uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bennmarker, Helge
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Skans, Oskar Nordström
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Vikman, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    Workfare for the old and long-term unemployed2013In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 25, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We estimate the effects of conditioning benefits on program participation among older long-term unemployed workers. We exploit a Swedish reform which reduced UI duration from 90 to 60 weeks for a group of older unemployed workers in a setting where workers who exhausted their benefits received unchanged transfers if they agreed to participate in a work practice program. Our results show that job finding increased as a result of the shorter duration of passive benefits. The time profile of the job-finding effects suggests that the results are due to deterrence during the program-entry phase. We find no impact on ensuing job durations or wages, suggesting that the increased job-finding rate was driven by increased search intensity rather than lower reservation wages. A crude cost-benefit analysis suggests that the reform reduced the combined cost of programs and transfers.

  • 2.
    Björklund, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Carlsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Fixed Wage Contracts and Monetary Non-Neutrality2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the importance of wage rigidities for the monetary policy transmissionmechanism. Using uniquely rich micro data on Swedish wage negotiations,we isolate periods when the labor market is covered by xed wagecontracts. Importantly, negotiations are coordinated in time but their seasonalpatterns are far from deterministic. Using a VAR model, we documentthat monetary policy shocks have a substantially larger impact on productionduring xed wage episodes as compared to the average response. The resultsare not driven by the periodic structure, nor the seasonality, of the renegotiationepisodes.

  • 3.
    Björklund, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Carlsson, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Sveriges Riksbank, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. UCLS, Uppsala, Sweden;IZA, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Fixed-Wage Contracts and Monetary Non-neutrality2019In: American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, ISSN 1945-7707, E-ISSN 1945-7715, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 171-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the importance of wage rigidities for the monetary policy transmission mechanism. Using uniquely rich micro data on Swedish wage negotiations, we isolate periods when the labor market is covered by fixed-wage contracts. Importantly, negotiations are coordinated in time but their seasonal patterns are far from deterministic. Using a two-regime VAR model, we document that monetary policy shocks have a larger impact on production during fixed-wage episodes as compared to the average response. The results do not seem to be driven by the periodic structure, nor the seasonality, of the renegotiation episodes.

  • 4. Carlsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Evaluating Microfoundations for Aggregate Price Rigidities: Evidence from Matched Firm-Level Data on Product Prices and Unit Labor Cost2012In: The American Economic Review, ISSN 0002-8282, E-ISSN 1944-7981, Vol. 102, no 4, p. 1571-1595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using matched data on product-level prices and the producing firm's unit labor cost, we find a moderate pass-through of current idiosyncratic marginal-cost changes. Also, the response does not vary across firms facing very different idiosyncratic shock variances, but identical aggregate conditions. These results do not fit the predictions of Mackowiak and Wiederholt (2009). Neither do firms react strongly to predictable marginal-cost changes, as expected from Mankiw and Reis (2002). We find that firms consider both current and expected future marginal cost when setting prices. This points toward impediments to continuous price adjustments as a key driver of monetary non-neutrality.

  • 5.
    Forslund, Anders
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Swedish youth labour market policies revisited2006In: Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ISSN 0340-1707, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 168-185Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Fredriksson, Peter
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. UCLS, Uppsala, Sweden;IZA, Bonn, Germany.
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. UCLS, Uppsala, Sweden; CESifo, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. UCLS, Uppsala, Sweden;IZA, Bonn, Germany.
    Mismatch of Talent: Evidence on Match Quality, Entry Wages, and Job Mobility2018In: The American Economic Review, ISSN 0002-8282, E-ISSN 1944-7981, Vol. 108, no 11, p. 3303-3338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the impact of mismatch on entry wages, separations, and wage growth using unique data on worker talents. We show that workers are sorted on comparative advantage across jobs within occupations. The starting wages of inexperienced workers are unrelated to mismatch. For experienced workers, on the other hand, mismatch is negatively priced into their starting wages. Separations and wage growth are more strongly related to mismatch among inexperienced workers than among experienced workers. These findings are consistent with models of information updating, where less information is available about the quality of matches involving inexperienced workers.

