uu.seUppsala universitets publikationer
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 22 av 22
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Akrami, Nazar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Category and Stereotype Activation Revisited: The Intimate Relation between Category and Stereotypes2004Ingår i: The 6th European Social Cognition Network Meeting, Lisboa, Portugal, 2004Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In Study 1 (N = 230), we found that the participants’ explicit prejudice was not related to their knowledge of cultural stereotypes of immigrants in Sweden, and that they associated the social category immigrants with the same national/ethnic categories. In Study 2 (N = 88), employing the category and stereotype words obtained in Study 1 as primes, we examined whether participants with varying degrees of explicit prejudice differed in their automatic stereotyping and implicit prejudice when primed with category or stereotypical words. In accord with our hypothesis, and contrary to previous findings, the results showed that people’s explicit prejudice did not affect their automatic stereotyping and implicit prejudice, neither in the category nor stereotype activation condition. Study 3 (N = 62), employing category priming using facial photographs of Swedes and Immigrants as primes, showed that participants’ implicit prejudice was not moderated by their explicit prejudice. The outcome is discussed in relation to previous research, the distinction between category and stereotype activation, and in terms of the associative strength between a social category and its related stereotypes.

  • 2.
    Akrami, Nazar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ethnic Prejudice: A Matter of Personality or Social Psychology?2005Ingår i: 9th European Congress of Psychology, Granada, Spain., 2005Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 3.
    Akrami, Nazar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ethnic Prejudice: The Explanatory Power of Personality and Social Psychology2005Ingår i: the Conference on Personality, Group and Social Psychology, 2005, s. 7-20Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 4.
    Akrami, Nazar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Explaining Prejudice by Personality: Misleading and Inappropriate?2006Ingår i: 13th European Conference on Personality, Athens, Greece., 2006Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has, almost only, examined prejudice from either a personality or a social psychology perspective with results favoring the one or the other. In five correlational or experimental studies (N = 379, 182, 80, 139, and 148, respectively), the present paper integrates these perspectives. Specifically, we examine whether personality (Big-Five factors, social dominance orientation, and right-wing authoritarianism), or social psychology (group membership, group identification, and contextual factors), or an integration of both is the best way of explaining prejudice. Results from causal modeling and multiple regression analyses showed that a joint personality and social psychology model outperformed the personality-only and the social-psychology-only models. The findings emphasize the importance of integrating various approaches and disciplines to explain psychological phenomena in general and prejudice in particular.

  • 5.
    Akrami, Nazar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Personality Scale Response Latencies as Self-Schema Indicators: A New Look2004Ingår i: The VII European Conference on Psychological Assessment: Malaga, Spain, April 1-4, 2004., 2004Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study (N = 156) we examined the relation between participants’ responses and response latencies to the Big Five personality inventory. Extending previous research, we examined whether the relation between participants’ response latencies (regarded as self-schema indicators) for items of a specific personality trait and their position on that trait is characterised by a linear or curvilinear (quadratic, cubic) trend. Polynomial regression analyses showed consistent support for a quadratic (curvilinear) relation between participants’ positions on the personality traits and their response latencies. Participants scoring high or low on a trait responded faster than those scoring around the mean. This pattern of results lends support to the notion that the relation between personality trait levels and response latencies is characterised by an inverted-U effect. The results are discussed in the light of previous research employing other approaches to examining the self-schema evidence. Further, the potential of using response latency (self-schema) data to improve precision in personality assessment and prediction is discussed.

  • 6.
    Akrami, Nazar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Prejudice: A question of personality or social psychology, or both?2005Ingår i: International Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0020-7594, Vol. 39, nr 5-6, s. 380-Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper focuses on the personality and the social psychology approaches to explaining prejudice. In Study 1, examining the relation between Big-Five basic personality and generalised prejudice (a factor based on ethnic prejudice, sexism, homophobia, and negative attitudes to mentally disabled people), we found Openness to experience and Agreeableness to be the only basic personality variables to be related to generalised prejudice. In Study 2, in addition to basic personality and generalised prejudice we included Social Dominance Orientation (SDO) and Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) and examined various causal models of the relationships among these variables. The best-fitting causal model showed that basic personality had no direct effect on generalised prejudice but an indirect effect transmitted through RWA and SDO. Study 3 examined whether prejudice (sexism) is better explained by personality variables (Big-Five, SDO, and RWA) or social group membership (gender). Based on the outcome of Study 2, causal models were proposed and tested. The results showed that the best causal model to explain prejudice was the one that included the personality as well as social group membership variables. This outcome, also supported by multiple regression analyses, suggests that an integration of the personality and the social psychology approaches to explaining prejudicial beliefs would be the best option. The findings in the three studies are discussed against the background of recent research based on the personality and social psychology approaches to the study of prejudice.

  • 7.
    Akrami, Nazar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Prejudice: Its Personality and Social Psychology Components2004Ingår i: The 28th International Congress of Psychology, Beijing, China, 2004Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the personality and social psychology approaches to explaining prejudice. We examined whether prejudice (sexism) is better explained by personality (Big-Five factors, Social dominance orientation, and Right-wing authoritarianism) or social group membership (gender). Based on our previous research, alternative causal models were compared. The results showed that the best-fitting causal model to explain prejudice was the one that included the personality as well as social group membership variables. This outcome, also supported by multiple regression analyses, suggests that an integration of the personality and the social psychology approaches to explaining prejudicial beliefs would be the best option.

  • 8.
    Akrami, Nazar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Right-wing authoritarianism and social dominance orientation: Their roots in big five personality factors and facets2006Ingår i: Journal of Individual Differences, Vol. 27, s. 117-126Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Extending previous research on the relation of Big-Five personality with right-wing authoritarianism and social dominance orientation, we examined the relationships of Big Five facet scores rather than factor scores. The results (N = 332) of stepwise regression analyses showed that Openness to Experience was the only significant predictor of RWA on factor level, whereas Values and Ideas were significant predictors on facet level. A similar analysis of SDO showed that Agreeableness and Openness to Experience contributed significantly to the prediction on factor level, whereas Tender-Mindedness and Values were the best significant predictors on facet level. The prediction based on facet scores showed to be more accurate that the prediction based on factor scores. A random split of the sample confirmed the robustness of the findings. The results are discussed against the background of the personality and the social psychology approaches to explaining individual differences in prejudice.

  • 9.
    Akrami, Nazar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    The association between implicit and explicit prejudice: The moderating role of motivation to control prejudiced reactions.2005Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, Vol. 46, nr 4, s. 361-366Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 10.
    Akrami, Nazar
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Claesson, Malin
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för neurovetenskap.
    Sonnander, Karin
    Classical and modern prejudice: attitudes toward people with intellectual disabilities.2006Ingår i: Research in Developmental Disabilities, ISSN 0891-4222, E-ISSN 1873-3379, Vol. 27, nr 6, s. 605-617Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In two studies, we examine whether attitudes toward people with intellectual disabilities, like sexism and racism, consist of two forms – a classical and a modern, where the classical is overt and blatant and the modern is more subtle and covert. Self-report scales tapping these two forms were developed in Study 1. Based on confirmatory factor analyses, the results in Study 1 supported our hypothesis and revealed that the modern and classical forms are correlated but distinguishable. This outcome was replicated in Study 2. Construct and discriminatory validations of the scales provided further support for the distinction. The theoretical and practical importance of the results is discussed in relation to previous research on attitudes toward people with intellectual disabilities and other social outgroups.

  • 11.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Socialpsykologi2005Ingår i: Vår tids psykologi / [ed] Hwang, Philip, Stockholm: Natur & Kultur , 2005, s. 275-317Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 12.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Akrami, Nazar
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Personality and Prejudice: From Big-Five Personality Factors to Facets2006Ingår i: 13th European Conference on Personality, Athens, Greece, 2006Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    Extending our previous research on the relation between personality and prejudice, we examined, in two studies, the predictive power of Big Five facet scores instead of factor scores using the NEO-PI-R. In Study 1, our results showed that 18 facets were significantly correlated with generalized prejudice – a composite of ethnic prejudice, sexism, homophobia, and prejudice toward people with intellectual disabilities. Stepwise regression analyses showed that the prediction based on facet scores was significantly stronger than that based on factor scores with Agreeableness (A) and Openness (O) as the strongest factor predictors and with Tender-Mindedness (A) and Values (O) as the strongest facet predictors. In Study 2, we tested the robustness of the findings in Study 1 and examined one specific type of prejudice – sexism. The results were quite in line with those of Study 1 and showed that the prediction of sexism based on facet scores was stronger than that based on factor scores. The results are discussed against the background of previous research on the relationship between personality and prejudice, and in the context of the two major approaches to explaining individual differences in prejudice – the personality and the social psychology approach.

  • 13.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Akrami, Nazar
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Prejudice: A Question of Personality or Social Psychology, or Both?2004Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper focuses on the personality and the social psychology approaches to explaining prejudice. In Study 1, examining the relation between Big-Five basic personality and generalised prejudice (a factor based on ethnic prejudice, sexism, homophobia, and negative attitudes to mentally disabled people), we found Openness to experience and Agreeableness to be the only basic personality variables to be related to generalised prejudice. In Study 2, in addition to basic personality and generalised prejudice we included Social Dominance Orientation (SDO) and Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) and examined various causal models of the relationships among these variables. The best-fitting causal model showed that basic personality had no direct effect on generalised prejudice but an indirect effect transmitted through RWA and SDO. Study 3 examined whether prejudice (sexism) is better explained by personality variables (Big-Five, SDO, and RWA) or social group membership (gender). Based on the outcome of Study 2, causal models were proposed and tested. The results showed that the best causal model to explain prejudice was the one that included the personality as well as social group membership variables. This outcome, also supported by multiple regression analyses, suggests that an integration of the personality and the social psychology approaches to explaining prejudicial beliefs would be the best option. The findings in the three studies are discussed against the background of recent research based on the personality and social psychology approaches to the study of prejudice.

  • 14.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Akrami, Nazar
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Prejudice: Its Personality and Social Psychology Components2004Ingår i: The 4th Nordic Conference on Group and Social Psychology, 2004Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper focuses on the personality and the social psychology approaches to explaining prejudice. In Study 1, examining the relation between Big-Five basic personality and generalised prejudice (a factor based on ethnic prejudice, sexism, homophobia, and negative attitudes to mentally disabled people), we found Openness to Experience and Agreeableness to be related to generalised prejudice. In Study 2, in addition to basic personality and generalised prejudice, we included Social Dominance Orientation (SDO) and Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA) and examined various causal models of the relationships among these variables. The best-fitting causal model showed that generalised prejudice was effected indirectly by Extraversion, Openness to Experience, and Conscientiousness through RWA, and by Agreeableness through SDO, whereas Neuroticism had no effect at all. Thus, basic personality had no direct effect on generalised prejudice but an indirect effect transmitted through RWA and SDO, which both had strong direct effects on generalised prejudice, with RWA capturing basic personality aspects to a greater extent than SDO. Study 3 examined whether prejudice (sexism) is better explained by personality variables (Big-Five, SDO, and RWA) or social group membership (gender). Based on the outcome of Study 2, causal models were proposed and tested. The results showed that the best causal model to explain prejudice was the one that included the personality as well as the social group membership constructs. This outcome, also supported by multiple regression analyses, suggests that an integration of the personality and the social psychology approaches to explaining prejudicial beliefs would be the best option. The findings in the three studies are discussed against the background of recent research based on the personality and social psychology approaches to the study of prejudice.

  • 15.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Akrami, Nazar
    Prejudice: Personality and social psychology components2004Ingår i: Proceeding of the Fourth Nordic Conference on Group and Social Psychology, 2004Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 16.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Akrami, NazarUppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Proceedings of the Conference on Personality, Group and Social Psychology2005Konferensmeddelanden, proceedings (Refereegranskat)
  • 17.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Akrami, Nazar
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Gylje, Magnus
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Zakrisson, Ingrid
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    What matters most to prejudice: Big Five personality, social dominance orientation or right-wing authoritarianism?2004Ingår i: European Journal of Personality, Vol. 18, nr 6, s. 463-482Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas previous research has studied the relation of either 1) personality with prejudice, 2) personality with social dominance orientation (SDO) and right-wing authoritarianism (RWA), or 3) SDO and RWA with prejudice, the present research integrates all approaches within the same model. In our study (N = 183), various causal models of the relationships among the Big Five, SDO, RWA, and generalized prejudice are proposed and tested. Generalized Prejudice scores were obtained from a factor analysis of the scores on various prejudice instruments (racism, sexism, prejudice toward homosexuals, and mentally disabled people) which yielded a one-factor solution. The best-fitting causal model, which was our suggested hypothetical model, showed that Big Five personality had no direct effect on Generalized Prejudice but an indirect effect transmitted through RWA and SDO, where RWA seems to capture personality aspects to a greater extent than SDO. Specifically, Generalized Prejudice was effected indirectly by Extraversion, Openness to Experience, and Conscientiousness through RWA, and by Agreeableness through SDO, whereas Neuroticism had no effect at all. The results are discussed against the background of previous research and the personality and social psychology approaches to the study of prejudice.

  • 18.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Biel, Anders
    Department of Psychology, University of Göteborg.
    Social psychology in Sweden: A brief look2005Ingår i: European Bulletin of Social Psychology, Vol. 17, nr 1, s. 16-30Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 19.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Zuber, Irena
    The office of Cognitive Psychotherapy, Stockholm.
    Konstenius, Marja-Liisa
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University.
    An empirical look at the Defense Mechanism Test (DMT): Reliability and construct validity2005Ingår i: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, ISSN 0036-5564, Vol. 46, nr 3, s. 285-296Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
  • 20. Gärling, Tommy
    et al.
    Backenroth-Ohsako, GunnelEkehammar, BoUppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Diplomacy and psychology: Prevention of armed conflicts after the cold war2006Samlingsverk (redaktörskap) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 21.
    Snellman, Alexandra
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Does Social Group Membership influence Attributions of Responsibility and Subsequent Social Sanctions?2004Ingår i: The 28th International Congress of Psychology, Beijing, China, 2004Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Results of four experiments suggest that social group membership does not influence decision processes concerning help or punishment. But the individual difference variable Social Dominance Orientation may influence this process.

  • 22.
    Snellman, Alexandra
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ekehammar, Bo
    Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi. Uppsala universitet, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för psykologi.
    Ethnic hierarchies, ethnic prejudice, and social dominance orientation2005Ingår i: JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY & APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, ISSN 1052-9284, Vol. 15, nr 2, s. 83-94Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
1 - 22 av 22
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf