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  • 1. Bergman, E
    et al.
    Lundahl, A
    Forsell, P
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knutson, L
    Lennernäs, H
    The effect of gemfibrozil on the biliary excretion of rosuvastatin in pig and man2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2. Bergman, E
    et al.
    Lundahl, A
    Forsell, P
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knutson, L
    Lennernäs, H
    The hepatobiliary disposition of rosuvastatin in pigs and the impact of concomitant dosing with cyclosporine.2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3. Bergman, E
    et al.
    Sjödin, E
    Forsell, P
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knutson, L
    Lennernäs, H
    The biliary excretion of rosuvastatin and gemfibrozil in healthy humans2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4. Bergman, E
    et al.
    Sjödin, E
    Forsell, P
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knutson, L
    Lennernäs, H
    The biliary excretion of rosuvastatin and gemfibrozil in healthy humans2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bergman, Ebba
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Forsell, Patrik
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Tevell, Annica
    Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Persson, Eva M
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Knutson, Lars
    Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Lennernäs, Hans
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Biliary secretion of rosuvastatin and bile acids in humans during the absorption phase.2006In: Eur J Pharm Sci, ISSN 0928-0987, Vol. 29, no 3-4, p. 205-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Bjornstad, Kristian
    et al.
    Åberg, Annica Tevell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Kalb, Suzanne R.
    Wang, Dongxia
    Barr, John R.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Validation of the Endopep-MS method for qualitative detection of active botulinum neurotoxins in human and chicken serum2014In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 406, no 28, p. 7149-7161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly toxic proteases produced by anaerobic bacteria. Traditionally, a mouse bioassay (MBA) has been used for detection of BoNTs, but for a long time, laboratories have worked with alternative methods for their detection. One of the most promising in vitro methods is a combination of an enzymatic and mass spectrometric assay called Endopep-MS. However, no comprehensive validation of the method has been presented. The main purpose of this work was to perform a validation for the qualitative analysis of BoNT-A, B, C, C/D, D, D/C, and F in serum. The limit of detection (LOD), selectivity, precision, stability in matrix and solution, and correlation with the MBA were evaluated. The LOD was equal to or even better than that of the MBA for BoNT-A, B, D/C, E, and F. Furthermore, Endopep-MS was for the first time successfully used to differentiate between BoNT-C and D and their mosaics C/D and D/C by different combinations of antibodies and target peptides. In addition, sequential antibody capture was presented as a new way to multiplex the method when only a small sample volume is available. In the comparison with the MBA, all the samples analyzed were positive for BoNT-C/D with both methods. These results indicate that the Endopep-MS method is a valid alternative to the MBA as the gold standard for BoNT detection based on its sensitivity, selectivity, and speed and that it does not require experimental animals.

  • 7.
    Carlsson, Y
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Hedeland, M
    Bondesson, U
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Pettersson, C
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Non-aqueous capillary electrophoretic separation of enantiomeric amineswith (-)-2,3:4,6-di-O-isopropylidene-2-keto-L-gulonic acid as chiralcounter ion.2001In: J Chromatogr A, Vol. 922, p. 303-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Carlsson, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Curt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Non-aquoeus capillary electrophoretic separation of enantiomeric amines with (-)-2,3:4,6-di-O-isopropylidene-2-keto-L-gulonic acid as chiral counter ion2001In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, Vol. 922, no 1-2, p. 303-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    (2)-2,3:4,6-Di-O-isopropylidene-2-keto-L-gulonic acid [(2)-DIKGA] has been introduced as a chiral counter ion innon-aqueous capillary electrophoresis. High enantioresolutions (R $3) were obtained for amines, e.g., pronethalol, labetalol Sand bambuterol. Methanol containing NaOH and (2)-DIKGA was used as the background electrolyte. The counter ionconcentration and the nature of the injection medium were found to affect the chiral separation. Covalent coating of thefused-silica capillary reduced the electro-osmotic flow resulting in improved enantioresolutions.

  • 9.
    Dubbelboer, Ilse R
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Lilienberg, Elsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Piquette-Miller, Micheline
    Sjögren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Lennernäs, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    The Effects of Lipiodol and Cyclosporin A on the Hepatobiliary Disposition of Doxorubicin in Pigs2014In: Molecular Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1543-8384, E-ISSN 1543-8392, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 1301-1313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Doxorubicin (DOX) emulsified in Lipiodol (LIP) is used as local palliative treatment for unresectable intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma. The objective of this study was to examine the poorly understood effects of the main excipient in the drug delivery system, LIP, alone or together with cyclosporin A (CsA), on the in vivo liver disposition of DOX. The advanced, multi-sampling-site, acute pig model was used; samples were collected from three blood vessels (v. portae, v. hepatica and v. femoralis), bile and urine. The four treatment groups (TI-TIV) all received two intravenous 5 min infusions of DOX into an ear vein: at 0 and 200 min. Before the second dose, the pigs received a portal vein infusion of saline (TI), LIP (TII), CsA (TIII) or LIP and CsA (TIV). Concentrations of DOX and its active metabolite doxorubicinol (DOXol) were analyzed using UPLC-MS/MS. A multi-compartment model was developed to describe the distribution of DOX and DOXol in plasma, bile and urine. LIP did not affect the pharmacokinetics of DOX or DOXol. CsA (TIII and TIV) had no effect on the plasma pharmacokinetics of DOX, but a 2-fold increase in exposure to DOXol and a significant decrease in hepatobiliary clearance of DOX and DOXol was observed. Model simulations supported that CsA inhibits 99% of canalicular biliary secretion of both DOX and DOXol, but does not affect the metabolism of DOX to DOXol. In conclusion, LIP did not interact with transporters, enzymes and/or biological membranes important for the hepatobiliary disposition of DOX.

  • 10.
    Dubbelboer, Ilse R
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Lilienberg, Elsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Karalli, Amar
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Radiol, Stockholm.; Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm.
    Axelsson, Rimma
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Radiol, Stockholm.; Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm.
    Brismar, Torkel B
    Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Radiol, Stockholm.; Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLINTEC, Stockholm.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Norén, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Duraj, Frans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Mikael, Hedeland
    Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, Uppsala.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, Uppsala.
    Sjögren, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Stål, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Internal Med Huddinge, Unit Gastroenterol, Stockholm.; Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Dept Digest Dis, Stockholm.
    Nyman, Rickard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lennernäs, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Reply to "Comment on 'In Vivo Drug Delivery Performance of Lipiodol-Based Emulsion or Drug-Eluting Beads in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma'"2018In: Molecular Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1543-8384, E-ISSN 1543-8392, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 336-340Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Ekstrand, C.
    et al.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Gabrielsson, J.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Kallings, P.
    Olsen, L.
    Ingvast-Larsson, C.
    Plasma concentration-dependent suppression of endogenous hydrocortisone in the horse after intramuscular administration of dexamethasone-21-isonicotinate2015In: Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0140-7783, E-ISSN 1365-2885, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 235-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection times and screening limits (SL) are methods used to ensure that the performance of horses in equestrian sports is not altered by drugs. Drug concentration-response relationship and knowledge of concentration-time profiles in both plasma and urine are required. In this study, dexamethasone plasma and urine concentration-time profiles were investigated. Endogenous hydrocortisone plasma concentrations and their relationship to dexamethasone plasma concentrations were also explored. A single dose of dexamethasone-21-isonicotinate suspension (0.03mg/kg) was administered intramuscularly to six horses. Plasma was analysed for dexamethasone and hydrocortisone and urine for dexamethasone, using UPLC-MS/MS. Dexamethasone was quantifiable in plasma for 8.3 +/- 2.9days (LLOQ: 0.025g/L) and in urine for 9.8 +/- 3.1days (LLOQ: 0.15g/L). Maximum observed dexamethasone concentration in plasma was 0.61 +/- 0.12g/L and in urine 4.2 +/- 0.9g/L. Terminal plasma half-life was 38.7 +/- 19h. Hydrocortisone was significantly suppressed for 140h. The plasma half-life of hydrocortisone was 2.7 +/- 1.3h. Dexamethasone potency, efficacy and sigmoidicity factor for hydrocortisone suppression were 0.06 +/- 0.04g/L, 0.95 +/- 0.04 and 6.2 +/- 4.6, respectively. Hydrocortisone suppression relates to the plasma concentration of dexamethasone. Thus, determination of irrelevant plasma concentrations and SL is possible. Future research will determine whether hydrocortisone suppression can be used as a biomarker of the clinical effect of dexamethasone.

  • 12.
    Ekstrand, C.
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, Div Pharmacol & Toxicol, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Ingvast-Larsson, C.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, Div Pharmacol & Toxicol, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Olsen, L.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, Div Pharmacol & Toxicol, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Gabrielsson, J.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Biomed Sci & Vet Publ Hlth, Div Pharmacol & Toxicol, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    A quantitative approach to analysing cortisol response in the horse2016In: Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, ISSN 0140-7783, E-ISSN 1365-2885, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 255-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cortisol response to glucocorticoid intervention has, in spite of several studies in horses, not been fully characterized with regard to the determinants of onset, intensity and duration of response. Therefore, dexamethasone and cortisol response data were collected in a study applying a constant rate infusion regimen of dexamethasone (0.17, 1.7 and 17g/kg) to six Standardbreds. Plasma was analysed for dexamethasone and cortisol concentrations using UHPLC-MS/MS. Dexamethasone displayed linear kinetics within the concentration range studied. A turnover model of oscillatory behaviour accurately mimicked cortisol data. The mean baseline concentration range was 34-57g/L, the fractional turnover rate 0.47-1.5 1/h, the amplitude parameter 6.8-24g/L, the maximum inhibitory capacity 0.77-0.97, the drug potency 6-65ng/L and the sigmoidicity factor 0.7-30. This analysis provided a better understanding of the time course of the cortisol response in horses. This includes baseline variability within and between horses and determinants of the equilibrium concentration-response relationship. The analysis also challenged a protocol for a dexamethasone suppression test design and indicated future improvement to increase the predictability of the test.

  • 13. Eriksson, H
    et al.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knutson, L
    Dickinson, P
    Lennernäs, H
    Intestinal and liver CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of R/S-verapamil in pigs2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Garg, Neeraj
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Chemical Biology for Biomarker Discovery. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hansson, Annelie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Science. Nat Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75189 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Knych, Heather K.
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, KL Maddy Equine Analyt Chem Lab, Davis, CA 95616 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, Dept Vet Mol Biosci, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Stanley, Scott D.
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, KL Maddy Equine Analyt Chem Lab, Davis, CA 95616 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, Dept Vet Mol Biosci, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Thevis, Mario
    German Sport Univ Cologne, Inst Biochem, D-50933 Cologne, Germany.;German Sport Univ Cologne, Ctr Prevent Doping Res, D-50933 Cologne, Germany..
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Science. Nat Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75189 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Science. Nat Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75189 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Globisch, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Chemical Biology for Biomarker Discovery. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Structural elucidation of major selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) metabolites for doping control2018In: Organic and biomolecular chemistry, ISSN 1477-0520, E-ISSN 1477-0539, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 698-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a class of androgen receptor drugs, which have a high potential to be performance enhancers in human and animal sports. Arylpropionamides are one of the major SARM classes and get rapidly metabolized significantly complicating simple detection of misconduct in blood or urine sample analysis. Specific drug-derived metabolites are required as references due to a short half-life of the parent compound but are generally lacking. The difficulty in metabolism studies is the determination of the correct regio and stereoselectivity during metabolic conversion processes. In this study, we have elucidated and verified the chemical structure of two major equine arylpropionamide-based SARM metabolites using a combination of chemical synthesis and liquid chromatography- mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. These synthesized SARM-derived metabolites can readily be utilized as reference standards for routine mass spectrometry-based doping control analysis of at least three commonly used performance-enhancing drugs to unambigously identify misconduct.

  • 15.
    Grudén, Stefan
    et al.
    LIDDS AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandelin, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology.
    Rasanen, Veera
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Micke, Patrick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry. National Veterinary Institute (SVA), Department of Chemistry, Environment and Feed Hygiene, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Axén, Niklas
    LIDDS AB, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jeansson, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Antitumoral effect and reduced systemic toxicity in mice after intra-tumoral injection of an in vivo solidifying calcium sulfate formulation with docetaxel2017In: European journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics, ISSN 0939-6411, E-ISSN 1873-3441, Vol. 114, p. 186-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Docetaxel is a cytostatic agent approved for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer as well as other cancers. Although docetaxel is an effective cytostatic agent, its effectiveness in clinical practice is associated with a variety of acute and long term side-effects. To overcome systemic side-effects, a slow release formulation based on calcium sulfate with docetaxel for intra-tumoral administration was developed.

    Methods

    Two formulations with the calcium sulfate NanoZolid technology were generated with a twofold difference in docetaxel drug load. The formulations were injected intra-tumorally as a paste which solidified within the tumor. The effects of the two intra-tumoral injection formulations were tested in female mice (n = 60) inoculated with subcutaneous Lewis lung carcinoma cells. The two formulations were compared to systemic intraperitoneal injection of docetaxel and a placebo formulation without docetaxel. Tumor volumes were measured and systemic side-effects were evaluated using body weight and cell counts from whole blood as well as plasma concentrations.

    Results

    Both docetaxel formulations showed a significantly higher antitumor efficacy compared to placebo, which was comparable to that of systemic administration of docetaxel. Moreover, the intra-tumoral formulations with docetaxel showed reduced systemic toxicity compared to systemic treatment, including less weight loss and no decrease in blood cell counts.

    Conclusions

    The results suggest that intra-tumoral slow release calcium sulfate based formulations with docetaxel can be an alternative strategy as an efficient local antitumoral treatment with reduced systemic toxicity.

  • 16. Guddat, S.
    et al.
    Fusshoeller, G.
    Beuck, S.
    Thomas, A.
    Geyer, H.
    Rydevik, Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Lagojda, A.
    Schaenzer, W.
    Thevis, M.
    Synthesis, characterization, and detection of new oxandrolone metabolites as long-term markers in sports drug testing2013In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 405, no 25, p. 8285-8294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discovery and implementation of the long-term metabolite of metandienone, namely 17 beta-hydroxymethyl-17 alpha-methyl-18-norandrost-1,4,13-trien-3-one, to doping control resulted in hundreds of positive metandienone findings worldwide and impressively demonstrated that prolonged detection periods significantly increase the effectiveness of sports drug testing. For oxandrolone and other 17-methyl steroids, analogs of this metabolite have already been described, but comprehensive characterization and pharmacokinetic data are still missing. In this report, the synthesis of the two epimeric oxandrolone metabolites-17 beta-hydroxymethyl-17 alpha-methyl-18-nor-2-oxa-5 alpha-androsta-13-en-3-one and 17 alpha-hydroxymethyl-17 beta-methyl-18-nor-2-oxa-5 alpha-androsta-13-en-3-one-using a fungus (Cunninghamella elegans) based protocol is presented. The reference material was fully characterized by liquid chromatography nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry. To ensure a specific and sensitive detection in athlete's urine, different analytical approaches were followed, such as liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ and Q-Orbitrap) and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, in order to detect and identify the new target analytes. The applied methods have demonstrated good specificity and no significant matrix interferences. Linearity (R (2) > 0.99) was tested, and precise results were obtained for the detection of the analytes (coefficient of variation < 20 %). Limits of detection (S/N) for confirmatory and screening analysis were estimated at 1 and 2 ng/mL of urine, respectively. The assay was applied to oxandrolone post-administration samples to obtain data on the excretion of the different oxandrolone metabolites. The studied specimens demonstrated significantly longer detection periods (up to 18 days) for the new oxandrolone metabolites compared to commonly targeted metabolites such as epioxandrolone or 18-nor-oxandrolone, presenting a promising approach to improve the fight against doping.

  • 17.
    Haglind, Alfred
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. National Veterinary Institute (SVA), Dept. of Chemistry, Environment and Feed Hygiene, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Curt E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Major signal suppression from metal ion clusters in SFC/ESI-MS: Cause and Effects2018In: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376X, Vol. 1084, p. 96-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The widening application area of SFC-MS with polar analytes and water-containing samples facilitates the use of quick and simple sample preparation techniques such as “dilute and shoot” and protein precipitation. This has also introduced new polar interfering components such as alkali metal ions naturally abundant in e.g. blood plasma and urine, which have shown to be retained using screening conditions in SFC/ESI-TOF-MS and causing areas of major ion suppression. Analytes co-eluting with these clusters will have a decreased signal intensity, which might have a major effect on both quantification and identification. When investigating the composition of the alkali metal clusters using accurate mass and isotopic pattern, it could be concluded that they were previously not described in the literature. Using NaCl and KCl standards and different chromatographic conditions, varying e.g. column and modifier, the clusters proved to be formed from the alkali metal ions in combination with the alcohol modifier and make-up solvent. Their compositions were [(XOCH3)n+X]+, [(XOH)n+X]+, [(X2CO3)n+X]+ and [(XOOCOCH3)n+X]+ for X= Na+ or K+ in ESI+. In ESI-, the clusters depended more on modifier, with [(XCl)n+Cl]- and [(XOCH3)n+OCH3]- mainly formed in pure methanol and [(XOOCH)n+OOCH]- when 20 mM NH4Fa was added.

    To prevent the formation of the clusters by avoiding methanol as modifier might be difficult, as this is a widely used modifier providing good solubility when analyzing polar compounds in SFC. A sample preparation with e.g. LLE would remove the alkali ions, however also introducing a time consuming and discriminating step into the method. Since the alkali metal ions were retained and affected by chromatographic adjustments as e.g. mobile phase modifications, a way to avoid them could therefore be chromatographic tuning, when analyzing samples containing them.

  • 18.
    Hansson, Annelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Science.
    Knych, Heather
    Stanley, Scott
    Berndtson, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Science. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75651 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Jackson, Liora
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Science. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75651 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Science. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75651 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thevis, Mario
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Science. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75651 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Equine in vivo-derived metabolites of the SARM LGD-4033 and comparison with human and fungal metabolites.2018In: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376X, Vol. 1074-1075, p. 91-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    LGD-4033 has been found in human doping control samples and has the potential for illicit use in racehorses as well. It belongs to the pharmacological class of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) and can stimulate muscle growth, much like anabolic steroids. However, SARMs have shown superior side effect profiles compared to anabolic steroids, which arguably makes them attractive for use by individuals seeking an unfair advantage over their competitors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the metabolites formed from LGD-4033 in the horse in order to find suitable analytical targets for doping controls. LGD-4033 was administered to three horses after which plasma and urine samples were collected and analyzed for metabolites using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer. In horse urine, eight metabolites, both phase I and phase II, were observed most of which had not been described in other metabolic systems. Six of these were also detected in plasma. The parent compound was detected in plasma, but not in non-hydrolyzed urine. The longest detection times were observed for unchanged LGD-4033 in plasma and in urine hydrolyzed with β-glucuronidase and is thus suggested as the analytical target for doping control in the horse. The metabolite profile determined in the horse samples was also compared to those of human urine and fungal incubate from Cunninghamella elegans. The main human metabolite, dihydroxylated LGD-4033, was detected in the horse samples and was also produced by the fungus. However, it was a not a major metabolite for horse and fungus, which highlights the importance of performing metabolism studies in the species of interest.

  • 19.
    Hansson, Annelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knych, Heather
    Stanley, Scott
    Thevis, Mario
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Characterization of equine urinary metabolites of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) S1, S4 and S22 for doping control purposes2015In: Drug Testing and Analysis, ISSN 1942-7603, E-ISSN 1942-7611, Vol. 7, no 8, p. 673-683Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective androgen receptor modulators, SARMs, constitute a class of compounds with anabolic properties but with few androgenic side-effects. This makes them possible substances of abuse and the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has banned the entire class of substances. There have been several cases of illicit use of aryl propionamide SARMs in human sports and in 2013, 13 cases were reported. These substances have been found to be extensively metabolized in humans, making detection of metabolites necessary for doping control. SARMs are also of great interest to equine doping control, but the in vivo metabolite pattern and thus possible analytical targets have not been previously studied in this species. In this study, the urinary metabolites of the SARMs S1, S4, and S22 in horses were studied after intravenous injection, using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QToF-MS). Eight different metabolites were found for SARM S1, nine for SARM S4, and seven for SARM S22. The equine urinary metabolite profiles differed significantly from those of humans. The parent compounds were only detected for SARMs S4 and S22 and only at the first sampling time point at 3h post administration, making them unsuitable as target compounds. For all three SARMs tested, the metabolite yielding the highest response had undergone amide hydrolysis, hydroxylation and sulfonation. The resulting phase II metabolites (4-nitro-3-trifluoro-methyl-phenylamine sulfate for SARMs S1 and S4 and 4-cyano-3-trifluoro-methyl-phenylamine sulfate for SARM S22) are proposed as analytical targets for use in equine doping control.

  • 20.
    Hansson, Annelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knych, Heather
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, KL Maddy Equine Analyt Chem Lab, Davis, CA 95616 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, Dept Vet Mol Biosci, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Stanley, Scott
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, KL Maddy Equine Analyt Chem Lab, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Thevis, Mario
    German Sport Univ Cologne, Inst Biochem, Cologne, Germany.;German Sport Univ Cologne, Ctr Prevent Doping Res, Cologne, Germany..
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75651 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75651 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Investigation of the selective androgen receptor modulators S1, S4 and S22 and their metabolites in equine plasma using high-resolution mass spectrometry2016In: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 0951-4198, E-ISSN 1097-0231, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 833-842Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RationaleSelective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are prohibited in sports due to their performance enhancing ability. It is important to investigate the metabolism to determine appropriate targets for doping control. This is the first study where the equine metabolites of SARMs S1, S4 (Andarine) and S22 (Ostarine) have been studied in plasma. MethodsEach SARM was administered to three horses as an intravenous bolus dose and plasma samples were collected. The samples were pretreated with protein precipitation using cold acetonitrile before separation by liquid chromatography. The mass spectrometric analysis was performed using negative electrospray, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry operated in MSE mode and triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry operated in selected reaction monitoring mode. For the quantification of SARM S1, a deuterated analogue was used as internal standard. ResultsThe numbers of observed metabolites were eight, nine and four for the SARMs S1, S4 and S22, respectively. The major metabolite was formed by the same metabolic reactions for all three SARMs, namely amide hydrolysis, hydroxylation and sulfonation. The values of the determined maximum plasma concentrations were in the range of 97-170 ng/mL for SARM S1, 95-115 ng/mL for SARM S4 and 92-147 ng/mL for SARM S22 and the compounds could be detected for 96 h, 12 h and 18 h, respectively. ConclusionsThe maximum plasma concentration of SARMs S1, S4 and S22 was measured in the first sample (5 min) after administration and they were eliminated fast from plasma. The proposed targets to be used in equine doping control are the parent compounds for all three SARMs, but with the metabolite yielding the highest response as a complementary target. 

  • 21.
    Hansson, Annelie
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Thevis, Mario
    German Sport Univ Cologne, Inst Biochem, Cologne, Germany.;German Sport Univ Cologne, Ctr Prevent Doping Res, Cologne, Germany..
    Cox, Holly
    Sports Med Res & Testing Lab, Salt Lake City, UT USA..
    Miller, Geoff
    Sports Med Res & Testing Lab, Salt Lake City, UT USA..
    Eichner, Daniel
    Sports Med Res & Testing Lab, Salt Lake City, UT USA..
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75189 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, SE-75189 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Investigation of the metabolites of the HIF stabilizer FG-4592 (roxadustat) in five different in vitro models and in a human doping control sample using high resolution mass spectrometry2017In: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, ISSN 0731-7085, E-ISSN 1873-264X, Vol. 134, p. 228-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    FG-4592 is a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilizer, which can increase the number of red blood cells in the body. It has not been approved by regulatory authorities, but is available for purchase on the Internet. Due to its ability to improve the oxygen transportation mechanism in the body, FG-4592 is of interest for doping control laboratories, but prior to this study, little information about its metabolism was available. In this study, the metabolism of FG-4592 was investigated in a human doping control sample and in five in vitro models: human hepatocytes and liver microsomes, equine liver microsomes and S9 fraction and the fungus Cunninghamella elegans. By using liquid chromatography coupled to a Q-TOF mass spectrometer operated in MSE and MSMS modes, twelve different metabolites were observed for FG-4592. One monohydroxylated metabolite was detected in both the human and equine liver microsome incubations. For the fungus Cunninghamella elegans eleven different metabolites were observed of which the identical monohydroxylated metabolite had the highest response. This rich metabolic profile and the higher levels of metabolites produced by Cunninghamella elegans demonstrates its usefulness as a metabolite producing medium. In the doping control urine sample, one metabolite, which was the result of a direct glucuronidation, was observed. No metabolites were detected in neither the human hepatocyte nor in the equine liver S9 fraction incubates.

  • 22. Hansson, H
    et al.
    Bergvall, K
    Bondesson, U
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Analytisk farmaceutisk kemi.
    Hedeland, M
    Törneke, K
    Clinical pharmacology of clemastine in healthy dogs.2004In: Vet Dermatol, ISSN 0959-4493, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 152-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Preparation of Drug Metabolites2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24. Hedeland, Mikael
    et al.
    Fredriksson, Elisabeth
    Lennernäs, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry.
    Simultaneous quantification of the enantiomers of verapamil and its N-demethylated metabolite in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry2004In: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376X, Vol. 804, no 2, p. 303-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A stereoselective bioanalytical method for the simultaneous quantification of the enantiomers of verapamil and its active main metabolite norverapamil in human plasma has been developed and validated. The samples were analysed by liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) in the Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode using a deuterated internal standard. The stationary phase used for the chiral separation was a Chiral-AGP. The enantiomers of verapamil were selectively detected from those of norverapamil by the mass spectrometer due to different molecular masses, although there was a chromatographic co-elution. Thus, time-consuming procedures like achiral preseparation or chemical derivatisation could be avoided. Higher detection sensitivity than earlier published methods based on fluorescence detection was obtained, although a mobile phase of high water-content and high flow-rate was introduced into the electrospray interface (85% aqueous ammonium acetate pH 7.4 +15% acetonitrile at 0.6 ml/min). The enantiomers of verapamil and norverapamil could be quantified at levels down to 50 pg and 60 pg/500 microl plasma sample, respectively, with R.S.D. in the range of 3.6-7.8%. The presented method was successfully applied to an in vivo intestinal absorption and bioavailability study in humans, using the Loc-I-Gut method.

  • 25.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Rydevik, Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Krug, O
    Thevis, M
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Mass spectrometric study of the metabolism of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) in the fungus Cunninghamella elegans2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Rydevik, Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Krug, O
    Thevis, M
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Mass spectrometric study of the metabolism of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) in the fungus Cunninghamella elegans2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Rydevik, Axel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Krug, O
    Thevis, M
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Mass spectrometric study of the metabolism of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) in the fungus Cunninghamella elegans2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Tevell Åberg, Annica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    The relevance of using a fungus as a model of equine metabolism2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Hedeland, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Curt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Chiral separation of amines with N-benzoxycarbonylglycyl-L-proline as selector in non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis using methanol and 1,2-dichloroethane in the background electrolyte2003In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 984, no 2, p. 261-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    N-Benzoxycarbonylglycyl-L-proline (L-ZGP) has been introduced as a chiral selector for enantioseparation of amines in non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis. Methanol mixed with different proportions of dichloromethane, 1,2-dichloroethane or 2-propanol containing L-ZGP and ammonium acetate was used as the background electrolyte. Enantioseparation of different types of pharmacologically active amines was performed, e.g. the local anaesthetic bupivacaine and the beta-adrenoceptor blocking agent pindolol. Addition of the solvents (dichloromethane, 1,2-dichloroethane or 2-propanol) gave an improved chiral separation partly due to a distinct decrease in the electroosmotic flow. The use of 1,2-dichloroethane in the background electrolyte gave higher precision in migration time (RSD 2.2%) compared to the systems containing dichloromethane. An enantiomeric separation of mepivacaine was performed within 72 s by use of short-end injection with an effective capillary length of 8.5 cm.

  • 30.
    Henrohn, Dan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Sandqvist, Anna
    Umeå universitet.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Egeröd, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Acute haemodynamic response in relation to plasma vardenafil concentrations in patients with pulmonary hypertension2012In: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0306-5251, E-ISSN 1365-2125, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 990-998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS

    To evaluate the acute haemodynamic effects of a single oral dose of vardenafil and to study the drug concentration in relation to haemodynamic effects in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH).

    METHODS

    Sixteen patients with PH (aged 29–85\ years), received one single oral dose of vardenafil (5, 10 or 20 mg). The haemodynamic effect was assessed over a 60 min period. Vardenafil plasma concentrations were measured after 15, 30, 45 and 60 min using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry.

    RESULTS

    At 60 min a reduction in mPAP with a median % decrease of −20.3% (range −48.3 to 3.0; P < 0.001) and an increase in cardiac output and the cardiac index with a median % change of 10.6% (range −25.0 to 88.1; P = 0.015) and 12.1% (range −24.0 to 94.4; P = 0.01) respectively was observed. The pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was reduced with a median % decrease of −28.9% (range −61.5 to −5.9; P < 0.001), and pulmonary selectivity was reflected by a median percent reduction of −16.9% (range −49.0 to 16.5; P = 0.002; n = 14) in the PVR/systemic vascular resistance ratio. There was a correlation between the plasma concentrations of vardenafil and change in mPAP (r = −0.579, P = 0.019) and between vardenafil concentrations and change in PVR (r = −0.662, P = 0.005).

    CONCLUSIONS

    Vardenafil causes rapid changes in cardiopulmonary haemodynamics and there is a correlation between plasma vardenafil drug concentration and the acute changes in mPAP as well as PVR in patients with PH.

  • 31.
    Knych, Heather K.
    et al.
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, KL Maddy Equine Analyt Chem Lab, 620 West Hlth Sci Dr, Davis, CA 95616 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, Dept Vet Mol Biosci, 620 West Hlth Sci Dr, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Stanley, Scott D.
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, KL Maddy Equine Analyt Chem Lab, 620 West Hlth Sci Dr, Davis, CA 95616 USA.;Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, Dept Vet Mol Biosci, 620 West Hlth Sci Dr, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    McKemie, Dan S.
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, KL Maddy Equine Analyt Chem Lab, 620 West Hlth Sci Dr, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Arthur, Rick M.
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, 620 West Hlth Sci Dr, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Natl Vet Inst SVA, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Thevis, Mario
    German Sport Univ Cologne, Ctr Prevent Doping Res, Inst Biochem, Cologne, Germany..
    Kass, Philip H.
    Univ Calif Davis, Sch Vet Med, Dept Populat Hlth & Reprod, 620 West Hlth Sci Dr, Davis, CA 95616 USA..
    Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of meldonium in exercised thoroughbred horses2017In: Drug Testing and Analysis, ISSN 1942-7603, E-ISSN 1942-7611, Vol. 9, no 9, p. 1392-1399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although developed as a therapeutic medication, meldonium has found widespread use in human sports and was recently added to the World Anti-Doping Agency's list of prohibited substances. Its reported abuse potential in human sports has led to concern by regulatory authorities about the possible misuse of meldonium in equine athletics. The potential abuse in equine athletes along with the limited data available regarding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of meldonium in horses necessitates further study. Eight exercised adult thoroughbred horses received a single oral dose of 3.5, 7.1, 14.3 or 21.4 mg/kg of meldonium. Blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined using non-compartmental analysis. Maximum serum concentrations ranged from 440.2 to 1147 ng/mL and the elimination half-life from 422 to 647.8 h. Serum concentrations were below the limit of quantitation by days 4, 7, 12 and 12 for doses of 3.5, 7.1, 14.3 and 21.4 mg/kg, respectively. Urine concentrations were below the limit of detection by day 44 following administration of 3.5 mg/kg and day 51 for all other dose groups. No adverse effects were observed following meldonium administration. While the group numbers were small, changes in heart rate were observed in the 3.5 mg/kg dose group (n = 1). Glucose concentrations changed significantly in all dose groups studied (n = 2 per dose group). Similar to that reported for humans, the detection time of meldonium in biological samples collected from horses is prolonged, which should allow for satisfactory regulation in performance horses. Copyright (C) 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 32. Krug, Oliver
    et al.
    Thomas, Andreas
    Beuck, Simon
    Schenk, Ina
    Machnik, Marc
    Schänzer, Wilhelm
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Thevis, Mario
    Characterization of In Vitro Synthesized Equine Metabolites of the Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators S24 and S42012In: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, ISSN 0737-0806, E-ISSN 1542-7412, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 562-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have been synthesized and investigated in humans, rats, and dogs in the past, but no data are yet available concerning the metabolism of SARMs in horses. The aryl-propionamide-derived drug candidates S24 and S4 (andarine) have a strong androgen receptor binding affinity and show distinctive specific cell answers. Although no SARM drug candidate (aiming for testosterone replacement therapy) has completed clinical trials yet, S4 has been illicitly available via the Internet. These facts led to the prohibition of SARMs by the German equestrian federation, and the (mis)use of such compounds would further represent a doping rule violation in horse racing. In this study, the drug candidates S24 and S4 were subjected to in vitro metabolism experiments with equine liver microsomal preparations from a female Quarter Horse to obtain information about potential target analytes in equine doping control analysis. The enzymatically synthesized metabolites were characterized by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry and –high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry. All observed S24 and S4 equine metabolites are in agreement with earlier in vitro and in vivo studies in humans and dogs. Nevertheless, the relative percentage of generated equine metabolites (as determined from the analytes’ response in full-scan chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry and –high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry measurements) differs considerably from the reported profiles. Although the S24 metabolite pattern is comparably balanced concerning glucuronidated and sulfonated conjugates, the major S4 metabolite was found to be the unconjugated dephenylated compound, with a proportion of more than 90%.

  • 33.
    Lampinen Salomonsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Structural evaluation of the glucuronides of morphine and formoterol using chemical derivatization with 1,2-dimethylimidazole-4-sulfonyl chloride and liquid chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry2008In: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 0951-4198, E-ISSN 1097-0231, Vol. 22, no 17, p. 2685-2697Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the first time chemical derivatization of isomeric drug glucuronides with 1,2-dimethylimidazole-4-sulfonyl chloride (DMISC) has been successfully applied as a tool for determining the site of conjugation. This provides a way to differentiate between glucuronide isomers containing aliphatic and phenolic hydroxyl groups. The analyses were performed with liquid chromatography/electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MSn). DMISC has previously been shown to react selectively with phenols in estrogens, thus improving sensitivity in ESI-MS. The model compounds selected for this study were commercially available standards of formoterol, morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G). Formoterol glucuronides were produced with an enzymatic method in house. Both formoterol and morphine possess one phenolic and one aliphatic hydroxyl group where glucuronidation could take place. The product ion mass spectra of the native morphine glucuronides were indistinguishable due to the initial neutral loss of monodehydrated glucuronic acid (1.76u). However, a significant difference between the isomers was observed with DMISC derivatization, as only the form with a free phenol, M6G, gave a detectable reaction product. Formoterol formed two detectable glucuronide isomers in the enzymatic reaction. Their respective sites of conjugation could not be directly determined from the product ion spectra. Reaction with DMISC, however, gave a detectable product with only one of the isomers. Based on previous experience of the preferred DMISC reactions with phenols, and interpretation of the fragmentation pattern of the derivative, it was concluded that the reactive isomer had a free phenol, and was thus conjugated on the aliphatic chain.

  • 34.
    Lampinen-Salomonsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Analytisk Farmaceutisk kemi.
    Beckman, Elin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Analytisk Farmaceutisk Kemi.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Analytisk Farmaceutisk Kemi.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Detection of altrenogest and its metabolites in post administration horse urine using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry-increased sensitivity by chemical derivatisation of the glucuronic acid conjugate.2006In: J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci, ISSN 1570-0232, Vol. 833, no 2, p. 245-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Lampinen-Salomonsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Analytisk Farmaceutisk kemi.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Analytisk Farmaceutisk Kemi.
    Petersson, Carl
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Differentiation of estriol glucuronide isomers by chemical derivatization and electrospray tandem mass spectrometry2006In: Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom, ISSN 0951-4198, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1429-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Lilienberg, E
    et al.
    Ebeling Barbier, C
    Nyman, C
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Axén, N
    Lennernäs, H
    Local and sustained release in the treatment of primary liver cancer? Pharmacokinetic understanding of two formulations for intra arterial injection2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37. Lilienberg, E
    et al.
    Ebeling Barbier, C
    Nyman, R
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Axén, N
    Lennenrnäs, H
    Improved Pharmacokinetic Understanding of Two Formulations for Intra-arterial Injection2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38. Lilienberg, E
    et al.
    Ebeling Barbier, C
    Nyman, R
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Axén, N
    Lennernäs, H
    Improved Pharmacokinetic Understanding of Two Formulations for Intra-arterial Injection2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Lilienberg, Elsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Ebeling-Barbier, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Nyman, Rickard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Axén, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Lennernas, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Investigation of Hepatobiliary Disposition of Doxorubicin Following Intrahepatic Delivery of Different Dosage Forms2014In: Molecular Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1543-8384, E-ISSN 1543-8392, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 131-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unresectable, intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often treated palliatively in humans by doxorubicin (DOX). The drug is administered either as a drug-emulsified-in-Lipiodol (DLIP) or as drug loaded into drug eluting beads (DEB), and both formulations are administered intrahepatically. However, several aspects of their in vivo performance in the liver are still not well-understood. In this study, DLIP and DEB were investigated regarding the local and systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of DOX and its primary metabolite doxorubicinol (DOXol). An advanced PK-multisampling site acute in vivo pig model was used for simultaneous sampling in the portal, hepatic, and femoral veins and the bile duct. The study had a randomized, parallel design with four treatment groups (TI–TIV). TI (n = 4) was used as control and received an intravenous (i.v.) infusion of DOX as a solution. TII and TIII were given a local injection in the hepatic artery with DLIP (n = 4) or DEB (n = 4), respectively. TIV (n = 2) received local injections of DLIP in the hepatic artery and bile duct simultaneously. All samples were analyzed for concentrations of DOX and DOXol with UPLC-MS/MS. Compared to DLIP, the systemic exposure for DOX with DEB was reduced (p < 0.05), in agreement with a slower in vivo release. The approximated intracellular bioavailability of DOX during 6 h appeared to be lower for DEB than DLIP. Following i.v. infusion (55 min), DOX had a liver extraction of 41 (28–53)%, and the fraction of the dose eliminated in bile of DOX and DOXol was 20 (15–22)% and 4.2 (3.2–5.2)%, respectively. The AUCbile/AUCVP for DOX and DOXol was 640 (580–660) and 5000 (3900–5400), respectively. In conclusion, DLIP might initially deliver a higher hepatocellular concentration of DOX than DEB as a consequence of its higher in vivo release rate. Thus, DLIP delivery results in higher intracellular peak concentrations that might correlate with better anticancer effects, but also higher systemic drug exposure and safety issues.

  • 40.
    Lodén, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Pettersson, Curt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Development of a chiral non-aqueous capillary electrophoretic system using the partial filling technique with UV and mass spectrometric detection2003In: Journal of Chromatography A, ISSN 0021-9673, E-ISSN 1873-3778, Vol. 986, no 1, p. 143-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A chiral non-aqueous CE system with UV and mass spectrometric detection has been developed. The enantioseparation was promoted by diastereomeric complex (ion-pair) formation between the amines (e.g. salbutamol, atenolol) and the chiral selector, (-)-2,3:4,6-di-O-isopropylidene-2-keto-L-gulonic acid [(-)-DIKGA]. Different solvent mixtures were studied, as well as different concentrations of (-)-DIKGA and ammonium acetate in the background electrolyte. A partial filling technique was developed with a selector plug composed of (-)-DIKGA and ammonium acetate in a solvent mixture of methanol and 2-propanol. The separated enantiomers of pronethalol were detected by a Q-TOF MS system equipped with a sheath-flow electrospray ionization interface.

  • 41. Lundahl, A
    et al.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knutson, L
    Lennernäs, H
    Metabolitidentifiering av finasterid i human galla och urin2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42. Lundahl, A
    et al.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knutson, L
    Lennernäs, H
    The effect of St John’s wort on the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of finasteride in man2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43. Lundahl, A
    et al.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knutson, L
    Lennernäs, H
    The effect of St John’s Wort treatment on finasteride metabolism and identification of new finasteride metabolites in humans2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44. Lundahl, A
    et al.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knutson, L
    Lennernäs, H
    The effect of St. John’s wort treatment on finasteride pharmacokinetics and identification of new phase I and phase II metabolites in humans2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45. Lundahl, A
    et al.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Knutsson, L
    Lennernäs, H
    The effect of St John's Wort on the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of finasteride in healthy men2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46. Lundahl, A
    et al.
    Lennernäs, H
    Knutson, L
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Identification of hydroxylated and glucuronidated metabolites of finasteride in human bile and urine2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47. Lundahl, A
    et al.
    Tevell Åberg, Annica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Lennernäs, H
    Metabolite identification by mass spectrometry of the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride in vitro and in vivo2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Lundahl, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Åberg, Annica Tevell
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Lennernäs, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    High-resolution mass spectrometric investigation of the phase I and II metabolites of finasteride in pig plasma, urine and bile2014In: Xenobiotica, ISSN 0049-8254, E-ISSN 1366-5928, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 498-510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. The metabolite profile of the 5 alpha-reductase type II inhibitor finasteride has been studied in pig plasma, urine and bile using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The porcine biotransformation products were compared to those formed by human liver microsomes and to literature data of recently identified human in vivo metabolites. The objective of this study was to gain further evidence for the validity of using pigs for advanced, invasive drug-drug interaction studies that are not possible to perform in humans. 2. The use of high-resolution mass spectrometry with accurate mass measurements enabled identification of the metabolites by calculation of their elemental compositions as well as their fragmentation patterns. 3. There was an excellent match between the porcine and human metabolic profiles, corroborating the pig as a model of human drug metabolism. The glucuronides of the two recently described human hydroxylated metabolites MX and MY and the carboxylated metabolite M3 were identified as the major biotransformation products of finasteride in pig urine and bile. 4. Furthermore, the CYP enzymes involved in the formation of the hydroxylated metabolites were characterized. Human recombinant CYP3A4 could produce the two major hydroxylated metabolites MX and MY, whereas human recombinant CYP2D6 formed MY only.

  • 49.
    Lundgren, Jakob
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Cardiol, Lund, Sweden; Skåne Univ Hosp, Sect Heart Failure & Valvular Dis, Hemodynam Lab, Heart & Lung Clin, Lund, Sweden.
    Sandqvist, Anna
    Umeå Univ, Dept Pharmacol & Clin Neurosci, Clin Pharmacol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Science. Natl Vet Inst (SVA), Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Bondesson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Science. Natl Vet Inst (SVA), Dept Chem Environm & Feed Hyg, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Wikström, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology.
    Rådegran, Göran
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Cardiol, Lund, Sweden; Skåne Univ Hosp, Sect Heart Failure & Valvular Dis, Hemodynam Lab, Heart & Lung Clin, Lund, Sweden.
    Alterations in plasma L-arginine and methylarginines in heart failure and after heart transplantation2018In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 196-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Endothelial function, including the nitric oxide (NO)-pathway, has previously been extensively investigated in heart failure (HF). In contrast, studies are lacking on the NO pathway after heart transplantation (HT). We therefore investigated substances in the NO pathway prior to and after HT in relation to hemodynamic parameters.

    Design: 12 patients (median age 50.0 yrs, 2 females), heart transplanted between June 2012 and February 2014, evaluated at our hemodynamic lab, at rest, prior to HT, as well as four weeks and six months after HT were included. All patients had normal left ventricular function post-operatively and none had post-operative pulmonary hypertension or acute cellular rejection requiring therapy at the evaluations. Plasma concentrations of ADMA, SDMA, L-Arginine, L-Ornithine and L-Citrulline were analyzed at each evaluation.

    Results: In comparison to controls, the plasma L-Arginine concentration was low and ADMA high in HF patients, resulting in low L-Arginine/ADMA-ratio pre-HT. Already four weeks after HT L-Arginine was normalized whereas ADMA remained high. Consequently the L-Arginine/ADMA-ratio improved, but did not normalize. The biomarkers remained unchanged at the six-month evaluation and the L-Arginine/ADMA-ratio correlated inversely to pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) six months post-HT.

    Conclusions: Plasma L-Arginine concentrations normalize after HT. However, as ADMA is unchanged, the L-Arginine/ADMA-ratio remained low and correlated inversely to PVR. Together these findings suggest that (i) the L-Arginine/ADMA-ratio may be an indicator of pulmonary vascular tone after HT, and that (ii) NO-dependent endothelial function is partly restored after HT. Considering the good postoperative outcome, the biomarker levels may be considered “normal” after HT.

  • 50.
    Petri, N
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Borga, O
    Nyberg, L
    Hedeland, M
    Bondesson, U
    Department of Medicinal Chemistry. Analytisk Farmaceutisk Kemi.
    Lennernas, H
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacy.
    Effect of erythromycin on the absorption of fexofenadine in the jejunum, ileum and colon determined using local intubation in healthy volunteers.2006In: Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther, ISSN 0946-1965, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 71-9Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 84
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