm, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Neonatal exposure to whole body ionizing radiation induces adult neurobehavioural defects: Critical period, dose-response effects and strain and sex comparison2016In: Behavioural Brain Research, ISSN 0166-4328, E-ISSN 1872-7549, Vol. 304, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of the brain includes periods which can be critical for its normal maturation. The present study investigates specifically vulnerable peri-/postnatal periods in mice which are essential for understanding the etiology behind radiation induced neurotoxicity and functional defects, including evaluation of neurotoxicity between sexes or commonly used laboratory mouse strains following low/moderate doses of ionizing radiation (IR). Male Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice, whole body irradiated to a single 500 mGy IR dose, on postnatal day (PND) 3 or PND 10 showed an altered adult spontaneous behaviour and impaired habituation capacity, whereas irradiation on PND 19 did not have any impact on the studied variables. Both NMRI and C57bl/6 male and female mice showed an altered adult spontaneous behaviour and impaired habituation following a single whole body irradiation of 500 or 1000 mGy, but not after 20 or 100 mGy, on PND 10. The present study shows that exposure to low/moderate doses of IR during critical life stages might be involved in the induction of neurological/neurodegenerative disorder/disease. A specifically vulnerable period for radiation induced neurotoxicity seems to be around PND 3-10 in mice. Further studies are needed to investigate mechanisms involved in induction of developmental neurotoxicity following low dose irradiation.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Low-dose Ionizing Radiation Interacts with Environmental Agents During Brain Development: Exacerbation of Cognitive Dysfunction inMice2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö.
    Neonatal low-dose co-exposure to the anaesthetic agent ketamine and gamma-radiation causes persistent neurobehavioural defects in adult mice2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organism Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Fischer, Celia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organism Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organism Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Interaction of gamma-radiation and methyl mercury during a  critical phase of neonatal brain development in mice  exacerbates developmental neurobehavioral effects2010In: Neurotoxicology, ISSN 0161-813X, E-ISSN 1872-9711, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our environment, mammals (including humans) are exposed to various types of ionizing radiation and both persistent and non-persistent toxic chemicals. It is known that ionizing radiation, as well as methyl mercury, can induce neurotoxicological and neurobehavioural effects in mammals. These developmental neurotoxic effects can be seen following exposure during gestation. There is a lack of knowledge concerning the effects and consequences of low-dose exposure during critical phases of pen natal and/or neonatal brain development, and of the combination of ionizing radiation and environmental chemicals. A recent study has indicated that low doses of ionizing radiation to the human brain during infancy influence cognitive ability in adulthood. In the present study, 10-day old neonatal male NMRI mice were exposed to a single oral dose of MeHg (0.40 or 4.0 mg/kg bw). Four hours after the MeHg exposure the mice were subjected to Co-60 gamma-radiation on one occasion at doses of 0.2 and 0.5 Gy. The animals were then subjected to a spontaneous behaviour test at 2 and 4 months, and a water maze test at the age of 5 months. Neither the single dose of MeHg (0.4 mg/kg bw) nor the radiation dose of 0.2 Gy affected their spontaneous behaviour, whereas the co-exposure to external gamma-radiation and MeHg caused developmental neurotoxic effects. The study shows that gamma-radiation and MeHg can interact and significantly exacerbate developmental neurotoxic effects, as manifested by disrupted spontaneous behaviour, lack of habituation, and impaired learning and memory functions.

