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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christnina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Lewin, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Foodwork among people with intellectual disabilities and dietary implications depending on staff involvement2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN ISSN 1501-7419, EISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 40-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The food provision for people with intellectual disability (ID) in Sweden is organized within their own households. The aim of this study was to describe how foodwork – planning for meals, shopping for food and cooking – is performed in different social contexts in community settings involving people with ID, staff or both. Dietary intake in the main meals in relation to foodwork practice was also studied. Four different foodwork practices could be distinguished. For some participants only one kind of foodwork practice was found, but for most of them two or more different practices. There was a tendency that food items and dishes chosen and used differed depending on what foodwork practice was performed, which, in turn, affected the nutrient intake. More attention needs to be directed to these everyday matters as a means to increase the quality of support in food for people with ID.

  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Food, eating and meals in the everyday life of individuals with intellectual disabilities - a case studyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Social aspects of eating events among people with intellectual disability in community living2010In: Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, ISSN 1366-8250, E-ISSN 1469-9532, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 259-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    In Sweden, a process involving the deinstitutionalisation of services and the establishment of community-based settings for people with intellectual disability has meant changes in meal arrangements. In the present study, we focus on the social arrangements of meals in community-based settings.

    Method:

    Participant observations were used to study the meals as social events for 32 participants, 9 of whom lived in supported living and 23 in group homes.

    Results:

    Breakfast and dinner were often eaten alone, while lunch at the daily activity centre and the food eaten between meals snacks were mostly shared with other people. Meals for participants in supported living were seldom social, and meals for participants in the group homes often hierarchical.

    Conclusion:

    The participants were often limited in choosing their company at meals, which typically consisted of other people with intellectual disability and staff. If they made such choices, they were dependent upon staff support to realise them.

  • 4.
    Adolfsson, Päivi
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Lewin, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Observed dietary intake in adults with intellectual disability living in the community2008In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, Vol. 52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge is lacking about dietary habits among people with intellectual disability (ID) living in community residences under new living conditions.

    Objective: To describe the dietary habits of individuals with ID living in community residences, focusing on intake of food, energy and nutrients as well as meal patterns.

    Design: Assisted food records and physical activity records over a 3-day observation period for 32 subjects.

    Results: Great variation was observed in daily energy intake (4.9-14 MJ) dispersed across several meals, with on average 26% of the energy coming from in-between-meal consumption. Main energy sources were milk products, bread, meat products, buns and cakes. The daily intake of fruit and vegetables (320_221 g) as well as dietary fiber (21_99.6 g) was generally low. For four vitamins and two minerals, 19-34% of subjects showed an intake below average requirement (AR). The physical activity level (PAL) was low for all individuals (1.4_0.1).

    Conclusion: A regular meal pattern with a relatively high proportion of energy from in-between-meal eating occasions and a low intake of especially fruits were typical of this group of people with ID. However, the total intake of energy and other food items varied a great deal between individuals. Thus, every adult with ID has to be treated as an individual with specific needs. A need for more knowledge about food in general and particularly how fruit and vegetables could be included in cooking as well as encouraged to be eaten as inbetween-meals seems imperative in the new living conditions for adults with ID.

  • 5.
    Brunosson, Albina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics. Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Brante, Göran
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sepp, Hanna
    Högskolan Kristianstad.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    To use a recipe - not a piece of cake: Students with mild intellectual disabilities use of recipes in home economics2014In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 412-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recipes are not only part of today's cooking culture, they are also part of the Swedish syllabus of home economics. The aim of this study was to investigate what kinds of difficulties students with mild intellectual disabilities have using recipes during cooking lessons in home economics. We conducted an ethnographically inspired approach, with a total of 44 h of accompanying observations. Three compulsory schools for students with intellectual disabilities were enrolled in the study, and 37 students and three teachers were included. The socio-cultural theory of learning has been used as a theoretical framework. The findings reveal both that recipes are central artefacts during the cooking lessons and that the students have various difficulties using the recipes. The difficulties vary, and they concern both how the recipes are designed and the purport of the recipes. Difficulties in relation to the design included, for example, the separation of ingredients and instructions in the text and the large amount of information given in both the whole and the parts of the recipes. The difficulties in relation to the purport – that is, the meaning or sense of the recipe – were the ingredients, the kitchen utensils and the knowledge of how to perform a specific task. These difficulties can be considered special in relation to the use of the recipes. We suggest the concept of ‘recipe literacy’ to capture the complex knowledge of using recipes.

  • 6.
    Fjellström, C
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Sepp, H
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Mattsson Sydner, Y
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Virhammar, K
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Måltidsforskning i Sverige 1980-2002.2002Book (Other scientific)
  • 7.
    Fjellström, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Dependency and Individualism: The Influence of Modern Ideologies on Older People´s Food Security2013In: Ageing in European Societies: Healthy Ageing in Europe / [ed] Constantinos Phellas, New York: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2013, p. 47-60Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Individualism has become a dominant part of modern thinking which means that each and everyone should be responsible for their own lives. This could be exemplified by taking care of health and body by responsible food choice. People are encouraged to be as independent as possible no matter what age a person is. This entails that nobody wants to be dependent of other people which is expressed in many studies among young as well as old people. To become dependent is considered a failure, and perhaps especially among those who are independent. However, because so many more old people live longer, and are diagnosed with for example dementia, become frail or enter widowhood, means many more will need support in later life. The area of food could be seen as particularly problematic since food, eating and meals in everyday life requires a continuous support. However, the studies (by our research group) showed that there is a dilemma in the dichotomy between encouraging independency and managing food in everyday life when need of support. Older free living women struggling to be independent were at risk of being undernourished because they lack the strength to shop for food or cook daily meals. On the other hand, community food services for older people are based on collective solutions, overlooking the needs of the individual. The outcomes of both examples may have implications on people’s food security, which involves not only the availability of affordable and nutritious food but also culturally acceptable food. In this chapter, we aim to discuss food security by analyzing loss of what we call physiological appetite, but moreover the loss of social appetite, from a societal context.

  • 8.
    Fjellström, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Måltidens sociala betydelse - ett äldreperspektiv2009In: Nordisk Nutrition, ISSN 1654-8337, no 2, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Fjellström, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Social Significance of Older Peoples Meals: Balancing Adaptive Strategies Between Ideals and Structure2017In: Food for the Aging Population / [ed] Monique M. Raats, Lisette C.P.G.M. de Groot & Dieneke van Asselt, Oxford: Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2017, 2, p. 83-98Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Meals in everyday life, including selection of food, commensality, and culinary rules are important for people’s identity. The complexity of meals is multifaceted and includes several dimensions. Growing old and being dependent may alter an individual’s food habits, which could affect the social significance of meals in everyday life. To manage food provision in old age and the well-known problems related to this scope of organization policymaking is a common approach. However, applying policies in reality is difficult and can cause dilemmas in everyday life, which is referred to as the policy–practice gap. Adaptive strategies must be used to manage this gap and thereby to reach food security, which is a human right.

  • 10.
    Fjellström, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Sepp, Hanna
    Wirhammar, Katarina
    Studier om livsmedel, mat och måltider2003In: Näring för magen eller själen?: Om svensk måltidsforskning 1980-2003 / [ed] Christina Fjellström, Uppsala: Institutionen för hushållsvetenskap , 2003, p. 26-40Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Fjellström, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Raats, Mounique
    Lumbers, Margret
    Organization, responsibility and practice of food provision in home-help service: an exploratory study among professionals2015In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 117, no 7, p. 1921-1932Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - In the home help service, food provision is one common welfare service that involves different professionals at different levels within a social organisation. The purpose of this paper is to examine how different professionals involved in this sector view and describe their work and responsibilities.

    Design/methodology/approach - A qualitative study was designed based on interviews with 17 professionals representing different positions in the organisation, and an inductive thematic analysis was carried out.

    Findings - The various professionals' views of food provision mainly focus on the meal box and other meals seem to receive much less attention. The professionals also illuminated their respective roles within the food provision organisation by means of boundaries and split responsibilities, and expressed a view of food provision as an issue for outsourcing. The restricted manner in which food provision was viewed and described illuminates a risk of food insecurity for dependent people in home help service situations.

    Originality/value - The restriction of how food provision was viewed and described illuminates a risk of food insecurity for dependent people in home help service.

  • 12.
    Granberg, Albina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Brante, Göran
    Olsson, Viktoria
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Knowing how to use and understand recipes: What Arithmetical Understanding Is Needed When Students With Mild Intellectual Disabilities Use Recipes In Practical Cooking Lessons In Home Economics?2017In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 494-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore what arithmetical understanding is needed when students with mild intellectual disabilities use recipes during practical cooking lessons in Home Economics. The settings were compulsory schools in Sweden attended by students with intellectual disabilities. Sixteen lessons in Home Economics during which cooking took place were observed. In total, 37 students and three teachers participated. All students had a mild intellectual disability. Their ages varied, but most were between 13 and 14 years old. The sociocultural perspective on learning, combined with a literacy framework, was used as a theoretical foundation for the study. Main findings are that students need an arithmetical understanding of (i) how to interpret numbers, (ii) how to interpret and use units, and (iii) how to compute when using recipes. The knowledge and skills needed to be able to use a recipe are featured in the concept recipe literacy, capturing both theoretical, declarative knowledge and the more practical, procedural knowledge. Recipe literacy can be used to theorize the use of recipes when learning to cook, as in Home Economics.

  • 13.
    Granberg, Albina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics. Kristianstad Univ.
    Olsson, Viktoria
    Kristianstad Univ.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Teaching and learning cooking skills in Home Economics: What do teachers for students with mild intellectual disabilities consider important to learn?2017In: British Food Journal, ISSN 0007-070X, E-ISSN 1758-4108, Vol. 119, no 5, p. 1067-1078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore which elements of cooking skills Home Economics (HE) teachers in schools for students withmild intellectual disability (ID) consider important for their students to learn.

    Design/methodology/approach - In total, 22 qualitative interviews with HE teachers of students with mild ID were conducted. The transcripts were analyzed thematically using the sociocultural approach on learning and knowledge as a theoretical framework.

    Findings - The elements of cooking skills that were emphasized included mastering the language of cooking, measuring, following recipes, representing an instrumental and task-centered - knowledge on cooking.

    Practical implications - The results of this study provide an insight into cooking lessons in HE in schools, not only regarding the focus that teachers give to cooking skills, but also to how cooking skills can be understood on a theoretical level. This has implications for both regular schools and schools for students with mild IDs since the elements that teachers consider important then guide what the students are given to learn. Teachers should be conscious that the planning of lessons should also be based on the students' specific circumstances and context.

    Originality/value - To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study that provides knowledge about how HE teachers reason regarding which cooking skills they consider important for students to learn. HE is taught to both children and adolescents, and it is important to investigate teachers' perceptions about the subject and how the teaching is organized, including cooking skills.

  • 14. Lyon, Phil
    et al.
    Sydner Mattsson, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Janhonen-Abruquah, Hille
    Schröder, Monika
    Colquhoun, Anne
    Continuity in the kitchen: how younger and older women compare in their food practices and use of cooking skills2011In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 529-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparisons between younger and older women in the kitchen usually focus on the historical argument that younger women do not have the domestic cooking skills of their mothers or grandmothers. At one level, this is convincing because there is now demonstrably greater reliance on ready meals and processed foods, and less on the home production of meals from raw ingredients. Compared with the immediate post-Second World War years, not so much time is routinely spent in the kitchen, and food preparation is no longer a task central to the lives of many women. The availability of meals or meal components requiring less domestic labour and improved kitchen technology are both factors in this transformation of women's lives. However, they are not just available to the young. So, this research questions the impact of these factors across the age spectrum. Older women may have had very different domestic experiences earlier in their lives but have they now converged with the practices of younger women? How do younger and older women compare in terms of their food practices and the cooking skills they currently use in the kitchen? Using Scottish questionnaire data from a cross-national study, this paper reports on the differences and similarities for 37 younger women (25-45 years; mean 32 years) and 43 older women (60-75 years; mean 68 years) in their actual use of specific food preparation and cooking techniques, the kind of meals they made, and the extent to which they ate out or ordered in meals for home consumption. Results indicated that while there were some differences in food preparation, the use of fresh ingredients and the style of cooking undertaken in the home, these were mostly marginal. There were similar response patterns for the adequacy of their domestic facilities and equipment. There was, however, a notable divergence in their patterns of eating meals out, or phoning out for meals. These data suggest that while younger and older women - different cooking generations - do differ, the way they differ is related more to current lifestyle factors than to any highly differentiated domestic food preparation and cooking skills.

  • 15.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Den maktlösa måltiden: Om mat inom äldreomsorgen2002Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Swedish elderly-care sector the institutions are of different character and the kind of care and food-supply they offer vary in scope and intensity. The aim of this study was to analyse how food and meals were handled and provided to the elderly living within those situations and in this context, how food was expressed as a substance or/and in symbols. This study focus on the social organisation that embraces the diet of the elderly and shapes the provisions of their meals, on the norms, values and behaviours of the different social identities in the organisation. The empirical work included in-depth interviews and participant observations in four different residential care homes, including various hierarchical levels, i.e. politicians and different personnel, in the organisation of food-supply to the elderly. In each care home different types of care and food-supply were studied, i.e. elderly having their meals in 24hour care, partime day care and those who ate in the restaurants. Generally, provision of meals was routine and meals were planned, prepared and served with little or no attention to what substanse and symbol it brought to the elderly. The elderly had limited possibilities to influence their own meals and those with the largest need of care, being the most fragile and sick had the least influence. The views of politicians and different personnel indicated that they considered themself powerless, which resulted in a "freedom of responsibility". It was obvious that there existed a clear discrepancy between how the informants considered the provision of food and meals should be organised and carried out, in comparison to reality. The current unsatisfactory provision of meals to the elderly is attributed to the marginalisation of specifically three areas: the symbolic value of food, the life and needs of the elderly and the traditional knowledge and experiences of women in their role as housewife and carer of the family.

  • 16.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Den viktiga maten och den sociala måltiden2015In: Äldre i centrum, ISSN 1653-3585, no 1, p. 33-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Dimensioner och diskurser: klagomål om mat och måltider inom äldreomsorgen2015In: Klagandets diskurs: matforskare reflekterar / [ed] Chritina Fjellström, Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Ekologisk mat: vetenskap eller trendig ideologi?2009In: Näringsvärt, ISSN 0348-0674, no 2, p. 31-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fördelar och nackdelar med storhushåll2006Other (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Handledning behövs!2009In: Näringsvärt, no 3, p. 27-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Koststudenterna behöver få komma ut på praktik för att kunna få en god förståelse för hur deras kunskaper kan komma till nytta i arbetslivet.

  • 21.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Kritisk hållning viktigt inom foodservice2008In: Näringsvärt : om kost & näring, ISSN 1653-8137, no 6, p. 23-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Utbildningarna till kostekonom och kostvetare.

  • 22.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Institutionen för kostvetenskap, Umeå universitet.
    Mat inom handikapp- och äldreomsorg2005Other (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Mat inom äldreomsorgen2002In: Vård - utbildning, utveckling, forskning, ISSN 0281-921X, no 4, p. 45-50Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mat och måltider för äldre inom vård och omsorg2007In: Socionomen, ISSN 0283-1929, no 4, p. 66-69Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Meningen med maten2003In: Vi människor, Vol. 56, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mer forskning behövs inom vårt område!2008In: Näringsvärt : om kost & näring, ISSN 1653-8137, no 5, p. 27-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Villkor och möjligheter för mat inom äldreomsorgen2009In: Gastronomisk Forskning / [ed] Chrisina Fjellström, Stockholm: Gastronomiska Akademiens bibliotek vol , 2009, p. 151-159Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Andersson, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Quality of Life management of Living Resource (SENIOR FOOD-QOL). Determining the role of meals in later life2004In: The 8th Nordic Nutrition Conference, Tönsberg, Norway 20-23 June 2004., 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Food provision and the meal situation in elderly care: outcomes in different social contexts2005In: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics (Print), ISSN 0952-3871, E-ISSN 1365-277X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 45-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Nutritional problems concerning older people in care can be affected both by their illness and by the standard procedures surrounding food provision, for example rigid routines of food supply and ritualized mealtime situations.

    Method The aim was to study how organizational structure and staff members' routines and actions influence activities related to food and meals in different caring context in Sweden. The qualitative methodology chosen for this study was participant observation.

    Result Care recipients were given different opportunities concerning what, how, when and with whom to eat, depending on where their meals were served. In restaurants, older people could choose from several foods and they could also choose the time of and company for the meal. At care units with 'part-of-day' care or 'around-the-clock' care, food choices, time and company were limited, especially at the units with 'around-the-clock' care, where the most ailing older people lived.

    Conclusions Food provision and the mealtime situation for the elderly are shaped by the individual's living arrangements, and the social organization surrounding it, not determined by the individual's needs and wishes, including social and cultural meanings of food and meals, which could, thereby, affect nutritional intake.

  • 30.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Food-service in the public elderly care sector1999In: The third European Forum for Dietitians, Delfi, Grekland 6-9 juni 1999. Muntlig presentation i work-shop., 1999Conference paper (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Food service in the public elderly care sector

  • 31.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Food-service in the public elderly care sector - Ideologes about freedom of choice and nourishing food.2000In: The 15 th Nordic Gerontological Congress, Reykjavik, Island 4-7 juni 2000. Poster., 2000Conference paper (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    FOOD-SERVICE IN THE PUBLIC ELDERY CARE SECTOR

  • 32.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences. kost.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences. kost.
    Illuminating the (non-) meaning of food: organization, power and responsibilities in public elderly care.: A Swedish perspective.2007In: Journal of Foodservice, Vol. 18, p. 119-129Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Neddragningar inom äldreomsorgen hot mot måltidsverksamheten?1997Other (Other scientific)
  • 34.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University.
    The meaning of symbols of culinary rules.2003In: Culinary Arts and Sciences IV.: Global and National Perspectives, 2003, p. 363-371Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences. Kost.
    The meaning of symbols of culinary rules: The food and meals in Elderly care2006In: Journal of Foodservice, ISSN 1748-0140, E-ISSN 1745-4506, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 182-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, meals are provided to the elderly living in various types of institutions. This paper discusses how food in this context is expressed as substance and symbols. It focuses on the social organization surrounding food provision in residential care homes, from considerations in menu planning to the final presentation of the meal. This encompasses the diet of the elderly and how the norms, values and behaviours of different social identities in such an organization shape food provision. The empirical work is based on participant observations in four residential care homes. In each home, the manager of the restaurant kitchen was responsible for menu planning for all meals served to the elderly. This meant that they planned menus they thought were suitable for elderly people, i.e. most of the dishes were plain Swedish food. The dishes presented on the menu card symbolized a specific taste and shape. These different dishes are traditionally and variously connected to different kinds of trimmings. Although symbols such as specific taste, shape and trimmings were linked to the dish when the manager planned the menu, the servings were often presented with some variation in reality. The cooks rarely used a written recipe; they sometimes interpreted a dish with a particular name differently, and they did not always use the ‘indicated’ ingredients associated with these dishes. The elderly who ate their meals in the restaurants could wish for and had access to a wide range of condiments. At the units where the staff served the meals, however, the final servings were often far from the symbols associated with each specific dish. Thus, the cooks, and moreover the staff, lacked knowledge about the ‘right’ trimmings, were unable or did not care to offer these traditional symbols, which are important to the elderly meal situation as a whole.

  • 36.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Äldreomsorgens måltidsverksamhet.1999In: Spris konferens, Äldreomsorg och vård av äldre - Nationellt forum för forskare Stockholm 21-22 april 1999. Muntlig presentation i plenum., 1999Conference paper (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Äldreomsorgens måltidsverksamhet

  • 37.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Lundmark, Berit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Från lingonlådor om hösten till portionsförpackad sylt: från ekonomiföreståndare till kostekonom - ett yrke i förändring2001Report (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences. kost.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Humanistisk-samhällsvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences. kost.
    Raats, Monique
    Lumbers, Margaret
    Food habits and foodwork - The Life Course Perspective of Senior Europeans2007In: Food, culture and society, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 367-387Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Neuman, Nicklas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Persson Osowski, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Swedish students' interpretations of food symbols and their perceptions of healthy eating: An exploratory study2014In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 82, p. 29-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study used focus group discussions to investigate how a group of Swedish University students (24 women and five men) interpret symbols with claims about health and/or symbols with information about nutrition. The participants mostly talked about farming methods and food processes when asked about health and nutrition symbols. The Swedish Keyhole was the most familiar symbol to the participants but they had scant knowledge of its meaning. Symbols that were judged to be the most useful in guiding food choices were, according to the participants, symbols showing information about number of calories and/or nutrients. However, the most striking finding is still that the food experts' medical discourse, i.e. the focus on physical health and nutritional effects on the individual body, seems to be inconsistent with the participants' perceptions of healthy eating and risk. The participants rather used what we call an “inauthenticity discourse” where health and risks are judged in relation to farming methods, industrial food production, additives and other aspects of the food that are unknown to the individual. Despite limitations considering the number of participations and their relative homogeneity, these findings contribute to a further understanding of the gap between experts and the public when it comes to perceptions of healthy eating and risks. If this is a broader phenomenon, then we argue that this must be acknowledged if information about health and risk is to be communicated successfully.

  • 40.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Andersson, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Fjellström, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Kerstin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Quality of Life and Management of Living Resources: Choosing foods, eating meals: sustaining independence and quality of life in old age-an EU funded project2004In: The 8th Nordic Nutrition Conference, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Oljans, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Elmståhl, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Hjälmeskog, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    From nutrients to wellbeing identifying discourses of food in relation to health in syllabi2017In: Pedagogy, Culture & Society, ISSN 1468-1366, E-ISSN 1747-5104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food and health have long had dominant position within the subject of Home Economics (HE) in Sweden. However, what constitutes a proper diet, and how it is associated with a healthy lifestyle changes over time. In this article, a discourse analytic approach combined with a didactic perspective are used as the theoretical frame. The aim is to explore how food in relation to health has been constructed within the syllabus of HE. Six HE syllabi from 1962 to 2011 were analysed. From the results three different discourses were identified and named after their main areas of focus: (i) the medical discourse, (ii) the consumer discourse and (iii) the human ecological discourse. Each discourse represents a different way of constructing food in relation to health, and different representations have dominated over the past fifty years. The construction of food in relation to health is thereby seen in its historical and cultural context according to what this knowledge content includes or excludes.

  • 42.
    Oljans, Emma
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Elmståhl, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    The construction of diet in the Swedish syllabus for Home and Consumer Studies2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Ivarsson, Annelie
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Umeå University.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    The everyday life of adolescent coeliacs: issues of importance for compliance with the gluten-free diet2008In: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics (Print), ISSN 0952-3871, E-ISSN 1365-277X, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 359-367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Noncompliance with the gluten-free diet is often reported among adolescents with coeliac disease. However, knowledge is limited regarding their own perspectives and experiences of managing the disease and the prescription of a gluten-free diet. The aim of this study was to explore how adolescents with coeliac disease perceive and manage their everyday lives in relation to a gluten-free diet.

    Methods

    In total, 47 adolescents with coeliac disease, divided into 10 focus groups, were interviewed. In the qualitative analysis, themes emerged to illustrate and explain the adolescents' own perspectives on life with a gluten-free diet.

    Results

    The probability of compliance with the gluten-free diet was comprised by insufficient knowledge of significant others, problems with the availability and sensory acceptance of gluten-free food, insufficient social support and their perceived dietary deviance. Three different approaches to the gluten-free diet emerged: compliers, occasional noncompliers, and noncompliers. Each approach, as a coping strategy, was rational in the sense that it represented the adolescents' differing views of everyday life with coeliac disease and a prescription of a gluten-free diet.

    Conclusions

    Adolescents with coeliac disease experience various dilemmas related to the gluten-free diet. The study demonstrated unmet needs and implies empowerment strategies for optimum clinical outcomes.

  • 44. Olsson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Lyon, Phil
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Ivarsson, Annelie
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Food That Makes You Different: The Stigma Experienced by Adolescents With Celiac Disease2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 976-984Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For adolescents with celiac disease (CD), a gluten-free diet (GFD) is crucial for health, but compliance is problematic and noncompliance is common even among those aware of the risks. To better understand their lives with the disease, Swedish CD adolescents were invited to take part in focus group discussions. Data were analyzed for recurrent stigma-related themes across the groups. Adolescents described an awareness of being different from others that was produced by meal appearance and the poor availability of gluten-free food. The GFD often required discussions and special requests, so eating in public had the effect of making an invisible condition visible, and thereby creating a context for felt or enacted stigma. Maintaining invisibility avoided negative consequences of stigma, and other strategies were used to reduce the costs of visibility. The results of the study show that the GFD can produce stigma experiences in adolescence, and that dietary compliance (or lack thereof) can be understood in terms of dealing with GFD concealment and disclosure.

  • 45.
    Rydén, Petra
    et al.
    Institutionen för kostvetenskap, Umeå universitet.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Implementing and sustaining dietary change in the context of social relationships2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 583-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  Changing to healthier dietary habits is quite difficult to implement and even more difficult to sustain. As the majority of people have some or all their meals with others, it is likely that their social relationships influence the dietary change process and its sustainability. Thus, the aim of this research was to explore and describe experiences of dietary change and its sustainability in the context of an individual’s social relationships.

    Methods:  Semi-structured interviews were conducted individually with fourteen individuals who had previously been participants in a 3-month dietary intervention study using a Mediterranean diet. Thematic analysis was used on verbatim transcripts of the interviews.

    Results:  Social relationships were the main barrier to sustainability – in particular social relationships within the household where various coping strategies were needed on an everyday basis. Social relationships outside the household were also difficult to manage as dietary change challenged existing traditions and norms of what to eat. The changer was thereby forced to risk social disapproval or to deviate from the diet.

    Conclusions:  Social relationships within and outside the household complicated the accomplishment of healthy dietary changes. Hence, it is important to acknowledge the social context of the changer when dietary change is to be implemented.

  • 46. Rydén, Petra
    et al.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Hagfors, Linda
    Counting the cost of healthy eating: a Swedish comparison of Mediterranean-style and ordinary diets2008In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research was to examine the cost of a diet generally regarded as healthy, a Swedish version of the Mediterranean diet, and to compare it with the cost of an ordinary Swedish diet. A total of 30 individuals provided detailed dietary data collected in a randomized intervention study, examining the effect of dietary change to a Mediterranean-style diet in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (Mediterranean group, n = 16, control group, n = 14). The data, covering 1-month dietary intake, were examined with three different diet quality indicators to see whether the Mediterranean group consumed a healthier diet than the control group. All diet quality indicators showed that the Mediterranean group consumed a healthier diet than the control group. Consumer food prices were used to analyse the cost of the different diets. In immediate consumer cost terms, eating a healthier diet was more expensive when differences in energy intake were discounted. However, non-energy adjusted costs showed no significant difference between the groups. Hence, if one of the reasons for choosing a healthier diet is to achieve weight loss – by consuming less energy – it is possible that healthier eating is not more expensive.

  • 47.
    Skinnars Josefsson, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Access to competence and policy- food provision in Swedish eldercare2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: To provide food and meals in elderly care is a growing concern in the welfare state.  Objective:  Investigate and compare nutritional competence and its relation to different kind of food policies within elderly care in Swedish municipalities, in 2006 and 2013-14. Methodology: Web based questionnaires were distributed to all Swedish municipalities (N= 290) twice. Results:  Access to clinical- and administrative dietitians differ between analyzed years and between sizes of municipalities. Nutritional competences correlated with local policies in 2006 and the national guideline (introduced in 2011) 2013-14. Conclusion: Municipal size and nutritional competence are central in strategic food provision work.

  • 48.
    Skinnars Josefsson, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Persson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Quality indicators of nutritional care practice in elderly care2017In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1057-1064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim is to explore the effects of antecedent, structural and process quality indicators of nutritional care practice on meal satisfaction and screened nutritional status among older adults in residential care homes. Design: Data for this Swedish cross-sectional study regarding older adults living in residential care homes were collected by i) a national questionnaire, ii) records from the quality registry Senior Alert, iii) data from an Open Comparison survey of elderly care in 2013/2014. The data represented 1154 individuals in 117 of 290 Swedish municipalities. Measurements: Meal satisfaction (%) and adequate nutritional status, screened by the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form (MNA-SF), were the two outcome variables assessed through their association with population density of municipalities and residents’ age, together with 12 quality indicators pertaining to structure and process domains in the Donabedian model of care. Results: Meal satisfaction was associated with rural and urban municipalities, with the structure quality indicators: local food policies, private meal providers, on-site cooking, availability of clinical/community dietitians, foodservice dietitians, and with the process quality indicators: meal choice, satisfaction surveys, and ‘meal councils’. Adequate nutritional status was positively associated with availability of clinical/community dietitians, and energy and nutrient calculated menus, and negatively associated with chilled food production systems. Conclusion: Municipality characteristics and structure quality indicators had the strongest associations with meal satisfaction, and quality indicators with local characteristics emerge as important for meal satisfaction. Nutritional competence appears vital for residents to be well-nourished.

  • 49.
    Skinnars Josefsson, Malin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Persson, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Reforming Foodservice in Elderly Care: National Actions and Local Outcomes2018In: Nutrition & Dietetics, ISSN 1446-6368, E-ISSN 1747-0080, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 79-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to explore the outcome, on a local level, of steering, organisation and practices of elderly care foodservice by Swedish municipalities, and changes relative to national actions.

    Methods: A survey using a web-based questionnaire about elderly care foodservice targeting all Swedish municipalities (n=290) was conducted in 2006 and 2013/14. The questionnaire included the topics: organisation of foodservice, its practice in elderly care, and steering devices such as guidelines and policies. Based on the share of a rural population, municipalities were divided into groups: rural (≥50%), urban (<50%) and city (≤20%).

    Results: The response rate from municipalities was 80% in 2006 and 56% in 2013/14; 45% participated in both surveys. The results showed increased use of local food policies (P=0.03) and meal choice (P<0.001), while access to clinical/community dietitians declined (P=0.01) between the surveys. In home-help services, daily delivered cook-serve meals declined (P<0.001) and chilled meals delivered three times a week increased (P=0.002) between the surveys. City municipalities used private foodservice organisations the most, (P<0.001) and reported reduced use of cook-serve systems in favour of chilled. In rural municipalities, the use of public providers (98%) and a cook-serve system (94%) were firmly established. Urban municipalities were placed between the other groups.

    Conclusions: National actions such as soft governance and benchmarking appear largely to determine local level outcomes. However, conditions for adapting these measures vary between municipality groups. While efficiency enhancing trends were prominent, questions remain whether national actions should be expanded beyond performance to also examine their consequences.

  • 50. Vas de Almeida, M D.
    et al.
    Davidson, K.
    De Morais, C
    Marshall, H
    Bofill, S
    Grunert, K G
    Kozlowska, K
    Lacasta, Y
    Martines, S
    Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Domestic Sciences. kost.
    Nielsen, H B
    Seltmann, G
    Szczecinska, A
    Raats, M
    Lumbers, M
    Alcohol consumption in elderly people across European countries: Results from the food in later life project2005In: Ageing International, ISSN 0163-5158, E-ISSN 1936-606X, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 377-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to identify social and cultural aspects of alcohol consumption in a sample of older people living in their own homes, in eight different European countries. We explore several aspects of alcohol consumption, establishing comparisons between genders, age groups and living circumstances. The phenomenon of alcohol consumption within these countries and cultures is compared in order to gain a better understanding of similarities and differences.

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