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  • 1.
    Annerbo, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hultin, Hella
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Left-shifted relation between calcium and parathyroid hormone in Graves' Disease2014In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 99, no 2, p. 545-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Patients with Graves' disease (GD) have disturbances in calcium regulation with manifestations such as postoperative hypocalcemia. We have investigated the thyroid as well as the parathyroid function in detail.

    Material and Method:

    A series of patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for GD (n=56) or Multi Nodular Goitre (MNG, n=50) were scrutinized for postoperative hypocalcemia, need for calcium and/or vitamin D substitution. CiCa-clamp was used in 14 patients and 21 controls to quantify the secretion of PTH in relation to the ionized plasma calcium level. The setpoint, equal to the plasma ionized calcium concentration at which 50% of the maximal secretion of PTH is inhibited, as well as other CiCa-related parameters were calculated.

    Results:

    Hypocalcemia was present in 48% of GD and 41.2% of patients with MNG postoperatively. Patients with GD had lower calcium levels, 18% had S-Ca< 2.00 mmol/L compared to 4.0% in the MNG group, p=0.02. A higher degree of GD patients were given parenteral calcium-substitution during the hospital stay (3.6% vs 0 %) and oral calcium substitution at discharge (48% vs 10%), although they had normal vitamin D3 levels. The GD group showed a significantly left-shifted setpoint compared to the normal group on CiCa clamp, 1.16 mmol/l vs. 1.20 mmol/L (p<0.001), as well as an increased PTH release to hypocalcemic stimulus. GD patients also show an association between degree of subclinical toxicosis at time of surgery and risk for developing postoperative hypocalcemia.

    Conclusion:

    Patients with GD demonstrate dysregulation of the calcium homeostasis by several parameters. GD patients have lower postoperative S-calcium compared to patients with MNG, lower calcium/PTH setpoint and a significantly increased release of PTH to hypocalcemic stimulus compared to controls. The CiCa clamp response in GD patients with normal 25-OH-vitamin D3 levels mimics that of obese patients in which vitamin D insufficiency has been proposed as an underlying cause.

  • 2.
    Annerbo, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Management of Grave's Disease Is Improved by Total Thyroidectomy2012In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 36, no 8, p. 1943-1946Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 267 consecutive patients with Graves' disease (GD). The principal aim of this study was to evaluate the risk for recurrence and complications when changing the surgical method from subtotal (ST) to total thyroidectomy (TT). Information from 267 consecutive patients operated on for GD between 2000 and 2006 was collected at Uppsala University Hospital (143) and Falun County Hospital (128). There were 229 women and 38 men. Four patients were operated on twice. A total of 40 STs and 229 TTs were performed. Results were compared to those of a previous cohort from the same hospital, with a majority of STs (157/176) performed from 1980 to 1992. The risk for relapse of GD was reduced from 20 to 3.3 % after the shift from ST to TT. In terms of surgical complications, 2.2 % demonstrated permanent vocal cord paralysis and 4.5 % had persistent hypocalcemia, not significant when compared to the previous cohort. In spite of TT, there were four recurrences, all due to remnant thyroid tissue high up at the hyoid bone. Changing the surgical method did not affect postoperative progression of dysthyroid ophthalmopathy (DO, 7.0 vs. 7.5 %). There were no differences in outcome with respect to which hospital the patients had their operation. Change from ST to TT dramatically reduced the risk for recurrence of GD without increasing the rate of complications. TT is not more effective than ST in hampering progression of DO as has been advocated by some. Careful surgical dissection up to the hyoid bone is necessary to avoid recurrence.

  • 3.
    Backman, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Maharjan, Rajani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Falk Delgado, Alberto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery.
    Crona, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Cupisti, Kenko
    Marien Hosp, Dept Surg, Euskirchen, Germany..
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Global DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Two Discrete clusters of Pheochromocytoma with Distinct Genomic and Genetic Alterations2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 44943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PPGLs) are rare and frequently heritable neural-crest derived tumours arising from the adrenal medulla or extra-adrenal chromaffin cells respectively. The majority of PPGL tumours are benign and do not recur with distant metastases. However, a sizeable fraction of these tumours secrete vasoactive catecholamines into the circulation causing a variety of symptoms including hypertension, palpitations and diaphoresis. The genetic landscape of PPGL has been well characterized and more than a dozen genes have been described as recurrently mutated. Recent studies of DNA-methylation have revealed distinct clusters of PPGL that share DNA methylation patterns and driver mutations, as well as identified potential biomarkers for malignancy. However, these findings have not been adequately validated in independent cohorts. In this study we use an array-based genome-wide approach to study the methylome of 39 PPGL and 4 normal adrenal medullae. We identified two distinct clusters of tumours characterized by different methylation patterns and different driver mutations. Moreover, we identify genes that are differentially methylated between tumour subcategories, and between tumours and normal tissue.

  • 4.
    Backman, Samuel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Crona, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Detection of Somatic Mutations in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Using Targeted Deep Sequencing2017In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 705-712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mutations affecting the mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) signalling pathway are frequent in human cancer and have been identified in up to 15% of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Grade A evidence supports the efficacy of MTOR inhibition with everolimus in pancreatic NETs. Although a significant proportion of patients experience disease stabilization, only a minority will show objective tumour responses. It has been proposed that genomic mutations resulting in activation of MTOR signalling could be used to predict sensitivity to everolimus.

    PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with NETs that underwent treatment with everolimus at our Institution were identified and those with available tumour tissue were selected for further analysis. Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to re-sequence 22 genes that were selected on the basis of documented involvement in the MTOR signalling pathway or in the tumourigenesis of gastroenterpancreatic NETs. Radiological responses were documented using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours.

    RESULTS: Six patients were identified, one had a partial response and four had stable disease. Sequencing of tumour tissue resulted in a median sequence depth of 667.1 (range=404-1301) with 1-fold coverage of 95.9-96.5% and 10-fold coverage of 87.6-92.2%. A total of 494 genetic variants were discovered, four of which were identified as pathogenic. All pathogenic variants were validated using Sanger sequencing and were found exclusively in menin 1 (MEN1) and death domain associated protein (DAXX) genes. No mutations in the MTOR pathway-related genes were observed.

    CONCLUSION: Targeted NGS is a feasible method with high diagnostic yield for genetic characterization of pancreatic NETs. A potential association between mutations in NETs and response to everolimus should be investigated by future studies.

  • 5.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Gill, Anthony J.
    Royal N Shore Hosp, Dept Anat Pathol, St Leonards, NSW 2065, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia..
    Sidhu, Stan
    Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.;Royal N Shore Hosp, Dept Surg, St Leonards, NSW 2065, Australia..
    Norlen, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.;Royal N Shore Hosp, Dept Surg, St Leonards, NSW 2065, Australia..
    Dina, Roberto
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Hammersmith Hosp, Dept Histopathol, London, England..
    Palazzo, F. Fausto
    Univ London Imperial Coll Sci Technol & Med, Hammersmith Hosp, Endocrine Surg, London, England..
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine discriminates between parathyroid adenoma and carcinoma2016In: Clinical Epigenetics, E-ISSN 1868-7083, Vol. 8, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Primary hyperparathyroidism is characterized by enlarged parathyroid glands due to an adenoma (80-85 %) or multiglandular disease (similar to 15 %) causing hypersecretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and generally hypercalcemia. Parathyroid cancer is rare (<1-5 %). The epigenetic mark 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is reduced in various cancers, and this may involve reduced expression of the ten-eleven translocation 1 (TET1) enzyme. Here, we have performed novel experiments to determine the 5hmC level and TET1 protein expression in 43 parathyroid adenomas (PAs) and 17 parathyroid carcinomas (PCs) from patients who had local invasion or metastases and to address a potential growth regulatory role of TET1. Results: The global 5hmC level was determined by a semi-quantitative DNA immune-dot blot assay in a smaller number of tumors. The global 5hmC level was reduced in nine PCs and 15 PAs compared to four normal tissue samples (p < 0.05), and it was most severely reduced in the PCs. By immunohistochemistry, all 17 PCs stained negatively for 5hmC and TET1 showed negative or variably heterogeneous staining for the majority. All 43 PAs displayed positive 5hmC staining, and a similar aberrant staining pattern of 5hmC and TET1 was seen in about half of the PAs. Western blotting analysis of two PCs and nine PAs showed variable TET1 protein expression levels. A significantly higher tumor weight was associated to PAs displaying a more severe aberrant staining pattern of 5hmC and TET1. Overexpression of TET1 in a colony forming assay inhibited parathyroid tumor cell growth. Conclusions: 5hmC can discriminate between PAs and PCs. Whether 5hmC represents a novel marker for malignancy warrants further analysis in additional parathyroid tumor cohorts. The results support a growth regulatory role of TET1 in parathyroid tissue.

  • 6.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Gill, Anthony J.
    Kolling Inst Med Res, Canc Diag & Pathol Res Grp, St Leonards, NSW, Australia..
    Sidhu, Stan
    Royal North Shore Hosp, Dept Surg, St Leonards, NSW, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Norlen, Olov
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck Lab, Endocrine Unit, Dept Surg Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.;Royal North Shore Hosp, Dept Surg, St Leonards, NSW, Australia.;Univ Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia..
    Dina, Roberto
    Imperial Coll, Hammersmith Hosp, Dept Histopathol, London, England..
    Palazzo, F. Fausto
    Imperial Coll, Hammersmith Hosp, Dept Endocrine Surg, London, England..
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    A role for TET2 in parathyroid carcinoma2017In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 329-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) is rarely caused by parathyroid carcinoma (PC, <1-5% of pHPT cases). The TET proteins oxidize the epigenetic mark 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) and inactivation by mutation or epigenetic deregulation of TET1 and TET2 play important roles in various cancers. Recently, we found that 5hmC was severely reduced in all of the analyzed PCs and with deranged expression of TET1 for the majority of PCs. Here, we have examined the expression of the TET2 protein in 15 5hmC-negative PCs from patients who had local invasion or metastases. Cell growth and cell migratory roles for TET2 as well as epigenetic deregulated expression were addressed. Immunohistochemistry revealed very low/undetectable expression of TET2 in all PCs and verified for two PCs that were available for western blotting analysis. Knockdown of TET2 in the parathyroid cell line sHPT-1 resulted in increased cell growth and increased cell migration. DNA sequencing of TET2 in PCs revealed two common variants and no obvious inactivating mutations. Quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing analysis of the TET2 promoter CpG island revealed higher CpG methylation level in the PCs compared to that in normal tissues and treatment of a PC primary cell culture with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine caused increased expression of the methylated TET2 gene. Hence, the data suggest that deregulated expression of TET2 by DNA hypermethylation may contribute to the aberrantly low level of 5hmC in PCs and further that TET2 plays a cell growth and cell migratory regulatory role and may constitute a parathyroid tumor suppressor gene.

  • 7.
    Barazeghi, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Prabhawa, Surendra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Univ Hosp, Rudbeck Lab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    A Role of TETs and 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in SI-NETs2017In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 105, p. 18-18Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Chu, Xia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Monazzan, Azita
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Razmara, Masoud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Quantitative Protein Profiling of Adrenal Glands in a Men1 Mouse ModelManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9. Cromer, M. Kyle
    et al.
    Choi, Murim
    Nelson-Williams, Carol
    Fonseca, Annabelle L.
    Kunstman, John W.
    Korah, Reju M.
    Overton, John D.
    Mane, Shrikant
    Kenney, Barton
    Malchoff, Carl D.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Carling, Tobias
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Lifton, Richard P.
    Neomorphic effects of recurrent somatic mutations in Yin Yang 1 in insulin-producing adenomas2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 13, p. 4062-4067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insulinomas are pancreatic islet tumors that inappropriately secrete insulin, producing hypoglycemia. Exome and targeted sequencing revealed that 14 of 43 insulinomas harbored the identical somatic mutation in the DNA-binding zinc finger of the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1). Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) showed that this T372R substitution changes the DNA motif bound by YY1. Global analysis of gene expression demonstrated distinct clustering of tumors with and without YY1(T372R) mutations. Genes showing large increases in expression in YY1(T372R) tumors included ADCY1 (an adenylyl cyclase) and CACNA2D2 (a Ca2+ channel); both are expressed at very low levels in normal beta-cells and show mutation-specific YY1 binding sites. Both gene products are involved in key pathways regulating insulin secretion. Expression of these genes in rat INS-1 cells demonstrated markedly increased insulin secretion. These findings indicate that YY1(T372R) mutations are neomorphic, resulting in constitutive activation of cAMP and Ca2+ signaling pathways involved in insulin secretion.

  • 10.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Backman, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Maharjan, Rajani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Mayrhofer, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Isaksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Spatiotemporal Heterogeneity Characterizes the Genetic Landscape of Pheochromocytoma and Defines Early Events in Tumorigenesis.2015In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 21, no 19, p. 4451-4460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PPGL) patients display heterogeneity in the clinical presentation and underlying genetic cause. The degree of inter- and intratumor genetic heterogeneity has not yet been defined.

    EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: In PPGLs from 94 patients, we analyzed LOH, copy-number variations, and mutation status of SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, VHL, EPAS1, NF1, RET, TMEM127, MAX, and HRAS using high-density SNP array and targeted deep sequencing, respectively. Genetic heterogeneity was determined through (i) bioinformatics analysis of individual samples that estimated absolute purity and ploidy from SNP array data and (ii) comparison of paired tumor samples that allowed reconstruction of phylogenetic trees.

    RESULTS: Mutations were found in 61% of the tumors and correlated with specific patterns of somatic copy-number aberrations (SCNA) and degree of nontumoral cell admixture. Intratumor genetic heterogeneity was observed in 74 of 136 samples using absolute bioinformatics estimations and in 22 of 24 patients by comparison of paired samples. In addition, a low genetic concordance was observed between paired primary tumors and distant metastases. This allowed for reconstructing the life history of individual tumors, identifying somatic mutations as well as copy-number loss of 3p and 11p (VHL subgroup), 1p (Cluster 2), and 17q (NF1 subgroup) as early events in PPGL tumorigenesis.

    CONCLUSIONS: Genomic landscapes of PPGL are specific to mutation subtype and characterized by genetic heterogeneity both within and between tumor lesions of the same patient.

  • 11.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Wärnberg, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Metastases from Neuroendocrine Tumors to the Breast Are More Common than Previously Thought. A Diagnostic Pitfall?2013In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 1701-1706Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metastases from neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) to the breast have been described as a rare phenomenon. Presentation, imaging results, and cytopathologic findings of these tumours may closely mimic those of a mammary carcinoma. This study was a retrospective review of 661 patients with metastatic NETs, of whom 280 were females, treated at Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Patients with pathological breast lesions were identified. Histopathological slides from available NET breast lesions were analyzed for mammary carcinoma and neuroendocrine markers. We have identified 20 female patients with NET metastases to the breast, 11/235 with small intestinal NETs, 8/55 with lung NETs, and 1/6 with thymic NETs. There were no male patients with NET metastatic to the breast. Four patients had their breast lesion initially diagnosed as mammary carcinoma. Retrospectively, these lesions showed negative staining for mammary carcinoma markers. Metastases to the breast from neuroendocrine tumors may be more common than previously thought. Patients with a lesion to the breast and symptoms typical for NET may benefit from additional histopathological investigation, because NET metastases and mammary carcinoma have different immunohistochemical profiles.

  • 12.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Gustavsson, Tobias
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Åkerström, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Somatic Mutations and Genetic Heterogeneity at the CDKN1B Locus in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors.2015In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, ISSN 1068-9265, E-ISSN 1534-4681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Until recently, the genetic landscape of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) was limited to recurrent copy number alterations, most commonly a loss on chromosome 18. Intertumor heterogeneity with nonconcordant genotype in paired primary and metastatic lesions also is described, further contributing to the difficulty of unraveling the genetic enigma of SI-NETs. A recent study analyzing 55 SI-NET exomes nominated CDKN1B (p27) as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene.