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Viberg, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö.
    Ionizing radiation and environmental toxicants can interact during brain development to exacerbate cognitive defects in mice2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Eriksson, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental Toxicology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Fakulteten för naturresurser och lantbruksvetenskap, Institutionen för Mark och miljö.
    Co-exposure to radiation and environmental toxicants (PBDE 99 and MeHg) during a defined critical phase of neonatal brain development enhances cognitive defects in adult mice2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21. Fakir, Hatim
    et al.
    Sachs, Rainer K.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Hofmann, Werner
    Clusters of DNA double-strand breaks induced by different doses of nitrogen ions for various LETs: experimental measurements and theoretical analyses2006In: Radiation Research, ISSN 0033-7587, E-ISSN 1938-5404, Vol. 166, no 6, p. 917-927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The yields and clustering of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were investigated in normal human skin fibroblasts exposed to gamma rays or to a wide range of doses of nitrogen ions with various linear energy transfers (LETs). Data obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis on the dose and LET dependence of DNA fragmentation were analyzed with the randomly located clusters (RLC) formalism. The formalism considers stochastic clustering of DSBs along a chromosome due to chromatin structure, particle track structure, and multitrack action. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the total DSB yield did not depend strongly on LET, but particles with higher LET produced higher fractions of small DNA fragments, corresponding in the formalism to an increase in the average number of DSBs per DSB cluster. The results are consistent with the idea that DSB clustering along chromosomes is what leads to large RBEs of high-LET radiations for major biological end points. At a given dose, large fragments are less affected by the variability in LET than small fragments, suggesting that the two free ends in large fragments are often produced by two different tracks. The formalism successfully described an extra increase in small DNA fragments as dose increases and a related decrease in large fragments, mainly due to interlacing of DSB clusters produced along a chromosome by different tracks, since interlacing cuts larger DNA fragments into smaller ones.

  • 22.
    Fischer, Celia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology. Ekotoxikologi.
    Bergman, Synnöve
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology. Ekotoxikologi.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Environmental Toxicology. Ekotoxikologi.
    Developmental neurobehavioural effects after co-exposure to gamma-radiation and methyl mercury during a critical phase of neonatal brain development in mice2007In: The Toxicologist, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23. Guerra, Lina
    et al.
    Teter, Ken
    Lilley, Brendan N.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Holmes, Randall K.
    Ploegh, Hidde L.
    Sandvig, Kirsten
    Thelestam, Monica
    Frisan, Teresa
    Cellular internalization of cytolethal distending toxin: a new end to a known pathway2005In: Cellular Microbiology, ISSN 1462-5814, E-ISSN 1462-5822, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 921-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs) are unique in their ability to induce DNA damage, activate checkpoint responses and cause cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in intoxicated cells. However, little is known about their cellular internalization pathway. We demonstrate that binding of the Haemophilus ducreyi CDT (HdCDT) on the plasma membrane of sensitive cells was abolished by cholesterol extraction with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The toxin was internalized via the Golgi complex, and retrogradely transported to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as assessed by N-linked glycosylation. Further translocation from the ER did not require the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway, and was Derlin-1 independent. The genotoxic activity of HdCDT was dependent on its internalization and its DNase activity, as induction of DNA double-stranded breaks was prevented in Brefeldin A-treated cells and in cells exposed to a catalytically inactive toxin. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the CDT mode of action and highlight two important aspects of the biology of this bacterial toxin family: (i) HdCDT translocation from the ER to the nucleus does not involve the classical pathways followed by other retrogradely transported toxins and (ii) toxin internalization is crucial for execution of its genotoxic activity.

  • 24. Guidi, Riccardo
    et al.
    Guerra, Lina
    Levi, Laura
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Fox, James G
    Josenhans, Christine
    Masucci, Maria G
    Frisan, Teresa
    Chronic exposure to the cytolethal distending toxins of Gram-negative bacteria promotes genomic instability and altered DNA damage response2013In: Cellular Microbiology, ISSN 1462-5814, E-ISSN 1462-5822, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 98-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiological evidence links chronic bacterial infections to the increased incidence of certain types of cancer but the molecular mechanisms by which bacteria contribute to tumour initiation and progression are still poorly characterized. Here we show that chronic exposure to the genotoxin cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) of Gram-negative bacteria promotes genomic instability and acquisition of phenotypic properties of malignancy in fibroblasts and colon epithelial cells. Cells grown for more than 30 weeks in the presence of sublethal doses of CDT showed increased mutation frequency, and accumulation of chromatin and chromosomal aberrations in the absence of significant alterations of cell cycle distribution, decreased viability or senescence. Cell survival was dependent on sustained activity of the p38 MAP kinase. The ongoing genomic instability was associated with impaired activation of the DNA damage response and failure to efficiently activate cell cycle checkpoints upon exposure to genotoxic stress. Independently selected sublines showedenhanced anchorage-independent growth as assessed by the formation of colonies in semisolid agarose. These findings support the notion that chronic infection by CDT-producing bacteria may promote malignant transformation, and point to the impairment of cellular control mechanisms associated with the detection and repair of DNA damage as critical events in the process.

  • 25.
    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Abramenkovs, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair2014In: Mutation research, ISSN 0027-5107, E-ISSN 1873-135X, Vol. 769, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80-95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or gamma-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure which is uncoupled from its essential function in DSB repair. This could have implications for the development of therapeutic strategies aiming to radiosensitize tumors by affecting the DNA-PKcs function.

  • 26.
    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Hartman, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, The Svedberg Laboratory.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Formation and repair of clustered damaged DNA sites in high LET irradiated cells2015In: International Journal of Radiation Biology, ISSN 0955-3002, E-ISSN 1362-3095, Vol. 91, no 10, p. 820-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET) produces clustering of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) as well as non-DSB lesions. Heat-labile sites (HLS) are non-DSB lesions in irradiated cells that may convert into DSB at elevated temperature during preparation of naked DNA for electrophoretic assays and here we studied the initial formation and repair of these clustered damaged sites after irradiation with high LET ions.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Induction and repair of DSB were studied in normal human skin fibroblast (GM5758) after irradiation with accelerated carbon and nitrogen ions at an LET of 125 eV/nm. DNA fragmentation was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and by varying the lysis condition we could differentiate between prompt DSB and heat-released DSB.

    RESULTS: Before repair (t = 0 h), the 125 eV/nm ions produced a significant fraction of heat-released DSB, which appeared clustered on DNA fragments with sizes of 1 Mbp or less. These heat-released DSB increased the total number of DSB by 30-40%. This increase is similar to what has been found in low-LET irradiated cells, suggesting that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for DSB induction will not be largely affected by the lysis temperature. After 1-2 hours repair, a large fraction of DSB was still unrejoined but there was essentially no heat-released DSB present.

    CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that high LET radiation, as low LET gamma radiation, induces a significant fraction of heat-labile sites which can be converted into DSB, and these heat-released DSB may affect both induction yields and estimates of repair.

  • 27.
    Häggblad Sahlberg, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Pendekanti, Prathyusha N.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    The influence of AKT isoforms on radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in colon cancer cell lines2014In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 3525-3534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to ionizing radiation, several signaling cascades in the cell are activated to repair the DNA breaks, prevent apoptosis, and keep the cells proliferating. AKT is important for survival and proliferation and may also be an activating factor for DNA-PKcs and MRE11, which are essential proteins in the DNA repair process. AKT (PKB) is hyperactivated in several cancers and is associated with resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. There are three AKT isoforms (AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3) with different expression patterns and functions in several cancer tumors. The role of AKT isoforms has been investigated in relation to radiation response and their effects on DNA repair proteins (DNA-PKcs and MRE11) in colon cancer cell lines. The knockout of AKT1 and/or AKT2 affected the radiation sensitivity, and a deficiency of both isoforms impaired the rejoining of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. Importantly, the active/phosphorylated forms of AKT and DNA-PKcs associate and exposure to ionizing radiation causes an increase in this interaction. Moreover, an increased expression of both DNA-PKcs and MRE11 was observed when AKT expression was ablated, yet only DNA-PKcs expression influenced AKT phosphorylation. Taken together, these results demonstrate a role for both AKT1 and AKT2 in radiotherapy response in colon cancer cells involving DNA repair capacity through the nonhomologous end joining pathway, thus suggesting that AKT in combination with DNA-PKcs inhibition may be used for radiotherapy sensitizing strategies in colon cancer.