  • 7.
    Harju, Jarkko
    et al.
    CESifo, Helsinki, Finland.
    Kosonen, Tuomas
    CESifo, Helsinki, Finland;Acad Finland, Labour Inst Econ Res, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Firm types, price-setting strategies, and consumption-tax incidence2018In: Journal of Public Economics, ISSN 0047-2727, E-ISSN 1879-2316, Vol. 165, p. 48-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze price responses to large restaurant VAT rate reductions in two different European countries. Our results show that responses in the short and medium run were clustered around two focal points of zero pass-through and full pass-through. Differences between independent restaurants and chains is the key explanation for this pattern. While nearly all independent restaurants effectively ignored the tax reductions and left consumer prices unchanged, a substantial fraction of restaurants belonging to chains chose a rapid and complete pass-through. In the longer run, prices converged, but primarily through a price reversion among chain restaurants. The stark difference in price responses does not appear to arise because of different market characteristics such as location, initial price levels, meal types and restaurant segment.

  • 8.
    Hartman, Laura
    et al.
    Statskontoret.
    Liljeberg, Linus
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Stepping-stones, dead-ends, or both? An analysis of Swedish replacement contracts2010In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 645-668Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hartman, Laura
    et al.
    Statskontoret.
    Liljeberg, Linus
    IFAU.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    IFAU.
    Stepping-stones, dead-ends, or both? An analysis of Swedish replacement contracts2010In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921, no 38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hensvik, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. UCLS, Uppsala, Sweden;CESifo, Munich, Germany.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. UCLS, Uppsala, Sweden;IZA, Bonn, Germany.
    Social Networks, Employee Selection, and Labor Market Outcomes2016In: Journal Labor Economics, ISSN 0734-306X, E-ISSN 1537-5307, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 825-867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We provide a direct empirical test of Montgomery's 1991 notion that firms hire workers through social ties of productive employees as these workers know others with high unobserved productivity. We focus on coworker networks and show that firms recruit workers with better military draft test scores but shorter schooling when hiring previous colleagues of current employees, suggesting that firms use these networks to attract workers with better qualities in hard-to-observe dimensions. Incumbent workers' abilities predict the incidence, abilities, and wages of linked entrants. These results suggest that firms rely on the ability density of the studied networks when setting entry wages.

  • 11.
    Holmlund, Bertil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Liu, Qian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Mind the Gap? Estimating the Effects of Postponing Higher Education2006Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Holmlund, Bertil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Liu, Qian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Mind the Gap? Estimating the Effects of Postponing Higher Education2008In: Oxford Economic Papers, ISSN 0030-7653, E-ISSN 1464-3812, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 683-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper estimates the effects on earnings of “gap years” between high school and university enrollment. The effect is estimated by means of standard earnings functions augmented to account for gap years and a rich set of control variables using administrative Swedish data. We find that postponement of higher education is associated with a persistent and non-trivial earnings penalty. The main source of the persistent penalty appears to be the loss of work experience after studies. The reduction of lifetime earnings associated with two years postponement of higher education amounts to 40-50 percent of annual earnings at age 40.

