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  • 1.
    Alfonsson, Sven
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parling, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Screening of Adult ADHD Among Patients Presenting for Bariatric Surgery2012In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 918-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of bariatric surgery, research on symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and their interrelationships with other psychological risk factors such as depression and anxiety is scarce. The symptoms of adult ADHD seem to be common in the obese population, but they are rarely investigated before bariatric surgery. ADHD-related symptoms such as impulsivity have at the same time been identified as potential risk factors for less successful weight loss among bariatric surgery patients. The aims of the current study were to screen for symptoms of adult ADHD and to investigate their relationships with other psychological risk factors. Candidates for bariatric surgery ( = 187) were anonymously screened for symptoms of anxiety, depression, and adult ADHD, in addition to disordered eating patterns, by means of questionnaires. The relations between these symptoms were investigated. In the current sample, 10% of patients screened positively for adult ADHD, and the symptoms of adult ADHD were significantly correlated with those of anxiety, depression, and disordered eating. The results show that adult ADHD is more common in this clinical group than in the general population (4%) and that adult ADHD is associated with disordered eating patterns, depression, and anxiety. Further prospective research, using multivariate analysis, is needed to investigate whether the symptoms of adult ADHD, and their interaction with anxiety, depression, or disordered eating, may possibly constitute a risk factor in terms of difficulties in adhering to the post-surgery regime and its potential unfavorable outcome.

  • 2.
    Alfonsson, Sven
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parling, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet.
    Self-€reported symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder among obese patients seeking bariatric surgery and its relation to alcohol consumption, disordered eating and gender2013In: Clinical Obesity, ISSN 1758-8103, E-ISSN 1758-8111, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 124-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is already known about this subject

    • Symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are common among people with obesity.
    • Symptoms of ADHD are associated with other impulsive behaviours.
    • Impulsivity can manifest differently in women and men.

    What this study adds

    • The prevalence of ADHD symptoms was equal in both sexes in this patient group.
    • ADHD symptoms were associated with hazardous alcohol consumption in men but not in women.
    • It may be important to investigate several comorbid conditions simultaneously instead of a single diagnosis.

    Eating disorders and adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), both characterized by deficits in impulse control, are common among bariatric surgery patients. Previous studies in other groups have found gender differences in how symptoms of ADHD and eating disorders manifest as women show more disordered eating and men show more risk consumption of alcohol. In the present study, the association between symptoms of adult ADHD, eating disorders and hazardous alcohol consumption was investigated, while considering gender differences. Self-report questionnaires were obtained from 276 bariatric surgery patients 3–6 months before surgery. The prevalence rates of adult ADHD and binge eating disorder (BED) were 8.6% and 6.3%, respectively, with no evidence of gender difference in the prevalence rates. Hazardous alcohol consumption was reported by a significantly larger portion of men (16.9%) than women (8.6%). There was an association between adult ADHD and both BED and hazardous alcohol consumption. However, symptoms of adult ADHD were associated with hazardous alcohol consumption in men but not in women. Our results suggest gender differences in hazardous alcohol consumption and self-reported symptoms of disordered eating despite similar prevalence rate of BED, but no gender difference in symptoms of adult ADHD. Finally, as the associations between these variables seem to be different in women and men, future

  • 3. Andersson, Gerhard
    et al.
    Asmundson, Gordon J G
    Carlbring, Per
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hofmann, Stefan G
    Stewart, Sherry H
    Is CBT already the dominant paradigm in psychotherapy research and practice?2005In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Asmundson, Gordon
    et al.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Carlbring, Per
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hofmann, Stefan
    Stewart, Sherry
    Cognitive behaviour therapy in full flight2004In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 113-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ata, Ghaderi
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Psychometric properties of the Swedish version of Self-concept Questionnaire2005In: European journal of Psychological Assessment, Vol. 21, p. 139-146Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Ata, Ghaderi
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Foundation of the Self and the Assessment of Self-esteem2006In: The Concept of Self in Psychology, Nova Science Publishers , 2006Chapter in book (Other scientific)
  • 7.
    Ata, Ghaderi
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ätstörningar2006In: Kognitiv beteendeterapi inom psykiatrin., Natur & Kultur , 2006Chapter in book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 8.
    Ata, Ghaderi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Malin, Mårtensson
    Hanna, Schwan
    Primary prevention of eating disorders: A randomized trial of “everybody’s different” prevention program.2005In: Eating Disorders: The journal of Treatment and Prevention, Vol. 13, p. 245-259Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Bohman, B.
    et al.
    Eriksson, M.
    Lind, M.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Forsberg, L.
    Rasmussen, F.
    Infrequent attention to dietary and physical activity behaviours in conversations in Swedish child health services2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 5, p. 520-524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To investigate conversations between nurses and parents in Swedish child health services and to assess to what extent attention is directed towards dietary and physical activity behaviours in children. Methods Twenty-three nurses audio-recorded one session each. Recordings were assessed and topics were classified according to predetermined categories. Results The three most frequent topics of conversation concerned physical examinations of the child (30% of session time), talking to the child to establish or maintain contact and interest (15%), and development of language skills (12%). Dietary habits came on fourth place (10%), and physical activity ranked 14 (4%). Conclusion Attention to dietary and physical activity behaviours in children is infrequent in Swedish child health services. Concern is raised about the efficacy of prevention efforts against childhood obesity.

  • 10. Bohman, Benjamin
    et al.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Rasmussen, Finn
    Psychometric Properties of a New Measure of Parental Self-Efficacy for Promoting Healthy Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviors in Children2013In: European Journal of Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1015-5759, E-ISSN 2151-2426, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 291-298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of validated measures of parental self-efficacy (PSE) covering both physical activity and dietary behaviors in children which can be used to prevent childhood obesity. This study developed a new measure of PSE for promoting healthy physical activity and dietary behaviors in children and assessed its psychometric properties. Participants were mothers (n = 2,232) with 3-year-old first-born children living in Stockholm, Sweden. The mothers responded to questionnaires measuring PSE, locus of control, and self-esteem. Exploratory factor analysis yielded a three-factor structure, interpreted as PSE for promoting healthy dietary behaviors in children (Factor 1), PSE for limit-setting of unhealthy dietary or physical activity behaviors in children (Factor 2), and PSE for promoting healthy physical activity behaviors in children (Factor 3). The factor model was supported by confirmatory factor analysis. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the new PSE measure were high; discriminant validity was adequate. The Parental Self-Efficacy for Promoting Healthy Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviors in Children Scale (PSEPAD) shows promise as a valuable instrument in childhood obesity prevention.

  • 11. Enebrink, Pia
    et al.
    Hogstrom, Jens
    Forster, Martin
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Internet-based parent management training: A randomized controlled study2012In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 240-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The current study evaluated the efficacy of an Internet-based parent-training program for children with conduct problems. Dose-response ratio and costs for the program were also considered.

    Method: Parents of 104 children (aged 3-12 years) were randomly allocated to either parent training or a waitlist control condition. Diagnostic assessment was conducted at baseline and parent ratings of child externalizing behaviors and parent strategies were completed before and after treatment and at 6-month follow-up.

    Results: At post-treatment assessment, children whose parent(s) had received the intervention showed a greater reduction in conduct problems compared to the waitlist children. Between group intent-to-treat effect sizes (Cohen's d) on the Eyberg Intensity and Problem scales were .42 and .72, respectively (study completers .66 and 1.08). In addition, parents in the intervention group reported less use of harsh and inconsistent discipline after the treatment, as well as more positive praise. Effects on behavior problems were maintained at 6-month follow-up.

    Conclusions: The results support the efficacy of parent training, administered through Internet, with outcomes comparable to many of the group-based parent training programs. The efficacy, low cost, and higher accessibility make this intervention a fitting part in a stepped-care model.

  • 12.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Does individualization matter? A randomized trial of standardized (focused) versus individualized (broad) cognitive behavior therapy for bulimia nervosa.2006In: Behav Res Ther, ISSN 0005-7967, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 273-88Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Parling, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lev med din kropp: Om acceptans och självkänsla2009 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Scott, Berit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Coping in dieting and eating disorders: A population-based study2000In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, ISSN 0022-3018, E-ISSN 1539-736X, Vol. 188, no 5, p. 273-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of different coping strategies, measured by the Ways of Coping Questionnaire was investigated among 1157 women (18 to 30 years), randomly selected from the general population of Sweden as part of a longitudinal study. Subjects were clustered into five groups: subjects with past or current eating disorders (ED), and subjects with no ED but with past, current, or no history of dieting. Subjects with past or current ED reported significantly higher levels of escape avoidance and lower levels of seeking social support and purposeful problem solving compared with subjects with neither ED nor dieting. These group comparisons were then reanalyzed with sum of depressive symptoms as a covariate in covariate analyses. The only significant difference between the groups concerned the use of escape avoidance. The significant differences in the use of escape-avoidance strategies may motivate more extensive training in coping in the context of prevention and treatment of ED and maladaptive dieting.

  • 15.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Scott, Berit
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Pure and guided self-help for full and subthreshold bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder2003In: British Journal of Clinical Psychology, Vol. 42, p. 257-270Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Scott, Berit
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The preliminary reliability and validity of the Survey for Eating Disorders (SEDs): A self-report questionnaire for diagnosing eating disorders.2002In: European Eating Disorders Review, Vol. 10, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Scott, Berit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The reliability and validity of the Swedish version of Body Shape Questionnaire2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 319-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ) were examined using data from three samples: 1) a sample from the general population (n=1157), 2) a student sample (n=124) and 3) a clinical sample (n=90). Analyses showed that a single factor solution might be a reasonable solution as 32 of the 34 items loaded heavily on the first factor. The derived short 14-item version of the BSQ also showed a coherent structure with all the items loading on one single factor. The BSQ showed high test-retest reliability, very high internal consistency, ranging from .94 to .97, and high split-half reliability (above .93). Furthermore, it showed high validity by correlating highly with the body dissatisfaction subscale of the Eating Disorders Inventory (r=.72 and higher), and high discriminant validity. Thus, the Swedish version of the BSQ showed good concurrent and discriminant validity as well as high reliability.

  • 18. Hayden-Wade, Helen A
    et al.
    Stein, Richard I
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Saelens, Brian E
    Zabinski, Marion F
    Wilfley, Denise E
    Prevalence, characteristics, and correlates of teasing experiences among overweight children vs. non-overweight peers.2005In: Obes Res, ISSN 1071-7323, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 1381-92Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Hogstrom, Jens
    et al.
    Enebrink, Pia
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Moderating Role of Child Callous-Unemotional Traits in an Internet-Based Parent-Management Training Program2013In: Journal of family psychology, ISSN 0893-3200, E-ISSN 1939-1293, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 314-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although parent management training (PMT) is generally considered the treatment of choice for children with conduct problems, some specific adaptations might be essential for various subgroups of parents or children to benefit well from PMT. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of child callous-unemotional (CU) traits on the outcome of an Internet-based PMT program for parents of children with conduct problems (n = 57; mean age 6.65). Within a randomized controlled trial of PMT, children assigned to the intervention group were categorized and compared as either "high-CU" (n = 8) or "low-CU" (n = 49) based on a cut-off score on the CU subscale of the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; Frick & Hare, 2001). CU traits in children were associated with more severe conduct problems at baseline, as well as more hyperactivity and peer-related problems. Treatment outcome, in terms of conduct-problem reduction, was poor in the high-CU group compared with the low-CU group, despite the fact that parents in both groups improved equally in parenting skills. The same pattern of results emerged after controlling for initial difficulties of conduct problems and other pretreatment differences between the groups. Elevated levels of CU traits in children seem to contribute to an inferior treatment response in PMT. These findings call for more attention on empathy and emotional patterns in the assessment of children with conduct problems.

  • 20.
    Holmes, Emily A.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden;MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England;Cent & North West London NHS Fdn Trust, Forced Migrat Trauma Serv, London, England;London Sch Econ, Dept Psychol & Behav Sci, London, England.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden;MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England;Cent & North West London NHS Fdn Trust, Forced Migrat Trauma Serv, London, England;London Sch Econ, Dept Psychol & Behav Sci, London, England.
    Eriksson, Ellinor
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden;MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England;Cent & North West London NHS Fdn Trust, Forced Migrat Trauma Serv, London, England;London Sch Econ, Dept Psychol & Behav Sci, London, England.
    Lauri, Klara Olofsdotter
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden;MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England;Cent & North West London NHS Fdn Trust, Forced Migrat Trauma Serv, London, England;London Sch Econ, Dept Psychol & Behav Sci, London, England.
    Kukacka, Olivia M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden;MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England;Cent & North West London NHS Fdn Trust, Forced Migrat Trauma Serv, London, England;London Sch Econ, Dept Psychol & Behav Sci, London, England.
    Mamish, Maya
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden;MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England;Cent & North West London NHS Fdn Trust, Forced Migrat Trauma Serv, London, England;London Sch Econ, Dept Psychol & Behav Sci, London, England.
    James, Ella L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden;MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England;Cent & North West London NHS Fdn Trust, Forced Migrat Trauma Serv, London, England;London Sch Econ, Dept Psychol & Behav Sci, London, England.
    Visser, Renee M.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden;MRC, Cognit & Brain Sci Unit, Cambridge, England;Cent & North West London NHS Fdn Trust, Forced Migrat Trauma Serv, London, England;London Sch Econ, Dept Psychol & Behav Sci, London, England.
    'I Can't Concentrate': A Feasibility Study with Young Refugees in Sweden on Developing Science-Driven Interventions for Intrusive Memories Related to Trauma2017In: Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, ISSN 1352-4658, E-ISSN 1469-1833, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 97-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The number of refugees is the highest ever worldwide. Many have experienced trauma in home countries or on their escape which has mental health sequelae. Intrusive memories comprise distressing scenes of trauma which spring to mind unbidden. Development of novel scalable psychological interventions is needed urgently. Aims: We propose that brief cognitive science-driven interventions should be developed which pinpoint a focal symptom alongside a means to monitor it using behavioural techniques. The aim of the current study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the methodology required to develop such an intervention. Method: In this study we recruited 22 refugees (16-25 years), predominantly from Syria and residing in Sweden. Participants were asked to monitor the frequency of intrusive memories of trauma using a daily diary; rate intrusions and concentration; and complete a 1-session behavioural intervention involving Tetris game-play via smartphone. Results: Frequency of intrusive memories was high, and associated with high levels of distress and impaired concentration. Levels of engagement with study procedures were highly promising. Conclusions: The current work opens the way for developing novel cognitive behavioural approaches for traumatized refugees that are mechanistically derived, freely available and internationally scalable.

  • 21.
    Johansson, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Stroop interference for food- and body-related words: A meta-analysis2005In: Eating behaviors, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 271-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to cognitive theories of eating disorders, biased information processing in favour of dysfunctional attitudes about food and body appearance play a vital role in the development and maintenance of such disorders. Data from 27 studies evaluating Stroop interference for food- and body-related words with negative overtones were included in a meta-analysis in order to investigate whether such processing biases are specific to eating disordered samples. Participants were females characterised as eating disordered, non-eating disordered but nevertheless over-concerned with body appearance and eating, and normal controls. Mean Stroop interference for eating disordered females was of medium effect size (Cohen´s d = 0.48) and significantly larger than for both non-eating disordered females concerned with body appearance and eating, and normal control females (both d = 0.21). Stroop interference for eating disordered females was thus of fairly modest magnitude where it was unclear whether such interference is specific to this sample.

  • 22.
    Johansson, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    The role of sensitivity to external food cues in attentional allocation to food words on dot probe and Stroop tasks2004In: Eating behaviors, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 261-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of sensitivity of external food cues in producing attentional bias toward food-, body-weight-, and shape-related words on the Stroop and the dot probe tasks was examined. Contrary to expectations, individuals high in responsiveness to external food cues directed attention away from food words, whereas individuals low in responsiveness to external food cues directed their attention toward food words on the dot probe task. No significant differences were found between the groups high and low in sensitivity to external food cues for body words on the dot probe task or for food or body words on the Stroop task. Results are discussed with reference to theoretical views of differences between the Stroop and the dot probe tasks.

  • 23. Lapidoth, J. de Man
    et al.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Norring, C.
    Binge eating in surgical weight-loss treatments: Long-term associations with weight loss, health related quality of life (HRQL), and psychopathology2011In: Eating and Weight Disorders, ISSN 1124-4909, E-ISSN 1590-1262, Vol. 16, no 4, p. E263-E269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies that have investigated the relationship between binge eating and the long-term outcome of bariatric surgery have shown mixed results. Does binge eating affect long-term BMI, health-related quality of life (HRQL), or psychopathology after surgery?

    METHODS: We assessed 173 bariatric patients before and three years after weight loss surgery with regard to weight, binge eating, HRQL, and psychopathology.

    RESULTS: Binge eating before and after weight loss surgery was unrelated to long-term BMI outcome. Binge eating after weight loss surgery was associated with more psychopathology and lower HRQL.

    CONCLUSIONS: Binge eating before or after weight loss surgery does not predict long-term BMI outcome. Therefore, exclusions from surgery for this reason alone are difficult to motivate. However, results show that binge eating after weight loss surgery is common and is associated with more psychopathology and lower HRQL, which might increase the vulnerability for future weight regain and complications beyond the follow-up period of the present study. The high rate of binge eating after surgery and its negative association with HRQL and psychopathology suggest that we need to be observant of the occurrence and potential effects of binge eating in the context of bariatric surgery.

  • 24. Ljotsson, B.
    et al.
    Lundin, C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Mitsell, K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Carlbring, P.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Remote treatment of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder: A randomized trial of Internet-assisted cognitive behavioural therapy2007In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 649-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the efficacy of self-help based on cognitive behaviour therapy in combination with Internet support in the treatment of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. After confirming the diagnosis with an in-person interview, 73 patients were randomly allocated to treatment or a waiting list control group. Treated individuals showed marked improvement after 12 weeks of self-help compared to the control group on both primary and secondary outcome measures. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed that 37% (46% among completers) had no binge eating or purging at the end of the treatment and a considerable number of patients achieved clinically significant improvement on most of the other measures as well. The results were maintained at the 6-month follow-up, and provide evidence to support the continued use and development of self-help programmes.

  • 25.
    Ljungman, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Cernvall, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ljungman, Gustaf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Neuropediatrics/Paediatric oncology.
    von Essen, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Ljótsson, Brjánn
    Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    An open trial of individualized face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychological distress in parents of children after end of treatment for childhood cancer including a cognitive behavioral conceptualization2018In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 6, article id e4570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    A subgroup of parents of children who have been treated for childhood cancer report high levels of psychological distress. To date there is no empirically supported psychological treatment targeting cancer-related psychological distress in this population. The aim of the current study was to test the feasibility and preliminarily evaluate the effect of individualized face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for parents of children after the end of treatment for childhood cancer. A secondary aim was to present a cognitive behavioral conceptualization of cancer-related distress for these parents.

    Methods

    An open trial was conducted where 15 parents of children who had completed successful treatment for cancer three months to five years earlier and who reported psychological distress related to a child’s previous cancer disease were provided CBT at a maximum of 15 sessions. Participants were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and three-month follow-up using self-reported psychological distress (including posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), depression, and anxiety) and the diagnostic Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Feasibility outcomes relating to recruitment, data collection, and delivery of the treatment were also examined. Individual case formulations for each participant guided the intervention and these were aggregated and presented in a conceptualization detailing core symptoms and their suggested maintenance mechanisms.

    Results

    A total of 93% of the participants completed the treatment and all of them completed the follow-up assessment. From baseline to post-assessment, parents reported significant improvements in PTSS, depression, and anxiety with medium to large effect sizes (Cohen’s d = 0.65–0.92). Results were maintained or improved at a three-month follow-up. At baseline, seven (47%) participants fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder and four (29%) fulfilled the criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder, compared to none at a post-assessment and a follow-up assessment. The resulting cognitive behavioral conceptualization suggests traumatic stress and depression as the core features of distress, and avoidance and inactivity is suggested as the core maintenance mechanisms.

    Conclusion

    The treatment was feasible and acceptable to the participants. Significant improvements in distress were observed during the study. Overall, results suggest that the psychological treatment for parents of children after end of treatment for childhood cancer used in the current study is promising and should be tested and evaluated in future studies.

  • 26.
    Parling, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cernvall, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    Ramklint, Mia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Holmgren, Sven
    Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A randomised trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa after daycare treatment, including five-year follow-up2016In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 16, article id 272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: No specific psychotherapy for adult anorexia nervosa (AN) has shown superior effect. Maintenance factors in AN (over-evaluation of control over eating, weight and shape) were addressed via Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). The study aimed to compare 19 sessions of ACT with treatment as usual (TAU), after 9 to 12weeks of daycare, regarding recovery and risk of relapse up to five years. METHODS: Patients with a full, sub-threshold or partial AN diagnosis from an adult eating disorder unit at a hospital were randomized to ACT (n=24) and TAU (n=19). The staff at the hospital, as well as the participants, were unaware of the allocation until the last week of daycare. Primary outcome measures were body mass index (BMI) and specific eating psychopathology. Analyses included mixed model repeated measures and odds ratios. RESULTS: Groups did not differ regarding recovery and relapse using a metric of BMI and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). There were only significant time effects. However, odds ratio indicated that ACT participants were more likely to reach good outcome. The study was underpowered due to unexpected low inflow of patients and high attrition. CONCLUSION: Longer treatment, more focus on established perpetuating factors and weight restoration integrated with ACT might improve outcome. Potential pitfalls regarding future trials on AN are discussed. Trial registration number ISRCTN 12106530. Retrospectively registered 08/06/2016.

  • 27.
    Parling, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cernvall, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Psychosocial oncology and supportive care.
    Stewart, Ian
    School of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway.
    Barnes-Holmes, Dermot
    Department of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Maynooth.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Using the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure to Compare Implicit Pro-Thin/Anti-Fat Attitudes of Patients with Anorexia Nervosa and Non-clinical Controls2012In: Eating Disorders, ISSN 1064-0266, E-ISSN 1532-530X, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 127-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implicit pro-thin/anti-fat attitudes was investigated among a mixed group of patients with full and sub-threshold Anorexia Nervosa (n = 17), and a matched-age control group (n = 17). The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) was employed to measure implicit pro-thin and anti-fat attitudes towards Self and Others in addition to ‘striving for thinness’ and ‘avoidance of fatness’. The clinical group showed an implicit pro-fat attitude towards Others and stronger anti-fat attitudes towards Self and avoidance of fatness compared with controls. The findings are discussed in relation to the over-evaluation of weight and shape in the clinical group.

  • 28.
    Parling, Thomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Mortazavi, Modtjaba
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Alexithymia and emotional awareness in anorexia nervosa: time for a shift in the measurement of the concept?2010In: Eating Behaviors, ISSN 1471-0153, E-ISSN 1873-7358, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 205-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study compared 35 patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) with an age matched control group using the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20; a self-report instrument) and the Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (LEAS; a performance-based instrument). Depression and anxiety have been shown to account for elevated levels of alexithymia in AN, and an elevated level of perfectionism might affect self-reporting in general. The AN-group reported a higher level of alexithymia on the TAS-20 compared to the control group, a difference that disappeared after controlling for depression or anxiety (but not for perfectionism). The findings suggest that the AN-patients believe that they have difficulties in identifying and reporting emotions, but actually perform as well as the control group when confronted with the task of identifying and reporting their emotions according to LEAS. It might be time to rethink the measurement of alexithymia. Maybe, similar to assessment of personality disorders, it should not be assessed when patients are depressed, or it should be assessed through instruments and modalities that are not sensitive to the mood state of the patient.

  • 29.
    Ramklint, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Jeansson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Holmgren, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Assessing personality disorders in eating disordered patients using the SCID-II: Influence of measures and timing on prevalence rate2010In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 218-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The SCID-II Personality Questionnaire is available as a screening tool to shorten the time it takes to perform the SCID-II interview. However, very little is known about combining the questionnaire with the interview in eating disordered individuals. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of personality disorder (PD) among patients with eating disorders (ED) by combining initial screening self-assessment with a later interview. not performed until axis I symptoms decreased. This was performed on 154 patients with ED. According to the initial self-assessment, the rate of any PD was 90%; however, according to the later SCID-II interview, the rate decreased to 37%. In a sub-sample of 15 patients, the questionnaire was filled out twice: at intake and at the time of the interview. In the subgroup performing the questionnaire twice, there was no decline in PD symptoms over time. However, the PD rate decreased significantly when the patient was assessed by the interview. These findings indicate that the influence of measures might be greater than the influence of timing. The findings support that prevalence rates of PD in eating disordered patients are high, but not as high as it has commonly been reported.

  • 30.
    Ramklint, Mia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Jeansson, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Holmgren, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Guided self-help as the first step for bulimic symptoms: Implementation of a stepped-care model within specialized psychiatry2012In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, ISSN 0276-3478, E-ISSN 1098-108X, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 70-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This study describes the implementation and effectiveness of the first step, guided self-help (GSH), in a clinical setting, of a stepped-care model of cognitive behavior therapy for patients with bulimic symptoms.

    Method: Eighty-nine patients participated.

    Results: In the intent to-treat analyses, the effect sizes were small to moderate (0.25-0.66). However, the effect sizes were substantially larger (0.44-1.66) for the patients who completed all the GSH sessions (45%). The majority of non-completers stayed within psychiatric services. Supplementary treatments were mostly directed towards comorbid conditions, especially depression. Those discontinuing treatment in advance where characterized by more lifetime diagnoses and higher ratings on the restraint subscale of the EDE-Q.

    Discussion: GSH within specialized psychiatry might be effective for about 30% of the patients. There is no indication of patients losing their confidence in psychiatric services by being offered GSH as the first treatment.

  • 31.
    Weineland, Sandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Alfonson, S.
    Dahl, Joanne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Screening for Disordered Eating following Obesity Surgery: Psychometric properties of the Disordered Eating in Bariatric Surgery (DEBS)2012Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Welch, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Birgegård, Andreas
    Parling, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire and Clinical Impairment Assessment Questionnaire: General population and clinical norms for young adult women in Sweden2011In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Optimal use of assessment instruments for the detection and diagnosis of eating disorders (ED) depends on the availability of normative data. The aim of this work was to, for the first time, collect norms for both the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and the newly developed Clinical Impairment Assessment (CIA) Scale from a general population of young women in Sweden, as well as from a clinical population of ED patients in Sweden. Participants were composed of both a randomized sample from the general population of women aged 18-30 years (N = 760) as well as from a clinical population aged 18-66 years (N = 2383). Data for the clinical population was extracted from the Stepwise database. Mean scores, standard deviations and percentile ranks for the global for the EDE-Q (as well as its subscales) and the CIA are presented. Prevalence figures of key eating disorder behaviors are also reported. Comparisons are made between the results in the present study with other existing normative studies on the EDE-Q and the CIA. The present study contributes to improving the accuracy of the interpretation of scores of the widely used self-report measure of ED, the EDE-Q, and the CIA, both of which play important roles in for diagnosis, prevention and intervention of ED.

  • 33.
    Welch, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lagerström, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Body Shape Questionnaire: Psychometric properties of the short version (BSQ-8C) and norms from the general Swedish population.2012In: Body image, ISSN 1740-1445, E-ISSN 1873-6807, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 547-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for brief, sensitive, and reliable instruments for contextual assessment of body dissatisfaction. Suitable selection and optimal use of psychological assessment instruments requires appropriate psychometric as well as normative data. Two studies were conducted to investigate the psychometric properties and collect general population norms for a short, eight item version of the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ-8C). In the first study, a sample of undergraduate students (N=182) was recruited to investigate the psychometric properties of the BSQ-8C, while in the second study a sample from the general population of Swedish women aged 18-30 years (N=747) was used to collect norms. The test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and convergent validity for BSQ-8C were high. Given the questionnaire's briefness and good psychometric properties, particularly when used in conjunction with norms, the BSQ-8C is considered a valuable instrument for measuring body shape dissatisfaction among young adult women.

  • 34.
    Westerberg-Jacobson, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Edlund, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Risk and Protective Factors for Disturbed Eating: A 7-Year Longitudinal Study of Eating Attitudes and Psychological Factors in Adolescent Girls and their Parents2010In: Eating and Weight Disorders, ISSN 1124-4909, E-ISSN 1590-1262, Vol. 15, no 4, p. e208-e218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this seven-year longitudinal study of 228 girls (9 and 13 year olds) were 1) to examine the predictive value of eating attitudes, a wish to be thinner, dieting, perfectionism, self-esteem and  Body Mass Index; 2) to examine the girls’ parents’ eating attitudes and perfectionism in relation to the development of disturbed eating attitudes, seven years later; and 3) to examine whether normal body weight, healthy eating attitudes and low perfectionism together with high self-esteem might operate as protective factors for the later development of disturbed eating attitudes. The pre-adolescent girls (9-year olds) “wish to be thinner” and fathers’ EAT scores contributed most to the prediction of disturbed eating attitudes seven years later. Corresponding analysis for the adolescent girls (13-year olds) showed that a “wish to be thinner” and mothers’ rating on perfectionism contributed most to the prediction of disturbed eating attitudes seven years later. Protective factors were low BMI and more healthy eating attitudes - especially moderated by high self-esteem, and a low-to-medium degree of perfectionism. High self-esteem appeared to be a protective factor when the girls had a high degree of perfectionism. These results suggest that it is important to focus on healthy eating attitudes at home to prevent overweight in early childhood, enhance self-esteem and to take a critical stand toward the thinness ideal in our society.

  • 35.
    Westerberg-Jacobson, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Ghaderi, Ata
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Edlund, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    A longitudinal study of motives for wishing to be thinner and weight-control practices in 7-to 18-year-old Swedish girls2012In: European eating disorders review, ISSN 1072-4133, E-ISSN 1099-0968, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 294-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main aim of this seven-year longitudinal study, of 411 Swedish pre-adolescent girls, (aged 7–11 years, Year 1) was to examine a wish to be thinner, dieting attempts, described motives for wishing to be thinner, and weight-control practices. A further aim was to examine to what extent BMI accounted for motives for wishing to be thinner and weight control practices. A wish to be thinner and dieting attempts increased significantly with increasing age between the ages of 9 and18. The most frequently reported motive for wishing to be thinner was to “feel better about yourself”. Categories that emerged from the qualitative analysis of self-described motives for the wish to be thinner were for example to “correspond to the societal ideal” and to “wear particular clothes”. A majority of the girls adopted weight control practices that would be considered as healthy, but extreme weight control practices increased with age. Girls with BMIs over the 75th percentile reported a greater number of motives for wishing to be thinner and used extreme weight control practices significantly more often than the other girls. However, of the girls who changed BMI from above the 75th percentile to under the 75th percentile, 34.1% reported that they had not used any weight control practices at all. Our results show that girls at a very early age are aware of the ‘thin’ ideal in our society, wish to be thinner, and try to lose weight. The results point to the importance of detecting girls who wish to be thinner as early as possible. If we can employ preventive action in time it is possible that dieting behavior will never develop. By considering the motives for wishing to be thinner, preventive efforts might be perceived as more meaningful and relevant to the girls at risk of developing eating disorders.

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