  • 28.
    Häggblad Sahlberg, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Mortensen, Anja C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Haglöf, Jakob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Engskog, Mikael K. R.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Arvidsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Curt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Different functions of AKT1 and AKT2 in molecular pathways, cell migration and metabolism in colon cancer cells2017In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 5-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AKT is a central protein in many cellular pathways such as cell survival, proliferation, glucose uptake, metabolism, angiogenesis, as well as radiation and drug response. The three isoforms of AKT (AKT1, AKT2 and AKT3) are proposed to have different physiological functions, properties and expression patterns in a cell type-dependent manner. As of yet, not much is known about the influence of the different AKT isoforms in the genome and their effects in the metabolism of colorectal cancer cells. In the present study, DLD-1 isogenic AKT1, AKT2 and AKT'/2 knockout colon cancer cell lines were used as a model system in conjunction with the parental cell line in order to further elucidate the differences between the AKT isoforms and how they are involved in various cellular pathways. This was done using genome wide expression analyses, metabolic profiling and cell migration assays. In conclusion, downregulation of genes in the cell adhesion, extracellular matrix and Notch-pathways and upregulation of apoptosis and metastasis inhibitory genes in the p53-pathway, confirm that the knockout of both AKT1 and AKT2 will attenuate metastasis and tumor cell growth. This was verified with a reduction in migration rate in the AKT1 KO and AKT2 KO and most explicitly in the AKT1/2 KO. Furthermore, the knockout of AKT1, AKT2 or both, resulted in a reduction in lactate and alanine, suggesting that the metabolism of carbohydrates and glutathione was impaired. This was further verified in gene expression analyses, showing downregulation of genes involved in glucose metabolism. Additionally, both AKT1 KO and AKT2 KO demonstrated an impaired fatty acid metabolism. However, genes were upregulated in the Wnt and cell proliferation pathways, which could oppose this effect. AKT inhibition should therefore be combined with other effectors to attain the best effect.

  • 29.
    Häggblad Sahlberg, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Evaluation of cancer stem cell markers CD133, CD44, CD24: association with AKT isoforms and radiation resistance in colon cancer cells.2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, p. e94621-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cell surface proteins CD133, CD24 and CD44 are putative markers for cancer stem cell populations in colon cancer, associated with aggressive cancer types and poor prognosis. It is important to understand how these markers may predict treatment outcomes, determined by factors such as radioresistance. The scope of this study was to assess the connection between EGFR, CD133, CD24, and CD44 (including isoforms) expression levels and radiation sensitivity, and furthermore analyze the influence of AKT isoforms on the expression patterns of these markers, to better understand the underlying molecular mechanisms in the cell. Three colon cancer cell-lines were used, HT-29, DLD-1, and HCT116, together with DLD-1 isogenic AKT knock-out cell-lines. All three cell-lines (HT-29, HCT116 and DLD-1) expressed varying amounts of CD133, CD24 and CD44 and the top ten percent of CD133 and CD44 expressing cells (CD133(high)/CD44(high)) were more resistant to gamma radiation than the ten percent with lowest expression (CD133(low)/CD44(low)). The AKT expression was lower in the fraction of cells with low CD133/CD44. Depletion of AKT1 or AKT2 using knock out cells showed for the first time that CD133 expression was associated with AKT1 but not AKT2, whereas the CD44 expression was influenced by the presence of either AKT1 or AKT2. There were several genes in the cell adhesion pathway which had significantly higher expression in the AKT2 KO cell-line compared to the AKT1 KO cell-line; however important genes in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition pathway (CDH1, VIM, TWIST1, SNAI1, SNAI2, ZEB1, ZEB2, FN1, FOXC2 and CDH2) did not differ. Our results demonstrate that CD133(high)/CD44(high) expressing colon cancer cells are associated with AKT and increased radiation resistance, and that different AKT isoforms have varying effects on the expression of cancer stem cell markers, which is an important consideration when targeting AKT in a clinical setting.

  • 30.
    Häggblad Sahlberg, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Lennartsson, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    The effect of a dimeric Affibody molecule (ZEGFR:1907)2 targeting EGFR in combination with radiation in colon cancer cell lines2012In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 176-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in colorectal cancer and is therefore an attractive target for treatment. (ZEGFR:1907)2 is a newly developed dimeric affibody molecule with high affinity to the extracellular part of EGFR. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic effects of (ZEGFR:1907)2 in combination with external radiation and the possible inhibitory effects in the EGFR signalling pathways in the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and HCT116. The effects were compared with an EGFR antibody (cetuximab) and the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (erlotinib and sunitinib). These cell lines are genotypically different with respect to e.g. KRAS and BRAF mutational status, recently shown to be of clinical significance for therapeutic effects. Both cell lines express approximately 100,000-150,000 EGFRs per cell but differ in the radiation response (HCT116, SF2=0.28 and HT-29, SF2=0.70). Exposure to (ZEGFR:1907)2 produced a small, but significant, reduction in survival in HCT116 but did not affect HT-29 cells. Similar results were obtained after exposure to EGF and the EGFR antibody cetuximab. The EGFR tyrosine kinase targeting inhibitor erlotinib and the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib reduced survival in both cell lines. However, none of the drugs had any significant radiosensitizing effects in combination with radiation. Akt and Erk are central proteins in the EGFR downstream signalling and in the cellular response to ionizing radiation. The activation of Akt (Ser 473) and Erk (Thr202/Tyr204) by radiation was both dose- and time-dependent. However the activation of EGFR was not clearly affected by radiation. Neither (ZEGFR:1907)2 nor any of the other drugs were able to completely inactivate Akt or Erk. On the contrary, erlotinib stimulated Akt phosphorylation in both cell lines and in HCT116 cells Erk was activated. Overall the results illustrate the complexity in response to radiation and drugs in cells with differential phenotypic status.

  • 31.
    Karlsson, Karin H
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Stenerlow, Bo
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Focus formation of DNA repair proteins in normal and repair-deficient cells irradiated with high-LET ions.2004In: Radiat Res, ISSN 0033-7587, Vol. 161, no 5, p. 517-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Kempf, Stefan J.
    et al.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    von Toerne, Christine
    Moertl, Simone
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Hauck, Stefanie M.
    Atkinson, Michael J.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Tapio, Soile
    Ionising Radiation Immediately Impairs Synaptic Plasticity-Associated Cytoskeletal Signalling Pathways in HT22 Cells and in Mouse Brain: An In Vitro/In Vivo Comparison Study2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 10, p. e110464-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients suffering from brain malignancies are treated with high-dose ionising radiation. However, this may lead to severe learning and memory impairment. Preventive treatments to minimise these side effects have not been possible due to the lack of knowledge of the involved signalling pathways and molecular targets. Mouse hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells were irradiated with acute gamma doses of 0.5 Gy, 1.0 Gy and 4.0 Gy. Changes in the cellular proteome were investigated by isotope-coded protein label technology and tandem mass spectrometry after 4 and 24 hours. To compare the findings with the in vivo response, male NMRI mice were irradiated on postnatal day 10 with a gamma dose of 1.0 Gy, followed by evaluation of the cellular proteome of hippocampus and cortex 24 hours post-irradiation. Analysis of the in vitro proteome showed that signalling pathways related to synaptic actin-remodelling were significantly affected at 1.0 Gy and 4.0 Gy but not at 0.5 Gy after 4 and 24 hours. We observed radiation-induced reduction of the miR-132 and Rac1 levels; miR-132 is known to regulate Rac1 activity by blocking the GTPase-activating protein p250GAP. In the irradiated hippocampus and cortex we observed alterations in the signalling pathways similar to those in vitro. The decreased expression of miR-132 and Rac1 was associated with an increase in hippocampal cofilin and phospho-cofilin. The Rac1-Cofilin pathway is involved in the modulation of synaptic actin filament formation that is necessary for correct spine and synapse morphology to enable processes of learning and memory. We suggest that acute radiation exposure leads to rapid dendritic spine and synapse morphology alterations via aberrant cytoskeletal signalling and processing and that this is associated with the immediate neurocognitive side effects observed in patients treated with ionising radiation.

  • 33.
    Kempf, Stefan J.
    et al.
    Helmholtz Zentrum München.
    Casciati, Arianna
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Janik, Dirk
    von Toerne, Christine
    Helmholtz Zentrum München.
    Ueffing, Marius
    Neff, Frauke
    Moertl, Simone
    Helmholtz Zentrum München.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Saran, Anna
    Atkinson, Michael J.
    Helmholtz Zentrum München.
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Pazzaglia, Simonetta
    Tapio, Soile
    Helmholtz Zentrum München.
    The cognitive defects of neonatally irradiated miceare accompanied by changed synaptic plasticity,adult neurogenesis and neuroinflammation2014In: Molecular Neurodegeneration, ISSN 1750-1326, E-ISSN 1750-1326, Vol. 9, p. 57-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/purpose of the study: Epidemiological evidence suggests that low doses of ionising radiation(≤1.0 Gy) produce persistent alterations in cognition if the exposure occurs at a young age. The mechanismsunderlying such alterations are unknown. We investigated the long-term effects of low doses of total body gammaradiation on neonatally exposed NMRI mice on the molecular and cellular level to elucidate neurodegeneration.Results: Significant alterations in spontaneous behaviour were observed at 2 and 4 months following a single 0.5or 1.0 Gy exposure. Alterations in the brain proteome, transcriptome, and several miRNAs were analysed 6–7months post-irradiation in the hippocampus, dentate gyrus (DG) and cortex. Signalling pathways related to synapticactin remodelling such as the Rac1-Cofilin pathway were altered in the cortex and hippocampus. Further, synapticproteins MAP-2 and PSD-95 were increased in the DG and hippocampus (1.0 Gy). The expression of synapticplasticity genes Arc, c-Fos and CREB was persistently reduced at 1.0 Gy in the hippocampus and cortex. Thesechanges were coupled to epigenetic modulation via increased levels of microRNAs (miR-132/miR-212, miR-134).Astrogliosis, activation of insulin-growth factor/insulin signalling and increased level of microglial cytokine TNFαindicated radiation-induced neuroinflammation. In addition, adult neurogenesis within the DG was persistentlynegatively affected after irradiation, particularly at 1.0 Gy.Conclusion: These data suggest that neurocognitive disorders may be induced in adults when exposed at a youngage to low and moderate cranial doses of radiation. This raises concerns about radiation safety standards andregulatory practices.

  • 34.
    Lennartsson, Johan
    et al.
    Ludwiginstitutet för Cancerforskning.
    Carlsson, Jörgen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor family in radionuclide therapy of tumors-signal transduction and DNA repair2006In: Letters in Drug Design & Discovery, ISSN 1570-1808, E-ISSN 1875-628X, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 357-368Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To therapeutically target disseminated tumor cells, while sparing the surrounding tissues, it is necessary to develop agents that interact with structures exposed selectively on the tumor cell surface. Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor family are commonly overexpressed in several tumor types and may serve as targeting structures. In this review we discuss the effects of EGFR and HER2 targeting agents that can deliver radioactive nuclides, i.e. antibodies and affibody molecules, on intracellular signaling. If the targeting agent, in addition to deliver radioactivity to the tumor, can sensitize the tumor for its effects by influencing signal pathways that regulate cell survival and proliferation this will probably be advantageous. We discuss the changes in intracellular signaling that occurs after treatment of cancer cells with the clinically approved monoclonal antibodies cetuximab (anti-EGFR), trastuzumab (anti-HER2) as well as HER2 targeted affibody molecules which are under preclinical development. An important defence mechanism for cells against radiation is to activate DNA repair systems and we also address how DNA repair proteins are regulated in response to radiation or EGFR activation.

  • 35.
    Lundsten, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Mortensen, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Makiniemi, A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    The HSP90-inhibitor Onalespib Potentiates Lu-177-Dotatate Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors2017In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 44, p. S326-S326Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Lundsten, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Raval, Nakul
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Potentiating Lu-177-DOTATATE Therapy By HSP90 Inhibition - First In Vivo Study2018In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 45, p. S12-S13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37. Meijer, Annelie E.
    et al.
    Jernberg, A. R-M.
    Heiden, T.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Persson, L. M.
    Tilly, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Lind, B. K.
    Edgren, M. R.
    Dose and time dependent apoptotic response in a human melanoma cell line exposed to accelerated boron ions at four different LET2005In: International Journal of Radiation Biology, ISSN 0955-3002, E-ISSN 1362-3095, Vol. 81, no 4, p. 261-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate and compare the influence of linear energy transfer (LET), dose and time on the induction of apoptosis in a human melanoma cell line exposed to accelerated light boron ((10)B) ions and photons. Cells were exposed in vitro to doses up to 6 Gy accelerated boron ions (40, 80, 125 and 160 eV nm(-1)) and up to 12 Gy photons (0.2 eV nm(-1)). The induction of apoptosis was measured up to 9 days after irradiation using morphological characterization of apoptotic cells and bodies. In parallel, measurements of cell-cycle distribution, monitored by DNA flow cytometry, and cell survival based on the clonogenic cell survival assay, were performed. In addition, the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were studied. Accelerated boron ions induced a significant increase in apoptosis as compared with photons at all time points studied. At 1-5 h the percentage of radiation-induced apoptotic cells increased with both dose and LET. At the later time points (24-216 h) the apoptotic response was more complex and did not increase in a strictly LET-dependent manner. The early premitotic apoptotic cells disappeared at 24 h following exposure to the highest LET (160 eV nm(-1)). A postmitotic apoptotic response was seen after release of the dose-, time- and LET-dependent G2/M accumulations. The loss of clonogenic ability was dose- and LET-dependent and the fraction of un-rejoined DSB increased with increasing LET. Despite the LET-dependent clonogenic cell killing, it was not possible to measure quantitatively a LET-dependent apoptotic response. This was due to the different time course of appearance and disappearance of apoptotic cells.

