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  • 1. Backhausen, Mette G
    et al.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Magnussen, Britta Kjeldberg
    Shawe, Jill
    Stern, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Hegaard, Hanne K
    Pregnancy planning and lifestyle prior to conception and during early pregnancy among Danish women2014In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 57-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate the extent to which Danish women attending antenatal care plan their pregnancies and to determine the association between pregnancy planning and the intake of folic acid, alcohol consumption and smoking habits prior to conception and before the 16th week of gestation. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 258 women. Main outcome measures: intake of folic acid, alcohol consumption and smoking. Pregnancy planning was assessed by the London Measure of Unplanned Pregnancy (LMUP) and the five graded Swedish Pregnancy Planning Scale. Results Most (77%) of the participants reported that their pregnancies were very or fairly well planned. Higher median LMUP scores were observed in women taking folic acid (p < 0.001), in those consuming less alcohol, and in women who stopped smoking prior to pregnancy (p = 0.043). However, 43% of the respondents with a high degree of pregnancy planning and 98% of those with a low degree of planning had not taken folic acid prior to pregnancy. Binge drinking during early pregnancy was reported by 20% of women with a high degree of planned pregnancy and 31% of those with a low degree (p = 0.1). Conclusion Pregnancy planning was associated with a healthier lifestyle but still many women could improve their lifestyle in connection to pregnancy. Their level of alcohol consumption is higher than that recommended for best pregnancy outcome.

  • 2.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    von Essen, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Swedish teenager perceptions of teenage pregnancy, abortion, sexual behavior, and contraceptive habits: a focus group study among 17-year-old female high-school students2005In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 84, no 10, p. 980-986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sweden has the highest abortion numbers among the Nordic countries. Since 1995, the abortion rate among teenagers has increased by nearly 50%. We therefore undertook a study where the overall aim was to gain a deeper understanding on which factors female teenagers believe may explain the increasing numbers of teenage abortions. Teenagers' perceptions of teenage pregnancy, abortion, sexual behavior, and contraceptive habits were investigated. METHODS: Six focus group interviews with 17-year-old Swedish girls were conducted. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by manifest content analysis. RESULTS: Negative attitudes toward teenage pregnancy and supportive attitudes toward abortion were expressed. Risk-taking behaviors such as negligence in contraceptive use and intercourse under the influence of alcohol were suggested as main reasons behind the increasing numbers of abortions among Swedish teenagers. The contemporary, sexualized, media picture was believed to influence adolescents' sexual behavior, and liberal attitudes toward casual sex were expressed. Girls were perceived as more obliged than boys in taking responsibility for contraceptive compliance and avoidance of pregnancy. The apprehension that hormonal contraceptives cause negative side-effects was widely spread, and the participants were found to have a somewhat limited knowledge of abortion. The majority were unsatisfied with the quality of sexual education provided by the schools. CONCLUSION: Possible reasons for increased abortion numbers among teenagers in Sweden could be liberal attitudes toward casual sex in combination with negligence in contraceptive use, use of alcohol followed by sexual risk-taking, fear of hormonal contraceptives, and a deterioration of sexual education in the schools.

  • 3.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Tyden, Tanja
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Twelve-month follow-up of advance provision of emergency contraception among teenage girls in Sweden-a randomized controlled trial2013In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 118, no 4, p. 271-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of an intervention with advance provision of emergency contraceptive pills (ECP), condoms, and extended information to a targeted group of teenage girls, compared with a control group, 12 months after intervention. Material and methods. A randomized controlled trial among 420 girls, 15-19 years old, requesting emergency contraception at a youth clinic in Sweden was carried out. Data were collected by a questionnaire at the initial visit and structured telephone interviews 12 months after enrolment. Differences between the intervention group and the control group regarding ECP use, time interval from unprotected intercourse to ECP intake, contraceptive use, and sexual risk-taking were analysed. Results. One year after the intervention 62% of the girls could be reached for follow-up. The girls in the intervention group reported a shorter time interval (mean 15.3 hours) from unprotected intercourse to ECP intake compared to the control group (mean 25.8 hours) (p = 0.019), without any evidence of decreased use of contraceptives or increased sexual risk-taking. Conclusion. Even up to 12 months following the intervention, advance provision of ECP at one single occasion, to a specific target group of adolescent girls, shortens the time interval from unprotected intercourse to pill intake, without jeopardizing contraceptive use or increasing sexual risk-taking. Considering the clinical relevance of these results, we suggest that advance provision of ECP could be implemented as a routine preventive measure for this target group.

  • 4.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Tyden, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kihlbom, Ulrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Swedish parents’ interest in preconception genetic carrier screening2016In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 121, no 4, p. 289-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Genetic technologies advance rapidly. It is possible to undergo genetic carrier screening before pregnancy to examine genetic risks to future offspring. We aimed to investigate parents’ interest and motives towards preconception genetic carrier screening (PCS) as well as factors associated with interest in PCS.

    Material and methods: Our study sample consists of 777 parent couples within the longitudinal Swedish Pregnancy Planning study. Women responded to questionnaires at three occasions: in early pregnancy, late pregnancy, and one year after childbirth. Male partners responded to one questionnaire one year after childbirth.

    Results: One-third of the parents were positive (30% versus 34% of women and men, respectively), less than a third were negative (26% versus 28%), and 45% versus 38% were uncertain about whether to consider PCS before a future pregnancy. No differences in PCS interest were found between women and men (P = 0.091), but a higher proportion of women were concerned about negative consequences (53% versus 46%, P < 0.003) and were ‘opposed to such a way of child selection’ (31.8% versus 25.2%,P = 0.002). Factors associated with PCS interest were experiences of prenatal diagnostics and positive attitudes towards finding out or choosing sex of one’s child (women), and prenatal diagnostics, self-rated poor health, and pregnancy planning (men).

    Conclusion: Both women and men had relatively high uncertainty towards PCS, but women were more concerned about negative consequences. The future extent of the clinical utility of PCS is currently unknown, but parents’ interests and doubts are important aspects to consider.

  • 5.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    An illusion of power: Qualitative Perspectives On Abortion Decision-Making Among Teenage Women In Sweden2009In: Perspectives on sexual and reproductive health, ISSN 1538-6341, E-ISSN 1931-2393, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 173-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT:Swedish law permits abortion at the request of a pregnant woman untilthe 18th week of gestation. However, the extent to which the decision istruly the woman's own is subject to debate; women are often influenced,directly or indirectly, by the attitudes of their partners, family andfriends or by social norms. METHODS: Individual in-depth interviewsabout the pregnancy and the abortion decision were conducted 3-4 weekspostabortion with 25 women aged 16-20 at different periods in 2003, 2005and 2007. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim andanalyzed using latent content analysis. RESULTS: The main reasons forunplanned pregnancy were underestimation of pregnancy risk andinconsistent contraceptive use. Pregnancy prevention was perceived asthe woman's responsibility. The abortion decision was accompanied bymixed emotions, and was seen as a natural yet difficult choice. Socialnorms and the negative attitudes of family and friends stronglyinfluenced the decision. Partners and parents were regarded as the mostimportant sources of support. After the abortion, the women feltpressured by contraceptive counselors to use highly effectivecontraceptives despite their previous negative experiences or worriesabout side effects. CONCLUSIONS: Swedish teenagers' basic right todecide whether to have an abortion may be limited by societal norms anddisapproval of teenage childbearing. Given the perception that women areresponsible for contraception, programs need to emphasize thatpregnancy prevention is a shared responsibility; greater efforts toinclude males in prevention practices are needed.

  • 6.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Darj, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Preventing pregnancy: A girls' issue. Seventeen-year-old Swedish boys' perceptions on abortion, reproduction and use of contraception2007In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 111-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To gain deeper understanding of how teenage males view abortion, adolescent   fatherhood, sexual behavior, and use of contraception.  Method We conducted six focus-group interviews with 17-year-old boys (n 1⁄4 40). The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using manifest content analysis.  Results Adolescent fatherhood was considered to be a catastrophe and abortion a moral   dilemma. Most participants agreed that the unrestricted right to decide on abortion rests upon the girl, but some were frustrated by not having any legal right to influence the decision. Contraceptive failure was viewed as common and mainly due to the influence of alcohol or in relation to unplanned sex. Boys perceived girls as having a greater responsibility in avoiding pregnancy, and they often put a blind trust in the girls’ use of hormonal contraceptives or initiation of emergency contraception. Several groups had insufficient knowledge about fetal development and other aspects of reproduction. Many were unsatisfied with the sex education they had received at school, but still considered it to be an important counterweight to other sources of information concerning sex, such as  pornography.  Conclusion Equal responsibility among boys and girls regarding reproductive issues is still a challenge, but nevertheless an important key to the prevention of unwanted pregnancies.

  • 7.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Exposing oneself and one's partner to sexual risk-taking as perceived by young Swedish men who requested a Chlamydia test2011In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 100-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To explore young men's perceptions of (i) the risk for themselves and their partners in connection with unprotected intercourse, and (ii) the main barriers to practising safe sex. Methods: Qualitative latent content analysis of interviews involving 22 Swedish males aged 16-20, who requested a Chlamydia test. Results:The main categories identified were: (1) Low perceived threat regarding sexual risk-taking - personal consequences in focus. Threats could be both immediate and distant with varying preventative strategies. The young men worried more about their personal consequences than about the consequences for their partner. They were confident that an unintended pregnancy would be terminated, leading to decreased motivation for sharing pregnancy-preventing practices with their partner. (2) Perceived barriers to practising safe sex. Main barriers to condom use were interference with spontaneity, pleasure reduction, fear of loosing one's erection, and embarrassment or distrust. Other obstacles were the girl's use of hormonal contraception, and difficulties in communicating about safe sex. Conclusion The young men did not seem to worry about risks when having unprotected sex. To protect men's - and women's - sexual and reproductive health, efforts are needed to increase the former's contraceptive responsibilities and awareness of consequences related to unprotected sex.

  • 8.
    Ekstrand Ragnar, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Grandahl, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Stern, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Sophiahemmet Univ, Dept Hlth Promoting Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mattebo, Magdalena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research. Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Important but far away: adolescents' beliefs, awareness and experiences of fertility and preconception health2018In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 265-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim was to explore adolescents' beliefs and awareness regarding fertility and preconception health, as well as their views and experiences of information about fertility and preconception health directed at their age group.

    Methods: We performed seven semi-structured focus group interviews among upper secondary school students (n = 47) aged 16-18 years in two Swedish counties. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis.

    Results: One theme ('important but far away') and five categories ('starting a family far down on the list'; 'high awareness but patchy knowledge of fertility and preconception health'; 'gender roles influence beliefs about fertility and preconception health'; 'wish to preserve fertility and preconception health in order to keep the door to procreation open'; 'no panacea - early and continuous education about fertility and preconception health') emerged from the interviews. Participants recognised the importance of preconception health and were highly aware of the overall importance of a healthy lifestyle. Their knowledge, however, was patchy and they had difficulties relating to fertility and preconception health on a personal and behavioural level. Participants wanted more information but had heterogeneous beliefs about when, where and how this information should be given.

    Conclusion: The adolescents wanted information on fertility and preconception health to be delivered repeatedly as well as through different sources.

  • 9.
    Ekstrand Ragnar, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Hultstrand, Jenny Niemeyer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Development of an evidence-based website on Preconception health2018In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 123, no 2, p. 116-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Many women and men lack knowledge about fertility, including timing of the fertile window, age-related decline, and lifestyle factors that may impair fertility. The Internet has become an important source of information, but evidence-based information on fertility and reproduction in Swedish on the Internet is limited. The present study aimed to develop and evaluate an evidence-based fertility awareness website, 'reproduktivlivsplan.se', to increase awareness of fertility and provide guidance for improved preconception health and care among individuals and healthcare providers. Methods: The website's content, design, and layout were evaluated qualitatively among a total of 20 nursing students. An expert group of researchers also provided feedback on the content. Finally, healthcare providers (n = 24) answered a questionnaire covering attitudes and views on the Reproductive Life Plan website as a tool for counselling. Results: The developing process resulted in a mobile-friendly website, 'reproduktivlivsplan.se' (in English: Reproductive Life Plan). The website, including the content and layout, was positively evaluated by most participants and was amended according to suggested improvements. Uppsala University was found to be a trustworthy source. Conclusion: The evidence-based website 'reproduktivlivsplan.se' was well received among users and healthcare providers and may provide guidance for improved preconception health and care if it becomes well known and frequently used.

  • 10.
    Liljas Stålhandske, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Uppsala Religion and Society Research Centre.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Existential Experiences and Strategies in Relation to Induced Abortion: an Interview Study With 24 Swedish Women2011In: Archive for the Psychology of Religion/ Archiv für Religionspsychologie, ISSN 0084-6724, E-ISSN 1573-6121, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 345-370Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Induced abortion is as common in religious as secular cultures, but interpretations and ways to handle abortion differ. This study focuses existential aspects of abortion, in relation to a secularized context, through in-depth interviews with 24 Swedish women. Existential questions belonging to four areas were found: Life and Death, Meaning of Life, Morality and Self Image. Furthermore, four different existential strategies were found: (1) Detaching Strategies (creating distance to the pregnancy), (2) Meaning-Making Strategies (relating the abortion to one’s worldview), (3) Social Strategies (sharing the abortion with others), and (4) Symbolic Strategies (expressing the experience in bodily ways). Existential questions and strategies did not imply that the woman regretted her abortion. However, while some women easily processed existential questions, others seemed to be more at loss. In a secularized country, where many people are unaccustomed to deal with existential issues, greater existential competence among abortion personnel thus might be needed.

  • 11.
    Liljas Stålhandske, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Uppsala Religion and Society Research Centre.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Women’s existential experiences within Swedish abortion care2011In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 35-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore Swedish women’s experiences of clinical abortion care in relation to their need for existential support.

    Methods: Individual in-depth interviews with 24 women with previous experience of unwanted pregnancy and abortion. Participants were recruited between 2006 and 2009. Interviews were analysed by latent content analysis.

    Findings: Although the women had similar experiences of the abortion care offered, the needs they expressed differed. Swedish abortion care was described as rational and neutral, with physical issues dominating over existential ones. For some women, the medical procedures triggered existential experiences of life, meaning, and morality. While some women abstained from any form of existential support, others expressed a need to reflect upon the existential aspects and/or to reconcile their decision emotionally.

    Conclusion: As women’s needs for existential support in relation to abortion vary, women can be disappointed with the personnel’s ability to respond to their thoughts and feelings related to the abortion. To ensure abortion care personnel meet the physical, psychological, and existential needs of each patient, better resources and new lines of education are needed to ensure abortion personnel are equipped to deal with the existential aspects of abortion care.

  • 12. Shawe, Jill
    et al.
    Delbaere, Ilse
    Ekstrand, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Hegaard, Hanne Kristine
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo
    Stern, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Steegers, Eric
    Stephenson, Judith
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Preconception care policy, guidelines, recommendations and services across six European countries: Belgium (Flanders), Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden and the United Kingdom2015In: European journal of contraception & reproductive health care, ISSN 1362-5187, E-ISSN 1473-0782, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Preconception care is important for the screening, prevention and management of risk factors that affect pregnancy outcomes. We aimed to investigate pre-pregnancy care policies, guidelines, recommendations and services in six European countries. Methods In 2013, an electronic search and investigation was undertaken of preconception policy, guidelines, recommendations and services available to healthcare professionals and the general public in six European countries: Belgium (Flanders), Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Findings were compared within five categories: Governmental policy and legislation; Professional bodies and organisations; Healthcare providers; Charitable organisations; Web-based public information and internet sites. Results All countries had preconception recommendations for women with chronic diseases, such as diabetes and epilepsy. Recommendations for healthy women and men were fragmented and inconsistent. Preconception guidance was often included in antenatal and pregnancy guidelines. Differences between countries were seen with regard to nutritional and lifestyle advice particularly in relation to fish, caffeine and alcohol consumption, and vitamin supplementation. Conclusions Current guidelines are heterogeneous. Collaborative research across Europe is required in order to develop evidence-based guidelines for preconception health and care. There is a need to establish a clear strategy for promoting advice and guidance within the European childbearing population.

  • 13.
    Stern, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Salih Joelsson, Lana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Berglund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ekstrand, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Hegaard, Hanne
    Aarts, Clara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Is pregnancy planning associated with background characteristics and pregnancy planning behavior?2016In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 182-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Prevalence of planned pregnancies varies between countries but is often measured in a dichotomous manner. The aim of this study was to investigate to what level pregnant women had planned their pregnancies and whether pregnancy planning was associated with background characteristics and pregnancy planning behavior.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study that utilized the baseline measurements from the Swedish Pregnancy Planning (SWEPP) study. Pregnant women (n= 3390) recruited at antenatal clinics answered a questionnaire. Data were analyzed with multinomial logistic regression, Kruskal-Wallis H and χ(2) tests.

    RESULTS: Three out of four pregnancies were very or fairly planned and 12 % fairly or very unplanned. Of women with very unplanned pregnancies, 32 % had considered an induced abortion. Women with planned pregnancies were more likely to have a higher level of education, higher household income, to be currently working ≥50 %, and to have longer relationships than women with unplanned pregnancies. The level of pregnancy planning was associated with planning behavior, such as information seeking and intake of folic acid, but without a reduction in alcohol consumption. One third of all women took folic acid one month prior to conception, 17 % used tobacco daily and 11 % used alcohol weekly three months before conception.

    CONCLUSIONS: A majority rated their pregnancy as very or fairly planned, with socio-economic factors as explanatory variables. The level of pregnancy planning should be queried routinely to enable individualized counselling, especially for women with unplanned pregnancies. Preconception recommendations need to be established and communicated to the public to increase health promoting planning behavior.

  • 14.
    Stern, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Salih Joelsson, Lana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Tydén, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Berglund, Anna
    Uppsala University, National Centre for Knowledge on Men.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Hegaard, Hanne
    The Research Unit Women’s and Children’s Health, The Juliane Marie Centre for Women, Children and Reproduction, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen; The Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Aarts, Clara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Is pregnancy planning associated with background characteristics and pregnancy planning behavior?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Tydén, Tanja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Hegaard, H.
    Rigshosp Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Hedegaard, M.
    Rigshosp Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Stern, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Aarts, Clara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Ekstrand, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Berglund, A.
    Natl Ctr Knowledge Mens Violence Women, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Pregnancy planning and among women attending antenatal care in Sweden and Denmark2015In: Human Reproduction, ISSN 0268-1161, E-ISSN 1460-2350, Vol. 30, no Suppl. 1, p. 444-444Article in journal (Other academic)
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