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  • 1.
    Arnell, Robert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology. Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology. Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Fornstedt, Torgny
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology. Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry.
    Analytical Characterization of Chiral Drug-Protein Interactions: Comparison between the Optical Biosensor (Surface Plasmon Resonance) Assay and the HPLC Perturbation Method2006In: Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 78, no 5, 1682-1689 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two modern, fundamentally different methods were used for a detailed investigation of enantioselective drug-protein interactions, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based Biacore 2000 biosensor assay and the previously validated HPLC perturbation method (HPLC-PM). This is the first time SPR has been used for this purpose. The fundamental features of the two methods were investigated, and the consequences for operation and data evaluation were addressed. With HPLC-PM, chiral data could be obtained directly from the racemic mixture, whereas a separate analysis of each pure enantiomer was required to obtain chiral data with SPR. It was shown that if chirality is not attributed in the SPR analysis, misleading average racemic binding constants will be obtained. Both drug and protein consumption were considerably higher with HPLC-PM. HPLC-PM was found to be best suited for measurements of weak affinity interactions, whereas the SPR method was best for strong interactions. With both methods, the presence of DMSO in the samples severely affected the interactions, introducing errors. The binding of the -blockers alprenolol and propranolol to Cel7a cellulase was used as a model system. These methods gave results that agreed quite well qualitatively, but considerable quantitative deviations were sometimes obtained.

  • 2.
    Basu, Alex
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Nanofibrillated cellulose hydrogels for wound healing solutions: the status quo and future prospects2015In: Uppsala Biomaterials Conference 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Basu, Alex
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Heitz, Karen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Welch, Ken
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ion-crosslinked wood-derived nanocellulose hydrogels with tunable antibacterial properties: Candidate materials for advanced wound care applications2018In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 181, 345-350 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Development of advanced dressings with antimicrobial properties for the treatment of infected wounds is an important approach in the fight against evolution of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains. Herein, the effects of ion-crosslinked nanocellulose hydrogels on bacteria commonly found in infected wounds were investigated in vitro. By using divalent calcium or copper ions as crosslinking agents, different antibacterial properties against the bacterial strains Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were obtained. Calcium crosslinked hydrogels were found to retard S. epidermidis growth (up to 266% increase in lag time, 36% increase in doubling time) and inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, while copper crosslinked hydrogels prevented S. epidermidis growth and were bacteriostatic towards P. aeruginosa (49% increase in lag time, 78% increase in doubling time). The wound dressing candidates furthermore displayed barrier properties towards both S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa, hence making them interesting for further development of advanced wound dressings with tunable antibacterial properties.

  • 4.
    Basu, Alex
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hemocompatibility of Ca2+-Crosslinked Nanocellulose Hydrogels: Toward Efficient Management of Hemostasis2017In: Macromolecular Bioscience, ISSN 1616-5187, E-ISSN 1616-5195, 1-9 p., 1700236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work investigates Ca2+-crosslinked nanofibrillated cellulose hydrogels as potential hemostatic wound dressings by studying core interactions between the materials and a central component of wounds and wound healing—the blood. Hydrogels of wood-derived anionic nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and NFC hydrogels that incorporate kaolin or collagen are studied in an in vitro whole blood model and with platelet-free plasma assays. The evaluation of thrombin and factor XIIa formation, platelet reduction, and the release of activated complement system proteins, shows that the NFC hydrogel efficiently triggered blood coagulation, with a rapid onset of clot formation, while displaying basal complement system activation. By using the NFC hydrogel as a carrier of kaolin, the onset of hemostasis is further boosted, while the NFC hydrogel containing collagen exhibits blood activating properties comparable to the anionic NFC hydrogel. The herein studied NFC hydrogels demonstrate great potential for being part of advanced wound healing dressings that can be tuned to target certain wounds (e.g., strongly hemorrhaging ones) or specific phases of the wound healing process for optimal wound management.

  • 5.
    Basu, Alex
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ålander, Eva
    Rise Bioeconomy.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    On the use of ion-crosslinked nanocellulose hydrogels for wound healing solutions: Physicochemical properties and application-oriented biocompatibility studies2017In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 174, 299-308 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Calcium ion-crosslinked nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) hydrogels were investigated as potential materials for wound healing dressings. The physicochemical properties of the hydrogels were examined by rheology and water retention tests. Skin cells and monocytes were selected for application-oriented bio-compatibility studies. The NFC hydrogels presented entangled fibrous networks and solid-like behavior. Water retention tests showed the material's potential to maintain a suitable moist environment for different type of wounds. The hydrogels did not affect dermal fibroblasts monolayer cultures upon directcontact, as cell monolayers remained intact after application, incubation and removal of the materials. Inflammatory response studies with blood-derived mononuclear cells revealed the inert nature of the hydrogels in terms of cytokine secretion and reactive oxygen species production. Results highlight the great potential of ion-crosslinked NFC hydrogels for the development of advanced wound dressings, where further functionalization of the material could lead to improved properties towards the healing of specific wound types.

  • 6. Brena, Beatriz M.
    et al.
    Díaz, Laura
    Sienra, Daniel
    Ferrari, Graciela
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Hellman, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Gonzalez-Sapienza, Gualberto
    Last, Jerold A.
    ITREOH building of regional capacity to monitor recreational water: development of a non-commercial microcystin ELISA and its impact on public health policy2006In: International journal of occupational and environmental health, ISSN 1077-3525, E-ISSN 2049-3967, Vol. 12, no 4, 377-385 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2001, a University of California, Davis-University of the Republic, Montevideo, partnership created a Fogarty ITREOH program to exploit the potential of ELISA to provide a low-cost environmental analysis attractive to economically distressed countries of temperate South America. This paper describes the development and validation of an ELISA method for the determination of Cyanobacteria microcystin toxins in algal blooms, which release hepatotoxic metabolites that can reach toxic levels in rivers, lakes, or coastal estuaries used for recreation or water supplies. The assay made possible the first systematic monitoring of water from the Rio de la Plata at Montevideo over two summers. The project has been integrated into a bi-national effort to monitor the Rio de la Plata.

  • 7.
    Carlsson, Daniel O
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Renal Medicine.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Towards blood purification applications of polypyrrole and cellulose nanocomposites2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Carlsson, Daniel O
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Conducting Nanocellulose Polypyrrole Membranes Intended for Hemodialysis2012In: European Cells and Materials, ISSN 1473-2262, E-ISSN 1473-2262, Vol. 23, no Suppl 5, 32-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Carlsson, Daniel O
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hong, J
    Larsson, R
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Renal Medicine.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Conduting nanocellulose polypyrrole membranes intended for hemodialysis2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Carlsson, Daniel O
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Nyström, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Development of nanocellulose/polypyrrole composites towards blood purification2012In: Procedia Engineering, ISSN 1877-7058, E-ISSN 1877-7058, Vol. 44, 733-736 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Carlsson, Daniel O
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Nyström, Gustav
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Shou, Qi
    Berglund, Lars A
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Development of Nanocellulose/Polypyrrole Composites Towards Blood Purification2012In: Euromembrane 2012, Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre, London, UK, 23-27 September 2012, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology.
    Effect of Surface Nanotopography on Blood-Biomaterial Interactions2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biologically inspired materials are being developed with the aim of improving the integration of medical implants and minimizing non-desirable host reactions. A promising strategy is the design of topographically patterned surfaces that resemble those found in the extracellular environment.

    Nanoporous alumina has been recognized as a potential biomaterial and as an important template for the fabrication of nanostructures.

    In this thesis in vitro studies were done to elucidate the role of alumina nanoporosity on the inflammatory response. Specifically, by comparing alumina membranes with two pore sizes (20 and 200 nm in diameter). Complement and platelet activation were evaluated as well as monocyte/macrophage behaviour.

    Whole blood was incubated with the alumina membranes and thereafter the biomaterial surfaces were evaluated in terms of protein and platelet adhesion as well as procoagulant properties. The fluid phase was analyzed for complement activation products and platelet activation markers. Besides, human mononuclear cells were cultured on the alumina membranes and cell adhesion, viability, morphology and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines were evaluated.

    The results indicated that nanoporous alumina with 200 nm pores promotes higher complement activation than alumina with 20 nm pores.

    In addition, platelet response to nanoporous alumina was found to be highly dependent on the material porosity, as reflected by differences in adhesion, PMP generation and procoagulant characteristics.

    A clear difference in monocyte/macrophage adhesion and activation was found between the two pore size alumina membranes. Few but highly activated cells adhered to the 200 nm membrane in contrast to many but less activated monocytes/macrophages on the 20 nm surface.

    The outcome of this work emphasizes that nanotopography plays an important role in the host response to biomaterials.

    Better understanding of molecular interactions on nano-level will undoubtedly play a significant role in biomaterial implant development and will contribute to design strategies for controlling specific biological events.

    List of papers
    1. Nanoporesize affects complement activation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nanoporesize affects complement activation
    2008 (English)In: Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A, ISSN 1552-4965, Vol. 87, no 3, 575-81 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, we have shown the vast importance of biomaterial nanotexture when evaluating inflammatory response. For the first time in an in vitro whole blood system, we have proven that a small increase in nanoporesize, specifically 180 nm (from 20 to 200 nm), has a huge effect on the complement system. The study was done using nanoporous aluminiumoxide, a material that previously has been evaluated for potential implant use, showing good biocompatibility. This material can easily be manufactured with different pore sizes making it an excellent candidate to govern specific protein and cellular events at the tissue-material interface. We performed whole blood studies, looking at complement activation after blood contact with two pore size alumina membranes (pore diameters, 20 and 200 nm). The fluid phase was analyzed for complement soluble components, C3a and sC5b-9. In addition, surface adsorbed proteins were eluted and dot blots were performed to detect IgG, IgM, C1q, and C3. All results point to the fact that 200 nm pore size membranes are more complement activating. Significantly, higher values of complement soluble components were found after whole blood contact with 200 nm alumina and all studied proteins adsorbed more readily to this membrane than to the 20 nm pore size membrane. We hypothesize that the difference in complement activation between our two test materials is caused by the type and the amount of adsorbed proteins, as well as their conformation and orientation. The different protein patterns created on the two alumina membranes are most likely a consequence of the material topography.

    Keyword
    nanotopography, nanoporous alumina, complement, whole blood, protein adsorption
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-88357 (URN)10.1002/jbm.a.31818 (DOI)000260984800002 ()18186072 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-01-30 Created: 2009-01-29 Last updated: 2009-07-13Bibliographically approved
    2. Influence of nanoporesize on platelet adhesion and activation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of nanoporesize on platelet adhesion and activation
    2008 (English)In: Journal of materials science. Materials in medicine, ISSN 0957-4530, Vol. 19, no 9, 3115-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we have evaluated the influence of biomaterial nano-topography on platelet adhesion and activation. Nano-porous alumina membranes with pore diameters of 20 and 200 nm were incubated with whole blood and platelet rich plasma. Platelet number, adhesion and activation were determined by using a coulter hematology analyzer, scanning electron microscopy, immunocytochemical staining in combination with light microscopy and by enzyme immunoassay. Special attention was paid to cell morphology, microparticle generation, P-selectin expression and beta-TG production. Very few platelets were found on the 200 nm alumina as compared to the 20 nm membrane. The platelets found on the 20 nm membrane showed signs of activation such as spread morphology and protruding filipodia as well as P-selectin expression. However no microparticles were detected on this surface. Despite the fact that very few platelets were found on the 200 nm alumina in contrast to the 20 nm membrane many microparticles were detected on this surface. Interestingly, all microparticles were found inside circular shaped areas of approximately 3 mum in diameter. Since this is the approximate size of a platelet we speculate that this is evidence of transient, non-adherent platelet contact with the surface, which has triggered platelet microparticle generation. To the authors knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates how nanotexture can influence platelet microparticle generation. The study highlights the importance of understanding molecular and cellular events on nano-level when designing new biomaterials.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-88354 (URN)10.1007/s10856-008-3449-7 (DOI)000256964300016 ()18414999 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-01-30 Created: 2009-01-29 Last updated: 2009-10-29Bibliographically approved
    3. Procoagulant behavior and platelet microparticle generation on nanoporous alumina
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Procoagulant behavior and platelet microparticle generation on nanoporous alumina
    2010 (English)In: Journal of biomaterials applications, ISSN 0885-3282, E-ISSN 1530-8022, Vol. 24, no 8, 675-692 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, we have investigated platelet microparticle(PMP) generation in whole blood after contact with nanoporous alumina.Alumina membranes with pore sizes of 20 and 200nm in diameter were incubated with whole blood and the number of PMP in the fluid phase was determined by flow cytometry. The role of the complement system in PMP generation was investigated using an analog of the potent complement inhibitor compstatin. Moreover, the procoagulant activity of the two pore size membranes were compared by measuring thrombin formation. Results indicated that PMP were not present in the fluid phase after whole blood contact with either of the alumina membranes. However, scanning electron microscope micrographs clearly showed the presence of PMP clusters on the 200nm pore size alumina, while PMP were practically absent on the 20nm membrane. We probed no influence of complement activation in PMP generation and adhesion and we hypothesize that other specific material-related protein–platelet interactions are taking place. A clear difference in procoagulant activity between the membranes could also be seen, 20nm alumina showed 100% higher procoagulant activity than 200nm membrane. By combining surface evaluation and flow cytometry analyses of the fluid phase, we are able to conclude that 200nm pore size alumina promotes PMP generation and adhesion while the 20nm membrane does not appreciably cause any release or adhesion of PMP, thus indicating a direct connection between PMP generation and nanoporosity.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SAGE, 2010
    Keyword
    nanoporous alumina, nanotopography, platelets, platelet microparticles, procoagulant activity, compstatin
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Research subject
    Immunology; Materials Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-130496 (URN)10.1177/0885328209338639 (DOI)000277806100001 ()19581322 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2010-09-08 Created: 2010-09-08 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Time sequence of blood activation by nanoporous alumina: Studies on platelets and complement system
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time sequence of blood activation by nanoporous alumina: Studies on platelets and complement system
    2010 (English)In: Microscopy research and technique (Print), ISSN 1059-910X, E-ISSN 1097-0029, Vol. 73, no 12, 1101-1109 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work the time sequence of blood activation by alumina membranes with different porosities (20 and 200 nm in diameter) was studied. The membranes were incubated with whole blood from 2 min to 4 h. Platelet adhesion and activation in addition to complement activation were monitored at different time points. Evaluation of platelet adhesion and activation was done by determining the change in platelet number and the levels of thrombospondin-1 in the fluid phase. Scanning electron microscopy studies were done to further evaluate platelet adhesion and morphology. Immunocytochemical staining was used to evaluate the presence of CD41 and CD62P antigens on the material surface. Complement activation was monitored by measuring C3a and sC5b-9 in plasma samples by means of enzyme immunoassays. Both alumina membranes displayed similar complement activation time profiles, with levels of C3a and sC5b-9 increasing with incubation time. A statistically significant difference between the membranes was found after 60 min of incubation. Platelet activation characteristics and time profile were different between the two membranes. Platelet adhesion increased over time for the 20 nm surface, while the clusters of microparticles on the 200 nm surface did not appreciably change during the course of the experiment. The release of thrombospondin-1 increased with time for both membranes, however much later for the 200 nm alumina (240 min) as compared to the 20 nm membrane (60 min). The surface topography of the alumina most probably influence protein transition rate, which in turn affects material-platelet activation kinetics.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Wiley-Liss Inc., 2010
    Keyword
    nanotopography, biomaterial, whole blood, thrombospondin-1, platelet microparticles
    National Category
    Other Basic Medicine
    Research subject
    Immunology; Materials Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-110620 (URN)10.1002/jemt.20854 (DOI)000284063800005 ()
    Available from: 2009-11-18 Created: 2009-11-18 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
    5. Nanoporosity of alumina surfaces induces different patterns of activation in adhering monocytes/macrophages
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nanoporosity of alumina surfaces induces different patterns of activation in adhering monocytes/macrophages
    2010 (English)In: International Journal of Biomaterials, ISSN 1687-8787, E-ISSN 1687-8795, Vol. 2010, 402715- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The present study shows that alumina nanotopography affects monocyte/macrophage behaviour. Human mononuclear cells cultured on alumina membranes with pore diameters of 20 and 200 nm were evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, viability, morphology and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. After 24 hours, cell adhesion was assessed by means of light microscopy and cell viability by measuring LDH release. The inflammatory response was evaluated by quantifying interleukin-1ß and tumour necrosis factor-α. Finally, scanning electron microscopy was used to study cell morphology. Results showed pronounced differences in cell number, morphology and cytokine release depending on the nanoporosity. Few but highly activated cells were found on the 200 nm porous alumina, while relatively larger number of cells was found on the 20 nm porous surface. However, despite their larger number, the cells adhering on the 20 nm surface exhibited reduced pro-inflammatory activity. It can be speculated that the difference in surface topography may lead to distinct protein adsorption patterns and therefore to different degree of cell activation. The data of this paper emphasize the role played by the material nanotexture in dictating cell responses and implies that nanotopography could be exploited for controlling the inflammatory response to implants.

    Keyword
    macrophages, nanoporous alumina, biomaterials, nanotopography, inflammatory response
    National Category
    Other Basic Medicine
    Research subject
    Immunology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-110623 (URN)10.1155/2010/402715 (DOI)21234322 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2009-11-18 Created: 2009-11-18 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
  • 13.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology. Ytbioteknik.
    Pro-inflammatory characteristics af nano-porous alumina: Effect o9f surface topography2007Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
  • 14.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    The Guide Nano Project2014In: NFM conference, Prague 16-18th June 2014., 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Carlsson, Daniel O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Renal Medicine.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Haemocompatibility and ion exchange capability of nanocellulose polypyrrole membranes intended for blood purification2012In: Journal of the Royal Society Interface, ISSN 1742-5689, E-ISSN 1742-5662, Vol. 9, no 73, 1943-1955 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composites of nanocellulose and the conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) are presented as candidates for a new generation of haemodialysis membranes. The composites may combine active ion exchange with passive ultrafiltration, and the large surface area (about 80 m2 g−1) could potentially provide compact dialysers. Herein, the haemocompatibility of the novel membranes and the feasibility of effectively removing small uraemic toxins by potential-controlled ion exchange were studied. The thrombogenic properties of the composites were improved by applying a stable heparin coating. In terms of platelet adhesion and thrombin generation, the composites were comparable with haemocompatible polymer polysulphone, and regarding complement activation, the composites were more biocompatible than commercially available membranes. It was possible to extract phosphate and oxalate ions from solutions with physiological pH and the same tonicity as that of the blood. The exchange capacity of the materials was found to be 600 ± 26 and 706 ± 31 μmol g−1 in a 0.1 M solution (pH 7.4) and in an isotonic solution of phosphate, respectively. The corresponding values with oxalate were 523 ± 5 in a 0.1 M solution (pH 7.4) and 610 ± 1 μmol g−1 in an isotonic solution. The heparinized PPy–cellulose composite is consequently a promising haemodialysis material, with respect to both potential-controlled extraction of small uraemic toxins and haemocompatibility.

  • 16.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Carlsson, Daniel O
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Larsson, Rolf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hemocompatibility of Nanocellulose Polypyrrole Membranes Intended for Hemodialysis2012In: 9th World Biomaterials Congress, June 1-5, 2012, Chengdu, China, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hoess, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Thormann, Annika
    Heilmann, Andreas
    Shen, Jinhui
    Tang, Liping
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Role of Alumina Nanoporosity in Acute Cell Response2011In: Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ISSN 1533-4880, E-ISSN 1533-4899, Vol. 11, no 8, 6698-6704 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work studied the effect of nanoporous alumina in acute cellular response in an in vivo model. Nanoporous alumina membranes, with pore size diameters of 20 and 200 nm, were fabricated by anodic oxidation of aluminium. The membranes were thereafter characterized in terms of pore size distribution and chemical composition. To evaluate acute inflammatory response, the membranes were implanted in the peritoneal cavity of mice. Cell recruitment to the implant site was determined by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. Cell adhesion to material surfaces was studied in terms of cell number, type, and morphology using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunocytochemical staining followed by fluorescence microscopy. The fabricated nanoporous alumina membranes were found to have narrow pore size distribution. The in vivo study showed that 200 nm alumina membranes induced stronger inflammatory response than 20 nm membranes. This was reflected by the number of implant-associated phagocytes and the number of cells recruited to the implantation site. Since both pore-size membranes possess similar chemical composition, we believe that the observed difference in cell recruitment and adhesion is an effect of the material nanotopography. Our results suggest that nanotopography can be used to subtly control the recruitment and adherence of phagocytic cells during the acute inflammatory response to alumina membranes.

  • 18.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology.
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology.
    Procoagulant behavior and platelet microparticle generation on nanoporous alumina2010In: Journal of biomaterials applications, ISSN 0885-3282, E-ISSN 1530-8022, Vol. 24, no 8, 675-692 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, we have investigated platelet microparticle(PMP) generation in whole blood after contact with nanoporous alumina.Alumina membranes with pore sizes of 20 and 200nm in diameter were incubated with whole blood and the number of PMP in the fluid phase was determined by flow cytometry. The role of the complement system in PMP generation was investigated using an analog of the potent complement inhibitor compstatin. Moreover, the procoagulant activity of the two pore size membranes were compared by measuring thrombin formation. Results indicated that PMP were not present in the fluid phase after whole blood contact with either of the alumina membranes. However, scanning electron microscope micrographs clearly showed the presence of PMP clusters on the 200nm pore size alumina, while PMP were practically absent on the 20nm membrane. We probed no influence of complement activation in PMP generation and adhesion and we hypothesize that other specific material-related protein–platelet interactions are taking place. A clear difference in procoagulant activity between the membranes could also be seen, 20nm alumina showed 100% higher procoagulant activity than 200nm membrane. By combining surface evaluation and flow cytometry analyses of the fluid phase, we are able to conclude that 200nm pore size alumina promotes PMP generation and adhesion while the 20nm membrane does not appreciably cause any release or adhesion of PMP, thus indicating a direct connection between PMP generation and nanoporosity.

  • 19.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology.
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Santin, Matteo
    School of Pharmacy & Biomolecualr Sciences, University of Brighton.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology.
    Nanoporosity of alumina surfaces induces different patterns of activation in adhering monocytes/macrophages2010In: International Journal of Biomaterials, ISSN 1687-8787, E-ISSN 1687-8795, Vol. 2010, 402715- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study shows that alumina nanotopography affects monocyte/macrophage behaviour. Human mononuclear cells cultured on alumina membranes with pore diameters of 20 and 200 nm were evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, viability, morphology and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. After 24 hours, cell adhesion was assessed by means of light microscopy and cell viability by measuring LDH release. The inflammatory response was evaluated by quantifying interleukin-1ß and tumour necrosis factor-α. Finally, scanning electron microscopy was used to study cell morphology. Results showed pronounced differences in cell number, morphology and cytokine release depending on the nanoporosity. Few but highly activated cells were found on the 200 nm porous alumina, while relatively larger number of cells was found on the 20 nm porous surface. However, despite their larger number, the cells adhering on the 20 nm surface exhibited reduced pro-inflammatory activity. It can be speculated that the difference in surface topography may lead to distinct protein adsorption patterns and therefore to different degree of cell activation. The data of this paper emphasize the role played by the material nanotexture in dictating cell responses and implies that nanotopography could be exploited for controlling the inflammatory response to implants.

  • 20.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology.
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Clinical Immunology.
    Time sequence of blood activation by nanoporous alumina: Studies on platelets and complement system2010In: Microscopy research and technique (Print), ISSN 1059-910X, E-ISSN 1097-0029, Vol. 73, no 12, 1101-1109 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work the time sequence of blood activation by alumina membranes with different porosities (20 and 200 nm in diameter) was studied. The membranes were incubated with whole blood from 2 min to 4 h. Platelet adhesion and activation in addition to complement activation were monitored at different time points. Evaluation of platelet adhesion and activation was done by determining the change in platelet number and the levels of thrombospondin-1 in the fluid phase. Scanning electron microscopy studies were done to further evaluate platelet adhesion and morphology. Immunocytochemical staining was used to evaluate the presence of CD41 and CD62P antigens on the material surface. Complement activation was monitored by measuring C3a and sC5b-9 in plasma samples by means of enzyme immunoassays. Both alumina membranes displayed similar complement activation time profiles, with levels of C3a and sC5b-9 increasing with incubation time. A statistically significant difference between the membranes was found after 60 min of incubation. Platelet activation characteristics and time profile were different between the two membranes. Platelet adhesion increased over time for the 20 nm surface, while the clusters of microparticles on the 200 nm surface did not appreciably change during the course of the experiment. The release of thrombospondin-1 increased with time for both membranes, however much later for the 200 nm alumina (240 min) as compared to the 20 nm membrane (60 min). The surface topography of the alumina most probably influence protein transition rate, which in turn affects material-platelet activation kinetics.

  • 21.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Leschinskaya, Anastasia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Toomadj, Farshad
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Membrane characterization and solute diffusion in porous composite nanocellulose membranes for hemodialysis2013In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 20, no 6, 2959-2970 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The membrane and solute diffusion properties of Cladophora cellulose and polypyrrole (PPy) functionalized Cladophora cellulose were analyzed to investigate the feasibility of using electroactive membranes in hemodialysis. The membranes were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, zeta-potentiometry, He-pycnometry, N-2 gas adsorption, and Hg porosimetry. The diffusion properties across the studied membranes for three model uremic toxins, i.e. creatinine, vitamin B12 and bovine serum albumin, were also analyzed. The characterization work revealed that the studied membranes present an open structure of weakly negatively charged nanofibers with an average pore size of 21 and 53 nm for pristine cellulose and PPy-Cladophora cellulose, respectively. The results showed that the diffusion of uremic toxins across the PPy-Cladophora cellulose membrane was faster than through pure cellulose membrane, which was related to the higher porosity and larger average pore size of the former. Since it was found that the average pore size of the membranes was larger than the hydrodynamic radius of the studied model solutes, it was concluded that these types of membranes are favorable to expand the Mw spectrum of uremic toxins to also include conditions associated with accumulation of large pathologic proteins during hemodialysis. The large average pore size of the composite membrane could also be exploited to ensure high-fluxes of solutes through the membrane while simultaneously extracting ions by an externally applied electric current.

  • 22.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Surface Biotechnology.
    Leverrier, Julieta
    Biochemistry Department, University of the Republic, Uruguay.
    Batista-Viera, Francisco
    Biochemistry Department, University of the Republic, Uruguay.
    Manta, Carmen
    Biochemistry Department, University of the Republic, Uruguay.
    Thiopropyl-agarose as a solid phase reducing agent for chemical modification of IgG and F(ab´)22008In: Biotechnology progress (Print), ISSN 8756-7938, E-ISSN 1520-6033, Vol. 24, no 5, 1154-1159 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Is there a future for electrochemically assisted hemodialysis?: Focus on the application of polypyrrole-nanocellulose composites2014In: Nanomedicine, ISSN 1743-5889, E-ISSN 1748-6963, Vol. 9, no 7, 1095-1110 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work summarizes the various aspects of using electrochemically assisted solute removal techniques in hemodialysis with a focus on blood electrodialysis and electrochemically controlled uremic retention solute removal using polypyrrole. In particular, the feasibility of using highly porous conductive polypyrrole-Cladophora cellulose membranes for hemodialysis are overviewed as a part of our dedicated research efforts during the past 4 years. The potential benefits and the current limitations associated with using the electrochemically controlled uremic retention solute removal techniques are discussed in detail.

  • 24.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Biocompatibility of Novel Nano-engineering Cellulose-polypyrrole Composite.2011In: MRS 2011 Spring meeting San Francisco: Hybrid Biological Materials II, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Fellström, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Pradhan, Sulena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Nyholm, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    In vitro and in vivo toxicity of rinsed and aged nanocellulose-polypyrrole composites2012In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, ISSN 1549-3296, E-ISSN 1552-4965, Vol. 100A, no 8, 2128-2138 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel composites of nanocellulose and the conducting polymer polypyrrole (PPy) are herein suggested as potential candidates for active ion-extraction membranes in electrochemically controlled hemodialysis. This work has defined processing parameters to obtain a biocompatible nanocellulose-PPy composite and for the first time, the effect of the composite ageing on cell viability has been studied.

    The influence of rinsing and extraction process steps, as well as ageing under different conditions (i.e. in air, at –20 ˚C and in argon), on the electroactivity and cytotoxicity of a PPy-nanocellulose composite has been investigated. The biocompatibility evaluation was based on indirect toxicity assays with fibroblasts and monocyte cell lines and an acute toxicity test in mice, while the electroactivity was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry experiments.

    The as-prepared composite did not induce any cytotoxic response in vitro or in vivo. Extensive rinsing and 48 hour incubation in biological buffer previous to the preparation of the culture medium extracts were, however, necessary to obtain a non-cytotoxic composite. The as-prepared composite was also found to exhibit acceptable electrochemical performance, which was retained upon 4 weeks storage in argon atmosphere.  It was shown that ageing of the composite had a negative effect on biocompatibility, regardless of the storage condition. Thus, to allow for long time storage of electroactive nanocellulose-PPy hemodialysis membranes, the degradation of PPy upon storage must be controlled. The present results show that the biocompatibility of PPy composites depends on the rinsing and pre-treatment of the composite material as well as the aging of the material.

  • 26.
    Frykstrand, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Forsgren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Cheung, Ocean
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Zhang, Peng
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Study of mesoporous magnesium carbonate in contact with whole human blood2016In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 6, no 58, 52810-52816 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction of mesoporours magnesium carbonate (Upsalite) particles (50-100 mm) with human whole blood was investigated using an in vitro loop model and the effect on the complement system, blood coagulation and red blood cell lysis was assessed. The removal of Ca2+ by Upsalite and the possible exchange with and/or release of Mg2+ were explored as well. Upsalite was found to present anticoagulant properties, most probably due to the uptake of Ca2+ by the particles. No hemolytic activity was detected at Upsalite concentrations up to 1 mg ml(-1). Moderate to high levels of C3a and sC5b-9 were observed for Upsalite, however such levels were statistically different from the negative control only when the particle concentrations were 0.25 mg ml(-1) and 1.0 mg ml(-1), respectively. The presented findings are promising for the future development of mesoporous magnesium carbonate-based materials for biomedical applications.

  • 27.
    Frykstrand, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Forsgren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Synthesis and potential of Upsalite: a Mesoporous magnesium carbonate synthesized without surfactants2015In: Uppsala Biomaterials Conference, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Frykstrand, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Forsgren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Cytotoxicity and in vivo irritation of Upsalite®, a mesoporous magnesium carbonate 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Frykstrand, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Zhang, Peng
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Forsgren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    The surfactant-free synthesis of Upsalite®, a mesoporous magnesium carbonate and its use as a solubility enhancer for poorly soluble drugs: -2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Frykstrand, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Zhang, Peng
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Forsgren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Cytotoxicity, in Vivo Skin Irritation and Acute Systemic Toxicity of the Mesoporous Magnesium Carbonate Upsalite®2015In: Journal of Biomaterials and Nanobiotechnology, ISSN 2158-7027, E-ISSN 2158-7043Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Hoess, Andreas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Thormann, Annika
    Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWMH, Halle, Germany.
    Heilmann, Andreas
    Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWMH, Halle, Germany.
    Shen, Jinhui
    Department of Bioengineering, The University of Texas at Arlington, Texas, USA.
    Tang, Liping
    Department of Bioengineering, The University of Texas at Arlington, Texas, USA.
    Karlsson Ott, Marjam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    In Vivo Acute Inflammatory Response to Nanoporous Alumina2011In: 24th European Conference on Biomaterials, Dublin, September 04-08, 2011., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Carlsson, Daniel O
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Characterization and cytocompatibility of Cladophora nanocellulose films2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Carlsson, Daniel O
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Characterization and in vitro cytocompatibility of microfibrillated cellulose2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Carlsson, Daniel O
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Fibroblast behaviour on microfibrillated cellulose films2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Carlsson, Daniel O
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    In vitro cytocompatibility of Cladophora nanocellulose2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Carlsson, Daniel O
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    In vitro cytocompatibility of Cladophora nanocellulose2013In: European Cells and Materials, ISSN 1473-2262, E-ISSN 1473-2262, Vol. 26, no Suppl.2, 13-13 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Carlsson, Daniel O.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Nanocellulose from green algae: Physicochemical characterization and cytocompatibility studies2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Carlsson, Daniel Otto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ålander, Eva
    Lindström, Tom
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Translational study between structure and biological response of nanocellulose from wood and green algae2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 6, 2892-2903 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of nanostructure on the cytocompatibility of cellulose films is analyzed providing insight into how physicochemical properties of surface modified microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) and Cladophora nanocellulose (CC) affect the materials cytocompatibility. CC is modified through TEMPO-mediated oxidation and glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride (EPTMAC) condensation to obtain anionic and cationic nanocellulose samples respectively, while anionic and cationic MFC samples are obtained by carboxymethylation and EPTMAC condensation respectively. Films of unmodified, anionic and cationic MFC and CC are prepared by vacuum filtration and characterized in terms of specific surface area, pore size distribution, degree of crystallinity, surface charge and water content. Human dermal fibroblasts are exposed to culture medium extracts of the films in an indirect contact cytotoxicity test. Moreover, cell adhesion and viability are evaluated in a direct contact assay and the effects of the physicochemical properties on cell behavior are discussed. In the indirect cytotoxicity test no toxic leachables are detected, evidencing that the CC and MFC materials are non-cytotoxic, independently ofthe chemical treatment that they have been subjected to. The direct contact tests show that carboxymethylated-MFC presents a more cytocompatible profile than unmodified and trimethylammonium-MFC. TEMPO-CC promotes fibroblast adhesion and presents cell viability comparable to the results obtained with the tissue culture material Thermanox. We hypothesize that the distinct aligned nanofiber structure present in the TEMPO-CC films is responsible for the improved cell adhesion. Thus, by controlling the surface properties of cellulose nanofibers, such as chemistry, charge, and orientation, cell adhesion properties can be promoted.

  • 39.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Rocha, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials. Minist Educ Brazil, CAPES Fdn, BR-70040020 Brasilia, DF, Brazil.
    Zhang, Peng
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Gustafsson, Simon
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ning, Yi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Transition from bioinert to bioactive material by tailoring the biological cell response to carboxylated nanocellulose2016In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 17, no 3, 1224-1233 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents an insight into the relationship between cell response and physicochemical properties of Cladophora cellulose (CC) by investigating the effect of CC functional group density on the response of model cell lines. CC was carboxylated by electrochemical TEMPO-mediated oxidation. By varying the amount of charge passed through the electrolysis setup, CC materials with different degrees of oxidation were obtained. The effect of carboxyl group density on the material’s physicochemical properties was investigated together with the response of human dermal fibroblasts (hDF) and human osteoblastic cells (Saos-2) to the carboxylated CC films. The introduction of carboxyl groups resulted in CC films with decreased specific surface area and smaller total pore volume compared with the unmodified CC (u-CC). While u-CC films presented a porous network of randomly oriented fibers, a compact and aligned fiber pattern was depicted for the carboxylated-CC films. The decrease in surface area and total pore volume, and the orientation and aggregation of the fibers tended to augment parallel to the increase in the carboxyl group density. hDF and Saos-2 cells presented poor cell adhesion and spreading on u-CC, which gradually increased for the carboxylated CC as the degree of oxidation increased. It was found that a threshold value in carboxyl group density needs be reached to obtain a carboxylated-CC film with cytocompatibility comparable to commercial tissue culture material. Hence, this study demonstrates that a normally bioinert nanomaterial can be rendered bioactive by carefully tuning the density of charged groups on the material surface, a finding that not only may contribute to the fundamental understanding of biointerface phenomena, but also to the development of bioinert/bioactive materials.

  • 40.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Cell response to nanocellulose films2015In: Uppsala Biomaterials Conference: A joint conference between local groups at Uppsala University working with biomaterials and their applications:, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Nanocellulose from green algae modulates the in vitro inflammatory response of monocytes/macrophages2015In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 22, no 6, 3673-3688 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The response of monocytes and macrophages to functionalized Cladophora nanocellulose (CC) films was evaluated. Carboxyl-CC and hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium-CC [referred to as anionic-CC (a-CC) and cationic-CC (c-CC), respectively] were synthesized by TEMPO-mediated oxidation and epoxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride condensation of unmodified CC (u-CC). The cell response to u-CC, a-CC and c-CC of untreated and phorbol 12-myristate-13 acetate treated THP-1 cells, i.e. monocytes and macrophages, in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was studied. u-CC impairs the viability of THP-1 monocytes and macrophages most probably due to the presence of impurities. In the absence of LPS, the functionalized materials behave as inert materials in terms of the inflammatory response of both monocytes and differentiated macrophages. Under pro-inflammatory stimuli the functionalized CC films suppressed the inflammatory response induced by LPS. The a-CC material with its aggregated, aligned fibre structure caused a more pronounced reduction of TNF-alpha levels compared to the c-CC film that exhibited non-aggregated, randomly oriented fibres. These results push forward the option of using functionalized CC materials in the biomedical field.

  • 42.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ålander, Eva
    Lindström, Tom
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Surface Chemistry of Nanocellulose Fibers Directs Monocyte/Macrophage Response2015In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 16, no 9, 2787-2795 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of surface functionalization of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) on monocyte/macrophage (MM) behavior is investigated to understand how the physicochemical properties of nanocelluloses influence the interactions of such materials with biological systems. Films of anionic (a-), cationic (c-), and unmodified (u-) NFC were synthesized and characterized in terms of surface charge. THP-1 monocytes were cultured on the surface of the films for 24 h in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and the cell response was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, morphology, and secretion of TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-1ra. The results show that MMs cultured on carboxymethylated-NFC films (a-NFC) are activated toward a proinflammatory phenotype, whereas u-NFC promotes a mild activation of the studied cells. The presence of hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium groups on c-NFC, however, does not promote the activation of MMs, indicating that c-NFC closely behaves as an inert material in terms of MM activation. None of the materials is able to directly activate the MMs toward an anti-inflammatory response. These results may provide a foundation for the design of future NFC-based materials with the ability to control MM activation and may expand the use of NFC in biomedical applications.

  • 43.
    Hua, Kai
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ålander, Eva
    Lindström, Tom
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Nanocellulose surface chemistry modulates monocytes/macrophages2015In: Fourth International Conference on Multifunctional, Hybrid and Nanomaterials (Hybrid Materials 2015). Stiges, Spain 2015, 2015, ABC.04.01.- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Lindh, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Hua, Kai
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ruan, Changqing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Rocha, Igor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Carlsson, Daniel Otto
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Chemical Modifications of Nanocellulose2014In: NFM conference, Prague 16-18th June 2014., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Lopes, Viviana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Impacts of nanocellulose towards the human health2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Lopes, Viviana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    The biological impact of cellulose nanofibers: towards enhanced knowledge2015In: Uppsala Biomaterials Conference 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Lopes, Viviana
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Sanchez-Martinez, Carla
    UCL Inst Ophthalmol, Ocular Biol & Therapeut, 11-43 Bath St, London EC1V 9EL, England.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    In vitro biological responses to nanofibrillated cellulose by human dermal, lung and immune cells: surface chemistry aspect2017In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, ISSN 1743-8977, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 14, 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose, and particularly nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), has been proposed for a diversity of applications in industry and in the biomedical field. Its unique physicochemical and structural features distinguish nanocellulose from traditional materials and enable its use as an advance nanomaterial. However, its nanoscale features may induce unknown biological responses. Limited studies with NFC are available and the biological impacts of its use have not been thoroughly explored. This study assesses the in vitro biological responses elicited by wood-derived NFC gels, when human dermal fibroblasts, lung MRC-5 cells and THP-1 macrophage cells are exposed to the nanomaterial. Furthermore, whether the presence of surface charged groups (i.e. carboxymethyl and hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium groups) on NFC can induce distinct biological responses is investigated.

  • 48.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strømme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Current status and future prospects of nanotechnology in cosmetics2012In: Progress in Materials Science, ISSN 0079-6425, E-ISSN 1873-2208, Vol. 57, no 5, 875-910 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cosmetics industry was among the first to implement nanotechnological principles in product development. Of more than one thousand registered nanotechnology-based products on the global market in 2009, more than 13% were classified as products for cosmetic use. In this review we highlight the most important scientific articles, expert opinions by regulatory authorities, and patent literature from Europe and the USA for the time period between 2000 and 2010 concerning the use of nanotechnology in dermatological, dental, and haircare products intended for improving the appearance of the user. We present current and suggested uses of nanotechnology in cosmetics with the main focus on nanomaterials as active substances, carriers and formulation aids. The new functionalities these materials are claimed to introduce are also described. We briefly discuss public opinion of nanotechnology in general, and include the most important definitions related to this emerging technology along with a summary of the general characteristics of nanoparticles and their safety aspects. The aim of the review is, thus, to provide an update on the current status and trends of research and industrial development related to the use of nanotechnology in cosmetics and to give an indication of where the field could be heading in the future.

  • 49.
    Rocha, Igor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Chemical modification of Cladophora nanocellulose to provide a non-toxic material with anticoagulant properties2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood purification is a common procedure for treating patients with kidney failure in which an extracorporeal device filled with a porous material containing antibodies can retain toxins from the blood. In order to avoid activation and coagulation, heparin is administrated to patients; however this sulfonated polysaccharide may cause many side effects such as intense bleeding and osteoporosis. In this project nanocellulose from Cladophora green algae was used for the development of a porous material with anticoagulant properties. A periodate oxidation followed by an amine cross-linking and subsequent reduction produced dialdehyde cellulose beads ranging from 10-100 mm in diameter with improved mechanical properties and high stability in alkaline media. This material was then sulfonated to acquire anticoagulant properties and characterized by FTIR, z-potential, condutometric titration, elemental analysis and BET surface area showing that its porosity varies with the degree of sulfonation. After extensive washing, toxicology experiments were performed with a THP-1 monocyte cell line in order to examine if the material was non-toxic and could be suitable as a matrix in blood purification.

  • 50.
    Rocha, Igor
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Ferraz, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Mihranyan, Albert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Strömme, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Chemical modifications of Cladophorananocellulose to provide a non-toxicmaterial with anticoagulant properties2016Conference paper (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 59
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