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  • 1.
    Alström, Per
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, POB 7007, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden; Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.
    Jonsson, Knud A
    Jon, Fjeldså
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Irestedt, Martin
    Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species2015Ingår i: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 2, nr 3, artikel-id 140364Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has diverged mainly in plumage, which may be the result of selection for improved camouflage in its new arboreal niche, while selection pressures for other morphological changes have probably been weak owing to preadaptations for the novel niche. By contrast, we suggest thatAmaurocichla's niche change has led to divergence in both structure and plumage.

  • 2. Andersson, MS
    et al.
    Ödeen, A
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi. Zooekologi.
    Håstad, O
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi. Zooekologi.
    A partly covered badge signalling avian virus resistance2006Ingår i: Acta Zoologica, Vol. 87, s. 71-76Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 3.
    Boström, Jannika E.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Dimitrova, Marina
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi. Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Canton, Cindy
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Hastad, Olle
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anat Physiol & Biochem, Box 7011, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Qvarnstrom, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anat Physiol & Biochem, Box 7011, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ultra-Rapid Vision in Birds2016Ingår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, nr 3, artikel-id e0151099Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Flying animals need to accurately detect, identify and track fast-moving objects and these behavioral requirements are likely to strongly select for abilities to resolve visual detail in time. However, evidence of highly elevated temporal acuity relative to non-flying animals has so far been confined to insects while it has been missing in birds. With behavioral experiments on three wild passerine species, blue tits, collared and pied flycatchers, we demonstrate temporal acuities of vision far exceeding predictions based on the sizes and metabolic rates of these birds. This implies a history of strong natural selection on temporal resolution. These birds can resolve alternating light-dark cycles at up to 145 Hz (average: 129, 127 and 137, respectively), which is ca. 50 Hz over the highest frequency shown in any other vertebrate. We argue that rapid vision should confer a selective advantage in many bird species that are ecologically similar to the three species examined in our study. Thus, rapid vision may be a more typical avian trait than the famously sharp vision found in birds of prey.

  • 4.
    Boström, Jannika E.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Haller, Nicola K.
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Solvegatan 35, S-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    Dimitrova, Marina
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Kelber, Almut
    Lund Univ, Dept Biol, Solvegatan 35, S-22362 Lund, Sweden..
    The flicker fusion frequency of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) revisited2017Ingår i: Journal of Comparative Physiology A. Sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology, ISSN 0340-7594, E-ISSN 1432-1351, Vol. 203, nr 1, s. 15-22Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    While color vision and spatial resolution have been studied in many bird species, less is known about the temporal aspects of bird vision. High temporal resolution has been described in three species of passerines but it is unknown whether this is specific to passerines, to small actively flying birds, to insectivores or to birds living in bright habitats. Temporal resolution of vision is commonly tested by determining the flicker fusion frequency (FFF), at which the eye can no longer distinguish a flickering light from a constant light of equal intensity at different luminances. Using a food reward, we trained the birds to discriminate a constant light from a flickering light, at four different luminances between 750 and 7500 cd/m(2). The highest FFF found in one bird at 3500 cd/m(2) was 93 Hz. Three birds had higher FFF (82 Hz) at 7500 cd/m(2) than at 3500 cd/m(2). Six human subjects had lower FFF than the birds at 1500 but similar FFF at 750 cd/m(2). These results indicate that high temporal resolution is not a common trait for all small and active birds living in bright light habitats. Whether it is typical for passerines or for insectivorous birds remains to be tested.

  • 5.
    Harris, Rebecca B.
    et al.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Burke Museum Nat Hist & Culture, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Alström, Per
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi. Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, Uppsala, Sweden.;Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing, Peoples R China.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Leache, Adam D.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biol, Seattle, USA.;Burke Museum Nat Hist & Culture, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Discordance between genomic divergence and phenotypic variation in a rapidly evolving avian genus (Motacilla)2018Ingår i: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 120, s. 183-195Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Generally, genotypes and phenotypes are expected to be spatially congruent; however, in widespread species complexes with few barriers to dispersal, multiple contact zones, and limited reproductive isolation, discordance between phenotypes and phylogeographic groups is more probable. Wagtails (Motacilla) are a genus of birds with striking plumage pattern variation across the Old World. Up to 13 subspecies are recognized within a single species, yet previous studies using mitochondrial DNA have supported polyphyletic phylogeographic groups that are inconsistent with subspecies plumage characteristics. In this study, we investigate the link between phenotypes and genotype by taking a phylogenetic approach. We use genome-wide SNPs, nuclear introns, and mitochondrial DNA to estimate population structure, isolation by distance, and species relationships. Together, our genetic sampling includes complete species-level sampling and comprehensive coverage of the three most phenotypically diverse Palearctic species. Our study provides strong evidence for species-level patterns of differentiation, however population-level differentiation is less pronounced. SNPs provide a robust estimate of species-level relationships, which are mostly corroborated by a combined analysis of mtDNA and nuclear introns (the first time-calibrated species tree for the genus). However, the mtDNA tree is strongly incongruent and is considered to misrepresent the species phylogeny. The extant wagtail lineages originated during the Pliocene and the Eurasian lineage underwent rapid diversification during the Pleistocene. Three of four widespread Eurasian species exhibit an east-west divide that contradicts both subspecies taxonomy and phenotypic variation. Indeed, SNPs fail to distinguish between phenotypically distinct subspecies within the M. alba and M. flava complexes, and instead support geographical regions, each of which is home to two or more different looking subspecies. This is a major step towards our understanding of wagtail phylogeny compared to previous analyses of fewer species and considerably less sequence data.

  • 6. Hastad, Olle
    et al.
    Odeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Different ranking of avian colors predicted by modeling of retinal function in humans and birds2008Ingår i: American Naturalist, ISSN 0003-0147, E-ISSN 1537-5323, Vol. 171, nr 6, s. 831-838Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Only during the past decade have vision-system-neutral methods become common practice in studies of animal color signals. Consequently, much of the current knowledge on sexual selection is based directly or indirectly on human vision, which may or may not emphasize spectral information in a signal differently from the intended receiver. In an attempt to quantify this discrepancy, we used retinal models to test whether human and bird vision rank plumage colors similarly. Of 67 species, human and bird models disagreed in 26 as to which pair of patches in the plumage provides the strongest color contrast or which male in a random pair is the more colorful. These results were only partly attributable to human UV blindness. Despite confirming a strong correlation between avian and human color discrimination, we conclude that a significant proportion of the information in avian visual signals may be lost in translation.

  • 7.
    Hastad, Olle
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Victorsson, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Odeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Differences in color vision make passerines less conspicuous in the eyes of their predators2005Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 102, nr 18, s. 6391-6394Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual selection often favors brighter and exaggerated traits, which also increase the risk of detection by predators. Signals that are preferentially conspicuous to conspecifics would reduce the predation cost of signaling and, therefore, might facilitate the evolution of stronger sexual and social signals. This selective signaling is possible if predators and prey have differently tuned sensory systems. By using a retinal model to compare reflectance from the plumages of Swedish songbirds to the reflectance of their natural backgrounds, we found their color badges to be significantly more conspicuous to other songbirds (which have a UV-tuned visual system) than to raptors and corvids (which have a violet-tuned system) in both coniferous and deciduous forests, consistent with an adaptive private communication system.

  • 8. Hastad, Olle
    et al.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    A vision physiological estimation of ultraviolet window marking visibility to birds2014Ingår i: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 2, s. e621-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Billions of birds are estimated to be killed in window collisions every year, worldwide. A popular solution to this problem may lie in marking the glass with ultraviolet reflective or absorbing patterns, which the birds, but not humans, would see. Elegant as this remedy may seem at first glance, few of its proponents have taken into consideration how stark the contrasts between ultraviolet and human visible light reflections or transmissions must be to be visible to a bird under natural conditions. Complicating matters is that diurnal birds differ strongly in how their photoreceptors absorb ultraviolet and to a lesser degree blue light. We have used a physiological model of avian colour vision to estimate the chromatic contrasts of ultraviolet markings against a natural scene reflected and transmitted by ordinary window glass. Ultraviolets markings may be clearly visible under a range of lighting conditions, but only to birds with a UVS type of ultraviolet vision, such as many passerines. To bird species with the common VS type of vision, ultraviolet markings should only be visible if they produce almost perfect ultraviolet contrasts and are viewed against a scene with low chromatic variation but high ultraviolet content.

  • 9.
    Håstad, Olle
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi. Zooekologi.
    Ernstdotter, Emma
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Ultraviolet vision and foraging in dip and diving birds2005Ingår i: Biology Letters, Vol. 1, s. 306-309Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 10.
    Håstad, Olle
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysiologi och utvecklingsbiologi, Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Partridge, Julian
    School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Ultraviolet photopigment sensitivity and ocular media transmittance in gulls, with an evolutionary perspective2009Ingår i: Journal of Comparative Physiology A. Sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology, ISSN 0340-7594, E-ISSN 1432-1351, Vol. 195, nr 6, s. 585-590Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Gulls (Laridae excluding Sternidae) appear to be the only shorebirds (Charadriiformes) that have a short wavelength sensitive type 1 (SWS1) cone pigment opsin tuned to ultraviolet (UV) instead of violet. However, the apparent UV-sensitivity has only been inferred indirectly, via the interpretation that the presence of cysteine at the key amino acid position 90 in the SWS1 opsin confers UV sensitivity. Unless the cornea and the lens efficiently transmit UV to the retina, gulls might in effect be similar to violet-sensitive birds in spectral sensitivity even if they have an ultraviolet sensitive (UVS) SWS1 visual pigment. We report that the spectral transmission of the cornea and lens of great black-backed Larus marinus and herring gulls L. argentatus allow UV-sensitivity, having a λ value, 344 nm, similar to the ocular media of UV sensitive birds. By molecular sequencing of the second α-helical transmembrane region of the SWS1 opsin gene we could also infer that 15 herring gulls and 16 yellow-legged gulls L. michahellis, all base-pair identical, are genetically UV-sensitive.

  • 11.
    Håstad, Olle
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi. Zooekologi.
    Victorsson, Jonas
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi. Zooekologi.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution. Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi. Zooekologi.
    Differences in color vision make passerines less conspicious in the eyes of their predators2005Ingår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, Vol. 102, s. 6391-6394Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 12.
    Li, Xinlei
    et al.
    Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Zool, State Key Lab Genet Resources & Evolut, Kunming 650223, Peoples R China.;Univ Chinese Acad Sci, Beijing 100049, Peoples R China..
    Dong, Feng
    Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Zool, State Key Lab Genet Resources & Evolut, Kunming 650223, Peoples R China..
    Lei, Fumin
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China..
    Alström, Per
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Swedish Species Informat Ctr, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Zhang, Ruiying
    Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Zool, Key Lab Zool Systemat & Evolut, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China..
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Univ Copenhagen, Nat Hist Museum Denmark, Ctr Macroecol Evolut & Climate, Univ Pk 15, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Vertebrate Zool, POB 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zou, Fasheng
    South China Inst Endangered Anim, Guangzhou 510260, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Yang, Xiaojun
    Chinese Acad Sci, Kunming Inst Zool, State Key Lab Genet Resources & Evolut, Kunming 650223, Peoples R China..
    Shaped by uneven Pleistocene climate: mitochondrial phylogeographic pattern and population history of white wagtail Motacilla alba (Aves: Passeriformes)2016Ingår i: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 47, nr 2, s. 263-274Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the phylogeography and population history of the white wagtail Motacilla alba, which has a vast breeding range, covering areas with different Pleistocene climatic histories. The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit II gene (ND2) and Control Region (CR) were analyzed for 273 individuals from 45 localities. Our data comprised all nine subspecies of white wagtail. Four primary clades were inferred (M, N, SW and SE), with indications of M. grandis being nested within M. alba. The oldest split was between two haplotypes from the endemic Moroccan M. a. subpersonata (clade M) and the others, at 0.63-0.96 Mya; other divergences were at 0.31-0.38 Mya. The entire differentiation falls within the part of the Pleistocene characterized by Milankovitch cycles of large amplitudes and durations. Clade N was distributed across the northern Palearctic; clade SW in southwestern Asia plus the British Isles and was predicted by Ecological niche models (ENMs) to occur also in central and south Europe; and clade SE was distributed in central and east Asia. The deep divergence within M. a. subpersonata may reflect retention of ancestral haplotypes. Regional differences in historical climates have had different impacts on different populations: clade N expanded after the last glacial maximum (LGM), whereas milder Pleistocene climate of east Asia allowed clade SE a longer expansion time (since MIS 5); clade SW expanded over a similarly long time as clade SE, which is untypical for European species. ENMs supported these conclusions in that the northern part of the Eurasian continent was unsuitable during the LGM, whereas southern parts remained suitable. The recent divergences and poor structure in the mitochondrial tree contrasts strongly with the pronounced, well defined phenotypical differentiation, indicating extremely fast plumage divergence.

  • 13. Li, Xinlei
    et al.
    Dong, Feng
    Lei, Fumin
    Alström, Per
    Zhang, Ruiying
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Fjeldså, Jon
    Ericson, Per G. P.
    Zou, Fasheng
    Yang, Xiaojun
    Shaped by uneven Pleistocene climate: mitochondrial phylogeographic pattern and population history of White Wagtail Motacilla alba (Aves: Passeriformes).2016Ingår i: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 47, s. 263-274Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the phylogeography and population history of the white wagtail Motacilla alba, which has a vast breeding range, covering areas with different Pleistocene climatic histories. The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit II gene (ND2) and Control Region (CR) were analyzed for 273 individuals from 45 localities. Our data comprised all nine subspecies of white wagtail. Four primary clades were inferred (M, N, SW and SE), with indications of M. grandis being nested within M. alba. The oldest split was between two haplotypes from the endemic Moroccan M. a. subpersonata (clade M) and the others, at 0.63–0.96 Mya; other divergences were at 0.31–0.38 Mya. The entire differentiation falls within the part of the Pleistocene characterized by Milankovitch cycles of large amplitudes and durations. Clade N was distributed across the northern Palearctic; clade SW in southwestern Asia plus the British Isles and was predicted by Ecological niche models (ENMs) to occur also in central and south Europe; and clade SE was distributed in central and east Asia. e deep divergence within M. a. subpersonata may reflect retention of ancestral haplotypes. Regional differences in historical climates have had different impacts on different populations: clade N expanded after the last glacial maximum (LGM), whereas milder Pleistocene climate of east Asia allowed clade SE a longer expansion time (since MIS 5); clade SW expanded over a similarly long time as clade SE, which is untypical for European species. ENMs supported these conclusions in that the northern part of the Eurasian continent was unsuitable during the LGM, whereas southern parts remained suitable. e recent divergences and poor structure in the mitochondrial tree contrasts strongly with the pronounced, well defined phenotypical differentiation, indicating extremely fast plumage divergence. 

  • 14.
    Lisney, Thomas J.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Ekesten, Björn
    Tauson, Ragnar
    Håstad, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Evolution och utvecklingsbiologi.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Using electroretinograms to assess flicker fusion frequency in domestic hens Gallus gallus domesticus2012Ingår i: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 62, s. 125-133Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The assessment of flicker fusion frequency (FFF), the stimulus frequency at which a flickering light stimulus can no longer be resolved and appears continuous, and critical flicker fusion frequency (CFF; the highest frequency at any light intensity that an observer can resolve flicker) are useful methods for comparing temporal resolution capabilities between animals. Behavioural experiments have found that average CFFs in domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) are in the range of ca. 75-87 Hz, measured in response to full spectrum (i.e. white light plus UV) stimuli. In order to examine whether the chicken retina is able to detect flicker at higher frequencies, we used electroretinograms (ERGs) to assess FFF/CFF in adult hens from two commercial genotypes, Lohmann Selected Leghorns (LSLs) and Lohmann Browns (LBs). ERGs were recorded in response to flickering light at ten full spectrum light intensities ranging from 0.7 to 2740 cd m(-2). Two methods were used to determine FFF/CFF from the ERG recordings and these methods yielded very similar results, with average FFF ranging from ca. 20 Hz at 0.7 cd m(-2) to an average CFF of ca. 105 Hz at 2740 cd m(-2). In some individuals, CFFs of 118-119 Hz were recorded. The Intensity/FFF (I/FFF) curves are double-branched with a break point representing the rod-cone transition occurring between 2.5 and 5.9 cd m(-2). No significant differences in the I/FFF curves were found between the two genotypes. At stimulus light intensities >250 cd m(-2), the ERG-derived FFF and CFF values are all higher than those from behavioural studies using the same stimuli. Although hens do not appear to be able to consciously perceive flicker above approximately 90 Hz, the finding that the ERG responses are able to remain in phase with light flickering at frequencies >100 Hz means that the retinae of domestic poultry housed in artificial light conditions may be able to resolve flicker from fluorescent lamps. As range of detrimental effects have been reported in humans as a result of exposure to such "invisible flicker", the possibility exists that flicker from fluorescent lamps also acts as stressor in domesticated birds.

  • 15.
    Lisney, Thomas J.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Rubene, Diana
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Rozsa, Jani
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Løvlie, Hanne
    Håstad, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Evolution och utvecklingsbiologi.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Behavioural assessment of flicker fusion frequency in chicken Gallus gallus domesticus2011Ingår i: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 51, nr 12, s. 1324-1332Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To interact with its visual environment, an organism needs to perceive objects in both space and time. High temporal resolution is hence important to the fitness of diurnally active animals, not least highly active aerial species such as birds. However, temporal resolution, as assessed by flicker fusion frequency (FFF; the stimulus frequency at which a flickering light stimulus can no longer be resolved and appears continuous) or critical flicker fusion frequency (CFF; the highest flicker fusion frequency at any light intensity) has rarely been assessed in birds. In order to further our understanding of temporal resolution as a function of light intensity in birds we used behavioural experiments with domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) from an old game breed 'Gammalsvensk dvarghona' (which is morphologically and behaviourally similar to the wildtype ancestor, the red jungle fowl, G. gallus), to generate an 'Intensity/FFF curve' (I/FFF curve) across full spectrum light intensities ranging from 0.2 to 2812 cd m(-2). The I/FFF curve is double-branched, resembling that of other chordates with a duplex retina of both rods and cones. Assuming that the branches represent rod and cone mediated responses respectively, the break point between them places the transition between scotopic and photopic vision at between 0.8 and 1.9 cd m(-2). Average FFF ranged from 19.8 Hz at the lowest light intensity to a CFF 87.0 Hz at 1375 cd m(-2). FFF dropped slightly at the highest light intensity. There was some individual variation with certain birds displaying CFFs of 90-100 Hz. The FFF values demonstrated by this non-selected breed appear to be considerably higher than other behaviourally derived FFF values for similar stimuli reported for white and brown commercial laying hens, indicating that the domestication process might have influenced temporal resolution in chicken.

  • 16.
    Marzal, Julia Carolina Segami
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Rudh, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Rogell, Björn
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool Ecol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Lovlie, Hanne
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Rosher, Charlotte
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Univ Manchester, Fac Life Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Qvarnström, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Cryptic female Strawberry poison frogs experience elevated predation risk when associating with an aposematic partner2017Ingår i: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 7, nr 2, s. 744-750Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Population divergence in sexual signals may lead to speciation through prezygotic isolation. Sexual signals can change solely due to variation in the level of natural selection acting against conspicuousness. However, directional mate choice (i.e., favoring conspicuousness) across different environments may lead to gene flow between populations, thereby delaying or even preventing the evolution of reproductive barriers and speciation. In this study, we test whether natural selection through predation upon mate-choosing females can favor corresponding changes in mate preferences. Our study system, Oophaga pumilio, is an extremely color polymorphic neotropical frog with two distinctive antipredator strategies: aposematism and crypsis. The conspicuous coloration and calling behavior of aposematic males may attract both cryptic and aposematic females, but predation may select against cryptic females choosing aposematic males. We used an experimental approach where domestic fowl were encouraged to find digitized images of cryptic frogs at different distances from aposematic partners. We found that the estimated survival time of a cryptic frog was reduced when associating with an aposematic partner. Hence, predation may act as a direct selective force on female choice, favoring evolution of color assortative mating that, in turn, may strengthen the divergence in coloration that natural selection has generated.

  • 17.
    Mege, Pascal
    et al.
    Univ Angers, GECCO, 2 Blvd Lavoisier, F-49045 Angers, France.;Museum Natl Hist Nat, CNRS, Dept Ecol & Biodivers Management, UMR 7179, F-91800 Brunoy, France..
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Thery, Marc
    Museum Natl Hist Nat, CNRS, Dept Ecol & Biodivers Management, UMR 7179, F-91800 Brunoy, France..
    Picard, Damien
    Univ Angers, GECCO, 2 Blvd Lavoisier, F-49045 Angers, France.;Univ Angers, CNRS, LETG, UMR 6554, F-49045 Angers, France..
    Secondi, Jean
    Univ Angers, GECCO, 2 Blvd Lavoisier, F-49045 Angers, France.;Univ Angers, CNRS, LETG, UMR 6554, F-49045 Angers, France..
    Partial Opsin Sequences Suggest UV-Sensitive Vision is Widespread in Caudata2016Ingår i: Evolutionary biology, ISSN 0071-3260, E-ISSN 1934-2845, Vol. 43, nr 1, s. 109-118Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultraviolet (UV) vision exists in several animal groups. Intuitively, one would expect this trait to be favoured in species living in bright environments, where UV light is the most present. However, UV sensitivity, as deduced from sequences of UV photoreceptors and/or ocular media transmittance, is also present in nocturnal species, raising questions about the selective pressure maintaining this perceptual ability. Amphibians are among the most nocturnal vertebrates but their visual ecology remains poorly understood relative to other groups. Perhaps because many of these species breed in environments that filter out a large part of UV radiation, physiological and behavioural studies of UV sensitivity in this group are scarce. We investigated the extent of UV vision in Caudata, the order of amphibians with the most nocturnal habits. We could recover sequences of the UV sensitive SWS1 opsin in 40 out of 58 species, belonging to 6 families. In all of these species, the evidence suggests the presence of functional SWS1 opsins under purifying selection, potentially allowing UV vision. Interestingly, most species whose opsin genes failed to amplify exhibited particular ecological features that could drive the loss of UV vision. This likely wide distribution of functional UV photoreceptors in Caudata sheds a new light on the visual ecology of amphibians and questions the function of UV vision in nocturnal animal species.

  • 18.
    Odeen, A
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för evolutionsbiologi. Zooekologi.
    Florin, A-B
    Sexual selection and peripatric speciation: the Kaneshiro model revisited2002Ingår i: Journal of evolutionary biology, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 301-306Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Kaneshiro model proposes a role for sexual

  • 19.
    Outomuro, David
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Söderquist, Linus
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Johansson, Frank
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Nordström, Karin
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap, Fysiologi. Flinders Univ S Australia, Anat & Histol Ctr Neurosci, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia..
    The price of looking sexy: visual ecology of a three-level predator–prey system2017Ingår i: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 31, nr 3, s. 707-718Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Colour signals and colour vision play a pivotal role in intraspecific communication and predator-prey interactions. However, the costs of expressing conspicuous sexual signals at multiple trophic levels have been largely overlooked. Sexual signals can also experience character displacement in sympatric populations of closely related species, leading to potential changes in conspicuousness. We here investigate a bird-damselfly-fruit fly predator-prey system, where two closely related damselfly species have conspicuous, sexually selected wing coloration. The damselflies can occur in sympatry and allopatry, and reproductive character displacement in the coloration size has been previously reported. We quantify the damselfly wing reflectance from replicated sympatric and allopatric populations, and use receptor noise models to investigate the visual discriminability of the wing coloration for the bird, damselfly and fly vision systems, against natural backgrounds. We perform electroretinograms to study damselfly eye sensitivity. We also estimate damselfly predation risk in natural populations. We find that the chromatic component of wing coloration makes males highly discriminable to the predator, but not to the prey. However, female wing coloration is predominantly cryptic for the predator and prey, and interestingly, also for male damselflies. A female being cryptic to conspecifics likely reduces male harassment. The estimates of predation risk partially support the discriminability results. We also show that there is no difference in colour vision sensitivity between the two damselfly species and sexes, and no difference in wing coloration or its discriminability between sympatric and allopatric populations. Our results suggest that sexually selected traits can be antagonistically selected by predators and prey and that this antagonistic selection can be sex-dependent: males are paying a large cost in terms of conspicuousness, while females remain mostly cryptic. Our study thus emphasizes the need for investigating visual communication at multitrophic levels since the degree of colour discriminability can differ between predators, prey and the focal species.

  • 20.
    Qvarnström, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Rudh, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Edström, Torkel
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Lovlie, Hanne
    Tullberg, Birgitta S.
    Coarse Dark Patterning Functionally Constrains Adaptive Shifts from Aposematism to Crypsis in Strawberry Poison Frogs2014Ingår i: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 68, nr 10, s. 2793-2803Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecological specialization often requires tight coevolution of several traits, which may constrain future evolutionary pathways and make species more prone to extinction. Aposematism and crypsis represent two specialized adaptations to avoid predation. We tested whether the combined effects of color and pattern on prey conspicuousness functionally constrain or facilitate shifts between these two adaptations. We combined data from 17 natural populations of strawberry poison frogs, Oophaga pumilio with an experimental approach using digitalized images of frogs and chickens as predators. We show that bright coloration often co-occurs with coarse patterning among the natural populations. Dull green frogs with coarse patterning are rare in nature but in the experiment they were as easily detected as bright red frogs suggesting that this trait combination represents a transient evolutionary state toward aposematism. Hence, a gain of either bright color or coarse patterning leads to conspicuousness, but a transition back to crypsis would be functionally constrained in populations with both bright color and coarse patterning by requiring simultaneous changes in two traits. Thus, populations (or species) signaling aposematism by conspicuous color should be less likely to face an evolutionary dead end and more likely to radiate than populations with both conspicuous color and coarse patterning.

  • 21. Riyahi, Sepand
    et al.
    Björklund, Mats
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Carlos Senar, Juan
    No association between the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) and black belly stripe size variation in the Great Tit Parus major2015Ingår i: Bird Study, ISSN 0006-3657, E-ISSN 1944-6705, Vol. 62, nr 1, s. 150-152Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Capsule The Great Tit Parus major displays a black melanin breast patch stripe (black tie or black belly stripe) which shows great variation and its size correlates with male breeding success, survival and dominance. We investigated for associations between the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) polymorphism, which has an important function in melanin colouration, and the size of the black belly stripe but were unable to detect any polymorphism in this gene. Variation in the size of the melanin-based black belly stripe may therefore be regulated through genetic variation at other genes or via modification of the gene expression inside the melanocortin system and melanogenesis.

  • 22.
    Rubene, Diana
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Håstad, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Evolution och utvecklingsbiologi.
    Tauson, Ragnar
    Wall, Helena
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    The presence of UV wavelengths improves the temporal resolution of the avian visual system2010Ingår i: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 213, nr 19, s. 3357-3363Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to perceive rapid movement is an essential adaptation in birds, which are involved in rapid flight, pursuing prey and escaping predators. Nevertheless, the temporal resolution of the avian visual systems has been less well explored than spectral sensitivity. There are indications that birds are superior to humans in their ability to detect movement, as suggested by higher critical flicker frequencies (CFFs). It has also been implied, but not properly tested, that properties of CFF, as a function of light intensity, are affected by the spectral composition of light. This study measured CFF in the chicken, Gallus gallus L., using four different light stimuli - white, full-spectrum (white with addition of UV), yellow (590 nm) and UV (400 nm) - and four light intensity levels, adjusted to relative cone sensitivity. The results showed significantly higher CFF values for full-spectrum compared with white light, as well as a steeper rate of increase with intensity. The presence of UV wavelengths, previously demonstrated to affect mate choice and foraging, appears to be important also for detection of rapid movement. The yellow and UV light stimuli yielded rather similar CFFs, indicating no special role for the double cone in flicker detection.

  • 23. Rundle, H.D.
    et al.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Mooers, A.
    An experimental test for indirect benefits in Drosophila melanogaster2007Ingår i: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 7, s. 36-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Despite much empirical attention, tests for indirect benefits of mate choice have rarely considered the major components of sexual and nonsexual offspring fitness relevant to a population. Here we use a novel experimental design to test for the existence of any indirect benefits in a laboratory adapted population of D. melanogaster. Our experiment compared the fitness (mating success, longevity, and productivity) of individuals possessing genomes that derived two generations previously from males that were either entirely successful (studs) or wholly unsuccessful (duds) at achieving mates in three subsequent rounds of mating trials. Results. Males from the stud treatment were 30% more successful on average at securing mates than males from the dud treatment. In contrast, we found no difference between treatments in measures of productivity or of longevity when measured in a mixed-sex environment. In the absence of females, however, males in the stud treatment outlived males in the dud treatment. Conclusion. Our results suggest that mating with successful males in this population provides an indirect benefit to females and that, at least in this environment, the benefit arises primarily through the production of more attractive male offspring. However, it is unclear whether this represents solely a traditional sexy sons benefit or whether there is an additional good genes component (with male offspring simply allocating their surplus condition to traits that enhance their mating success). The lack of any detectable differences in female fitness between the two treatments suggests the former, although the longevity advantage of males in the stud treatment when females were absent is consistent with the latter. Determining the effect of this indirect benefit on the evolution of female mate preferences (or resistance) will require comparable data on the direct costs of mating with various males, and an understanding of how these costs and benefits integrate across generations and vary among environments.

  • 24. Seddon, Nathalie
    et al.
    Tobias, Joseph A.
    Eaton, Muir
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Human Vision Can Provide a Valid Proxy for Avian Perception of Sexual Dichromatism2010Ingår i: The AUK: A Quarterly Journal of Ornithology, ISSN 0004-8038, E-ISSN 1938-4254, Vol. 127, nr 2, s. 283-292Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of sexual dichromatism has played an important role in the development and testing of evolutionary theory. However, previous work has often relied on human vision to assess plumage color and contrast, an approach challenged by the finding that dichromatism is often visible to birds but invisible to humans. We explicitly tested whether the use of human vision undermines previous comparative analyses in antbirds (Thamnophilidae). Focusing on a sample of 71 species, we used (1) molecular sequencing of the SWS1 opsin gene to assess spectral sensitivity and (2) spectrophotometry and color discrimination models to compare human and avian perception of dichromatism. We show that antbirds, like the majority of avian families studied to date, are violet-sensitive (VS) rather than ultraviolet-sensitive (UVS). We also demonstrate that species perceived as monochromatic by humans may look dichromatic to antbirds, but that human and avian perceptions of dichromatism are nonetheless positively correlated. To assess whether this relationship validates the assumptions of published comparative analyses, we re-ran the analyses using avian-perceived dichromatism; the results remained qualitatively unchanged. Although it is clear that the use of spectrophotometry and visual models can improve measurements of plumage coloration, we conclude that scores generated from human perception provide a meaningful estimate of sexual dichromatism for the purposes of comparative analyses, at least in antbirds. Furthermore, our results suggest that discrepancies between human and avian perceptions of sexual color differences may be relatively minor in avian families with VS visual systems. Received 7 July 2009, accepted 16 October 2009.

  • 25.
    Segami Marzal, Julia Carolina
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Rudh, Andreas
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Rogell, Björn
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Zool Ecol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Lovlie, Hanne
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Rosher, Charlotte
    Linkoping Univ, IFM Biol, Linkoping, Sweden.;Univ Manchester, Fac Life Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England..
    Qvarnström, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Cryptic female Strawberry poison frogs experience elevated predation risk when associating with an aposematic partner2017Ingår i: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 7, nr 2, s. 744-750Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Population divergence in sexual signals may lead to speciation through prezygotic isolation. Sexual signals can change solely due to variation in the level of natural selection acting against conspicuousness. However, directional mate choice (i.e., favoring conspicuousness) across different environments may lead to gene flow between populations, thereby delaying or even preventing the evolution of reproductive barriers and speciation. In this study, we test whether natural selection through predation upon mate-choosing females can favor corresponding changes in mate preferences. Our study system, Oophaga pumilio, is an extremely color polymorphic neotropical frog with two distinctive antipredator strategies: aposematism and crypsis. The conspicuous coloration and calling behavior of aposematic males may attract both cryptic and aposematic females, but predation may select against cryptic females choosing aposematic males. We used an experimental approach where domestic fowl were encouraged to find digitized images of cryptic frogs at different distances from aposematic partners. We found that the estimated survival time of a cryptic frog was reduced when associating with an aposematic partner. Hence, predation may act as a direct selective force on female choice, favoring evolution of color assortative mating that, in turn, may strengthen the divergence in coloration that natural selection has generated.

  • 26. Zhang, Guojie
    et al.
    Li, Cai
    Li, Qiye
    Li, Bo
    Larkin, Denis M.
    Lee, Chul
    Storz, Jay F.
    Antunes, Agostinho
    Greenwold, Matthew J.
    Meredith, Robert W.
    Ödeen, Anders
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Cui, Jie
    Zhou, Qi
    Xu, Luohao
    Pan, Hailin
    Wang, Zongji
    Jin, Lijun
    Zhang, Pei
    Hu, Haofu
    Yang, Wei
    Hu, Jiang
    Xiao, Jin
    Yang, Zhikai
    Liu, Yang
    Xie, Qiaolin
    Yu, Hao
    Lian, Jinmin
    Wen, Ping
    Zhang, Fang
    Li, Hui
    Zeng, Yongli
    Xiong, Zijun
    Liu, Shiping
    Zhou, Long
    Huang, Zhiyong
    An, Na
    Wang, Jie
    Zheng, Qiumei
    Xiong, Yingqi
    Wang, Guangbiao
    Wang, Bo
    Wang, Jingjing
    Fan, Yu
    da Fonseca, Rute R.
    Alfaro-Nunez, Alonzo
    Schubert, Mikkel
    Orlando, Ludovic
    Mourier, Tobias
    Howard, Jason T.
    Ganapathy, Ganeshkumar
    Pfenning, Andreas
    Whitney, Osceola
    Rivas, Miriam V.
    Hara, Erina
    Smith, Julia
    Farre, Marta
    Narayan, Jitendra
    Slavov, Gancho
    Romanov, Michael N.
    Borges, Rui
    Machado, Joao Paulo
    Khan, Imran
    Springer, Mark S.
    Gatesy, John
    Hoffmann, Federico G.
    Opazo, Juan C.
    Hastad, Olle
    Sawyer, Roger H.
    Kim, Heebal
    Kim, Kyu-Won
    Kim, Hyeon Jeong
    Cho, Seoae
    Li, Ning
    Huang, Yinhua
    Bruford, Michael W.
    Zhan, Xiangjiang
    Dixon, Andrew
    Bertelsen, Mads F.
    Derryberry, Elizabeth
    Warren, Wesley
    Wilson, Richard K.
    Li, Shengbin
    Ray, David A.
    Green, Richard E.
    O'Brien, Stephen J.
    Griffin, Darren
    Johnson, Warren E.
    Haussler, David
    Ryder, Oliver A.
    Willerslev, Eske
    Graves, Gary R.
    Alstroem, Per
    Fjeldsa, Jon
    Mindell, David P.
    Edwards, Scott V.
    Braun, Edward L.
    Rahbek, Carsten
    Burt, David W.
    Houde, Peter
    Zhang, Yong
    Yang, Huanming
    Wang, Jian
    Jarvis, Erich D.
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Wang, Jun
    Comparative genomics reveals insights into avian genome evolution and adaptation2014Ingår i: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 346, nr 6215, s. 1311-1320Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Birds are the most species-rich class of tetrapod vertebrates and have wide relevance across many research fields. We explored bird macroevolution using full genomes from 48 avian species representing all major extant clades. The avian genome is principally characterized by its constrained size, which predominantly arose because of lineage-specific erosion of repetitive elements, large segmental deletions, and gene loss. Avian genomes furthermore show a remarkably high degree of evolutionary stasis at the levels of nucleotide sequence, gene synteny, and chromosomal structure. Despite this pattern of conservation, we detected many non-neutral evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes and noncoding regions. These analyses reveal that pan-avian genomic diversity covaries with adaptations to different lifestyles and convergent evolution of traits.

  • 27.
    Ödeen, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för evolutionsbiologi. Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi. Zooekologi.
    Björklund, Mats
    Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Dynamics in the evolution of sexual traits: losses and gains, radiation and convergence in yellow wagtails (Motacilla flava)2003Ingår i: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 09621083, Vol. 12, nr 8, s. 2113-2130Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyse patterns of genetic diversity and song complexity in the Palaearctic yellow wagtail (Motacilla flava), a highly polytypic species complex. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA show that the complex is polyphyletic, despite parallel plumage variation i

  • 28.
    Ödeen, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Hart, Nathan S.
    School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane.
    Håstad, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysiologi och utvecklingsbiologi, Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Assessing the use of genomic DNA as a predictor of the maximum absorbance wavelength of avian SWS1 opsin visual pigments2009Ingår i: Journal of Comparative Physiology A. Sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology, ISSN 0340-7594, E-ISSN 1432-1351, Vol. 195, nr 2, s. 167-173Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, in vitro mutation studies have made it possible to predict the wavelengths of maximum absorbance (λmax) of avian UV/violet sensitive visual pigments (SWS1) from the identity of a few key amino acid residues in the opsin gene. Given that the absorbance spectrum of a cone's visual pigment and of its pigmented oil droplet can be predicted from just the λmax, it may become possible to predict the entire spectral sensitivity of a bird using genetic samples from live birds or museum specimens. However, whilst this concept is attractive, it must be validated to assess the reliability of the predictions of λmax from opsin amino acid sequences. In this paper, we have obtained partial sequences covering three of the known spectral tuning sites in the SWS1 opsin and predicted λmax of all bird species for which the spectral absorbance has been measured using microspectrophotometry. Our results validate the use of molecular data from genomic DNA to predict the gross differences in λmax between the violet- and ultraviolet-sensitive subtypes of SWS1 opsin. Additionally, we demonstrate that a bird, the bobolink Dolichonyx oryzivorus L., can have more than one SWS1 visual pigment in its retina.

  • 29.
    Ödeen, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Håstad, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysiologi och utvecklingsbiologi, Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    New Primers for the Avian SWS1 Pigment Opsin Gene Reveal New Amino Acid Configurations in Spectral Sensitivity Tuning Sites2009Ingår i: Journal of Heredity, ISSN 0022-1503, E-ISSN 1465-7333, Vol. 100, nr 6, s. 784-789Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, polymerase chain reaction-based estimates of visual pigment spectral tuning from genomic DNA have offered an alternative to the authoritative but rather slow and complicated retinal microspectrophotometry method. The genomic DNA method involves sequencing a fragment of the short-wavelength sensitive pigment, type 1 (SWS1) opsin gene covering amino acid positions 86, 90, and 93 and has been utilized in a wide range of avian species. Other key tuning sites have been proposed but not sequenced in the genomic DNA-based spectral sensitivity studies. We have designed 5 new primers for sequencing gene fragments of the ultraviolet-/violet-tuned SWS1 opsin gene containing the first, second and third, and sixth and seventh α-helical transmembrane regions and the spectral tuning sites 49, 86, 90, 93, 116, 118 and 298. Testing these primers on various bird species reveals some novel combinations of amino acid residues at the tuning sites. The potential significance of these on spectral tuning is discussed.

  • 30.
    Ödeen, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Håstad, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysiologi och utvecklingsbiologi, Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Pollinating birds differ in spectral sensitivity2010Ingår i: Journal of Comparative Physiology A. Sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology, ISSN 0340-7594, E-ISSN 1432-1351, Vol. 196, nr 2, s. 91-96Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Pollinating animals and their angiosperm hosts often show strong co-adaptation in traits that increase the likelihood of a successful transfer of pollen and nutrient rewards. One such adaptation is the reported colour difference caused by unequal distribution of anthocyanidin pigments amongst plant species visited by hummingbirds and passerines. This phenomenon has been suggested to reflect possible differences in the colour vision of these pollinating birds. The presence of any such difference in colour vision would arguably affect the ecological and evolutionary interactions between flowers and their visitors, accentuating differences in floral displays and attractiveness of plants to the favoured avian pollinators. We have tested for differences in colour vision, as indicated by the amino acid present at certain key positions in the short-wavelength-sensitive type 1 (SWS1) visual pigment opsin, between the major groups of pollinating birds: the non-passerine Trochilidae (hummingbirds), the passerine Meliphagidae (honeyeaters) and Nectariniidae (sunbirds) plus five other Passerida passerine families. The results reveal gross spectral sensitivity differences between hummingbirds and honeyeaters, on the one hand, and the Passerida species, on the other.

  • 31.
    Ödeen, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Håstad, Olle
    Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    The phylogenetic distribution of ultraviolet sensitivity in birds2013Ingår i: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 13, s. 36-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Colour vision in birds can be categorized into two classes, the ultraviolet (UVS) and violet sensitive (VS). Their phylogenetic distributions have traditionally been regarded as highly conserved. However, the complicated nature of acquiring spectral sensitivities from cone photoreceptors meant that until recently, only a few species had actually been studied. Whether birds are UVS or VS can nowadays be inferred from a wide range of species via genomic sequencing of the UV/violet SWS1 cone opsin gene. Results: We present genomic sequencing results of the SWS1 gene from 21 avian orders. Amino acid residues signifying UV sensitivity are found in the two most important spectral tuning sites 86 and 90 of Pteroclidiformes and Coraciiformes, in addition to the major clades, Palaeognathae, Charadriiformes, Trogoniformes, Psittaciformes and Passeriformes, where they where previously known to occur. We confirm that the presumed UVS-conferring amino acid combination F86, C90 and M93 is common to Palaeognathae and unique to this clade, despite available spectrometric evidence showing the ostrich retina to be VS. Conclusions: By mapping our results together with data from previous studies on a molecular phylogeny we show that avian colour vision shifted between VS and UVS at least 14 times. Single nucleotide substitutions can explain all these shifts. The common ancestor of birds most likely had a VS phenotype. However, the ancestral state of the avian SWS1 opsin's spectral tuning sites cannot be resolved, since the Palaeognathae are F86, C90 while the Neognathae are ancestrally S86, S90. The phylogenetic distribution of UVS and VS colour vision in birds is so complex that inferences of spectral sensitivities from closely related taxa should be used with caution.

  • 32.
    Ödeen, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Håstad, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för fysiologi och utvecklingsbiologi, Evolutionär organismbiologi.
    Alström, Per
    Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Swedish Museum of Natural History.
    Evolution of ultraviolet vision in shorebirds (Charadriiformes)2010Ingår i: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 6, nr 3, s. 370-374Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Diurnal birds belong to one of two classes of colour vision. These are distinguished by the maximum absorbance wavelengths of the SWS1 visual pigment sensitive to violet (VS) and ultraviolet (UVS). Shifts between the classes have been rare events during avian evolution. Gulls (Laridae) are the only shorebirds (Charadriiformes) previously reported to have the UVS type of opsin, but too few species have been sampled to infer that gulls are unique among shorebirds or that Laridae is monomorphic for this trait. We have sequenced the SWS1 opsin gene in a broader sample of species. We confirm that cysteine in the key amino acid position 90, characteristic of the UVS class, has been conserved throughout gull evolution but also that the terns Anous minutus, A. tenuirostris and Gygis alba, and the skimmer Rynchops niger carry this trait. Terns, excluding Anous and Gygis, share the VS conferring serine in position 90 with other shorebirds but it is translated from a codon more similar to that found in UVS shorebirds. The most parsimonious interpretation of these findings, based on a molecular gene tree, is a single VS to UVS shift and a subsequent reversal in one lineage.

  • 33.
    Ödeen, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Håstad, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi.
    Alström, Per
    Evolution of ultraviolet vision in the largest avian radiation: the passerines2011Ingår i: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 11, s. 313-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interspecific variation in avian colour vision falls into two discrete classes: violet sensitive (VS) and ultraviolet sensitive (UVS). They are characterised by the spectral sensitivity of the most shortwave sensitive of the four single cones, the SWS1, which is seemingly under direct control of as little as one amino acid substitution in the cone opsin protein. Changes in spectral sensitivity of the SWS1 are ecologically important, as they affect the abilities of birds to accurately assess potential mates, find food and minimise visibility of social signals to predators. Still, available data have indicated that shifts between classes are rare, with only four to five independent acquisitions of UV sensitivity in avian evolution. Results: We have classified a large sample of passeriform species as VS or UVS from genomic DNA and mapped the evolution of this character on a passerine phylogeny inferred from published molecular sequence data. Sequencing a small gene fragment has allowed us to trace the trait changing from one stable state to another through the radiation of the passeriform birds. Their ancestor is hypothesised to be UVS. In the subsequent radiation, colour vision changed between UVS and VS at least eight times. Conclusions: The phylogenetic distribution of SWS1 cone opsin types in Passeriformes reveals a much higher degree of complexity in avian colour vision evolution than what was previously indicated from the limited data available. Clades with variation in the colour vision system are nested among clades with a seemingly stable VS or UVS state, providing a rare opportunity to understand how an ecologically important trait under simple genetic control may co-evolve with, and be stabilised by, associated traits in a character complex.

  • 34.
    Ödeen, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution, Zooekologi.
    Moray, Clea M.
    Drosophila melanogaster virgins are more likely to mate with strangers than familiar flies2008Ingår i: Die Naturwissenschaften, ISSN 0028-1042, E-ISSN 1432-1904, Vol. 95, nr 3, s. 253-256Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent evidence shows that females of many species can discriminate against males and/or male phenotypes they have mated with previously. However, these studies have not tested whether actual mating is necessary to induce the avoidance behaviour. A preference for strangers may have evolved because it avoids multiple matings with similar genotypes. Alternatively, there may be selection against mating with familiar individuals directly. By choosing its first mate among unfamiliar individuals (which are less likely close relatives than are those encountered early in life), a virgin might disentangle some of the potential benefits of avoiding genetic incompatibility and inbreeding in the offspring from the costs of remating. In this study, we test whether Drosophila melanogaster flies bias their mate choice towards strangers according to previous, non-copulatory, experience. Based on 173 trials over 12 weeks, virgin females presented with two virgin males were 59% more likely to mate with a novel male than the one which she had been housed with for 8 h the day before. Hence we present the first report showing that a dipteran can distinguish between previously encountered and not previously encountered conspecifics.

  • 35.
    Ödeen, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för ekologi och genetik, Zooekologi.
    Pruett-Jones, Stephen
    Driskell, Amy C.
    Armenta, Jessica K.
    Håstad, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Biologiska sektionen, Institutionen för organismbiologi, Evolution och utvecklingsbiologi.
    Multiple shifts between violet and ultraviolet vision in a family of passerine birds with associated changes in plumage coloration2012Ingår i: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 279, nr 1732, s. 1269-1276Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Colour vision in diurnal birds falls into two discrete classes, signified by the spectral sensitivity of the violet- (VS) or ultraviolet-sensitive (UVS) short wavelength-sensitive type 1 (SWS1) single cone. Shifts between sensitivity classes are rare; three or four are believed to have happened in the course of avian evolution, one forming UVS higher passerines. Such shifts probably affect the expression of shortwave-dominated plumage signals. We have used genomic DNA sequencing to determine VS or UVS affinity in fairy-wrens and allies, Maluridae, a large passerine family basal to the known UVS taxa. We have also spectrophotometrically analysed male plumage coloration as perceived by the VS and UVS vision systems. Contrary to any other investigated avian genus, Malurus (fairy-wrens) contains species with amino acid residues typical of either VS or UVS cone opsins. Three bowerbird species (Ptilonorhynchidae) sequenced for outgroup comparison carry VS opsin genes. Phylogenetic reconstructions render one UVS gain followed by one or more losses as the most plausible evolutionary scenario. The evolution of avian ultraviolet sensitivity is hence more complex, as a single shift no longer explains its distribution in Passeriformes. Character correlation analysis proposes that UVS vision is associated with shortwave-reflecting plumage, which is widespread in Maluridae.

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