  • 13. Kramarz, Francis
    et al.
    Cahuc, Pierre
    Crépon, B
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Schank, T
    van Lomwel, G
    Zylberberg, A
    Labour Market Effects of Worksharing Arrangements in Europe2008In: Working Hours and Job Sharing in the EU and USA : Are Europeans Lazy? Or Americans Crazy? / [ed] Tito Boeri, Michael C. Burda & Francis Kramarz (editors), Oxford: Oxford University Press , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14. Kramarz, Francis
    et al.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    When Strong Ties are Strong: Networks and Youth Labour Market Entry2014In: The Review of Economic Studies, ISSN 0034-6527, E-ISSN 1467-937X, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 1164-1200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The conditions under which young workers find their first real post-graduation jobs are important for their future careers and insufficiently documented given their potential importance for young workers welfare. To study these conditions, and in particular the role played by social ties, we use a Swedish population-wide linked employer-employee data set of graduates from all levels of schooling that includes detailed information on family ties, neighbourhoods, schools, class composition, and parents' and children's employers over a period covering years with both high and low unemployment, together with measures of firm performance. We find that strong social ties (parents) are an important determinant for where young workers find their first job. The effects are larger if the graduate's position is "weak" (low education, bad grades), during high unemployment years, and when information on potential openings are likely to be scarce. On the hiring side, by contrast, the effects are larger if the parent's position is "strong" (long tenure, high wage) and if the parent's plant is more productive. The youths appear to benefit from the use of strong social ties through faster access to jobs and by better labour market outcomes as measured a few years after entry. In particular, workers finding their entry jobs through strong social ties are considerably more likely to remain in this job, while experiencing better wage growth than other entrants in the same plant. Firms also appear to benefit from these wage costs (relative to comparable entrants) starting at a lower base. They also benefit on the parents' side; parents' wage growth drops dramatically exactly at the entry of one of their children in the plant, although this is a moment when firm profits tend to be growing. Indeed, the firm-side benefits appear large enough for (at least small) firms to increase job creation at the entry level in years when a child of one of their employees graduates.

  • 15.
    Larsson, Laura
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Lindqvist, Linus
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Stepping-stones or dead-ends?: An analysis of Swedish replacement contracts2005Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Liu, Qian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    The Duration of Paid Parental Leave and Children's Scholastic Performance2010In: The B.E. Journals in Economic Analysis & Policy, ISSN 1935-1682, E-ISSN 1935-1682, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 3-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study how the duration of paid parental leave affects the accumulation of cognitive skills among children. Using a reform which extended parental leave benefits from 12 to 15 months for Swedish children born after August 1988 we evaluate the effects of prolonged parental leave on children's test scores and grades at age 16. We show that, on average, the reform had no effect on children's scholastic performance. However, we do find positive effects for children of well-educated mothers, a result that is robust to a number of different specifications. We find no corresponding heterogeneity relative to parental earnings or fathers' education, or relative to other predictors of child performance. We find no effects on intermediate outcomes such as mothers' subsequent earnings, child health, parental fertility, divorce rates, or the mothers' mental health. Overall the results suggest positive causal interaction effects between mothers' education and the amount of time mothers spend with their children. Since the institutional context is one in which the alternative is subsidized day care, the results imply that subsidizing longer parental leave spells rather than day care reinforce the relationship between maternal education and school outcomes.

  • 17.
    Lombardi, Stefano
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala Center For Labor Studies (UCLS), Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    Vikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Uppsala Center for Fiscal Studies.
    Targeted wage subsidies and firm performance2018In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 53, p. 33-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies how targeted wage subsidies affect the performance of the recruiting firms. Using Swedish administrative data from the period 1998-2008, we show that treated firms substantially outperform other recruiting firms after hiring through subsidies, despite identical pre-treatment performance levels and trends in a wide set of key dimensions. The pattern is less clear from 2007 onwards, after a reform removed the involvement of caseworkers from the subsidy approval process. Overall, our results suggest that targeted employment subsidies can have large positive effects on post-match outcomes of the hiring firms, at least if the policy environment allows for pre-screening by caseworkers.

  • 18.
    Lundin, Martin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Nordström-Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Zetterberg, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Leadership Experiences within Civil Organizations and Candidacy in Public Elections: Causal Evidence from a Quasi-Experimental Approach2016In: Political Behavior, ISSN 0190-9320, E-ISSN 1573-6687, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 433-454Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standing as a candidate in public elections has been characterized as the ultimate act of political participation. We test the hypothesis that acquiring office within civil organizations increases the probability of becoming a candidate in public elections. In order to take self-selection problems into account, we provide quasi-experimental evidence using election discontinuities, in which we compare the likelihood of being nominated for public office between closely ranked winners and losers in Swedish student union (SU) elections. Our original data cover 5,000 SU candidates and register data on their candidacies in public elections (1991–2010). The analysis provides support to the hypothesis: Students elected to SU councils were about 34 percent (6 percentage points) more likely to become a candidate in a public election than SU council candidates who were not elected. The causal impact is fairly stable over time. The analysis makes important contributions to two interrelated bodies of literature: First, it provides political recruitment literature with causal evidence that acquiring leadership experiences at arenas outside of representative democ­ratic institutions facilitate entry into election processes. Second, it provides strong evidence to an increasingly contested issue within political participation research by showing that certain organizational activities increase individuals’ political involvement.

  • 19.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Comment on Andersen and Haagen Pedersen: Distribution and labour market incentives in the welfare state - Danish experiences2007In: Swedish Economic Policy Review, ISSN 1400-1829, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 215-222Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    How does the age structure affect regional productivity?2008In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 787-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article studies the effects of a changing age structure on regional productivity using lagged population structure to purge estimates of the influence of endogenous migration. It is shown that workers aged 50-60 years have a positive effect on regional productivity. Together with evidence from previous research showing that the effect of the same age group on unemployment is positive, the results support the notion that well-matched workers gives rise to both high productivity and high unemployment.

  • 21.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Edin, Per-Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Holmlund, Bertil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Wage Dispersion Between and Within Plants: Sweden 1985-20002006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper describes the Swedish wage distribution and how it correlates with worker mobility and plant-specific factors. It is well known that wage inequality has increased in Sweden since the mid-1980s. However, little evidence has so far been available as to whether this development reflects increased dispersion between plants, between individuals in the same plant, or both. We use a new linked employer-employee data set and discover that a trend rise in between- plant wage inequality account for the entire increase in wage dispersion. This pattern, which remains when we control for observable individual human capital characteristics, may reflect increased sorting of workers by skill levels and/or increased scope for rent sharing in local wage negotiations. Our discussion suggests that both factors may have become more important.

  • 22.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    et al.
    IFAU.
    Sibbmark, Kristina
    IFAU.
    Åslund, Olof
    IFAU.
    Anonyma jobbansökningar i praktiken - En första utvärdering av en debatterad åtgärd.2008In: Ekonomisk debatt, Vol. 3, no 36, p. 36-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Rosenqvist, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics. IFAU.
    Nordström, Oskar Skans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Confidence enhanced performance? – The causal effects of success on future performance in professional golftournaments2015In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 117, p. 281-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides field evidence on the causal impact of past successes on future performances. Since persistence in success or failure is likely to be linked through, potentially time-varying, ability it is intrinsically difficult to identify the causal effect of succeeding on the probability of performing well in the future. We therefore employ a regression discontinuity design on data from professional golf tournaments exploiting that almost equally skilled players are separated into successes and failures half-way into the tournaments (the “cut”). We show that players who (marginally) succeeded in making the cut substantially increased their performance in subsequent tournaments relative to players who (marginally) failed to make the cut. This success-effect is substantially larger when the subsequent (outcome) tournament involves more prize money. The results therefore suggest that past successes provide an important prerequisite when performing high-stakes tasks.

  • 24.
    Skans, Oskar Nordstrom
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Liljeberg, Linus
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    The wage effects of subsidized career breaks2014In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 593-617Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies how subsidized career breaks affect future labor market performance. The analysis uses a Swedish career break program where applications were accepted until local funds were exhausted. The rejected applicants serve as counterfactuals to derive estimates that are unaffected by selection or omitted variables. The estimated wage effect of a 10-month-long break is negative and in the order of 3 % 1-2 years after the interruption. The average applicant is estimated to have substantially lower returns to experience than the average worker. The results thus show that career breaks are costly, even for groups with low expected returns to experience, and in an environment with very compressed wages. The career breaks also induced an increase in job and task mobility whereas post-leave labor supply remained unaffected except for workers close to retirement.

  • 25.
    Åslund, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Bohlmark, Anders
    Nordström, Oskar Skans
    Childhood and family experiences and the social integration of young migrants2015In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 35, p. 135-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study how age at migration affects social integration in adulthood. Using Swedish register data, we estimate the effects of age at migration by comparing siblings arriving (as children) at the same time, but at different ages. Migrants who were older when they arrived are less likely to live close to, work with, and marry natives. We also study 2nd generation immigrants and show that parental time in the host country has similar (although somewhat weaker) effects for this group. The effects do not appear to be propagated through socioeconomic status. Instead, preferences or cultural identities appear as key mechanisms.

  • 26.
    Åslund, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Hensvik, Lena
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Seeking Similarity: How Immigrants and Natives Manage in the Labor Market2014In: Journal Labor Economics, ISSN 0734-306X, E-ISSN 1537-5307, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 405-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate how the interplay between manager and worker origin affects hiring patterns, job separations, and wages. Numerous specifications utilizing a longitudinal matched employer-employee database including 70,000 establishments consistently show that managers are substantially more likely to hire workers of their own origin. Workers who share an origin with their managers earn higher wages and have lower separation rates than dissimilar workers, but this pattern is driven by differences in unobserved worker characteristics. Our findings indicate that the sorting patterns are more likely to be explained by profit-maximizing concerns than by preference-based discrimination.

  • 27.
    Åslund, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Do anonymous job application procedures level the playing field?2012In: Industrial & labor relations review, ISSN 0019-7939, E-ISSN 2162-271X, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 82-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite anti-discrimination legislation and the potential for hefty fines, labor market discrimination remains an issue for ethnic minorities and women, particularly in the recruitment and screening process. The apparent failure of legal and voluntary interventions has created a call for anonymous application procedures (AAP), in which key identifying data is hidden from recruiters in the initial recruiting process. Using unusually rich Swedish data on actual applications and recruitments, the authors show that AAP increased the chances of both women and individuals of non-Western origin of advancing to the interview stage. In addition, results show that women experienced an increased probability of being offered a job under AAP. However, applicants belonging to ethnic minorities were equally disadvantaged in terms of job offers under conventional and anonymous hiring procedures, suggesting that racial and ethnic discrimination may be harder to circumvent than gender discrimination.

  • 28.
    Åslund, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Nordström Skans, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    How to Measure Segregation Conditional on the Distribution of Covariates2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This short paper proposes a non-parametric method of accounting for the distribution of background characteristics when testing for segregation in empirical studies. It is shown and exemplified—using data on workplace segregation between immigrants and natives in Sweden—how the method can be applied to correct any measure of segregation for differences between groups in the distribution of covariates by means of simulation, and how analytical results can be used when studying segregation by means of peer group exposure. x

  • 29.
    Åslund, Olof
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Skans, Oskar Nordström
    Uppsala University, Units outside the University, Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation.
    Will I See You at Work?: Ethnic Workplace Segregation in Sweden, 1985-20022010In: Industrial & labor relations review, ISSN 0019-7939, E-ISSN 2162-271X, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 471-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using linked employer-employee data covering the entire working-age Swedish population between 1985 and 2002, the authors present evidence of substantial and increasing ethnic workplace segregation. Moreover, when human capital, geography and industrial affiliation tire taken into account, immigrants are overexposed both to workers front their own birth region and to immigrants from other regions. Segregation is generally negatively correlated with economic: status: groups with low employment rates are more segregated from natives: groups with many immigrant colleagues earn less than those with more native colleagues: and the higher the number of immigrants to which individuals ire exposed, the lower their wages. When local labor market conditions improve, however. segregation decreases. Though the degree and nature of segregation varies substantially across ethnic groups, the patterns are quite persistent over time.

1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf