uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bodén, Robert
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Rautaharju, Pentti
    Wake Forest Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Winston Salem, NC 27109 USA.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Electrocardiographic signs of autonomic imbalance in medicated patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders: relations to first treatment discontinuation and five-year remission status2012In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 213-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE:

    To explore measures in electrocardiograms (ECG) influenced by autonomic balance in early schizophrenia spectrum disorders and to examine their relation to subsequent first antipsychotic pharmacotherapy discontinuation and five-year remission status.

    SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

    Twelve-lead ECGs were recorded at baseline in 58 patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders and in 47 healthy controls of similar age. Selected ECG variables included heart rate and measures of repolarization. Pharmacotherapy data were extracted from medical records. At a five-year follow-up the patients were interviewed and assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale.

    RESULTS:

    Patients had higher heart rate and a different ST-T pattern than the controls. High T-wave amplitudes in the leads aVF and V5 and ST-elevations in V5 were associated both with higher risk of an earlier discontinuation of first antipsychotic pharmacotherapy and with non-remission five years later.

    DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION:

    In this longitudinal cohort study, simple ECG measures influenced by autonomic balance in the early phase of schizophrenia spectrum disorders contained prognostic information. As this is the first report of this association and is based on a relatively small sample, the results should be interpreted with caution.

  • 2.
    Ersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Klanger, Ann Rydberg
    Wallsten, Tuula
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Nilsson, Kent W
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Psykiatri Ulleråker.
    Ätstörningar och ADHD kan ha samband: Hetsätning kan lindra ADHD-symtom, centralstimulantia ger god hjälp2007In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 104, no 18, p. 1402-1405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [Possible connection between eating disorders and ADHD. Bulimia can relieve ADHD symptoms, central nervous stimulants are of good help]

    In Sweden the risk for female Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa is estimated to 1%. Females have ten times higher prevalence than males. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on the contrary has a male 2-3 times dominante. Among adults aprox. 3% has ADHD. ADHD is complex with at least one major associated psychiatric diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether clinical findings, not just related to Eating Disorder (ED), could match ADHD as a co-existing diagnosis, as well as to follow the patients the first months after treatment with Methylfenidate had been induced. Five patients, one male and four females, age 18-43, with a history of Eating Disorder (ED) of 5-35 years, were clinically described with DSM-IV diagnoses, treatment regimen and therapeutic outcome. They suffered from disability in normal social functioning, i.e. education, professional career and family life. All of them had symptoms matching ADHD. In this case report the assumtion is made that treatment with Methylfenidate lead to an decrease of ADHD-symptoms as well as typical ED-symptoms, better social functioning and increased quality of life.

  • 3. Hashimoto, Kenji
    et al.
    Engberg, Göran
    Shimizu, Eiji
    Nordin, Conny
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Iyo, Masaomi
    Reduced D-serine to total serine ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid of drug naive schizophrenic patients.2005In: Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry, ISSN 0278-5846, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 767-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Lindström, Leif
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lindström, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Swedish Agcy Hlth Technol Assessment & Assessment, Stockholm, Sweden.;Malmo Univ, Fac Odontol, Hlth Technol Assessment, Malmo, Sweden..
    Hoistad, Malin
    Swedish Agcy Hlth Technol Assessment & Assessment, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Med Management Ctr, LIME, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Maintenance therapy with second generation antipsychotics for bipolar disorder - A systematic review and meta-analysis2017In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 213, p. 138-150Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Second generations antipsychotics (SGA) are frequently used for maintenance treatment in bipolar disorder. We systematically reviewed the efficacy and long-term effects of treatment with SGA, regardless of treatment strategy (SGA administered either as monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy), in comparison to placebo, lithium or valproate. Primary outcomes were relapses (mood episode recurrence) and discontinuation. Method: Clinical studies were identified through database searching in PubMed, Embase, PsychInfo and Cochrane Library and critically appraised based on the Cochrane Handbook. Full data extraction of raw data was performed and analyzed with meta-analyses, and level of evidence graded using GRADE. Only randomized controlled studies (RCT) and observational studies were included, with a minimum follow-up of 6 months. Comparators used were restricted to placebo, lithium, valproate or other anti-epileptic drugs. Results: We identified 15 RCTs on SGA in bipolar disorder with follow-up-time of 6 months up to 2 years, and one observational study reporting long-term effects of up to 4 years. A total of 6142 patients were included in the randomized trials. No long-term RCTs beyond 2 years follow-up was identified. All RCTs except for one included patients with bipolar disorder type I only. All RCTs except for two included patients pre-stabilized on the drug under investigation prior to randomization (enrichment design). For SGA as adjunctive therapy to lithium or valproate, meta-analyses showed that treatment with either aripiprazole (RR: 0.65, 95% CI 0.50-0.85), quetiapine (RR: 0.38, 95% CI 0.32-0.46) or ziprasidone (RR: 0.62, 95% CI 0.40-0.96) reduced the overall risk of relapses in patients that had responded during the stabilization phase. Adjunctive therapy with quetiapine was the only drug that reduced both manic and depressive episodes. For SGA as monotherapy, only quetiapine was shown to be better than lithium/ valproate for both manic and depressive relapses, but only for patients stabilized on quetiapine during the acute phase. As monotherapy, olanzapine, quetiapine and risperidone were shown to be superior to placebo in reducing the overall risk of relapses. Limitations: There were considerable limitations to the evidence base of maintenance treatment with SGA in bipolar disorder. Most studies used stabilized patients, i.e. enrichment design (selection bias), had considerable dropout levels (attrition bias), and variable degree of reporting bias. No long-term RCT data on efficacy is available beyond 2 years, and almost all studies are on bipolar disorder type I patients only. Despite these limitations, we elucidate quantitative findings from meta-analyses conducted on the randomized trials published on the topic.

  • 5.
    Loof, L
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Leppert, J
    Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Bergkvist, L
    Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Lindstrom, L
    Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Sorensen, S
    Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Tegelberg, A
    Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Tuvemo, T
    Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    [Clinical research and continuing education on county hospital level.Experiences with cooperation between health care and academies]2002In: Läkartidningen, Vol. 99, no 46, p. 4624-Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 6.
    Neider, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lindström, Leif H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Boden, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Risk factors for suicide among patients with schizophrenia: a cohort study focused on cerebrospinal fluid levels of homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid2016In: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, ISSN 1176-6328, E-ISSN 1178-2021, Vol. 12, p. 1711-1714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), bullying, and later suicide among patients with schizophrenia. Methods: Ninety-nine patients with schizophrenia were included. Correlations of clinical factors, 5-HIAA and HVA, and later suicide were investigated. Results: Twelve patients committed suicide (12%) during a 28-year follow-up period. Later suicide was correlated to bullying in childhood (P=0.02) and a lower quotient of HVA/5-HIAA in CSF (P<0.05). Conclusion: Suicide in schizophrenia is related to childhood exposedness and CSF neurotransmitter levels.

  • 7.
    Nillson, Kent W.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Sjöberg, Rickard L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Damberg, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Alm, Per Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Öhrvik, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leppert, Jerzy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Role of the Serotonin Transporter Gene and Family Function in Adolescent Alcohol Consumption2005In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 564-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: That the extent to which a particular individual will engage in problematic behaviors such as delinquency, violence, or drug abuse is determined by the way psychosocial, situational, and hereditary factors interact is widely accepted. However, only recently have researchers begun to investigate the interactions between specific genotypes and psychosocial factors in relation to behavior. The purpose of the present study was to investigate possible interactions between a polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene and family relations on adolescent alcohol consumption.

    Methods: A cross-sectional study with a randomized sample from a total population of 16- and 19-year-old adolescents from a Swedish county was conducted. Eighty-one male and 119 female adolescents, who volunteered to participate after having answered a questionnaire, were randomly selected from quartiles of volunteers representing various degrees of psychosocial risk behavior.

    Results: 5-HTT genotype (p= 0.029) and family relations (p= 0.022) predicted alcohol consumption independently as well as through an interaction with one another (p= 0.05). The model explained 11% of the variance in alcohol consumption. In a binary logistic model, we found that adolescents with the LS variant of the 5-HTT gene and with family relations being “neutral” or “bad” had a 12- to 14-fold increased risk for high intoxication frequency.

    Conclusions: In sum, our results show that a functional polymorphism of the 5-HTT genotype, family relations, and interactions between these variables predict adolescent alcohol consumption in a randomized sample of adolescents.

  • 8.
    Nillson, Kent W.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Sjöberg, Rickard L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Damberg, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Leppert, Jerzy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Öhrvik, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Alm, Per Olof
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Role of Monoamine Oxidase A Genotype and Psychosocial Factors in Male Adolescent Criminal Activity2006In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 2, no 59, p. 121-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    A number of important sociological, psychological, and biological predictors of adolescent criminal behavior have been identified during the most recent decades. The aim of this study was to replicate recent findings that interactions between a polymorphism in the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) gene promoter region and psychosocial factors might predict male adolescent criminal activity.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional study with a randomized sample from the total population of 16- and 19-year-olds from the county of Västmanland, Sweden. Eighty-one male adolescents, who volunteered to participate, were randomly selected from groups representing different degrees of deviant risk behavior.

    Results

    The present study strongly supports the notion that carrying the 3-repeat allele of the MAO-A–gene promoter increases the risk of male adolescent criminal behavior, when interacting with psychosocial factors. No effects at all of the MAO-A genotype on adolescent criminal activity were found when MAO-A genotype was considered alone (i.e., without its psychosocial context). The explained variance of the bio-psychosocial model (controlling for MAO-A) in this study exceeded the psychosocial model by 12%.

    Conclusions

    The findings support the notion that genotype and psychosocial factors interact to precipitate male adolescent criminal behavior.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Edström, Oscar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wernegren, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bodén, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Tachycardia in Patients Treated with Clozapine versus Antipsychotic Long-Acting Injections2017In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 81, no 10 S, p. S408-S409Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Nilsson, Björn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bodén, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Persistent Clozapine Associated Tachycardia Investigated with 24 Hour Ambulatory Electrocardiogram2017In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 81, no 10, p. S408-S408Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Nilsson, Björn M.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Edström, Oscar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Wernegren, Petter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Bodén, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Tachycardia in patients treated with clozapine versus antipsychotic long-acting injections2017In: International Clinical Psychopharmacology, ISSN 0268-1315, E-ISSN 1473-5857, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 219-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tachycardia is a known adverse effect during clozapine treatment. However, prevalence reported differs widely between studies and hitherto there are no studies comparing clozapine-treated patients with a similar control group. The present study was carried out to assess the prevalence of tachycardia in patients treated with clozapine and antipsychotic long-acting injections (LAI). Data on heart rate (HR), concomitant medication, and relevant anthropometric and laboratory measurements were collected for all clozapine-treated patients (n=174) in a defined catchment area and compared with data on patients treated with LAI (n=87). In total, 33% of patients on long-term clozapine treatment had tachycardia (HR>100) compared with 16% in the LAI group (P<0.001). The mean HR was 91 in the clozapine group and 82 in the LAI group (P<0.001). Clozapine dose correlated with HR. The majority of patients with HR more than 100 received no specific treatment for tachycardia. In conclusion, the prevalence of tachycardia was twice as high in patients treated with clozapine as in a similar patient group with severe schizophrenia spectrum disorder. The tachycardia was in many cases clinically unnoticed. Tachycardia during antipsychotic treatment is a common phenomenon that must be monitored for actively and, when noticed, further investigated and treated.