    METHODS: This study aimed to determine the frequency of CDKN1B inactivation and to investigate genotype-phenotype correlations. It investigated 362 tumors from 200 patients. All samples were resequenced for mutations in CDKN1B using automated Sanger sequencing. The expression of p27 was investigated in 12 CDKN1B mutant and nine wild type tumors.

    RESULTS: Some 8.5 % (17/200) of patients had tumors with pathogenic mutations in CDKN1B including 13 insertion deletions, four nonsense variants, and one stop-loss variant. All variants with available nontumoral DNA were classified as somatic. Inter- and intratumor heterogeneity at the CDKN1B locus was detected respectively in six of ten and two of ten patients. Patients with CDKN1B mutated tumors had both heterogeneous disease presentation and diverse prognosis. Expression of the p27 protein did not correlate with CDKN1B mutation status, and no differences in the clinical characteristics between CDKN1B mutated and CDKN1B wild type tumor carriers were found.

    CONCLUSION: This study corroborates the finding of CDKN1B as a potential haplo-insufficient tumor suppressor gene characterized by inter- and intratumor heterogeneity in SI-NETs.

  • 13.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Maharjan, Rajani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Delgado Verdugo, Alberto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    MAX mutations status in Swedish patients with pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma tumours2014In: Familial Cancer, ISSN 1389-9600, E-ISSN 1573-7292, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 121-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pheochromocytoma (PCC) and Paraganglioma are rare tumours originating from neuroendocrine cells. Up to 60 % of cases have either germline or somatic mutation in one of eleven described susceptibility loci, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, VHL, EPAS1, RET, NF1, TMEM127 and MYC associated factor-X (MAX). Recently, germline mutations in MAX were found to confer susceptibility to PCC and paraganglioma (PGL). A subsequent multicentre study found about 1 % of PCCs and PGLs to have germline or somatic mutations in MAX. However, there has been no study investigating the frequency of MAX mutations in a Scandinavian cohort. We analysed tumour specimens from 63 patients with PCC and PGL treated at Uppsala University hospital, Sweden, for re-sequencing of MAX using automated Sanger sequencing. Our results show that 0 % (0/63) of tumours had mutations in MAX. Allele frequencies of known single nucleotide polymorphisms rs4902359, rs45440292, rs1957948 and rs1957949 corresponded to those available in the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Database. We conclude that MAX mutations remain unusual events and targeted genetic screening should be considered after more common genetic events have been excluded.

  • 14.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Nordling, Margareta
    Maharjan, Rajani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Integrative Genetic Characterization and Phenotype Correlations in Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Tumours2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 1, p. e86756-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: About 60% of Pheochromocytoma (PCC) and Paraganglioma (PGL) patients have either germline or somatic mutations in one of the 12 proposed disease causing genes; SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, VHL, EPAS1, RET, NF1, TMEM127, MAX and H-RAS. Selective screening for germline mutations is routinely performed in clinical management of these diseases. Testing for somatic alterations is not performed on a regular basis because of limitations in interpreting the results. Aim: The purpose of the study was to investigate genetic events and phenotype correlations in a large cohort of PCC and PGL tumours. Methods: A total of 101 tumours from 89 patients with PCC and PGL were re-sequenced for a panel of 10 disease causing genes using automated Sanger sequencing. Selected samples were analysed with Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification and/or SNParray. Results: Pathogenic genetic variants were found in tumours from 33 individual patients (37%), 14 (16%) were discovered in constitutional DNA and 16 (18%) were confirmed as somatic. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was observed in 1/1 SDHB, 11/11 VHL and 3/3 NF1-associated tumours. In patients with somatic mutations there were no recurrences in contrast to carriers of germline mutations (P = 0.022). SDHx/VHL/ EPAS1 associated cases had higher norepinephrine output (P = 0.03) and lower epinephrine output (P<0.001) compared to RET/NF1/H-RAS cases. Conclusion: Somatic mutations are frequent events in PCC and PGL tumours. Tumour genotype may be further investigated as prognostic factors in these diseases. Growing evidence suggest that analysis of tumour DNA could have an impact on the management of these patients.

  • 15.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Antonodimitrakis, Pantelis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Multiple and Secondary Hormone Secretion in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors2017In: Pancreas, ISSN 0885-3177, E-ISSN 1536-4828, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 441-441Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Antonodimitrakis, Pantelis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine oncology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine oncology.
    Multiple and Secondary Hormone Secretion in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours2016In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 445-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT:

    As a group, neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) secrete many different peptide hormones, yet heretofore each NET patient is typically thought to produce at most one hormone that causes a distinct hormonal syndrome. A minority of patients have multiple hormones at diagnosis and may also develop secondary hormone secretion at a later stage.

    OBJECTIVES:

    The objectives of the study were to determine the frequency and to describe the impact of multiple and secondary hormone secretion in sporadic gasteroenteropancreatic NET patients.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

    This was a retrospective analysis of patients (n = 972) with gasteroenteropancreatic NET treated at Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Patients with the secretion of multiple hormones at diagnosis and/or those developing secondary hormone secretion during the disease course were identified and studied in further detail.

    RESULTS:

    In pancreatic NETs (PNETs), a total of 19 of 323 patients (6%) had secretion of multiple hormones at diagnosis, and 14 of 323 (4%) had secondary changes during the disease course. These phenomena occurred exclusively in patients with an advanced disease stage, and secondary hormones were detected in a close time span with progressive disease. Patients with secondary insulin hypersecretion had increased morbidity as well as reduced survival (P < .002). In contrast, multiple and secondary hormone secretion was rarely seen in NETs of the small intestine with 0 and 1 of 603 cases, respectively.

    CONCLUSION:

    Diversity of PNET hormone secretion either at diagnosis or during the disease course occurred in a minority of patients (9.3%). These phenomena had a major impact on patient outcome both through increased morbidity and mortality. Our results support that patients with metastatic PNETs should be monitored for clinical symptoms of secondary hormone secretion during the disease course.

  • 17.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Targeted Next Generation Sequencing in the Screening for Familial Neuroendocrine Tumor Syndromes: A Tool for Personalized Medicine2014In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 99, no 3-4, p. 253-253Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Verdugo, Alberto Delgado
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Next-generation sequencing in the clinical genetic screening of patients with pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma2013In: Endocrine connections, ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 104-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Recent findings have shown that up to 60% of pheochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas (PGLs) are caused by germline or somatic mutations in one of the 11 hitherto known susceptibility genes: SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, VHL, HIF2A (EPAS1), RET, NF1, TMEM127 and MAX. This list of genes is constantly growing and the 11 genes together consist of 144 exons. A genetic screening test is extensively time consuming and expensive. Hence, we introduce next-generation sequencing (NGS) as a time-efficient and cost-effective alternative.

    METHODS:

    Tumour lesions from three patients with apparently sporadic PCC were subjected to whole exome sequencing utilizing Agilent Sureselect target enrichment system and Illumina Hi seq platform. Bioinformatics analysis was performed in-house using commercially available software. Variants in PCC and PGL susceptibility genes were identified.

    RESULTS:

    We have identified 16 unique genetic variants in PCC susceptibility loci in three different PCC, spending less than a 30-min hands-on, in-house time. Two patients had one unique variant each that was classified as probably and possibly pathogenic: NF1 Arg304Ter and RET Tyr791Phe. The RET variant was verified by Sanger sequencing.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    NGS can serve as a fast and cost-effective method in the clinical genetic screening of PCC. The bioinformatics analysis may be performed without expert skills. We identified process optimization, characterization of unknown variants and determination of additive effects of multiple variants as key issues to be addressed by future studies.

  • 19.
    Crona, Joakim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Verdugo, Alberto Delgado
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Maharjan, Rajani
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Stalberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Oncology.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Somatic Mutations in H-RAS in Sporadic Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Identified by Exome Sequencing2013In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 98, no 7, p. E1266-E1271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Up to 60% of pheochromocytoma (PCC) and paraganglioma (PGL) are associated with either somatic or germline mutations in established PCC and PGL susceptibility loci. Most unexplained cases are characterized by an increased activity of the RAS/RAF/ERK signaling pathway. Mutations in RAS subtypes H, K, and N are common in human cancers; however, previous studies have been inconsistent regarding the mutational status of RAS in PCC and PGL. Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify novel disease causing genes in PCC and PGL tumors. Design, setting, and participants: Four benign and sporadic PCC and PGL tumors were subjected to whole exome sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq Platform. Sequences were processed by CLC genomics 4.9 bioinformatics software and the acquired list of genetic variants was filtered against the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database. Findings were validated in an additional 78 PCC and PGL tumor lesions. Results: Exome sequencing identified 2 cases with somatic mutations in the H-RAS. In total, 6.9% (n = 4/58) of tumors negative for mutations in major PCC and PGL loci had mutations in H-RAS: G13R, Q61K, and Q61R. There were 3 PCC and 1 PGL; all had sporadic presentation with benign tumor characteristics and substantial increases in norepinephrine and/or epinephrine. H-RAS tumors were exclusively found in male patients (P = .007). Conclusions: We identified recurrent somatic H-RAS mutations in pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. Tumors with H-RAS mutations had activation of the RAS/RAF/ERK signaling pathway and were associated with male PCC patients having benign and sporadic disease characteristics. H-RAS could serve as a prognostic and predictive marker as well as a novel therapeutic target.

  • 20.
    Daskalakis, Kosmas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Karakatsanis, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Backlin, Carin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Tiensuu Janson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine oncology.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Midkine Is a New Novel Serum Biomarker in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors (SI-NETs)2016In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 103, p. 45-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Daskalakis, Kosmas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Karakatsanis, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hessman, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stuart, Heather C.
    Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Miami, Florida, USA.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Tiensuu Janson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Öberg, Kjell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Association of a Prophylactic surgical approach to Stage IV Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors with Survival.2018In: JAMA Oncology, ISSN 2374-2437, E-ISSN 2374-2445, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 183-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: Primary tumor resection and mesenteric lymph node dissection in asymptomatic patients with stage IV Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors (SI-NETs) is controversial.

    Objective:  To determine whether locoregional surgery performed at diagnosis in asymptomatic SI-NETs patients with distant metastases affects overall survival (OS), morbidity and mortality, length of hospital stay (LOS) and re-operation rates.

    Design: This investigation was a cohort study of asymptomatic patients with stage IV SI-NET, diagnosed between 1985 and 2015, using the prospective Uppsala database of SI-NETs and the Swedish National Patient Register. Patients included were followed until May 2016 and divided to a first group, which underwent Prophylactic Upfront Surgery within six months from diagnosis Combined with Oncological treatment (PUSCO group) and a second group, which was either treated non-surgically or operated later (Delayed Surgery As Needed Combined with Oncological treatment [DSANCO group]).

    Setting: A tertiary referral center with follow-up data from the Swedish National Patient Register.

    Participants: We included 363 stage IV SI-NET patients without any abdominal symptoms within 6 months from diagnosis, treated either with PUSCO (n=161) or DSANCO (n=202).

    Exposure: PUSCO vs DSANCO.

    Main Outcomes and Measures: Overall survival (OS), length of hospital stay (LOS), postoperative morbidity and mortality and re-operation rates measured from baseline. Propensity score match was performed between the two groups.

    Results: Two isonumerical groups (n=91) occurred after propensity score matching. There was no difference between groups in OS (PUSCO median 7.9 vs DSANCO 7.6 years; [hazard ratio] HR, 0.98; [95% CI, 0.70-1.37]; log-rank P=.93) and cancer-specific survival (median 7.7 vs 7.6 years, HR, 0.99; [95%CI, 0.71-1.40]; log-rank P=.99). There was no difference in 30-day mortality (0% in both matched groups) or postoperative morbidity (2% vs 1%; P>.99), LOS (median 73 vs 76 days; P=.64), LOS due to local tumor-related symptoms (median 7 vs 11.5 days; P=.81) or incisional hernia repairs (4% in both groups; P>.99).  Patients from the PUSCO group underwent more re-operative procedures (14%) compared to the DSANCO group (3%) due to intestinal obstruction (P< .001).

    Conclusion: Prophylactic upfront locoregional surgery confers no survival advantage in asymptomatic stage IV SI-NET patients. Delayed surgery as needed seems to be comparable in all examined outcomes, whilst offering the advantage of less re-operations for intestinal obstruction.  The value of a priori locoregional surgery in the presence of distant metastases is challenged and needs to be elucidated in a randomized controlled study.

     

  • 22.
    Daskalakis, Kosmas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Karakatsanis, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Clinical signs of fibrosis in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours.2016In: British Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0007-1323, E-ISSN 1365-2168, Vol. 104, no 1, p. 69-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In patients with small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (SI-NETs), serotonin and other cytokines released from tumour cells may induce fibrosis, leading to carcinoid heart disease and abdominal fibrotic reactions. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence, clinical complications and management of this reaction in the abdomen.

    METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with SI-NETs diagnosed between 1985 and 2015. Clinical data, outcomes, radiological findings, and surgical and radiological interventions were reviewed.

    RESULTS: A total of 824 patients were diagnosed with SI-NETs in the study interval. Clinically significant abdominal signs and symptoms of fibrosis occurred in 36 patients. Of these, 20 had critically symptomatic central mesenteric fibrosis causing obstruction of mesenteric vessels, and 16 had retroperitoneal fibrosis causing obstructive uropathy with hydronephrosis. Extensive fibrosis causing mesenteric vessel obstruction and/or obstructive uropathy was more often associated with symptomatic and advanced disease encompassing lymph node metastases in the mesenteric root, para-aortic lymph node metastases, as well as liver metastases and peritoneal carcinomatosis. Palliative intervention in terms of superior mesenteric vein stenting or resection of central mesenteric metastases and/or percutaneous nephrostomy and J stent treatment was beneficial in the majority of the patients.

    CONCLUSION: Extensive abdominal fibrosis associated with clinically significant symptoms of intestinal ischaemia and/or obstructive uropathy was linked to advanced disease in patients with SI-NETs. Prompt recognition and minimally invasive intervention was effective in disease palliation.

  • 23.
    Daskalakis, Kosmas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Karakatsanis, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Ex vivo activity of cytotoxic drugs and targeted agents in Small Intestinal NETsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumours (SI-NET) are considered to be generally resistant to systemic treatment. To date predictive markers for drug activity are lacking.

    Patients and Methods: Tumour samples from 27 patients with SI-NET were analyzed ex vivo for sensitivity to a panel of cytotoxic drugs and targeted agents using a short-term total cell kill assay. Samples of renal cancer, colorectal cancer (CRC), ovarian cancer, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) were included for comparison. For the SI-NET subset, drug sensitivity was analyzed in relation to clinico-pathological variables and pre-treatment biomarkers.

    Results: For standard cytotoxic drugs, SI-NETs demonstrated similar or higher sensitivity to 5-FU, platinums, gemcitabine and doxorubicin compared with CRC. For targeted kinase inhibitors, SI-NET was among the most sensitive diagnoses. CLL and ovarian cancer were generally the most sensitive diagnoses to both cytotoxic drugs and protein kinase inhibitors. The mTOR inhibitor sirolimus exhibited modest cytotoxic activity.

    Individual SI-NET samples demonstrated great variability in ex vivo sensitivity for most drugs. Cross-resistance between different drugs also varied considerably, being higher among protein kinase inhibitors.

    Age, stage, grade, peritoneal carcinomatosis and extra-abdominal metastases as well as serum chromogranin A and urine 5-HIAA concentrations at diagnosis did not correlate to drug sensitivity ex vivo.

    Conclusions: SI-NETs exhibit variable but generally intermediate sensitivity ex vivo to cytotoxic and targeted drugs. Clinico-pathological factors and currently used biomarkers were not clearly associated to ex vivo sensitivity, challenging these criteria for treatment decisions in SI-NETs. The great variability in drug sensitivity calls for individualized selection of therapy.

  • 24.
    Daskalakis, Kosmas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Karakatsanis, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Ex Vivo Activity of Cytotoxic Drugs and Targeted Agents in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors2018In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 106, no Supplement: 1, p. 189-189Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Delgado Verdugo, Alberto
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Crona, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Starker, Lee F
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Global DNA methylation patterns in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs)2014In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 21, no 1, p. L5-L7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) are rare hormone producing tumors and are often diagnosed at advanced stage. The genetic and epigenetic background of SI-NETs are poorly understood, but several reports have indicated chromosomal losses at 18.21-qter and 11q22-q23. The aim of this study was to characterize CpG DNA methylation status of primary SI-NETs and the corresponding lymph node metastases. We used the commercially available HumanMethylation27 Beadchip array (Illumina), which covers 27578 CpG sites spanning over 14495 genes, and analyzed a discovery cohort of 10 primary SI-NETs with matched metastases. Messenger- mRNA, were determined for selected genes in a 47 tumors. In comparison to the primary tumors, the metastases showed 2697 statistically significant differentially genes. Metastases were generally less methylated than primary tumors. The relative mRNA expression level of the differentially methylated genes AXL, CRMP1, FGF5, and APOBEC3C largely reflected the methylation status. MAPK4, RUNX3, TP73, CCND1, CHFR, AHRR, and Rb1 known to be hypermethylated in other cancer types, displayed overall high methylation level (β-value ≥ 0.9). Methylation (β -value >0,7) at 18q21-qter and 11q22-q23 were detected in genes SETBP1, ELAC1, MBD1, MAPK4, TCEB3C and ARVC1, MMP8, BTG4, APOA1, FAM89B, HSPB1, respectively. Furthermore unsupervised clustering of the tumors identified three distinct clusters, one with a highly malignant behavior. Our data supports involvement of CpG DNA methylation in metastatic progression of SI-NETs and this could present a possibility to identify more aggressive tumors based on DNA methylation.

  • 26.
    Dumanski, Jan P.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Rasi, Chiara
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Davies, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Ali, Abir S
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine oncology.
    Grönberg, Malin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine oncology.
    Welin, Staffan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine oncology.
    Sorbye, Halfdan
    Grønbæk, Henning
    Cunningham, Janet L
    Forsberg, Lars A.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Tiensuu Janson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    A MUTYH germline mutation is associated with small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors2017In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 427-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genetics behind predisposition to small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is largely unknown, but there is growing awareness of a familial form of the disease. We aimed to identify germline mutations involved in the carcinogenesis of SI-NETs. The strategy included next-generation sequencing of exome- and/or whole-genome of blood DNA, and in selected cases, tumor DNA, from 24 patients from 15 families with the history of SI-NETs. We identified seven candidate mutations in six genes that were further studied using 215 sporadic SI-NET patients. The result was compared with the frequency of the candidate mutations in three control cohorts with a total of 35,688 subjects. A heterozygous variant causing an amino acid substitution p.(Gly396Asp) in the MutY DNA glycosylase gene (MUTYH) was significantly enriched in SI-NET patients (minor allele frequencies 0.013 and 0.003 for patients and controls respectively) and resulted in odds ratio of 5.09 (95% confidence interval 1.56-14.74; P value = 0.0038). We also found a statistically significant difference in age at diagnosis between familial and sporadic SI-NETs. MUTYH is involved in the protection of DNA from mutations caused by oxidative stress. The inactivation of this gene leads to specific increase of G:C- > T:A transversions in DNA sequence and has been shown to cause various cancers in humans and experimental animals. Our results suggest that p.(Gly396Asp) in MUTYH, and potentially other mutations in additional members of the same DNA excision-repair pathway (such as the OGG1 gene) might be involved in driving the tumorigenesis leading to familial and sporadic SI-NETs.

  • 27.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Ahmad, Tanveer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Janson, Eva T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    TCEB3C a putative tumor suppressor gene of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors2014In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 275-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs), formerly midgut carcinoids, are rare and slow-growing neoplasms. Frequent loss of one copy of chromosome 18 in primary tumors and metastases has been observed. The aim of the study was to investigate a possible role of TCEB3C (Elongin A3), currently the only imprinted gene on chromosome 18, as a tumor suppressor gene in SI-NETs, and whether its expression is epigenetically regulated. Primary tumors, metastases, the human SI-NET cell line CNDT2.5, and two other cell lines were included. Immunohistochemistry, gene copy number determination by PCR, colony formation assay, Western blotting, real-time quantitative RT-PCR, RNA interference, and quantitative CpG methylation analysis by pyrosequencing were performed. The large majority of tumors (33/43) showed very low to undetectable Elongin A3 expression and as expected 89% (40/45) displayed one TCEB3C gene copy. The DNA hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine induced TCEB3C expression in CNDT2.5 cells, in primary SI-NET cells prepared directly after surgery, but not in two other cell lines. Also siRNA to DNMT1 and treatment with the general histone methyltransferase inhibitor 3-deazaneplanocin A induced TCEB3C expression in a cell type-specific way. CpG methylation at the TCEB3C promoter was observed in all analyzed tissues and thus not related to expression. Overexpression of TCEB3C resulted in a 50% decrease of clonogenic survival of CNDT2.5 cells, but not of control cells. The results support a putative role of TCEB3C as a tumor suppressor gene in SI-NETs. Epigenetic repression of TCEB3C seems to be tumor cell type-specific and involves both DNA and histone methylation.

  • 28.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Ahmad, Tanvver
    Åkerstrom, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Janson, Eva Tiensuu
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stalberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    TCEB3C (Elongin A3) on chromosome 18 presents a putative tumor suppressor gene of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors.2013In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 73, no 8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Different gene expression profiles in metastasizing midgut carcinoid tumors2011In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 479-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The genetic events leading the progression of midgut carcinoid tumors are largely unknown. The disease course varies from patient to patient, and there is a lack of reliable prognostic markers. In order to identify genes involved in tumor progression, gene expression profiling was performed on tumor specimens. Samples comprised 18 primary tumors, 17 lymph node (LN) metastases, and seven liver metastases from a total of 19 patients. Patients were grouped according to clinical data and histopathology into indolent or progressive course. RNA was subjected to a spotted oligo microarray and B-statistics were performed. Differentially expressed genes were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. Self-organizing maps demonstrated three clusters: 11 primary tumors separated in one cluster, five LN metastases in another cluster, whereas all seven liver metastases, seven primary, and 12 LN metastases formed a third cluster. There was no correlation between indolent and progressive behavior. The primary tumors with Ki67>5%, with low frequency of the carcinoid syndrome, and a tendency toward shorter survival grouped together. Primary tumors differed in expression profile from their associated LN metastases; thus, there is evidence for genetic changes from primary tumors to metastases. ACTG2, GREM2, REG3A, TUSC2, RUNX1, TPH1, TGFBR2, and CDH6 were differentially expressed between clusters and subgroups of tumors. The expression profile that assembles tumors as being genetically similar on the RNA expression level may not be concordant with the clinical disease course. This study reveals differences in gene expression profiles and novel genes that may be of importance in midgut carcinoid tumor progression.

  • 30.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Bäcklin, Christofer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Tiensuu Janson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Novel Serum Biomarkers in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine TumorsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Daskalakis, Kosmas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Bäcklin, Christofer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cancer Pharmacology and Computational Medicine.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Tiensuu Janson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrin Oncology.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    DcR3, TFF3 and Midkine are Novel Serum Biomarkers in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors2017In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 170-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) are amine- and peptide producing neoplasms. Most patients display metastases at the time of diagnosis, they have an unpredictable individual disease course and the tumors are often therapy resistant. Chromogranin A (CgA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) are the clinically most used biomarkers today, but there is a great need for novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and new therapeutic targets. Sixty-nine biomarkers were screened in serum from 23 SI-NET patients and 23 healthy controls using multiplex PLA (proximity ligation assay). A refined method, PEA (proximity extension assay), was used to analyze 76 additional biomarkers. Statistical testing and multivariate classification were performed. Immunohistochemistry and ELISA assays were performed in an extended cohort. Using PLA, 19 biomarkers showed a significant difference in serum concentrations between patients and controls, and PEA revealed difference in concentrations in 13 proteins. Multivariate classification analysis revealed decoy receptor 3 (DcR3), trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) and Midkine to be good biomarkers for disease, which was confirmed by ELISA analysis. All three biomarkers were expressed in tumor tissue. DcR3 concentrations were elevated in patients with stage IV disease. High concentrations of DcR3 and TFF3 were correlated to poor survival. DcR3, TFF3 and Midkine exhibited elevated serum concentrations in SI-NET patients compared to healthy controls, and DcR3 and TFF3 were associated with poor survival. DcR3 seems to be a marker for liver metastases while TFF3 and Midkine may be new diagnostic biomarkers for SI-NETs.

  • 32.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stalberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    ACTG2 Inhibits Growth and Is Epigenetically Repressed in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors2014In: Neuroendocrinology, ISSN 0028-3835, E-ISSN 1423-0194, Vol. 99, no 3-4, p. 227-227Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    A Plausible Role for Actin Gamma Smooth Muscle 2 (ACTG2) in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine TumorgenesisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    A plausible role for actin gamma smooth muscle 2 (ACTG2) in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumorigenesis2016In: BMC Endocrine Disorders, ISSN 1472-6823, E-ISSN 1472-6823, Vol. 16, no 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) originate from the enterochromaffin cells in the ileum and jejunum. The knowledge about genetic and epigenetic abnormalities is limited. Low mRNA expression levels of actin gamma smooth muscle 2 (ACTG2) have been demonstrated in metastases relative to primary SI-NETs. ACTG2 and microRNA-145 (miR-145) are aberrantly expressed in other cancers and ACTG2 can be induced by miR-145. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ACTG2 in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumorigenesis.

    METHODS: Protein expression was analyzed in SI-NETs (n = 24) and in enterochromaffin cells by immunohistochemistry. The cell line CNDT2.5 was treated with the histone methyltransferase inhibitor 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep), the selective EZH2 inhibitor EPZ-6438, or 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a DNA hypomethylating agent. Cells were transfected with ACTG2 expression plasmid or miR-145. Western blotting analysis, quantitative RT-PCR, colony formation- and viability assays were performed. miR-145 expression levels were measured in tumors.

    RESULTS: Eight primary tumors and two lymph node metastases displayed variable levels of positive staining. Fourteen SI-NETs and normal enterochromaffin cells stained negatively. Overexpression of ACTG2 significantly inhibited CNDT2.5 cell growth. Treatment with DZNep or transfection with miR-145 induced ACTG2 expression (>10-fold), but no effects were detected after treatment with EPZ-6438 or 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. DZNep also induced miR-145 expression. SI-NETs expressed relatively low levels of miR-145, with reduced expression in metastases compared to primary tumors.

    CONCLUSIONS: ACTG2 is expressed in a fraction of SI-NETs, can inhibit cell growth in vitro, and is positively regulated by miR-145. Theoretical therapeutic strategies based on these results are discussed.

  • 35.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Westin, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    ACTG2 Inhibits Growth and Is Epigenetically Repressed in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Ekeblad, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Halin Lejonklou, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Prognostic Relevance of Survivin in Pancreatic Endocrine Tumors2012In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 1411-1418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Better prognostic markers are needed for pancreatic endocrine tumors. Survivin is an apoptosis inhibitor that is suggested to have a negative prognostic impact in several tumor types. Contradictory data exist, especially regarding the significance of a nuclear versus cytoplasmic location of survivin. The prognostic relevance of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin expression in pancreatic endocrine tumors-controlled for the tumor Ki-67 index, World Health Organization classification, and TNM stage-was investigated.

    METHODS:

    A total of 111 patients treated at a tertiary referral center were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical data were gathered from medical records. Immunohistochemistry for survivin and Ki-67 was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue. Univariate and multivariate Cox analyses were performed.

    RESULTS:

    Patients with tumors that had <5% survivin-positive nuclei had a mean survival of 225 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 168-281]. The corresponding figure for patients with 5 to 50% survivin-positive tumor cell nuclei was 101 months [95% CI 61-140; hazard ratio (HR) 2.4; P < 0.01) and with >50% survivin-positive nuclei 47 months (95% CI 24-71; HR 4.9; P < 0.001). Nuclear survivin expression in >50% of the tumor cells was an independent marker of a poor prognosis (HR 5.7; P < 0.01). Cytoplasmic survivin was not a significant prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis (HR 0.94; P = 0.90).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    High expression of nuclear survivin is a significant marker of a poor prognosis in patients with a pancreatic endocrine tumor.

  • 37.
    Ekeblad, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Lejonklou, Margareta Halin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Grimfjärd, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Johansson, Térèse
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Grimelius, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrine Tumor Biology.
    Co-expression of ghrelin and its receptor in pancreatic endocrine tumours2007In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 115-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective 

    Expression of ghrelin has been reported in pancreatic endocrine tumours, but data on ghrelin receptor protein expression are lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the ghrelin receptor, as well as ghrelin, in a selected series of these tumours, including multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1) associated tumours, and to correlate data with clinical features including body mass index.

    Design 

    Immunohistochemical detection of ghrelin and its receptor was performed on frozen tissue from 31 tumours: 9 MEN1 and 22 sporadic. Twenty tumours were analysed by quantitative PCR. Plasma ghrelin was assessed in 26 patients.

    Results 

    Twenty-one (68%) of 31 tumours showed immunoreactivity for ghrelin (8/9 MEN1) and 19/20 expressed ghrelin mRNA. Ghrelin receptor protein was detected in 21/30 (70%) tumours (4/8 MEN1), and mRNA was detected in all analysed tumours. Insulinomas had significantly higher levels of receptor mRNA than other tumours. Five patients had elevated plasma ghrelin (> 2 SD above the control group mean). No significant difference in mean plasma ghrelin levels was found between patients (908 ± 569 ng/l) and controls (952 ± 164 ng/l). Mean BMI was 24·3 kg/m2. There was no association between ghrelin or receptor expression and survival.

    Conclusions 

    We report the first immunohistochemical data on expression of the ghrelin receptor in pancreatic endocrine tumours: 70% of tumours in our material. Concomitant ghrelin and receptor expression was seen in 50% of tumours, indicating an autocrine loop. Ghrelin was expressed in 68% of tumours (8/9 MEN1). Despite frequent ghrelin expression, elevated circulating ghrelin is rare in these patients.

  • 38. Ekeblad, Sara
    et al.
    Nilsson, Bengt
    Lejonklou, Margareta Halin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Johansson, Térèse
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Nilsson, Ola
    Ahlman, Håkan
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors express the orexigen ghrelin2006In: Endocrine-Related Cancer, ISSN 1351-0088, E-ISSN 1479-6821, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 963-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expression of the neuroendocrine marker synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2) has been reported in a few cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The goal of the present study was to assess the relevance of this finding and identify a possible hormone production in these tumors. We chose to study the orexigen ghrelin and its receptor, since these patients are seldom cachexic, even in advanced disease stages. We investigated ghrelin expression by means of immunohistochemistry on frozen or paraffin-embedded sections from 22 GISTs from a well-characterized patient material. Expression of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor, the ghrelin receptor, was investigated in a subset of lesions. In six tumors, mRNA levels of ghrelin, the ghrelin receptor, and SV2 were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. Totally 17 out of 22 tumors showed immunoreactivity for ghrelin. Five out of ten tumors were immunoreactive for the ghrelin receptor, and all of these co-expressed ghrelin. All tumors expressed ghrelin, ghrelin receptor, and SV2 mRNA. GISTs frequently express SV2, ghrelin, and its receptor, indicating the presence of autocrine/paracrine loops.

  • 39.
    Eriksson, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Juhlin, Christofer
    Backman, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Edfeldt, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Ihre-Lundgren, Catharina
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    TFF3 in primary tumours has a negative impact on survival in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumoursIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Eriksson, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Nilsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Krause, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Lundberg, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Skogseid, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Granberg, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Eriksson, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Surgery and radiofrequency ablation for treatment of liver metastases from midgut and foregut carcinoids and endocrine pancreatic tumors2008In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 930-938Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Many neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have a tendency to metastasize to the liver. In case of limited number of metastases, liver surgery or radiofrequency ablation (RFA) may result in apparently total clearance of metastases. However, it is not clear whether such therapy will provide symptom reduction or increased survival.

    METHODS:

    Seventy-three patients with foregut (n=6) or midgut carcinoids (n=37) or endocrine pancreatic tumors (n=28), and two patients with NETs without discernable origin were studied. Symptoms were evaluated using a Symptom Severity Score. Liver surgery was performed in 42 operations and RFA on 205 lesions.

    RESULTS:

    Apparently total clearance of liver metastases was attained in 1 of 6 patients with foregut carcinoids, 15 of 37 with midgut carcinoids, and 13 of 28 with EPT. Symptom improvement was noted in 12 of 17 (70.6%) patients with carcinoid syndrome, and 75% also reduced their 5-HIAA and P-CgA by at least 50%. Patients with nonfunctioning EPT generally had no improvement of symptoms after surgical/RFA liver treatment, but eight patients had functioning EPT, and four of these reduced their biochemical markers by at least 50%. NETs with higher Ki67 index tended to recur more often. Complications occurred in 9 of 45 open surgery procedures, and in 8 of 203 RFA procedures.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Treatment of liver metastases is successful in midgut carcinoid patients with limited liver metastases. Patients with foregut carcinoid and EPTs recur more often, possibly related to higher Ki67 index, and treatment of liver lesions less often reduces symptoms. Liver resections and RFA may be safely performed, and RFA is associated with few complications.

  • 41.
    Fyrsten, Ellen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Norlén, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hessman, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Long-Term Surveillance of Treated Hyperparathyroidism for Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: Recurrence or Hypoparathyroidism?2016In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 615-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is surgically treated with either a subtotal parathyroidectomy removing 3 or 3,5 glands (SPX), less than 3 glands (LSPX), or a total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation (TPX). Previous studies with shorter follow-up have shown that LSPX and SPX are associated with recurrent HPT, and TPX with hypocalcemia and substitution therapy. We examined the situation after long-term follow-up (median 20,6 years).

    METHODS: Sixty-nine patients with MEN1 HPT underwent 110 operations, the first operation being 31 LSPX, 30 SPX, and 8 TPX. Thirty patients underwent reoperative surgery in median 120 months later, as completion to TPX (n = 12), completion of LSPX to SPX (n = 9), extirpation of single glands (n = 3) still resulting in LSPX, and resection of forearm grafts (n = 3). Nine patients underwent a second, and 2 a third reoperation. In 24 patients genetic testing confirmed MEN1, and in the remaining heredity and phenotype led to the diagnosis.

    RESULTS: TPX had higher risk for hypoparathyroidism necessitating substitution therapy, at latest follow-up 50 %, compared to SPX (16 % after 3-6 months; none at latest follow-up). Recurrent HPT was common after LSPX, leading to 24 reoperations in 17 patients. No need for substitution therapy after SPX indicated forthcoming recurrent disease. Not having hypocalcemia in the postoperative period and less radical surgery than TPX were significantly associated to risk for recurrence. Further, mutation in exon 3 in the MEN1 gene may eventually be linked to risk of recurrence.

    CONCLUSION: LSPX is highly associated with recurrence and TPX with continuous hypoparathyroidism, also after long-term follow-up. SPX should be the chosen method in the majority of patients with MEN1 HPT.

  • 42.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Melin, Beatrice
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Enblad, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Alafuzoff, Irina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Beskow, Anna H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Birgisson, Helgi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Björ, Ove
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Edqvist, Per-Henrik D
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Hansson, Tony
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Helleday, Thomas
    Karolinska Inst, Div Translat Med & Chem Biol, Dept Med Biochem & Biophys, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Henriksson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Hesselager, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hultdin, Magnus
    Umeå Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umeå.
    Häggman, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Höglund, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Haematology.
    Jonsson, Håkan
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Larsson, Chatarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Mindus, Stephanie
    Akad Sjukhuset, Lung & Allergy Clin, Uppsala.
    Nygren, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Rosenquist, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Sandin, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ Hosp, RCC Uppsala Örebro, Uppsala.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Affin Prote, SciLifeLab, Solna.
    Stenling, Roger
    Umeå Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umeå.
    Stålberg, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Sundström, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Thellenberg Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, Umeå.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umeå.
    Claesson-Welsh, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umeå.
    Sjöblom, Tobias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    U-CAN: a prospective longitudinal collection of biomaterials and clinical information from adult cancer patients in Sweden.2018In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 187-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Progress in cancer biomarker discovery is dependent on access to high-quality biological materials and high-resolution clinical data from the same cases. To overcome current limitations, a systematic prospective longitudinal sampling of multidisciplinary clinical data, blood and tissue from cancer patients was therefore initiated in 2010 by Uppsala and Umeå Universities and involving their corresponding University Hospitals, which are referral centers for one third of the Swedish population.

    Material and Methods: Patients with cancer of selected types who are treated at one of the participating hospitals are eligible for inclusion. The healthcare-integrated sampling scheme encompasses clinical data, questionnaires, blood, fresh frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens, diagnostic slides and radiology bioimaging data.

    Results: In this ongoing effort, 12,265 patients with brain tumors, breast cancers, colorectal cancers, gynecological cancers, hematological malignancies, lung cancers, neuroendocrine tumors or prostate cancers have been included until the end of 2016. From the 6914 patients included during the first five years, 98% were sampled for blood at diagnosis, 83% had paraffin-embedded and 58% had fresh frozen tissues collected. For Uppsala County, 55% of all cancer patients were included in the cohort.

    Conclusions: Close collaboration between participating hospitals and universities enabled prospective, longitudinal biobanking of blood and tissues and collection of multidisciplinary clinical data from cancer patients in the U-CAN cohort. Here, we summarize the first five years of operations, present U-CAN as a highly valuable cohort that will contribute to enhanced cancer research and describe the procedures to access samples and data.

  • 43. Goh, Gerald
    et al.
    Scholl, Ute
    Healy, James
    Choi, Murim
    Prasad, Manju L
    Nelson-Williams, Carol
    Kuntsman, John W
    Korah, Reju
    Suttorp, Anna-Carinna
    Dietrich, Dimo
    Haase, Mathias
    Willenberg, Holger S
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björklund, Peyman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Experimental Surgery.
    Carling, Tobias
    Lifton, Richard P
    Recurrent activating mutation in PRKACA in cortisol-producing adrenal tumors2014In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 613-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adrenal tumors autonomously producing cortisol cause Cushing's syndrome1, 2, 3, 4. We performed exome sequencing of 25 tumor-normal pairs and identified 2 subgroups. Eight tumors (including three carcinomas) had many somatic copy number variants (CNVs) with frequent deletion of CDC42 and CDKN2A, amplification of 5q31.2 and protein-altering mutations in TP53 and RB1. Seventeen tumors (all adenomas) had no somatic CNVs or TP53 or RB1 mutations. Six of these had known gain-of-function mutations in CTNNB1 (β-catenin)5, 6 or GNAS (Gαs)7, 8. Six others had somatic mutations in PRKACA (protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit) resulting in a p.Leu206Arg substitution. Further sequencing identified this mutation in 13 of 63 tumors (35% of adenomas with overt Cushing's syndrome). PRKACA, GNAS and CTNNB1 mutations were mutually exclusive. Leu206 directly interacts with the regulatory subunit of PKA, PRKAR1A9, 10. Leu206Arg PRKACA loses PRKAR1A binding, increasing the phosphorylation of downstream targets. PKA activity induces cortisol production and cell proliferation11, 12, 13, 14, 15, providing a mechanism for tumor development. These findings define distinct mechanisms underlying adrenal cortisol-producing tumors.

  • 44. Grodski, S
    et al.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Robinson, BG
    Delbridge, L
    Surgery versus radioiodine therapy as definitive management for Graves' disease: The role of patient preference2007In: Thyroid, ISSN 1050-7256, E-ISSN 1557-9077, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 157-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Thyroidectomy is an option for the definitive management of Graves' disease. The aim of this study was to examine the role of patient preference for selecting surgery as definitive treatment. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study comprising all patients (n = 63) presenting to a single surgeon for surgical management of Graves' disease over 3 years. Documented reasons for surgery were compared with accepted indications, as well as patients' perceptions as assessed by questionnaire. Results: The most frequent absolute indication was the presence of a large goiter (n = 8; 13%) or associated thyroid nodule (n = 6; 10%). Ophthalmopathy, a relative indication, comprised the largest single group overall (n = 18; 29%); however, a significant number of patients (n = 17; 27%) elected surgery in the absence of a recognized indication. There was strong concordance (73%) between the recorded indication and the patients' survey response. Overall, there was a high level of satisfaction with surgery with 88% of respondents giving a satisfaction score of 7 or greater on a visual analog scale (VAS) (0–10). Conclusions: One-third of all patients electing surgery as definitive management do so in the absence of a specific indication. Overall, there is a high level of satisfaction with the decision for surgery as definitive management of Graves' disease.

  • 45.
    Gunnarsdottir, Guorun Mist
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Iceland, Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Guomundsdottir, Arna
    Univ Hosp Iceland, Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland..
    Hellmann, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Endurtekin krampaköst hjá ungri konu: sjúkratilfelli2016In: Laeknabladid, ISSN 0023-7213, Vol. 102, no 7-8, p. 339-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [is]

    18 ára hraust stúlka kom endurtekið á slysadeild á 6 vikna tímabili vegna krampakasta. Engin fyrri saga var um flogaveiki og hún tók engin lyf. Myndrannsóknir og heilalínurit bentu ekki til flogaveiki. Hún mældist með lækkaðan blóðsykur í tvígang á slysadeild, 1,3 mmól/L og 1,7 mmól/L (4,0-6,0 mmól/L). Vaknaði þá grunur um insúlínmyndandi æxli. Gerð var víðtæk leit að æxlisvexti sem bar engan árangur. Var hún því send erlendis í frekari uppvinnslu, meðal annars í jáeindaskanna og sérhæfða æðamyndatöku. Hún var að lokum greind með nesidioblastosis. Hér verður fjallað um sjúkratilfellið auk yfirferðar um þennan sjaldgæfa sjúkdóm og uppvinnslu á honum.

  • 46.
    Hellman, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hessman, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Hennings, Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Björck, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Eriksson, Lars-Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Stenting of the superior mesenteric vein in midgut carcinoid disease with large mesenteric masses2010In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1373-1379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Midgut carcinoid (MGC) tumors generally develop in the small intestine and in >50% of cases also present with lymph node metastases in the mesentery. The majority of these tumors are surgically resectable, but a fraction are inoperable and may cause obstruction of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV), often associated with stasis of the intestinal wall and severe symptoms. These symptoms include severe abdominal pain, attacks of diarrhea, and malnutrition. METHODS: Seven patients with severe MGC including a large fibrotic inoperable mesenteric mass and severe symptoms were studied. After an obstructed SMV and signs of venous stasis in the small intestine were demonstrated, an expandable stent was inserted after puncturing an intrahepatic portal venous branch. The associated venography, patient symptoms, and radiological signs on computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated. RESULTS: Four patients demonstrated resolution of their symptoms. In one patient who had intra-abdominal lymph leakage/chyloperitoneum, a complete normalization of the circulation followed and the intra-abdominal lymph leakage stalled. The venographies demonstrated normalization of the venous blood flow through the SMV, and CT scans demonstrated reduction in the thickness of the intestinal wall. In two cases there were no changes in the symptoms, and in one case a slight worsening of the symptoms ensued. In general, reductions of symptoms were associated with the degree of normalization of venous blood flow. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that in selected patients with MGC stenting of the SMV may improve symptoms.

  • 47.
    Hellman, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumor (NET) Surgery2014In: Tips and tricks in Endocrine Surgery / [ed] Watkinson JC and Scott-Coombs DM, London: Springer London, 2014, p. 91-103Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    GI NETs arise from stomach, duodenum, small intestine, appendix, large bowel, and appendix.

  • 48.
    Hellman, Per
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Neuroendokrina tumörer i gastrointestinalkanalen2013In: Mag-tarmkanalens cancersjukdomar / [ed] Hafström LO, Naredi P, Glimelius B, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013, p. 341-354Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Hessman, Ola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Sundin, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Garske, Ulrike
    Rudberg, Claes
    Eriksson, Lars-Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Hellman, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Åkerström, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    High success rate of parathyroid reoperation may be achieved with improved localization diagnosis2008In: World Journal of Surgery, ISSN 0364-2313, E-ISSN 1432-2323, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 774-81; discussion 782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Because of the difficulty of reoperative parathyroid surgery, preoperative imaging studies have been increasingly adopted. We report the use of consistently applied localization diagnosis to yield high success rates in parathyroid reoperations. METHODS: Parathyroid reoperation was performed after previous parathyroid surgery in 144 patients with nonmalignant hyperparathyroidism (HPT) between 1962 and 2007. From the year 2000, 46 patients who underwent parathyroid reoperation and 14 patients who were subjected to thyroid surgery before primary parathyroid operation were investigated with sestamibi scintigraphy (MIBI), 11C-methionine PET/CT (met-PET), surgeon-performed ultrasound (US), US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNA), and selective venous sampling (SVS) with rapid PTH (Q-PTH) analyses. When imaging was considered adequate, additional studies were generally not obtained. RESULTS: Reversal of hypercalcemia was achieved by reoperation in 134 of 144 (93%) of all patients with previous parathyroid surgery. In patients operated from year 2000, MIBI had 90% sensitivity and 88% predictive value, met-PET 79% sensitivity and 87% predictive value, and US 72% sensitivity and 93% predictive value. SVS with Q-PTH analyses provided accurate localization or regionalization in 11 of 11 recently selected patients. Q-PTH analyses in fine-needle aspirations verified parathyroid origin of excised specimens, and intraoperative Q-PTH helped decide when operations could be terminated. In patients subjected to the algorithm of imaging procedures, reversal of hypercalcemia and apparent cure was obtained after the reoperation in 45 of 46 patients with previous parathyroid surgery, implying a success rate of 98%, and in all patients with previous thyroid surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Reoperative parathyroid surgery is challenging. Results can be improved by consistently applied sensitive methods of preoperative imaging, and reoperative procedures may then achieve nearly the same success rates as primary operations.

  • 50. Ihre Lundgren, Catharina
    et al.
    Stålberg, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Grodski, Simon
    Sidhu, Stan
    Sywak, Mark
    Delbridge, Leigh
    Minimally invasive thyroid surgery for diagnostic excision of solitary thyroid nodules2007In: Asian journal of surgery, ISSN 1015-9584, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 250-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE

    Various techniques for minimally invasive thyroid surgery (MITS), including endoscopic and video-assisted procedures, have now been described. Based on our unit's experience with minimally invasive parathyroidectomy via a lateral incision, a similar technique for minimally invasive thyroid lobectomy has been developed and assessed.

    METHODS

    The last 203 consecutive thyroid procedures using the MITS technique, performed between July 2002 and June 2006, comprised the study group. Inclusion criteria for initial surgery were: initial nodule < 3.0 cm; no preoperative evidence of malignancy; absence of clinical multinodular change. A 2.5- cm lateral incision, using a headlight illumination, provided optimal exposure.

    RESULTS

    A total of 202 patients underwent 203 MITS procedures over the 4-year period, with one patient undergoing bilateral MITS. The procedures included 155 thyroid lobectomies and 48 nodule excisions; 31 of the patients underwent a minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) during which an ipsilateral thyroid nodule was removed. The mean tumour size was 17.3 mm, but the mean size of the thyroid lobe removed was 39.5 mm. Final diagnoses included benign multinodular goitre (26%), follicular adenoma (22%) and carcinoma (20%). The complication rate was low, with one permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy (anterior division only) (0.5%), four RLN neuropraxias which recovered (2%), and one haematoma not requiring re-operation (0.5%). The rate of complications was not significantly different from 819 conventional open hemithyroidectomies performed over the same period.

    CONCLUSION

    MITS is a safe and feasible alternative to open thyroid surgery in appropriately selected cases. It offers a valuable option for diagnostic excision biopsy in patients with thyroid nodules demonstrating an “atypical” fine-needle biopsy whilst avoiding the need for a standard cervical “collar” incision.

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