  • 38. Orre, Lukas M.
    et al.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Dhar, Sumeer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lewensohn, Rolf
    Lehtiö, Janne
    p53 is involved in clearance of ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci in a human colon cancer cell line2006In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 342, no 4, p. 1211-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated p53-related differences in cellular response to DNA damaging agents, focusing on p53s effects on RAD51 protein level and sub-cellular localization post exposure to ionizing radiation. In a human colon cancer cell line, HCT116 and its isogenic p53-/- subcell line we show here p53-independent RAD51 foci formation but interestingly the resolution of RAD51 foci showed clear p53 dependence. In p53 wt cells, but not in p53-/- cells, RAD51 protein level decreased 48 h post irradiation and fluorescence immunostaining showed resolution of RAD51 foci and relocalization of RAD51 to nucleoli at time points corresponding to the decrease in RAD51 protein level. Both cell lines rejoined DNA double strand breaks efficiently with similar kinetics and p53 status did not influence sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. We suggest that p53 has a role in RAD51 clearance post DSB repair and that nucleoli might be sites of RAD51 protein degradation.

  • 39.
    Philippot, Gaetan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Fredriksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve
    Eriksson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Buratovic, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Environmental toxicology.
    Developmental effects of neonatal fractionated co-exposure to low-dose gamma radiation and paraquat on behaviour in adult mice2019In: Journal of Applied Toxicology, ISSN 0260-437X, E-ISSN 1099-1263, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 582-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radiological methods for screening, diagnostics and therapy are often used in healthcare; however, it has recently been reported that developmental exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation (IR) causes neurotoxicity. Environmental chemicals also have the potential to affect the developing brain and the concomitant effects caused by IR and chemicals are of high interest today. We therefore aim to investigate if low-dose IR can interact with the known neurotoxicant paraquat to induce neurotoxicity in the neonatal mouse model. Using the same model, we also aim to investigate if fractionated low-dose IR can be as neurotoxic as higher acute doses. Male mice were exposed to a single dose of paraquat (0.2 or 0.02 mg/kg) on postnatal day 10 and 11. Two hours following paraquat exposure, mice were whole body irradiated with 100 or 300 mGy gamma radiation (Cs-137). Behavioural observations were performed at 2 and 3 months of age. Following behavioural testing, we evaluated striatal dopaminergic gene transcription. Animals co-exposed to IR and paraquat generally displayed altered spontaneous behaviour compared to controls and single agent exposed mice. Stronger effects by combined exposure were also observed on adult memory and learning. However, dopaminergic gene transcript levels remained unchanged by treatment. Co-exposure to low-dose IR and paraquat can interact to exacerbate neurotoxic effects and to impair cognitive function. Furthermore, fractionation of the radiation dose was observed to be as potent as higher acute exposure for induction of developmental neurotoxicity.

  • 40.
    Radulescu, I
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Elmroth, K
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Stenerlow, B
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Chromatin organization contributes to non-randomly distributeddouble-strand breaks after exposure to high-LET radiation.2004In: Radiat Res, Vol. 161, p. 1-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Sahlberg, Sara Haggblad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Oncology.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Radiation response in colorectal cancer cells2012In: International Journal of Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1107-3756, E-ISSN 1791-244X, Vol. 30, no S1, p. S7-S7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Dascalu, Adrian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Mortensen, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Abramenkovs, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Kuku, Gamze
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    The novel HSP90 inhibitor AT13387 potentiates radiation effects in squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cells2015In: OncoTarget, ISSN 1949-2553, E-ISSN 1949-2553, Vol. 6, no 34, p. 35652-35666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overexpression of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is associated with increased tumor cell survival and radioresistance. In this study we explored the efficacy of the novel HSP90 inhibitor AT13387 and examined its radiosensitizing effects in combination with gamma-radiation in 2D and 3D structures as well as mice-xenografts. AT13387 induced effective cytotoxic activity and radiosensitized cancer cells in monolayer and tumor spheroid models, where low drug doses triggered significant synergistic effects on cell survival together with radiation. Furthermore, AT13387 treatment resulted in G2/M-phase arrest and significantly reduced the migration capacity. The expression of selected client proteins involved in DNA repair, cell-signaling and cell growth was downregulated in vitro, though the expression of most investigated proteins recurred after 8-24 h. These results were confirmed in vivo where AT13387 treated tumors displayed effective downregulation of HSP90 and its oncogenic client proteins. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that AT13387 is a potent new cancer drug and effective radiosensitizer in vitro with an excellent in vivo efficacy. AT13387 treatment has the potential to improve external beam therapy and radionuclide therapy outcomes and restore treatment efficacy in cancers that are resistant to initial therapeutic regimes.

  • 43.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Lundsten, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Mortensen, Anja C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Abramenkovs, Andris
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    In Vitro and In Vivo Growth Inhibitory and Radiosensitizing Effects of the Anti-HSP90 agent Onalespib2017In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 44, p. S182-S182Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Mortensen, Anja C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Haylock, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Selvaraju, Ram Kumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Evaluation of biomarkers for imaging and radio-immunotherapy in combination with HSP90 inhibition in squamous cell carcinomas2014In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 41, no S2, p. S638-S638, article id P972Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Mortensen, Anja C
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Selvaraju, Ram K
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET-MRI Platform.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Molecular Imaging.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Molecular imaging of EGFR and CD44v6 for prediction and response monitoring of HSP90 inhibition in an in vivo squamous cell carcinoma model.2016In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 974-982Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is essential for the activation and stabilization of numerous oncogenic client proteins. AT13387 is a novel HSP90 inhibitor promoting degradation of oncogenic proteins upon binding, and may also act as a radiosensitizer. For optimal treatment there is, however, the need for identification of biomarkers for patient stratification and therapeutic response monitoring, and to find suitable targets for combination treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the response of surface antigens commonly expressed in squamous cell carcinoma to AT13387 treatment, and to find suitable biomarkers for molecular imaging and radioimmunotherapy in combination with HSP90 inhibition.

    METHODS: Cancer cell proliferation and radioimmunoassays were used to evaluate the effect of AT13387 on target antigen expression in vitro. Inhibitor effects were then assessed in vivo in mice-xenografts. Animals were treated with AT13387 (5 × 50 mg/kg), and were imaged with PET using either (18)F-FDG or (124)I-labelled tracers for EGFR and CD44v6, and this was followed by ex-vivo biodistribution analysis and immunohistochemical staining.

    RESULTS: AT13387 exposure resulted in high cytotoxicity and possible radiosensitization with IC50 values below 4 nM. Both in vitro and in vivo AT13387 effectively downregulated HSP90 client proteins. PET imaging with (124)I-cetuximab showed a significant decrease of EGFR in AT13387-treated animals compared with untreated animals. In contrast, the squamous cell carcinoma-associated biomarker CD44v6, visualized with (124)I-AbD19384 as well as (18)F-FDG uptake, were not significantly altered by AT13387 treatment.

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that AT13387 downregulates HSP90 client proteins, and that molecular imaging of these proteins may be a suitable approach for assessing treatment response. Furthermore, radioimmunotherapy targeting CD44v6 in combination with AT13387 may potentiate the radioimmunotherapy outcome due to radiosensitizing effects of the drug, and could potentially lead to a lower dose to normal tissues.

  • 46.
    Spiegelberg, Diana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Mortensen, Anja C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Selvaraju, Ram Kumar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Eriksson, Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Scott, A.
    Olivia Newton John Canc Res Inst, Ludwig Inst Canc Res, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;La Trobe Univ, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Nestor, Marika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery.
    Molecular imaging of EGFR and EGFRvIII for prediction and response monitoring of HSP90 inhibition in an in vivo squamous cell carcinoma model2015In: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, ISSN 1619-7070, E-ISSN 1619-7089, Vol. 42, no S1, p. S263-S264Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Stenerlöw, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
    Radiation-induced bystander effects2006In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 373-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Article does not have an abstract.

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