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  • 1.
    Arai, Kazuhiro
    et al.
    Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University.
    Oskarsson, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Yamauchi, Isamu
    Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Hirano, Shigemi
    Department of Economics, Kanagawa University.
    The Structure and Determinants of Trust: The Cases of Japan and Sweden2005In: Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, ISSN 0018-280X, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 183-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The structure and determinants of trust are analyzed using questionnaire data from a sample of Japanese and Swedish university students. A salient characteristic of this analysis is that it considers various dimensions of trust. There are similarities and differences between the two countries in the relative magnitude of trust belonging to those dimensions. Family trust does not reduce various kinds of trust. It can be inferred from the responses of economics students that education and culture are important determinants of trust. Those who rely heavily on signals for trust decisions are less cooperative and less trustworthy. Some interpretations are given.

  • 2.
    Hermansson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Lund, Anna
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Avkorporativisering och lobbyism: Konturerna till en ny politisk modell : en bok från PISA-projektet1999Book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Hermansson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Möller och socialpolitikens principfrågor: Inför 90-talet1989In: Tiden, ISSN 0040-6759, no 1, p. 60-65Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Hermansson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Finns det något vackrare än betong?1997In: Tankar med framtidsperspektiv: Manipulationens marknad?, Stockholm: Rikta kommunikation , 1997, p. 47-56Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Hermansson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Swedish Corporatism in Decline? An analysis with special attention to the politics of transportation, agriculture and labour market1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Hermansson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Vad blev det av den svenska korporativismen?1997In: Politica - Tidsskrift for politisk videnskab, ISSN 0105-0710, E-ISSN 2246-042X, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 365-384Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Munck Christiansen, Peter
    et al.
    Institut for Statsvetendskab, Aarhus Universitet.
    Sonne Nørgaard, Asbjørn
    Institut for Statsvetendskab, Syddansk Universitet.
    Rommetvedt, Hilmar
    International Research Institutute of Stavanger.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Thesen, Gunnar
    Institut for Statsvetendskab, Aarhus Universitet.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Varieties of democracy: Interest groups and corporatist committees in Scandinavian policy making2010In: VOLUNTAS - International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, ISSN 0957-8765, E-ISSN 1573-7888, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 22-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporatism may be seen as variety of capitalism in which specific structural prerequisites such as unionization, centralization, and strong states combined with bargaining and concertation produce certain economic outputs. Corporatism may also be seen as a variety of democracy in which interest groups are integrated in the preparation and/or implementation of public policies. Departing in the last position, we measure the strength of Scandinavian corporatism by the involvement of interest groups in public committees, councils, and commissions. Corporatism in relation to the preparation of policy has gone down in all three Scandinavian countries whereas corporatism in implementation processes are more varied among the three countries.

  • 8.
    Oskarsson, Sven
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Creating trust: The role of power asymmetries and institutional constraints2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     

    This article focuses on how institutions matter in generating relationships of trust in an environment of unequal power. Trust is seen as the truster’s expectation that the trustee will act trustworthily out of moral commitment and/or interest in continuing the relationship. The weight given to self-interest and moral commitment might differ across individuals and institutional settings. Using cross-sectional data from a survey conducted in 2006 on Swedish employment relations the authors show that perceived power asymmetries between an employee and his/her superior have a negative impact on trust. However, perceptions about the enforcement and fairness of institutional constraints – rules for dismissals, conflict resolution, wage setting, and promotion – have conditioning effects. The degree to which the employees perceived the institutional constraints as enforced and fairly implemented is positively related to the expressed trust in their superiors. Furthermore, when the respondents conceived the rules as fairly implemented, trust was less influenced by changes in power relations and the extent to which they perceived the rules for dismissals as enforced. The results have important implications. By designing institutions that are considered fair, distrust may be mitigated even in situations characterized by extensive power asymmetries.

     

  • 9.
    Oskarsson, Sven
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Power, trust, and institutional constraints: individual level evidence2009In: Rationality and Society, ISSN 1043-4631, E-ISSN 1461-7358, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 171-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on how institutions matter in generating relationships of trust in an environment of unequal power. Trust is seen as the truster’s expectation that the trustee will act trustworthily out of moral commitment and/or interest in continuing the relationship. Using cross-sectional data from a survey conducted in 2006 on Swedish employment relations the authors show that perceived power asymmetries between an employee and his/her superior have a negative impact on trust. However, perceptions about the enforcement and fairness of institutional constraints – rules for dismissals, conflict resolution, wage setting, and promotion – have conditioning effects. When the respondents conceive the rules as fair, trust is less influenced by increasing power asymmetries between an employee and his/her superior. The results have important implications. By designing institutions that are considered fair, distrust may be mitigated even in situations characterized by extensive power asymmetries.

  • 10.
    Oskarsson, Sven
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Making Capitalism Work: Fair Institutions and Trust2009In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 294-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     

    This study tests three hypotheses on data from a survey on employment relations conducted in Sweden in 2006. The first hypothesis implies that the extent to which an employee perceives formal institutions as fair and duly enforced increases the probability that he/she will behave cooperatively. The second hypothesis states that an employee's trust in the opposite party should have equivalent effects. The last hypothesis holds that an employee's perception of formal institutions as fair and duly enforced increases his/her trust in the opposite party. All three hypotheses are supported by the data. The interpretation is that there is indeed an effect on cooperative behavior and willingness to enter into flexible contracts from perceptions of fair and enforced institutions, but it is indirect and mediated by attitudes of trust.

     

  • 11.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Därför fungerar inte den svenska modellen!1998In: TFK Rapport, Institutet för Transportforskning , 1998, no 1Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Globalisation and Policy Change - the Swedish case of Marketization2004In: The Fifth ECPR Pan-European Conference on International Relations, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Globalisation, Marketization and Power – the Swedish case of Institutional Change2002In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 197-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Globalisation is often thought to threaten the autonomy of national policymaking and generous welfare policies. This article examines two decades of policy change in Sweden, often viewed as a prime example of a fully fledged welfare state. The analysis is focused on reforms within the welfare sector, which is compared with three other important areas – credit markets, the labour market, and infrastructure policy. These areas can all be seen as crucial aspects of the Swedish social democratic model. The findings can be summarised in three parts. First, seeing the credit–market deregulation as the first phase of the internationalisation of capital in Sweden lends some support to the idea of globalisation as the result of political decisions rather than a structural change caused by technical change. Second, during the last two decades, there have been signs of marketisation of the Swedish public sector. However, this analysis does not give support to the simple hypothesis of globalisation. There are quite large variations both between and within policy areas, variations that are not easily related to international integration. Third, marketisation involves a shift in political power. An overall effect is that the government has lost some of its former direct influence. However, behind the façade of the invisible market we find the same actors as before influencing policy. Globalisation can have tremendous effects on power. Whether or not this will be the case is first and foremost the result of political decisions and individual desires.

  • 14.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Managing the Bank System Crisis - The Swedish and Japanese Cases Compared2001In: Paper presented at ECPR (2001-09-04) and at the Workshop "Politics in Crisis", Tokyo/Kyoto December 6-10 2001., 2001, p. 21-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Marknadsanpassningens politik : Den svenska modellens förändring 1980-2000: En bok från PISA-projektet2001Book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Medelklassens välfärdsstat?1992In: Tiden: månadsskrift för socialistisk kritik och politik, ISSN 0040-6759, no 3, p. 174-178Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Novemberrevolutionen : om rationalitet och makt i beslutet att avreglera kreditmarknaden 1985: Rapport till Expertgruppen för studier i offentlig ekonomi - [ESO]1996Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is focused on the deregulation of the Swedish financial market in 1985, an event sometimes referred to as the The November Revolution.

  • 18.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Ojämlika offentliga pensioner kan ge jämlik inkomstfördelning1991In: Tiden: månadsskrift för socialistisk kritik och politik, ISSN 0040-6759, no 3, p. 182-185Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Opposition1998In: Regeringskansliet inför 2000-talet: rapport från ett ESO-seminarium : rapport till Expertgruppen för studier i offentlig ekonomi - [ESO], Stockholm: Fritzes, 1998, p. 43-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Pensionsreformen och den socialdemokratiska välfärdspolitikens förändring2004In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 124, no 4, p. 937-941Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Per Albin och hans tid1997In: Moderna Tider, Vol. 8, no 76Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Projekt eller lapptäcke?: Recension av Heclo & Madsen (1987). Policy and Politics in Sweden. Principled Pragmatism1987In: Tiden: Tidskrift för socialistisk kritik och politik, no 9Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Social välfärd - en rättighet1986In: Tiden: Tidskrift för socialistisk kritik och politik, no 8, p. 451-456Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Socialdemokratins dominans: en studie av den svenska socialdemokratins partistrategi1994Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Socialism som arbetshypotes: Levde Wigforss upp till sina vetenskapliga Ideal?1997In: Tiden, ISSN 0040-6759, no 7, p. 15-23Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Strengthening Control or Fostering Trust? Indian Politics and Scandinavian Experiences2016In: Reinventing Social Democratic Development: Insights from Indian and Scandinavian Comparisons / [ed] Olle Törnqvist and John Harris, Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2016, p. 168-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Sweden2013In: Comparative Employment Relations in the Global Economy / [ed] Carola Freege and John Kelly, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2013, 1, p. 227-244Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cross-class alliance between organized labor and capital was agreed upon in the 1930s. The ultimate break came in 1990 with decentralized wage-bargaining. In the wake of threatening wage inflation and rising unemployment a new regime for collective bargaining emerged through pattern-setting at the end of the 90’s. So far it seems to have survived challenges from declining unionization, the growth of the service sector, shrinking unionized industrial working-class, and an open European labor market. The cross-class alliance seems to have cast its skin and emerged in a new modernized version. Sweden still seems to represent a typical coordinated market economy.

  • 28.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Marketization of the Swedish Model2000In: Paper presented at the Conference "Institutional Analysis and Contemporary Challenges of Modern Welfare States" in Gothenburg 2000-05-24, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Swedish Model of Industrial Relations2015In: The Oxford Handbook of Swedish Politics / [ed] Jon Pierre, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Vem älskar välfärdsstaten?: Granskning av Stefan Svallfors (1989) Vem älskar välfärdsstaten? Attityder, organiserade intressen och svensk välfärdspolitik1989In: Tiden: Tidskrift för socialistisk kritik och politik, no 8Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Walter J.M. Kickert, Erik-Hans Kilijn and Joop F.M. Koppenjan (1997) Managing Complex Networks: Strategies for the Public Sector. London: Sage.2000In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 269-271Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Svensson, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Mabuchi, Masaru
    Kyoto University.
    Kamikawa, Ryunoshin
    Osaka University.
    Managing the Bank-System Crisis in Coordinated Market Economies: Institutions and Blame Avoidance Strategies in Sweden and Japan2006In: Governance: An International Journal of Policy, Administration and Institutions, ISSN 0952-1895, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 43-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden and Japan represent two different positions regarding policy-making facing similar crises of the bank systems. The Swedish public policy was encompassing, far-reaching and quick. The Japanese government hesitated for many years to take over bad loans, before they implemented policies of a more limited scope. Why?

    In short, different institutional settings lead the main actors into different paths of reactions in order to avoid blame. In the Japanese case, the very close relationship between private banks and the Ministry of Finance, in combination with the lesser degree of widespread perceptions of a system-crisis, made it more urgent as well as possible to conceal the actual state of affairs for the politicians. Confronted with the threat of losing power over the financial administration to a new agency, the ministry postponed the reforms in order to conceal the deep financial problems. The institutional setting was different in Sweden. The deregulation had separated the government from the administration of banks. Among the public deteriorating economic conditions were easily connected to the banks. This brought about political unity. It was possible to put the blame on the banks and take the credit for the efforts to tide up the mess without losing credibility.

  • 33.
    Svensson, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Oskarsson, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Makt, institutioner och tillit2008In: Statsvetare ifrågasätter: Uppsalamiljön vid tiden för professorsskiftet den 31 mars 2008, Uppsala: Statsvetenskapliga Föreningen i Uppsala , 2008, p. 201-215Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Svensson, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Teorell, Jan
    Att fråga och att svara: Samhällsvetenskaplig metod2007Book (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 35.
    Svensson, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Corporatism in Decline – Causes and Consequences2007Conference paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
  • 36.
    Svensson, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    How are Coordinated Market Economies Coordinated?: Evidence from Sweden2005In: West European Politics, ISSN 0140-2382, E-ISSN 1743-9655, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 1075-1100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Central actors in coordinated economies have a dense network of associations for coordinating their actions. However, we lack knowledge of how such relationships are constituted and how the mechanisms of such coordination work. In the present article, we concentrate on the non-market mechanisms of power and trust. We want to know: Are all actors in the industrial relations system connected to each other or are they divided into contending but coherent groups? And in that case, do certain actors play the role of ‘brokers’ connect these groups?

    A social network analysis on survey data from Sweden shows that the state and the peak-organisations still hold powerful positions. Simultaneously, when concentrating on reciprocal ties, the organisational borders are in particular bridged over by public sector organisations. However, actors with power are not highly trusted. Instead, other state actors-especially the Labour Court-play an important role as a broker that all parties trust.

  • 37.
    Svensson, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Korporatismen vid millennieskiftet2003In: Korporatismen i det nya millenniet: Tre uppsatser om intresseorganisationernas politiska deltagande i svensk politik / [ed] Torsten Svensson och PerOla Öberg, Uppsala: Forskningsprogrammet Svensk Modell i Förändring , 2003, p. 3-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Svensson, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Labour Market Organisations’ Participation in Swedish Public Policy-Making2002In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 295-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unions and employers are political actors. Apart from defending their interests on the labour market they act in the political arena. In order to weaken the trade unions neo-liberal parties and employers’ organisations have tried to change existing systems in Sweden and elsewhere. Hence, the general questions being asked in this article are: Do Swedish labour market organisations still participate in (i.e. try to influence) public policy-making on a large-scale? Are there any substantial differences in the degree to which unions and employers’ organisations participate or in their access and strategies of participation? In this article it is argued that while participation of labour market organisations in the old institutionalised framework has decreased, it has not vanished. Labour market organisations are also very much involved in public policy-making by informally contacting politicians and public servants. The unions have extensive contacts with politicians on all levels, but especially with the Social Democratic Party, while employers’ organisations have more intense contacts with the public administration and public servants. The over-all picture being presented in this article is that labour market organisations in Sweden have not at all been left out in the cold. It is clear that Sweden is far from a British situation and still remains similar to its Scandinavian neighbours.

  • 39.
    Svensson, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Power and Trust: The mechanisms of Cooperation2005In: Power and Institutions in Industrial Relations Regimes: Political Science Perspectives on the Transition of the Swedish Model, Stockholm: Arbetslivsinstitutet , 2005, p. 127-159Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Svensson, Torsten
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Öberg, PerOla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Power over, within and through institutions2005In: Power and Institutions in Industrial Relations Regimes: Political Science Perspectives on the Transition of the Swedish Model / [ed] PerOla Öberg and Torsten Svensson, Stockholm: Arbetslivsinstitutet , 2005, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Öberg, PerOla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Oskarsson, Sven
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Similarity vs. homogeneity: Contextual effects in explaining trust2011In: European Political Science Review, ISSN 1755-7739, E-ISSN 1755-7747, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 345-369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diversity has powerful advantages, but may also generate internal tensions and low interpersonal trust. Despite extensive attention to these questions, the relationship between diversity and trust is often misunderstood and findings methodologically flawed. In this article, we specify two different mechanisms and adherent hypotheses. An individual might base her decision to trust on her perceived social similarity in relation to others in the community, that is, a similarity hypothesis. However, in a homogenous context, she might expect trustworthy behavior irrespective of her own social position due to signals of low degrees of social conflict and dense social networks, that is, a homogeneity hypothesis. Prior research has pinpointed only one of these mechanisms. The homogeneity hypothesis has not been explicated, and when the intention has been to test the similarity hypothesis, the homogeneity hypothesis has unintentionally been tested instead. The results are straightforward. While the homogeneity hypothesis is strongly supported, the findings speak against the similarity hypothesis.

  • 42.
    Öberg, PerOla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Civil Society and Deliberative Democracy: Have Voluntary Organisations Faded from National Public Politics?2012In: Scandinavian Political Studies, ISSN 0080-6757, E-ISSN 1467-9477, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 246-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The political context of civil society in Western Europe has changed dramatically in recent decades. These changing circumstances may produce a decline in the integration of civil society into political life especially deliberative activities at the national level. This article discusses how serious these alleged threats are to a hitherto vital civil society that of Sweden. It focuses on fours indicators of organised civil society's contribution to deliberative democracy. First, have efforts to contact politicians, public servants and the media, as well as participation in public debates, decreased? Second, has civil society directed interest away from national arenas and instead concentrated resources in local and/or supranational arenas? Third, is there any evidence of a withdrawal from public activities, such as public debates and media activities in favour of direct contacts with politicians and public servants? Fourth, has civil society become more professionalised in the sense that interest groups are increasingly hiring professional consultants? Two surveys conducted in 1999 and 2005 show that Swedish organised civil society has not faded from national public politics. However, growing public participation is almost exclusively connected to increasing communication via the mass media and direct contact with politicians. Taking part in open public debate has not increased. The national arena has marginally lost some importance. Moreover, there is an increasing tendency to hire professional lobbying consultants. This might improve the quality of civil society's contributions to public deliberation, but a more elitist civil society might also develop, which is uninterested in social dialogue.

  • 43.
    Öberg, PerOla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Civila samhället och den upplysta välfärdsstaten2011In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-0747, Vol. 113, no 1, p. 131-139Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Öberg, PerOla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Does power drive out trust?: Relations between labour market actors in Sweden2010In: Political Studies, ISSN 0032-3217, E-ISSN 1467-9248, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 143-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although power and trust are crucial to human cooperation, and considerable attention has been paid to both these concepts in the social sciences, the relationship between them has been poorly investigated. In this article, based on data about a complete network of labour market actors in Sweden, it is investigated whether power ‘drive out trust’ or if power a requirement of trust. In contrast to previous research, it is concludes that there is a positive relationship between power and trust, although it levels out when power is at a very high level. Also in disagreement with previous findings, it is shown, that symmetry in power relations is not a guarantee of trust: two actors with symmetric low power do not trust each other, at least not in this specific institutional setting. Moreover, the theoretical argument is developed and refined by showing that shared beliefs and group membership also have independent impact on trust, as well as a perception that the other actor is pursuing the common good. Hence, the presumed negative impact of power on trust, is not only neutralised, but also transformed into a positive impact in the social context investigated here. However, more research is needed to show whether this finding is true only within certain institutional settings, and, if so, within which ones.

  • 45.
    Öberg, PerOla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Exploring Networks of Power, Trust and Deliberation in Swedish Industrial Relations. A First and Preliminary Social Network Analysis2002In: Paper to be presented at the XIIIth Nordic Political Science Conference, NOPSA, in Aalborg, August 15-17, 2002, 2002Conference paper (Other scientific)
  • 46.
    Öberg, PerOla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    How are co-ordinated market economies co-ordinated: evidence from Sweden2005In: West European Politics, ISSN 0140-2382, E-ISSN 1743-9655, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 1075-1100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Central actors in coordinated economies have a dense network of associations for coordinating their actions. However, we lack knowledge of how such relationships are constituted and how the mechanisms of such coordination work. In the present article, we concentrate on the non-market mechanisms of power and trust. We want to know: Are all actors in the industrial relations system connected to each other or are they divided into contending but coherent groups? And in that case, do certain actors playing the role of 'brokers' connect these groups? A social network analysis on survey data from Sweden shows that the state and the peak-organisations still hold powerful positions. Simultaneously, when concentrating on reciprocal ties, the organisational borders are in particular bridged over by public sector organisations. However, actors with power are not highly trusted. Instead, other state actors¾especially the Labour Court¾play an important role as a broker that all parties trust.

  • 47.
    Öberg, PerOla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, TorstenUppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Power and institutions in industrial relation regimes: political science perspectives on the transition of the Swedish model2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden's National Institute for Working Life launched the project 'The Swedish Model in Transition' in collaboration with the Faculty of Social Sciences at Uppsala University in 1996. The general idea was to explore recent developments on the Swedish labour market and its system of industrial relations - the frequently discussed 'Swedish model'. This volume consists of a set of essays written by political scientists who have been involved in the programme as doctoral students or post-doctoral researchers, and presents some of the contributions and insights gained. The first section of the book deals with struggles of power over institutions: It investigates alternative explanations of wage coordination, how gender equality politics is shaped, and why the former corporatist system in Sweden was undermined. The second section deals with power within institutions: which are the determinants of political cleavages in Sweden and what are the mechanisms of cooperation? The last section focuses on power through institutions: How does globalisation affect the strength of organised labour and how does unemployment and workplace democracy influence political participation? Furthermore, what is the impact of the European Union on Equal Pay policies? It is shown that future rules of the game will hamper some actors' powers while enhancing those of others. This will affect how alliances are built and coordination is achieved. But, whether the development of the Swedish Model will continue along the same path as hitherto, or whether it will change direction, will be determined in power struggles between well-informed and goal-oriented actors.

  • 48.
    Öberg, PerOla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Power, Trust and Deliberation in Swedish Labour-Market Politics2002In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 451-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article focuses on labour market relations and particularly the following aspects:

    To what extent do main actors share key opinions? Which actors are considered influential? Who is trusted by whom, and how much? Does communication take the character of deliberation?

    Since relational data in industrial relations is rare, 71 actors in Sweden were asked about each other (770 elite positions, slightly more that 300 answered).

    Asserted changes as regards power in the Swedish industrial relations system seem over-estimated. The state still hold key positions. The peak-organisations and the Social Democratic Party are also influential, although less than the ministries. All these powerful actors are less trusted over class borders, while the Labour Court and the Conciliators’ Office are considered trustworthy, rational ‘deliberators’. It is hypothesised that they produce “the cement of society” that holds the system together.

  • 49.
    Öberg, PerOla
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Svensson, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Christiansen, Peter Munk
    Aarhus University.
    Nørgaard, Asbjørn Sonne
    University of Southern Denmark.
    Rommetvedt, Hilmar
    IRIS, Stavanger.
    Thesen, Gunnar
    IRIS, Stavanger.
    Disrupted Exchange and Declining Corporatism: Government Authority and Interest Group Capability in Scandinavia2011In: Government and Opposition, ISSN 0017-257X, E-ISSN 1477-7053, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 365-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Denmark, Norway and Sweden are still among the most corporatist democracies in the world. Although corporatism has declined in Scandinavia over the last decades, it still exists, albeit at a lower level. Based on comparative and longitudinal data, we argue that this is a consequence of the disruption of some of the prerequisites to corporatist exchange. Neither governments nor the relevant interest groups in Scandinavia control what their exchange partner desires to the same extent as they did during the heyday of corporatism. Despite the involvement of different factors in the three countries, the main pattern is the same. Consequently, the character of state–interest group relations in Scandinavia is not as distinctive as it used to be.

1 - 49 of 49
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