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  • 1.
    Brodd, Katarina Strand
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Grönqvist, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Holmström, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Strömberg, Bo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Grönqvist, Erik
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Development of smooth pursuit eye movements in very preterm infants: 1. General aspects2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 7, p. 983-991Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  To investigate early oculo-motor development in a population-based cohort of very preterm infants.

    Methods:  Early oculo-motor development was prospectively studied by measuring smooth pursuit eye movements at 2 and 4 months corrected age in a population of very preterm infants born in Uppsala County 2004–2007. Eighty-one preterm infants were studied, and 32 healthy term infants constituted the control group.

    Results:  The study group consisted of infants with a mean gestational age of28 + 5 weeks. At 2 and 4 months corrected age, infants born very preterm showed lower gain (p < 0.001) and proportion of smooth pursuit eyemovements (p < 0.001) compared to the control group. The boys showed higher gain of smooth pursuit eye movements at both 2 and 4 months corrected age, compared to girls.

    Conclusions:  Oculo-motor development measured by smooth pursuit eye movements is delayed in very preterm infants at 2 and 4 months corrected age. This might be a risk factor or early indicator of later perceptual and behavioural impairment.

  • 2.
    Brodd, Katarina Strand
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Grönqvist, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Holmström, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Grönqvist, Erik
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Development of Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements in very preterm born infants: 3. Association to perinatal risk factors2012In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 164-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  To investigate the association between perinatal risk factors and neonatal complications and early oculo-motor development in very preterm infants.

    Methods:  Perinatal risk factors were identified, and the potential association with early oculo-motor development was evaluated by measuring smooth pursuit eye movements (SP) at 2 and 4 months' corrected age (CA) in a population of very preterm infants born in Uppsala County 2004-2007 (n = 113).

    Results:  Among the 15 tested factors, eight showed significant association in univariate analysis with lower levels of SP at 4 months' CA, namely administration of prenatal corticosteroids, gestational age, birthweight, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, periventricular leukomalacia, intraventricular haemorrhage >grade 2, and persistent ductus arteriosus. At 2 months' CA, only retinopathy of prematurity >stage 2 was associated with lower levels of SP. When all factors significant in the univariate tests were included in multiple regressions aimed to assess each factor's independent relation to SP, periventricular leukomalacia was the only significant independent factor. When adding 2-5 of the significant factors using multiple regression analysis, the levels of SP became lower.

    Conclusion:  Perinatal risk factors were associated with lower levels of SP. This could be interpreted as delayed or disturbed development of normal oculomotor ability.

  • 3.
    Cunha, Andrea Baraldi
    et al.
    Univ Fed Sao Carlos, Neuropediat Sect, Dept Phys Therapy, BR-13565905 Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil..
    Soares, Daniele de Almeida
    Univ Fed Mato Grosso do Sul, Ctr Biol & Hlth Sci, Phys Therapy, BR-79070900 Campo Grande, MS, Brazil..
    Carvalho, Raquel de Paula
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Dept Hlth Sci, BR-11015020 Santos, SP, Brazil..
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Tudella, Eloisa
    Univ Fed Sao Carlos, Neuropediat Sect, Dept Phys Therapy, BR-13565905 Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil..
    Maturational and situational determinants of reaching at its onset2015In: Infant Behavior and Development, ISSN 0163-6383, E-ISSN 1879-0453, Vol. 41, p. 64-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At 3 months of age, reaching behavior was measured in a group of 10 girls and 10 boys born at term. The assessments were carried out on the average 2 days after reaching onset. Reaching kinematics was measured in both supine and reclined positions. Girls reached more than boys, had straighter reaching trajectories and movements of shorter durations as well as fewer movement units. The reclined position gave rise to straighter trajectories in both girls and boys. Several anthropometric parameters were measured. Girls had less length and volume of the forearm than boys but similar upper arm volumes. There was a weak relation between kinematic and anthropometric variables.

  • 4.
    Ekberg, Therese L.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Olsson, Ulf
    Soska, Kasey C.
    Adolph, Karen E.
    Dynamic reaching in infants during binocular and monocular viewing2013In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 229, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined reaching in 6-, 8-, and 10-month-olds during binocular and monocular viewing in a dynamic reaching situation. Infants were rotated toward a flat vertical board and reached for objects at one of seven positions along a horizontal line at shoulder height. Hand selection, time to contact the object, and reaching accuracy were examined in both viewing conditions. Hand selection was strongly dependent on object location, not on infants' age or whether one eye was covered. Monocular viewing and age did, however, affect time to object contact and contact errors: Infants showed longer contact times when one eye was covered, and 6-month-olds made more contact errors in the monocular condition. For right-hand selection, contact times were longer when the covered right eye was leading during the chair rotation. For left-hand selection, there were no differences in contact time due to whether the covered eye was leading during rotation.

  • 5. Gredebäck, Gustaf
    et al.
    Stasiewicz, Dorota
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Falck-Ytter, Terje
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Action Type and Goal Type Modulate Goal-Directed Gaze Shifts in 14-Month-Old Infants2009In: Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0012-1649, E-ISSN 1939-0599, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 1190-1194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ten- and 14-month-old infants' gaze was recorded as the infants observed videos of different hand actions directed toward multiple goals. Infants observed an actor who (a) reached for objects and displaced them, (b) reached for objects and placed them inside containers, or (c) moved his fisted hand. Fourteen-month-olds, but not 10-month-olds, anticipated the goal of reaching actions but tracked all the other actions reactively. Fourteen-month-olds also produced more anticipatory gaze shifts during containment compared with displacement and differentiated between reaching actions dependent on whether the overall goal was to displace objects or place objects inside containers. These results demonstrate that action type and goal type modulate the latency of goal-directed gaze shifts in infants.

  • 6.
    Grönqvist, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Brodd, Katarina Strand
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Development of smooth pursuit eye movements in very prematurely born infants: 2. The low-risk subgroup.2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 7, p. e5-e11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:  To investigate the impact of premature birth on visual tracking in a group of 37 infants, born before the 32nd gestational weeks (mean 29 + 6 weeks) and diagnosed as being without major neonatal complications. This paper is a part of the LOVIS study (Strand Brodd, Ewald, Grönqvist, Holmström, Strömberg, Von Hofsten, et al. Acta Pediatrica, 2011). Methods:  At 2 and 4 months corrected age, eye and head movements were measured when the infant tracked a moving object. The eye movements were analysed in terms of smooth pursuit and saccades (Vision Res, 37, 1997, 1799; Exp Brain Res, 146, 2002, 257). Accuracy of gaze, proportion of smooth pursuit, head movements and saccades were calculated. Results:  Between 2 and 4 months of age, all infants improved their ability to smoothly pursue a moving object. However, at both occasions, the preterm infants had less proportion smooth pursuit than the full-term infants. The groups did not differ with respect to gaze and head movements, but the saccade frequency was higher for the very preterms in some of the conditions. Conclusion:  The development of smooth pursuit in the low-risk preterm infant group was strongly delayed compared to typically developed infants. Thus, the 2 months or more extra visual experience did not have a distinguishable positive effect on visuo-motor development as expressed in smooth pursuit.

  • 7.
    Hofsten, von, Claes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    On the development of the mirror neuron system2015In: New Frontiers in Mirror Neuron Research / [ed] G. Rizolatti and P. Ferrari (eds), Oxford University Press, 2015, p. 270-320Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Hreinsdottir, Jonina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Kaul, Ylva Fredriksson
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Holmström, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Impaired cognitive ability at 2.5 years predicts later visual and ophthalmological problems in children born very preterm2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 5, p. 822-830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To identify possible predictive factors for visual problems at 6.5 years in children born very preterm.

    Methods: During 2004–2007, all very preterm infants (gestational age [GA] <32 weeks) in Uppsala County, Sweden were screened for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) neonatally; at four months, visual tracking was tested; at 2.5 years, visuospatial and cognitive tests were carried out. At 6.5 years, 84 preterm children and a reference group of 64 full‐term children underwent ophthalmological testing.

    Results: Mean visual acuity (VA) did not differ between the groups, but subnormal VA (≤0.8) was more common in the preterm group (31% vs 14%; p < 0.05). More often than full‐term children, preterm children had impaired contrast sensitivity (<0.5) (36% vs 19%; p < 0.05) and strabismus (8% vs 0%; p < 0.05). Low GA, ROP, intraventricular haemorrhage 3‐4/periventricular leukomalacia and cognitive disability at 2.5 years predicted ophthalmological and visual problems at 6.5 years. Visual tracking ability at four months was not predictive of ophthalmological outcome.

    Conclusion: Children born preterm had more ophthalmological problems at 6.5 years of age, including subtle dysfunctions. ROP, early brain injury and impaired cognitive function around 2.5 years predicted later ophthalmological dysfunctions.

  • 9.
    Kaul, Ylva Fredriksson
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hofsten, von, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Brodd, Katarina Strand
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD).
    Holmström, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Kaul, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Bohm, Birgitta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Visual tracking in very preterm infants at 4 months predicts neurodevelopment at 3 years of age2016In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 35-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Typically developing infants track moving objects with eye and head movements in a smooth and predictive way at 4 mo of age, but this ability is delayed in very preterm infants. We hypothesized that visual tracking ability in very preterm infants predicts later neurodevelopment. METHOD: In 67 very preterm infants (gestational age<32wk), eye and head movements were assessed at 4 mo corrected age while the infant tracked a moving object. Gaze gain, smooth pursuit, head movements, and timing of gaze relative the object were analyzed off line. Results of the five subscales included in the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-III) at 3 y of age were evaluated in relation to the visual tracking data and to perinatal risk factors. RESULTS: Significant correlations were obtained between gaze gain and cognition, receptive and expressive language, and fine motor function, respectively, also after controlling for gestational age, severe brain damage, retinopathy of prematurity, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. CONCLUSION: This is the first study demonstrating that the basic ability to visually track a moving object at 4 mo robustly predicts neurodevelopment at 3 y of age in children born very preterm.

  • 10.
    Righetti, Ludovic
    et al.
    Max Planck Inst Intelligent Syst, Autonomous Mot Dept, D-72076 Tubingen, Germany..
    Nylén, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Iispeert, Auke Jan
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Sch Engn, Interfac Inst Bioengn, Biorobot Lab, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Kinematic and gait similarities between crawling human infants and other quadruped mammals2015In: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 6, article id UNSP 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crawling on hands and knees is an early pattern of human infant locomotion, which offers an interesting way of studying quadrupedalism in one of its simplest form. We investigate how crawling human infants compare to other quadruped mammals, especially primates. We present quantitative data on both the gait and kinematics of seven 10-month-old crawling infants. Body movements were measured with an optoelectronic system giving precise data on 3-dimensional limb movements. Crawling on hands and knees is very similar to the locomotion of non-human primates in terms of the quite protracted arm at touch-down, the coordination between the spine movements in the lateral plane and the limbs, the relatively extended limbs during locomotion and the strong correlation between stance duration and speed of locomotion. However, there are important differences compared to primates, such as the choice of a lateral-sequence walking gait, which is similar to most non-primate mammals and the relatively stiff elbows during stance as opposed to the quite compliant gaits of primates. These finding raise the question of the role of both the mechanical structure of the body and neural control on the determination of these characteristics.

  • 11.
    Rosander, K
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von, Hofsten Claes
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Visual-vestibular interaction in early infancy2000In: EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH, ISSN 0014-4819, Vol. 133, no 3, p. 321-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of visual and vestibular control of smooth gaze adjustments was studied longitudinally in 3- to 18-week-old infants. Eye and head movements were measured with electro-oculography (EOG) and an optoelectronic system, respectively. The infant

  • 12.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Visual tracking and its relationship to cortical development2007In: From action to cognition / [ed] VonHofsten C; Rosander K, 2007, Vol. 164, p. 105-122Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurements of visual tracking in infants have been performed from 2 weeks of age. Although directed appropriately, the eye movements are saccadic at this age. Over the first 4 months of life, a rapid transition to successively smoother eye movements takes place. Timing develops first and at 7 weeks of age the smooth pursuit is well timed to a sinusoidal motion of 0.25 Hz. From this age, the gain of the smooth pursuit improves rapidly and from 4 months of age, smooth pursuit dominates visual tracking in combination with head movements. This development reflects massive cortical and cerebellar changes. The coordination between eyes-head-body and the external events to be tracked presumes predictive control. One common type of model for explaining the acquisition of such control focuses on the maturation of the cerebellar circuits. A problem with such models, however, is that although Purkinje cells and climbing fibers are present in the newborn, the parallel and mossy fibers, essential for predictive control, grow and mature at 4-7 months postnatally. Therefore, an alternative model that also includes the prefrontal cerebral cortex might better explain the early development of predictive control. The prefrontal cortex functions by 3-4 months of age and provides a site for prediction of eye movements as a part of cerebro-cerebellar nets.

  • 13.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyström, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gredebäck, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cortical processing of visual motion in young infants2007In: Vision Research, ISSN 0042-6989, E-ISSN 1878-5646, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 1614-1623Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Development of gaze tracking of small and large objects2002In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 146, no 2, p. 257-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A longitudinal study was designed to address the relationships between the smooth pursuit (SP) and the optokinetic response (OKR). Eye and head movements were measured in infants between 7 and 14 weeks of age. They were placed in front of a moving object subtending visual angles of 2.5, 5, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35°. The object oscillated sinusoidally along a horizontal path with a frequency of 0.25 Hz and an amplitude of  ±25° visual angle. It was found that the number of saccades was dependent on object size: at 6 and 9 weeks of age there were more saccades for the smallest objects. With increasing age, the number of saccades decreased. The composite eye movement gain (smooth tracking + saccades) did not change with age but for the 6.5-week group the gain was higher for smaller objects. The gain of the smooth eye tracking increased with age and showed no dependency on object size. In conclusion, the results do not support the concept of two separate systems, the OKR and the SP, each of them processing eye tracking of small and large objects. Finally, it was observed that two infants at 6.5 weeks of age who used considerable head movements did not inhibit the vestibular-ocular response.

  • 15.
    Stapel, Janny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Child & Babylab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Child & Babylab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala Univ, Uppsala Child & Babylab, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Infants' Use of Multisensory Information for Postural Control2016In: 2016 Joint IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics (ICDL-EpiRob), New York: IEEE, 2016, p. 202-203Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    von Hofsten, C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rosander, K
    Development of smooth pursuit tracking in young infants1997In: Vision Research, Vol. 37, p. 1799-1810Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    von Hofsten, C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rosander, K
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The development of gaze control and predictive tracking in young infant1996In: Vision Research, Vol. 36, p. 81-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Perception-action in children with ASD2012In: Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5145, E-ISSN 1662-5145, no NOVArticle, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do disturbances to perception and action relate to the deficiencies expressed by children with autism? The ability to predict what is going to happen next is crucial for the construction of all actions and children develop these predictive abilities early in development. Children with autism, however, are deficient in the ability to foresee future events and to plan movements and movement sequences. They are also deficient in the understanding of other people's actions. This includes communicative actions as they are ultimately based on movements. Today there are two promising neurobiological interpretation of ASD. First, there is strong evidence that the Mirror Neuron System (MNS) is impaired. As stated by this hypothesis, action production and action understanding are intimately related. Both these functions rely on predictive models of the sensory consequences of actions and depend on connectivity between the parietal and pre-motor areas. Secondly, action prediction is accomplished through a system that includes a loop from the posterior parietal cortex through the cerebellum and back to the premotor and motor areas of the brain. Impairment of this loop is probably also part of the explanation of the prediction problems in children with ASD. Both the cortico-cerebellar loop and the MNS rely on distant neural connections. There are multiple evidence that such connections are weak in children with autism.

  • 19.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Development of Sensorimotor Intelligence in Infants2018In: Studying The Perception-Action System As A Model System For Understanding Development / [ed] Plumert, J M, Elsevier, 2018, p. 73-106Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infancy is the most dynamic part of human development. During this period, all basic sensorimotor and cognitive abilities are established. In this chapter, we will trace some of the important achievements of this development with a focus on how infants achieve predictive control of actions, i.e., how they come to coordinate their behavior with the ongoing events in the world without lagging behind. With the maturation of the brain, new possibilities that have profound effects on cognition open up. Some of them are core abilities, i.e., they function at birth or very early in development. Important examples are the structured perception of objects and surfaces and the control of arm movements. Closely after birth, infants move their arms to the vicinity of objects in front of them demonstrating that they have some control of their arms and indicating that they perceive objects as such. Another example is the rapid onset of smooth-pursuit eye movements during the second month of life and the emerging ability to predict when and where an occluded moving object will reappear. At 4 months of age, out of sight is no longer of mind. The child's sensorimotor system is especially designed to facilitate the extraction of knowledge about the world including other people. In addition, the infant is endowed with motives that ensure that the innate predispositions are transformed into a system of knowledge for guiding actions predictively. By perceiving and acting on the world, infants develop their cognition and through developmental studies; we can learn more about these processes.

  • 20.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Vishton, P
    Spelke, E.S.
    Feng, Q.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Predictive action in infancy: Tracking and reaching for moving objects1998In: Cognition, ISSN 0010-0277, E-ISSN 1873-7838, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 255-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because action plans must anticipate the states of the world which will be obtained when the actions take place, effective actions depend on predictions. The present experiments begin to explore the principles underlying early-developing predictions of object motion, by focusing on 6-month-old infants' head tracking and reaching for moving objects. Infants were presented with an object that moved into reaching space on four trajectories: two linear trajectories that intersected at the center of a display and two trajectories containing a sudden turn at the point of intersection. In two studies, infants' tracking and reaching provided evidence for an extrapolation of the object motion on linear paths, in accord with the principle of inertia. This tendency was remarkably resistant to counter-evidence, for it was observed even after repeated presentations of an object that violated the principle of inertia by spontaneously stopping and then moving in a new direction. In contrast to the present findings, infants fail to extrapolate linear object motion in preferential looking experiments, suggesting that early-developing knowledge of object motion, like mature knowledge, is embedded in multiple systems of representation.

  • 21. Witherington, David
    et al.
    von Hofsten, Claes
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rosander, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Robinette, Amanda
    Woollacott, Marjorie
    The development of anticipatory postural adjustments in Infancy2002In: Infancy, Vol. 3, p. 495-517Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 21 of 21
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