  • 12.
    Nilsson, Kent W.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Sjöberg, Rickard L.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Wargelius, Hanna-Linn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Leppert, Jerzy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    The monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) gene, family function and maltreatment as predictors of destructive behaviour during male adolescent alcohol consumption2007In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 389-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate possible interactions between a polymorphism in the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) gene promoter, family relations and maltreatment/sexual abuse on adolescent alcohol-related problem behaviour among male adolescents. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional study of a randomized sample of 66 male individuals from a total population of 16- and 19-year adolescents from a Swedish county. Boys, who volunteered to participate answering an alcohol-related problem/behaviour questionnaire, were investigated with regard to interactions between such problems, family function, maltreatment and MAO-A genotype. MEASUREMENTS: MAO-A genotype, family relations history, history of being maltreated or abused and alcohol-related problem behaviour. FINDINGS: Boys with the short (three-repeat) variant of the MAO-A gene, who had been maltreated/abused or came from families with poor relations, showed significantly higher scores of alcohol-related problems. We also found that maltreatment/abuse independently showed the strongest relation to alcohol-related problems among boys in our model. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that both maltreatment and MAO-A genotype may be useful for the understanding of male adolescent alcohol-related problem behaviour.

  • 13. Nilsson, L K
    et al.
    Linderholm, K R
    Engberg, G
    Paulson, L
    Blennow, K
    Lindström, L
    Uppsala University, Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Nordin, C
    Karanti, A
    Persson, P
    Erhardt, S
    Elevated levels of kynurenic acid in the cerebrospinal fluid of male patients with schizophrenia.2005In: Schizophr Res, ISSN 0920-9964, Vol. 80, no 2-3, p. 315-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Severance, Emily G.
    et al.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Pediat, Stanley Div Dev Neurovirol, 600 North Wolfe St,Blalock 1105, Baltimore, MD 21287 USA..
    Tveiten, Dag
    Lab1, Leif Tronstads Pl, Sandvika, Norway..
    Lindström, Leif H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Yolken, Robert H.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Pediat, Stanley Div Dev Neurovirol, 600 North Wolfe St,Blalock 1105, Baltimore, MD 21287 USA..
    Reichelt, Karl L.
    Univ Oslo, Kleve 4541, Oslo, Norway..
    The Gut Microbiota and the Emergence of Autoimmunity: Relevance to Major Psychiatric Disorders2016In: Current pharmaceutical design, ISSN 1381-6128, E-ISSN 1873-4286, Vol. 22, no 40, p. 6076-6086Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Autoimmune phenotypes are prevalent in major psychiatric disorders. Disequilibria of cellular processes occurring in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract likely contribute to immune dysfunction in psychiatric disorders. As the venue of a complex community of resident microbes, the gut in a homeostatic state equates with a functional digestive system, cellular barrier stability and properly regulated recognition of self and non-self antigens. When gut processes become disrupted as a result of environmental or genetic factors, autoimmunity may ensue. Methods: Here, we review the issues pertinent to autoimmunity and the microbiome in psychiatric disorders and show that many of the reported immune risk factors for the development of these brain disorders are in fact related and consistent with dysfunctions occurring in the gut. We review the few human microbiome studies that have been done in people with psychiatric disorders and supplement this information with mechanistic data gleaned from experimental rodent studies. Results: These investigations demonstrate changes in behavior and brain biochemistry directly attributable to alterations in the gut microbiome. We present a model by which autoantigens are produced by extrinsically-derived food and microbial factors bound to intrinsic components of the gut including receptors present in the enteric nervous system. Conclusion: This new focus on examining activities outside of the CNS for relevance to the etiology and pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders may require new modalities or a re-evaluation of pharmaceutical targets found in peripheral systems.

  • 15.
    Sjöberg, Rickard L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Nilsson, Kent W.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Nordquist, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Öhrvik, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leppert, Jerzy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Development of depression: sex and the interaction between environment and a promoter polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene2006In: International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 1461-1457, E-ISSN 1469-5111, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 443-449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has demonstrated that a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and adverse psychosocial circumstances interact to predict depression. The purpose of the present study was to explore the extent to which sex modulates these effects. Eighty-one boys and 119 girls (16-19 years old) were interviewed about psychosocial background variables and genotyped for the 5-HTT promoter polymorphism. There were two main results. First, boys and girls carrying the short 5-HTTLPR allele react to different kinds of environmental factors. Whereas males were affected by living in public housing rather than in own owned homes and by living with separated parents, females were affected by traumatic conflicts within the family. Second, the responses of males and females carrying the short 5-HTTLPR allele to environmental stress factors go in opposite directions. Thus, whereas females tend to develop depressive symptoms, males seem to be protected from depression. The results suggest that both the molecular and the psychosocial mechanisms underlying depression may differ between boys and girls.

  • 16.
    Sjöberg, Rickard L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Nilsson, Kent W.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Wargelius, Hanna-Linn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Leppert, Jerzy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Lindström, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Oreland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Adolescent girls and criminal activity: Role of MAOA-LPR genotype and psychosocial factors2007In: American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, ISSN 1552-4841, E-ISSN 1552-485X, Vol. 144, no 2, p. 159-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent findings among boys show that interactions between a polymorphism in the monoamine oxidase A gene promoter region (MAOA-LPR) and psychosocial factors predict criminal activity. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this finding could be extended to adolescent girls. One hundred nineteen female adolescents were recruited among respondents to a cross-sectional study of the total population of 16- and 19-year old girls. These girls constituted a randomly selected sub-sample from groups representing different degrees of risk behavior. The subjects filled in a questionnaire and were interviewed and genotyped with regard to MAOA-LPR. The results indicate that the long, (4-repeat) allele confer an increased risk for criminal behavior in the presence of psychosocial risk. Among girls without social risk, MAOA-LPR genotype was of no importance for criminal behavior. The present results suggest that previous observations on adolescent males, which demonstrate that the short MAOA-LPR genotype and psychosocial adversity interact to predict criminal activity, may not be applicable to females.

  • 17.
    Stålberg, Gabriella
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Lindström, Leif H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Larhammar, Dan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Bodén, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Neuropeptide Y, social function and long-term outcome in schizophrenia2014In: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509, Vol. 156, no 2-3, p. 223-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of biomarkers in schizophrenia and the mechanisms underlying the observed deficits in social functioning are poorly understood. This cohort study aimed to explore whether neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with schizophrenia is correlated to social function and clinical variables. A further aim was to determine whether baseline levels of NPY were associated with subsequent 3-year outcome. Fifty-six consecutively admitted patients with schizophrenia were included and underwent lumbar puncture and symptom ratings before antipsychotic treatment. NPY levels in CSF were determined by radioimmunoassay. Social function (Social Competence and Social Interest) was assessed by Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation while psychiatric symptoms were rated using the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale. Three-year outcome was assessed with the Strauss–Carpenter Outcome Scale. Cross-sectional analysis showed a correlation between level of NPY and Social Competence at index admission (rs = 0.37, p < 0.05). The longitudinal analysis (i.e. at the 3-year follow-up) indicated that, for each standard deviation increase in baseline NPY, there was an increased risk of being unemployed (odds ratio [OR] 2.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07–3.82), having moderate or severe symptoms (OR 3.09, CI 1.30–7.32) or being hospitalized at least 6 months the previous year (OR 3.24, CI 1.09–9.64). However, NPY was not correlated to Social Interest or clinical variables at index admission. In conclusion, NPY levels in CSF are correlated to Social Competence and seem to predict some aspects of longitudinal outcome in schizophrenia.

  • 18.
    Wiesel, F-A
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Enh för psykiatri, Ulleråker.
    Cullberg, J
    Farde, L
    Jarbin, H
    Lindström, E
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Enh för psykiatri, Ulleråker.
    Lindström, L
    Wieselgren, I-M
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Enh för psykiatri, Ulleråker.
    Vård och stöd till patienter med schizofreni - en kunskapsöverskt2003Other (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
1 - 18 of 18
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf