uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Cepeda, Diana
    et al.
    Ng, Hwee-Fang
    Sharifi, Hamid Reza
    Mahmoudi, Salah
    Soto Cerrato, Vanessa
    Fredlund, Erik
    Magnusson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Nilsson, Helen
    Malyukova, Alena
    Rantala, Juha
    Klevebring, Daniel
    Vinals, Francesc
    Bhaskaran, Nimesh
    Zakaria, Siti Mariam
    Rahmanto, Aldwin Suryo
    Grotegut, Stefan
    Nielsen, Michael Lund
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    Sun, Dahui
    Lerner, Mikael
    Navani, Sanjay
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Widschwendter, Martin
    Uhlen, Mathias
    Jirstrom, Karin
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Wohlschlegel, James
    Grander, Dan
    Spruck, Charles
    Larsson, Lars-Gunnar
    Sangfelt, Olle
    CDK-mediated activation of the SCFFBXO28 ubiquitin ligase promotes MYC-driven transcription and tumourigenesis and predicts poor survival in breast cancer2013In: EMBO Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1757-4676, E-ISSN 1757-4684, Vol. 5, no 7, p. 1067-1086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SCF (Skp1/Cul1/F-box) ubiquitin ligases act as master regulators of cellular homeostasis by targeting key proteins for ubiquitylation. Here, we identified a hitherto uncharacterized F-box protein, FBXO28 that controls MYC-dependent transcription by non-proteolytic ubiquitylation. SCFFBXO28 activity and stability are regulated during the cell cycle by CDK1/2-mediated phosphorylation of FBXO28, which is required for its efficient ubiquitylation of MYC and downsteam enhancement of the MYC pathway. Depletion of FBXO28 or overexpression of an F-box mutant unable to support MYC ubiquitylation results in an impairment of MYC-driven transcription, transformation and tumourigenesis. Finally, in human breast cancer, high FBXO28 expression and phosphorylation are strong and independent predictors of poor outcome. In conclusion, our data suggest that SCFFBXO28 plays an important role in transmitting CDK activity to MYC function during the cell cycle, emphasizing the CDK-FBXO28-MYC axis as a potential molecular drug target in MYC-driven cancers, including breast cancer.

  • 2. Fredholm, H.
    et al.
    Magnusson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindstrom, L. S.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences.
    Eaker, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Bergh, J.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Frisell, J.
    Fredriksson, I.
    Breast cancer in young women - age a risk factor only in those not given chemotherapy2014In: Breast, ISSN 0960-9776, E-ISSN 1532-3080, Vol. 23, no S1, p. S12-S12, article id HM31Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Fredholm, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Breast & Endocrine Surg, P9 03, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Magnusson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Lindstrom, Linda S.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Tobin, Nicholas P.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, Canc Ctr Karolinska, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Bergh, Jonas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Pathol & Oncol, Canc Ctr Karolinska, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Oncol, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Regional Cancer Center, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical and experimental pathology.
    Frisell, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Breast & Endocrine Surg, P9 03, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Fredriksson, Irma
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Breast & Endocrine Surg, P9 03, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Breast cancer in young women and prognosis: How important are proliferation markers?2017In: European Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0959-8049, E-ISSN 1879-0852, Vol. 84, p. 278-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    Compared to middle-aged women, young women with breast cancer have a higher risk of systemic disease. We studied expression of proliferation markers in relation to age and subtype and their association with long-term prognosis.

    Methods:

    Distant disease-free survival (DDFS) was studied in 504 women aged <40 years and 383 women aged >= 40 years from a population-based cohort. Information on patient characteristics, treatment and follow-up was collected from medical records. Tissue microarrays were produced for analysis of oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor (PR), Her2, Ki-67 and cyclins.

    Results:

    Young women with luminal tumours had significantly higher expression of Ki-67 and cyclins. Proliferation markers were prognostic only within this subtype. Ki-67 was a prognostic indicator only in young women with luminal PR+ tumours. The optimal cut-off for Ki-67 varied by age. High expression of cyclin E1 conferred a better DDFS in women aged <40 years with luminal PR- tumours (hazard ratio [HR] 0.47 [0.24-0.92]). Age < 40 years was an independent risk factor of DDFS exclusively in women with luminal B PR+ tumours (HR 2.35 [1.22-4.50]). Young women with luminal B PR- tumours expressing low cyclin E1 had a six-fold risk of distant disease compared with luminal A ( HR 6.21 [2.17-17.6]).

    Conclusions:

    The higher expression of proliferation markers in young women does not have a strong impact on prognosis. Ki-67 is only prognostic in the subgroup of young women with luminal PR tumours. The only cyclin adding prognostic value beyond subtype is cyclin E1. Age is an independent prognostic factor only in women with luminal B PR+ tumours.

  • 4.
    Fredholm, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery and Department of Breast- and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm..
    Magnusson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindström, Linda
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Stockholm.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Regional Cancer Center, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala. King’s College London, Medical School, Division of Cancer Studies, London, United Kingdom .
    Eaker Fält, Sonja
    Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Regional Cancer Center, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala..
    Lindman, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science.
    Bergh, Jonas
    Karolinska Institutet, Cancer Center Karolinska and Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm..
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Regional Cancer Center, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala. King’s College London, Medical School, Division of Cancer Studies, London, United Kingdom.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Frisell, Jan
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery and Department of Breast- and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm..
    Fredriksson, Irma
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery and Department of Breast- and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm..
    Longterm outcomes in young women with breast cancer – low age a risk factor in luminal B tumorsArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Magnusson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Protein Expression Profiling of Cancer Biomarkers2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Human Protein Atlas project is a Swedish research initiative that uses antibody-based proteomics for large scale protein profiling in human tissues and cells. Affinity-purified antibodies are produced within the project and used for immunohistochemical staining on tissue micro arrays (TMAs) in order to map the human proteome and publish the result in a protein atlas (www.proteinatlas.org). In this thesis, TMAs were used for analysis of protein expression patterns in order to identify and explore potential biomarkers of clinical relevance.

    In Paper I, protein expression of SATB2 was studied in colorectal cancer. The results show that SATB2 is a sensitive and specific biomarker for colorectal cancer, staining 85% of all investigated tumors. Moreover, SATB2 in combination with CK20 showed positivity in 97% of all colorectal carcinomas and is therefore suitable as a complementary tool in clinical differential diagnostics of cancer.

    In Paper II, ANLN was explored as a prognostic biomarker for breast cancer. A high nuclear fraction of ANLN in breast cancer was significantly correlated to large tumor size, high histological grade, hormone receptor negative tumors, high proliferation rate and poor prognosis. Furthermore, ANLN depletion in breast cancer cell lines resulted in cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence with altered cell morphology.

    In Paper III, young age at breast cancer diagnosis was investigated as an independent risk factor for poor prognosis. TMAs were produced from a selection of patients from a previously defined register-based cohort. The analysis shows that young women with luminal B tumors have a 2.2-fold higher risk of dying of breast cancer compared to older women.

    In Paper IV, vascular expression of CD93 was explored by image analysis of the tissue-based breast cancer cohort produced in Paper III. The analysis shows that young women with breast cancer display a significantly higher CD93-positive vessel area in their tumors. High CD93-positive vessel area was significantly associated with hormone receptor negative tumors, grade, Ki-67, EGFR and a poor prognosis.

    In conclusion, this thesis shows that protein expression profiling using TMAs is an important tool for identifying and exploring potential novel biomarkers for cancer.

    List of papers
    1. SATB2 in Combination With Cytokeratin 20 Identifies Over 95% of all Colorectal Carcinomas
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>SATB2 in Combination With Cytokeratin 20 Identifies Over 95% of all Colorectal Carcinomas
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: American Journal of Surgical Pathology, ISSN 0147-5185, E-ISSN 1532-0979, Vol. 35, no 7, p. 937-948Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 2 (SATB2), a nuclear matrix-associated transcription factor and epigenetic regulator, was identified as a tissue type-specific protein when screening protein expression patterns in human normal and cancer tissues using an antibody-based proteomics approach. In this respect, the SATB2 protein shows a selective pattern of expression and, within cells of epithelial lineages, SATB2 expression is restricted to glandular cells lining the lower gastrointestinal tract. The expression of SATB2 protein is primarily preserved in cancer cells of colorectal origin, indicating that SATB2 could function as a clinically useful diagnostic marker to distinguish colorectal cancer (CRC) from other types of cancer. The aim of this study was to further explore and validate the specific expression pattern of SATB2 as a clinical biomarker and to compare SATB2 with the well-known cytokeratin 20 (CK20). Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the extent of SATB2 expression in tissue microarrays with tumors from 9 independent cohorts of patients with primary and metastatic CRCs (n = 1882). Our results show that SATB2 is a sensitive and highly specific marker for CRC with distinct positivity in 85% of all CRCs, and that SATB2 and/or CK20 was positive in 97% of CRCs. In conclusion, the specific expression of SATB2 in a large majority of CRCs suggests that SATB2 can be used as an important complementary tool for the differential diagnosis of carcinoma of unknown primary origin.

    Keywords
    SATB2, colorectal cancer, antibody-based proteomics, diagnostic biomarker
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-156012 (URN)10.1097/PAS.0b013e31821c3dae (DOI)000291676200001 ()
    Available from: 2011-07-05 Created: 2011-07-05 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
    2. ANLN is a prognostic biomarker independent of Ki-67 and essential for cell cycle progression in primary breast cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>ANLN is a prognostic biomarker independent of Ki-67 and essential for cell cycle progression in primary breast cancer
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 16, article id 904Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Anillin (ANLN), an actin-binding protein required for cytokinesis, has recently been presented as part of a prognostic marker panel in breast cancer. The objective of the current study was to further explore the prognostic and functional value of ANLN as a single biomarker in breast cancer. Methods: Immunohistochemical assessment of ANLN protein expression was performed in two well characterized breast cancer cohorts (n = 484) with long-term clinical follow-up data and the results were further validated at the mRNA level in a publicly available transcriptomics dataset. The functional relevance of ANLN was investigated in two breast cancer cell lines using RNA interference. Results: High nuclear fraction of ANLN in breast tumor cells was significantly associated with large tumor size, high histological grade, high proliferation rate, hormone receptor negative tumors and poor prognosis in both examined cohorts. Multivariable analysis showed that the association between ANLN and survival was significantly independent of age in cohort I and significantly independent of proliferation, as assessed by Ki-67 expression in tumor cells, age, tumor size, ER and PR status, HER2 status and nodal status in cohort II. Analysis of ANLN mRNA expression confirmed that high expression of ANLN was significantly correlated to poor overall survival in breast cancer patients. Consistent with the role of ANLN during cytokinesis, transient knock-down of ANLN protein expression in breast cancer cell lines resulted in an increase of senescent cells and an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle with altered cell morphology including large, poly-nucleated cells. Moreover, ANLN siRNA knockdown also resulted in decreased expression of cyclins D1, A2 and B1. Conclusions: ANLN expression in breast cancer cells plays an important role during cell division and a high fraction of nuclear ANLN expression in tumor cells is correlated to poor prognosis in breast cancer patients, independent of Ki-67, tumor size, hormone receptor status, HER2 status, nodal status and age.

    Keywords
    ANLN, Prognostic biomarker, Breast cancer, Proliferation, Antibody-based proteomics
    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264237 (URN)10.1186/s12885-016-2923-8 (DOI)000388038200007 ()
    Funder
    Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Cancer Society
    Available from: 2015-10-07 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
    3. Longterm outcomes in young women with breast cancer – low age a risk factor in luminal B tumors
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longterm outcomes in young women with breast cancer – low age a risk factor in luminal B tumors
    Show others...
    (English)Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
    National Category
    Clinical Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264243 (URN)
    Available from: 2015-10-07 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2016-01-13
    4. Angiogenesis as a risk factor for young women with breast cancer
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Angiogenesis as a risk factor for young women with breast cancer
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    Angiogenesis, CD93, Prognostic biomarker, Breast cancer, Antibody-based proteomics
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264226 (URN)
    Funder
    Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
    Available from: 2015-10-07 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2016-01-13
  • 6.
    Magnusson, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Fredholm, Hanna
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery and Department of Breast- and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm..
    Georganaki, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    Science for Life Laboratory, KTH – Royal Institute of Technology.
    Fredriksson, Irma
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery and Department of Breast- and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Angiogenesis as a risk factor for young women with breast cancerManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Magnusson, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Gremel, Gabriela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Ponten, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Molecular and Morphological Pathology.
    Jirstrom, Karin
    Expression of the actin-binding protein Anillin is a prognostic biomarker for primary ER positive breast cancer.2013In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 73, no 8, p. S1-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Magnusson, Kristina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gremel, Gabriela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Rydén, Lisa
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Lund University..
    Pontén, Victor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    Science for Life Laboratory, KTH – Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Dimberg, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Vascular Biology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jirström, Karin
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Oncology and Pathology, Lund University, Lund..
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    ANLN is a prognostic biomarker independent of Ki-67 and essential for cell cycle progression in primary breast cancer2016In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 16, article id 904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Anillin (ANLN), an actin-binding protein required for cytokinesis, has recently been presented as part of a prognostic marker panel in breast cancer. The objective of the current study was to further explore the prognostic and functional value of ANLN as a single biomarker in breast cancer. Methods: Immunohistochemical assessment of ANLN protein expression was performed in two well characterized breast cancer cohorts (n = 484) with long-term clinical follow-up data and the results were further validated at the mRNA level in a publicly available transcriptomics dataset. The functional relevance of ANLN was investigated in two breast cancer cell lines using RNA interference. Results: High nuclear fraction of ANLN in breast tumor cells was significantly associated with large tumor size, high histological grade, high proliferation rate, hormone receptor negative tumors and poor prognosis in both examined cohorts. Multivariable analysis showed that the association between ANLN and survival was significantly independent of age in cohort I and significantly independent of proliferation, as assessed by Ki-67 expression in tumor cells, age, tumor size, ER and PR status, HER2 status and nodal status in cohort II. Analysis of ANLN mRNA expression confirmed that high expression of ANLN was significantly correlated to poor overall survival in breast cancer patients. Consistent with the role of ANLN during cytokinesis, transient knock-down of ANLN protein expression in breast cancer cell lines resulted in an increase of senescent cells and an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle with altered cell morphology including large, poly-nucleated cells. Moreover, ANLN siRNA knockdown also resulted in decreased expression of cyclins D1, A2 and B1. Conclusions: ANLN expression in breast cancer cells plays an important role during cell division and a high fraction of nuclear ANLN expression in tumor cells is correlated to poor prognosis in breast cancer patients, independent of Ki-67, tumor size, hormone receptor status, HER2 status, nodal status and age.

  • 9. Uhlen, Mathias
    et al.
    Bjorling, Erik
    Agaton, Charlotta
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    Amini, Bahram
    Andersen, Elisabet
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Andersson, Ann-Catrin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Angelidou, Pia
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Asplund, Caroline
    Berglund, Lisa
    Bergström, Kristina
    Brumer, Harry
    Cerjan, Dijana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Ekstrom, Marica
    Elobeid, Adila
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Eriksson, Cecilia
    Fagerberg, Linn
    Falk, Ronny
    Fall, Jenny
    Forsberg, Mattias
    Björklund, Marcus Gry
    Gumbel, Kristoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Halimi, Asif
    Hallin, Inga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Hamsten, Carl
    Hansson, Marianne
    Hedhammar, My
    Hercules, Görel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Larsson, Karin
    Lindskog, Mats
    Lodewyckx, Wald
    Lund, Jan
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    Magnusson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Malm, Erik
    Nilsson, Peter
    Odling, Jenny
    Oksvold, Per
    Olsson, Ingmarie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Oster, Emma
    Ottosson, Jenny
    Paavilainen, Linda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Persson, Anja
    Rimini, Rebecca
    Rockberg, Johan
    Runeson, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sivertsson, Asa
    Sköllermo, Anna
    Steen, Johanna
    Stenvall, Maria
    Sterky, Fredrik
    Strömberg, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    Department of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tegel, Hanna
    Tourle, Samuel
    Wahlund, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Waldén, Annelie
    Wan, Jinghong
    Wernéus, Henrik
    Westberg, Joakim
    Wester, Kenneth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    Wrethagen, Ulla
    Xu, Lan Lan
    Hober, Sophia
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Pathology.
    A human protein atlas for normal and cancer tissues based on antibody proteomics2005In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 1920-1932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody-based proteomics provides a powerful approach for the functional study of the human proteome involving the systematic generation of protein-specific affinity reagents. We used this strategy to construct a comprehensive, antibody-based protein atlas for expression and localization profiles in 48 normal human tissues and 20 different cancers. Here we report a new publicly available database containing, in the first version, ∼400,000 high resolution images corresponding to more than 700 antibodies toward human proteins. Each image has been annotated by a certified pathologist to provide a knowledge base for functional studies and to allow queries about protein profiles in normal and disease tissues. Our results suggest it should be possible to extend this analysis to the majority of all human proteins thus providing a valuable tool for medical and biological research.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf