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  • 1.
    Abu Hamdeh, Sami
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lytsy, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Medicine, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Surgical site infections in standard neurosurgery procedures-a study of incidence, impact and potential risk factors2014In: British Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0268-8697, E-ISSN 1360-046X, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 270-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. Surgical site infections (SSIs) may be devastating for the patient and they carry high economic costs. Studies of SSI after neurosurgery report an incidence of 1 - 11%. However, patient material, follow-up time and definition of SSI have varied. In the present study we prospectively recorded the prevalence of SSI 3 months after standard intracranial neurosurgical procedures. The incidence, impact and risk factors of SSI were analysed. Methods. We included patients admitted during 2010 to our unit for postoperative care after standard neurosurgical procedures. SSI was defined as evident with positive cultures from surgical samples or CSF, and/or purulent discharge during reoperation. Follow-up was done after 3 and 12 months and statistics was obtained after 3 months. The predictive values on the outcome of demographic and clinical factors describing the surgical procedure were evaluated using linear regression. Results. A total of 448 patients were included in the study and underwent a total of 466 procedures. Within 3 and 12 months, 33 and 88 patients, respectively, had died. Of the surviving patients, 20 (4.3% of procedures) developed infections within 3 months and another 3 (4.9% of procedures) within 12 months. Risk factors for SSI were meningioma, longer operation time, craniotomy, dural substitute, and staples in wound closure. Patients with SSI had significantly longer hospital stay. Multivariate analysis showed that factors found significant in univariate analysis frequently occur together. Discussion. We studied the prevalence of SSI after 3 and 12 months in a prospective 1-year material with standard neurosurgical procedures and found it to be 4.3% and 4.9%, respectively. The analysis of the results showed that a combination of parameters indicating a longer and more complicated procedure predicted the development of SSI. Our conclusion is that the prevention of SSI has to be done at many levels, especially with patients undergoing long surgical procedures.

  • 2.
    Blomquist, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Ronne Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Borota, Ljubisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Gál, Gyula
    Nilsson, Kristina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Montelius, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Grusell, Erik
    Isacsson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medical Radiation Science.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Positive correlation between occlusion rate and nidus size of proton beam treated brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs)2016In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Proton beam radiotherapy of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in the brain has been performed in Uppsala since 1991. An earlier study based on the first 26 patients concluded that proton beam can be used for treating large and medium sized AVMs that were considered difficult to treat with photons due to the risk of side effects. In the present study we analyzed the result from treating the subsequent 65 patients.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the patients' medical records, treatment protocols and radiological results was done. Information about gender, age, presenting symptoms, clinical course, the size of AVM nidus and rate of occlusion was collected. Outcome parameters were the occlusion of the AVM, clinical outcome and side effects.

    RESULTS: The rate of total occlusion was overall 68%. For target volume 0-2cm(3) it was 77%, for 3-10 cm(3) 80%, for 11-15 cm(3) 50% and for 16-51 cm(3) 20%. Those with total regress of the AVM had significantly smaller target volumes (p < 0.009) higher fraction dose (p < 0.001) as well as total dose (p < 0.004) compared to the rest. The target volume was an independent predictor of total occlusion (p = 0.03). There was no difference between those with and without total occlusion regarding mean age, gender distribution or symptoms at diagnosis. Forty-one patients developed a mild radiation-induced brain edema and this was more common in those that had total occlusion of the AVM. Two patients had brain hemorrhages after treatment. One of these had no effect and the other only partial occlusion from proton beams. Two thirds of those presenting with seizures reported an improved seizure situation after treatment.

    CONCLUSION: Our observations agree with earlier results and show that proton beam irradiation is a treatment alternative for brain AVMs since it has a high occlusion rate even in larger AVMs.

  • 3.
    Borota, Ljubisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Jangland, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Department of Medical Physics, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åslund, Per-Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology. Department of Medical Physics, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nyberg, Christoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Mahmoud, Ehab
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Sakaguchi, Takuya
    Patz, Andreas
    Spot fluoroscopy: a novel innovative approach to reduce radiation dose in neurointerventional procedures2017In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 600-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Increased interest in radiation dose reduction in neurointerventional procedures has led to the development of a method called "spot fluoroscopy" (SF), which enables the operator to collimate a rectangular or square region of interest anywhere within the general field of view. This has potential advantages over conventional collimation, which is limited to symmetric collimation centered over the field of view.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of SF on the radiation dose.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-five patients with intracranial aneurysms were treated with endovascular coiling. SF was used in 16 patients and conventional fluoroscopy in 19. The following parameters were analyzed: the total fluoroscopic time, the total air kerma, the total fluoroscopic dose-area product, and the fluoroscopic dose-area product rate. Statistical differences were determined using the Welch's t-test.

    RESULTS: The use of SF led to a reduction of 50% of the total fluoroscopic dose-area product (CF = 106.21 Gycm(2), SD = 99.06 Gycm(2) versus SF = 51.80 Gycm(2), SD = 21.03 Gycm(2), p = 0.003884) and significant reduction of the total fluoroscopic dose-area product rate (CF = 1.42 Gycm(2)/min, SD = 0.57 Gycm(2)/s versus SF = 0.83 Gycm(2)/min, SD = 0.37 Gycm(2)/min, p = 0.00106). The use of SF did not lead to an increase in fluoroscopy time or an increase in total fluoroscopic cumulative air kerma, regardless of collimation.

    CONCLUSION: The SF function is a new and promising tool for reduction of the radiation dose during neurointerventional procedures.

  • 4.
    Borota, Ljubisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Mahmoud, Ehab
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Nyberg, Christoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Dual lumen balloon catheter - An effective substitute for two single lumen catheters in treatment of vascular targets with challenging anatomy2018In: Journal of clinical neuroscience, ISSN 0967-5868, E-ISSN 1532-2653, Vol. 51, p. 91-99, article id S0967-5868(17)31621-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe our experience in the treatment of various pathological conditions of the cranial and spinal blood vessels and hypervascularized lesions using dual lumen balloon catheters. Twenty-five patients were treated with endovascular techniques: two with vasospasm of cerebral blood vessels caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage, one with a hypervascularized metastasis in the vertebral body, two with spinal dural fistula, four with cerebral dural fistula, three with cerebral arteriovenous malformations, and 13 with aneurysms. The dual lumen balloon catheters were used for remodeling of the coil mesh, injection of various liquid embolic agents, particles and nimodipine, for the prevention of reflux and deployment of coils and stents. The diameter of catheterized blood vessels varied from 0.7 mm to 4 mm. Two complications occurred: perforation of an aneurysm in one case and gluing of the tip of balloon catheter by embolic material in another case. All other interventions were uneventful, and therapeutic goals were achieved in all cases except in the case with gluing of the tip of balloon catheter. The balloons effectively prevented reflux regardless of the type of the embolic material and diameter of blood vessel. The results of our study show that dual lumen balloon catheters allow complex interventions in the narrow cerebral and spinal blood vessels where the safe use of two single lumen catheters is either limited or impossible.

  • 5.
    Elf, Kristin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Pelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Cerebral perfusion pressure between 50 and 60 mm Hg may be beneficial in head-injured patients: A computerized secondary insult monitoring study2005In: Neurosurgery, ISSN 0148-396X, E-ISSN 1524-4040, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 962-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the occurrence of secondary insults using a computerized monitoring data collecting system and to investigate their relationship to outcome when the neurointensive care was dedicated to avoiding secondary insults.

    METHODS: Patients 16 to 79 years old admitted to the neurointensive care unit between August 1998 and December 2002 with traumatic brain injury and 54 hours or more of valid monitoring within the first 120 hours after trauma (one value/min) were included. Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), systolic blood pressure (BPs), and mean blood pressure (BPm) was required, and insult levels were defined (ICP >25/>35, BPs <100/<90/>160/>180, BPm <80/<70/>110/>120, and CPP <60/<50/>70/>80 mm Hg). Insults were quantified as proportion of valid monitoring time at the insult level. Logistic regression analyses were performed with admission and secondary insult variables as explanatory variables and favorable outcome as dependent variable.

    RESULTS: Eighty-one patients, 63 men and 18 women, with a mean age of 43.0 years, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Seventy-two patients (89%) had Glasgow Coma Scale scores of 8 or less. Thirty-one patients (38%) had diffuse injury, and 50 (62%) had mass lesions. Mean Injury Severity Score was 26.6. After 6 months, 54% of the patients had achieved a favorable outcome. Most patients spent 5% or less of the monitoring time at the insult level except for CPP greater than 70 mm Hg. Low age, high Glasgow Coma Scale motor score, low Injury Severity Score, and CPP less than 60 mm Hg insults were significant predictors of favorable outcome in the final multiple logistic regression model.

    CONCLUSION: Overall, the secondary insults were rare, except for high CPP. The results suggest that patients with traumatic brain injury might benefit from a CPP slightly less than 60 mm Hg.

  • 6.
    Engquist, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Johnson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Pelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Rostami, Elham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hemodynamic Disturbances in the Early Phase After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Studied by Bedside Xenon-enhanced CT.2018In: Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology, ISSN 0898-4921, E-ISSN 1537-1921, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 49-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms leading to neurological deterioration and the devastating course of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are still not well understood. Bedside xenon-enhanced computerized tomography (XeCT) enables measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during neurosurgical intensive care. In the present study, CBF characteristics in the early phase after severe SAH were explored and related to clinical characteristics and early clinical course outcome.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients diagnosed with SAH and requiring mechanical ventilation were prospectively enrolled in the study. Bedside XeCT was performed within day 0 to 3.

    RESULTS: Data from 64 patients were obtained. Median global CBF was 34.9 mL/100 g/min (interquartile range [IQR], 26.7 to 41.6). There was a difference in CBF related to age with higher global CBF in the younger patients (30 to 49 y). CBF was also related to the severity of SAH with lower CBF in Fisher grade 4 compared with grade 3. rCBF disturbances and hypoperfusion were common; in 43 of the 64 patients rCBF<20 mL/100 g/min was detected in more than 10% of the region-of-interest (ROI) area and in 17 patients such low-flow area exceeded 30%. rCBF was not related to the localization of the aneurysm; there was no difference in rCBF of ipsilateral compared with contralateral vascular territories. In patients who initially were in Hunt & Hess grade I to III, median global CBF day 0 to 3 was significantly lower for patients who were in poor neurological state at discharge compared with patients in good neurological state, 25.5 mL/100 g/min (IQR, 21.3 to 28.3) versus 37.8 mL/100 g/min (IQR, 30.5 to 47.6).

    CONCLUSIONS: CBF disturbances are common in the early phase after SAH. In many patients, CBF was heterogenic and substantial areas with low rCBF were detected. Age and CT Fisher grade were factors influencing global cortical CBF. Bedside XeCT may be a tool to identify patients at risk of deteriorating so they can receive intensified management, but this needs further exploration.

  • 7.
    Engquist, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Rostami, Elham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Pelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Effect of HHH-Therapy on Regional CBF after Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Studied by Bedside Xenon-Enhanced CT2018In: Neurocritical Care, ISSN 1541-6933, E-ISSN 1556-0961, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 143-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Management of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is difficult and still carries controversies. In this study, the effect of therapeutic hypervolemia, hemodilution, and hypertension (HHH-therapy) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) was assessed by xenon-enhanced computerized tomography (XeCT) hypothesizing an increase in CBF in poorly perfused regions.

    METHODS:

    Bedside XeCT measurements of regional CBF in mechanically ventilated SAH patients were routinely scheduled for day 0-3, 4-7, and 8-12. At clinical suspicion of DCI, patients received 5-day HHH-therapy. For inclusion, XeCT was required at 0-48 h before start of HHH (baseline) and during therapy. Data from corresponding time-windows were also collected for non-DCI patients.

    RESULTS:

    Twenty patients who later developed DCI were included, and twenty-eight patients without DCI were identified for comparison. During HHH, there was a slight nonsignificant increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and a significant reduction in hematocrit. Median global cortical CBF for the DCI group increased from 29.5 (IQR 24.6-33.9) to 38.4 (IQR 27.0-41.2) ml/100 g/min (P = 0.001). There was a concomitant increase in regional CBF of the worst vascular territories, and the proportion of area with blood flow below 20 ml/100 g/min was significantly reduced. Non-DCI patients showed higher CBF at baseline, and no significant change over time.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    HHH-therapy appeared to increase global and regional CBF in DCI patients. The increase in SBP was small, while the decrease in hematocrit was more pronounced, which may suggest that intravascular volume status and rheological effects are of importance. XeCT may be potentially helpful in managing poor-grade SAH patients.

  • 8.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Silander, H C
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Rubertsson, Sten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Wiklund, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Adverse effects of high-dose epinephrine on cerebral blood flow during experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation2000In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 1423-1430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    To study the effects of high-dose epinephrine, compared with standard-dose epinephrine, on the dynamics of superficial cortical cerebral blood flow as well as global cerebral oxygenation during experimental cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We hypothesized that high-dose epinephrine might be unable to improve cerebral blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation as compared with standard-dose epinephrine.

    DESIGN:

    Randomized controlled study.

    SETTING:

    University hospital research laboratory.

    SUBJECTS:

    A total of 20 male anesthetized piglets.

    INTERVENTIONS:

    Ventricular fibrillation was induced. A nonintervention interval of 8 mins was followed by open-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The animals were randomized to receive repeated bolus injections of either 20 microg/kg (standard-dose group, n = 10) or 200 microg/kg (high-dose group, n = 10) of epinephrine.

    MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

    Focal cortical cerebral blood flow was measured continuously by using laser Doppler flowmetry. The duration of blood flow increase was significantly shorter in the high-dose group after the second dose of epinephrine. In the high-dose group there was also a consistent tendency for lower peak levels and shorter duration of flow increase in response to repeated bolus doses of epinephrine. Cerebral oxygen extraction ratio was significantly lower in the high-dose group after administration of epinephrine.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Repeated bolus doses of epinephrine 200 microg/kg, as compared with 20 microg/kg, do not improve superficial cortical cerebral blood flow during experimental open-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation. High-dose epinephrine appears to induce vasoconstriction of cortical cerebral blood vessels resulting in redistribution of blood flow from superficial cortex. This might be one explanation for the failure of high-dose epinephrine to improve overall outcome in clinical trials.

  • 9.
    Halawa, Imad
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Vlachogiannis, Pavlos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Amandusson, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Elf, Kristin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Zetterberg, H.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Dept Psychiat & Neurochem, Molndal, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Clin Neurochem Lab, Molndal, Sweden.;UCL, Inst Neurol, Dept Mol Neurosci, Queen Sq, London, England..
    Kumlien, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Seizures, CSF neurofilament light and tau in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 137, no 2, p. 199-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Patients with severe subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) often suffer from complications with delayed cerebral ischaemia (DCI) due to vasospasm that is difficult to identify by clinical examination. The purpose of this study was to monitor seizures and to measure cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of neurofilament light (NFL) and tau, and to see whether they could be used for predicting preclinical DCI.

    Methods

    We prospectively studied 19 patients with aneurysmal SAH who underwent treatment with endovascular coiling. The patients were monitored with continuous EEG (cEEG) and received external ventricular drainage (EVD). CSF samples of neurofilament light (NLF) and total tau (T-tau) protein were collected at day 4 and day 10. Cox regression analysis was applied to evaluate whether seizures and protein biomarkers were associated with DCI and poor outcome.

    Results

    Seven patients developed DCI (37%), and 4 patients (21%) died within the first 2months. Six patients (32%) had clinical seizures, and electrographic seizures were noted in one additional patient (4.5%). Increased tau ratio (proportion tau10/tau4) was significantly associated with DCI and hazard ratio [HR=1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.055-1.680. P=.016].

    Conclusion

    Acute symptomatic seizures are common in SAH, but their presence is not predictive of DCI. High values of the tau ratio in the CSF may be associated with development of DCI.

  • 10.
    Hedlund, Mathilde
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Zetterling, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Carlsson, Marianne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Sciences.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, University Hospital.
    Depression and posttraumatic stress disorder after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in relation to lifetime psychiatric morbidity2011In: British Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0268-8697, E-ISSN 1360-046X, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 693-700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Little is known about the roles that lifetime psychiatric disorders play in psychiatric and vocational outcomes of aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Materials and methods. Eighty-three SAH patients without apparent cognitive dysfunction were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV axis I disorders (SCID-I) after their SAH. Diagnoses were assessed for three time periods, 'lifetime before SAH', '12 months before SAH' and '7 months after SAH'. Results. Forty-five percentage of patients with SAH reported at least one lifetime psychiatric disorder. After SAH, symptoms of depression and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were seen in 41%, more often in those with a psychiatric history prior to SAH (p = 0.001). In logistic regressions, depression after SAH was associated with a lifetime history of major depression, or of anxiety or substance use disorder, as well as with lifetime psychiatric comorbidity. Subsyndromal or full PTSD was predicted by a lifetime history of major depression. After the SAH, 18 patients (22%) had received psychotropic medication and/or psychological treatment, 13 of whom had a disorder. Those with a lifetime history of major depression or treatment with antidepressants before SAH had lower return to work rates than others (p = 0.019 and p = 0.031, respectively). This was also true for those with symptoms of depression and/or PTSD, or with antidepressant treatment after SAH (p = 0.001 and p = 0.031, respectively). Conclusions. Depression and PTSD are present in a substantial proportion of patients 7 months after SAH. Those with a history of psychiatric morbidity, any time before the SAH, are more at risk and also constitute a risk group for difficulties in returning to work.

  • 11.
    Howells, Tim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Elf, Kristin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Jones, Patricia
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Piper, Ian
    Nilsson, Pelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Andrews, Peter
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Pressure reactivity as a guide in the treatment of cerebral perfusion pressure in patients with brain trauma2005In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 102, no 2, p. 311-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECT: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two different treatment protocols on physiological characteristics and outcome in patients with brain trauma. One protocol was primarily oriented toward reducing intracranial pressure (ICP), and the other primarily on maintaining cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP).

    METHODS: A series of 67 patients in Uppsala were treated according to a protocol aimed at keeping ICP less than 20 mm Hg and, as a secondary target, CPP at approximately 60 mm Hg. Another series of 64 patients in Edinburgh were treated according to a protocol aimed primarily at maintaining CPP greater than 70 mm Hg and, secondarily, ICP less than 25 mm Hg for the first 24 hours and 30 mm Hg subsequently. The ICP and CPP insults were assessed as the percentage of monitoring time that ICP was greater than or equal to 20 mm Hg and CPP less than 60 mm Hg, respectively. Pressure reactivity in each patient was assessed based on the slope of the regression line relating mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) to ICP. Outcome was analyzed at 6 months according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). The prognostic value of secondary insults and pressure reactivity was determined using linear methods and a neural network. In patients treated according to the CPP-oriented protocol, even short durations of CPP insults were strong predictors of death. In patients treated according to the ICP-oriented protocol, even long durations of CPP insult-mostly in the range of 50 to 60 mm Hg--were significant predictors of favorable outcome (GOS Score 4 or 5). Among those who had undergone ICP-oriented treatment, pressure-passive patients (MABP/ICP slope > or = 0.13) had a better outcome. Among those who had undergone CPP-oriented treatment, the more pressure-active (MABP/ICP slope < 0.13) patients had a better outcome.

    CONCLUSION: Based on data from this study, the authors concluded that ICP-oriented therapy should be used in patients whose slope of the MABP/ICP regression line is at least 0.13, that is, in pressure-passive patients. If the slope is less than 0.13, then hypertensive CPP therapy is likely to produce a better outcome.

  • 12.
    Howells, Tim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Johnson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    McKelvey, Tomas
    Chalmers, Dept Signals & Syst, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    The effects of ventricular drainage on the intracranial pressure signal and the pressure reactivity index2017In: Journal of clinical monitoring and computing, ISSN 1387-1307, E-ISSN 1573-2614, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 469-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients intracranial pressure (ICP) is usually monitored via an extraventricular drain (EVD), which can produce false readings when the drain is open. It is established that both the ICP cardiac pulse frequency and long term trends over several hours are often seriously corrupted. The aim of this study was to establish whether or not the intermediate frequency bands [respiratory, Mayer wave and very low frequency (VLF)] were also corrupted. The VLF range is of special interest because it is important in cerebral autoregulation studies. Using a pattern recognition algorithm we retrospectively identified 718 cases of EVD opening in 80 SAH patients. An analysis of differences between closed and open-drain periods showed that ICP amplitude decreased significantly in all of the three lower frequency bands when the EVD was open. A similar analysis of systemic arterial pressure signal revealed similar changes in the same frequency bands that were positively correlated with the ICP changes. Therefore we concluded that the changes in the ICP signal represented real, physiological changes and not artifact. Pressure reactivity index (PRx) values were also computed during closed and open-drain periods. We found a small but statistically significant decrease during open-drain periods. Based on analysis of the change in the PRx distribution during open drainage we concluded that this decrease also represented physiological changes rather than artifact. In summary the ICP respiratory, Mayer wave, and VLF frequency bands are not corrupted when the EVD is open, and it safe to use these for autoregulation studies.

  • 13.
    Howells, Tim
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Sköld, Mattias K.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    An evaluation of three measures of intracranial compliance in traumatic brain injury patients2012In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 1061-1068Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To compare intracranial pressure (ICP) amplitude, ICP slope, and the correlation of ICP amplitude and ICP mean (RAP index) as measures of compliance in a cohort of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. Mean values of the three measures were calculated in the 2-h periods before and after surgery (craniectomies and evacuations), and in the 12-h periods preceding and following thiopental treatment, and during periods of thiopental coma. The changes in the metrics were evaluated using the Wilcoxon test. The correlations of 10-day mean values for the three metrics with age, admission Glasgow Motor Score (GMS), and Extended Glasgow Outcome Score (GOSe) were evaluated. Patients under and over 60 years old were also compared using the Student test. The correlation of ICP amplitude with systemic pulse amplitude was analyzed. ICP amplitude was significantly correlated with GMS, and also with age for patients 35 years old and older. The correlations of ICP slope and the RAP index with GMS and with age were not significant. All three metrics indicated significant improvements in compliance following surgery and during thiopental coma. None of the metrics were significantly correlated with outcome, possibly due to confounding effects of treatment factors. The correlation of systemic pulse amplitude with ICP amplitude was low ( = 0.18), only explaining 3 % of the variance. This study provides further validation for all three of these features of the ICP waveform as measures of compliance. ICP amplitude had the best performance in these tests.

  • 14.
    Johansson, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Neurokirurgi.
    Norbäck, Ola
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Neurokirurgi.
    Gal, G
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology. Neuroröntgen.
    Cesarini, Kristina G.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Neurokirurgi.
    Tovi, Metin
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Solander, Sten
    Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Contant, Charlie
    Neurokirurgi.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Neurokirurgi.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience. Neurokirurgi.
    Clinical outcome after endovascular coil embolization in elderly patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage2004In: Neuroradiology: Interventional Neuroradiology, Vol. 46, p. 385-391Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Johnson, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Engquist, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Pelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Rostami, Elham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Increased risk of critical CBF levels in SAH patients with actual CPP below calculated optimal CPP2017In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 159, no 6, p. 1065-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Cerebral pressure autoregulation can be quantified with the pressure reactivity index (PRx), based on the correlation between blood pressure and intracranial pressure. Using PRx optimal cerebral perfusion pressure (CPPopt) can be calculated, i.e., the level of CPP where autoregulation functions best. The relation between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and CPPopt has not been examined. The objective was to assess to which extent CPPopt can be calculated in SAH patients and to investigate CPPopt in relation to CBF.

    Methods Retrospective study of prospectively collected data. CBF was measured bedside with Xenon-enhanced CT (Xe-CT). The difference between actual CPP and CPPopt was calculated (CPPa dagger). Correlations between CPPa dagger and CBF parameters were calculated with Spearman's rank order correlation coefficient (rho). Separate calculations were done using all patients (day 0-14 after onset) as well as in two subgroups (day 0-3 and day 4-14).

    Results Eighty-two patients with 145 Xe-CT scans were studied. Automated calculation of CPPopt was possible in adjunct to 60% of the Xe-CT scans. Actual CPP < CPPopt was associated with higher numbers of low-flow regions (CBF < 10 ml/100 g/min) in both the early phase (day 0-3, n = 39, Spearman's rho = -0.38, p = 0.02) and late acute phase of the disease (day 4-14, n = 35, Spearman's rho = -0.39, p = 0.02). CPP level per se was not associated with CBF.

    Conclusions Calculation of CPPopt is possible in a majority of patients with severe SAH. Actual CPP below CPPopt is associated with low CBF.

  • 16.
    Johnson, Ulf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Tim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Should the Neurointensive Care Management of Traumatic Brain Injury Patients be Individualized According to Autoregulation Status and Injury Subtype?2014In: Neurocritical Care, ISSN 1541-6933, E-ISSN 1556-0961, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 259-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The status of autoregulation is an important prognostic factor in traumatic brain injury (TBI), and is important to consider in the management of TBI patients. Pressure reactivity index (PRx) is a measure of autoregulation that has been thoroughly studied, but little is known about its variation in different subtypes of TBI. In this study, we examined the impact of PRx and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) on outcome in different TBI subtypes. 107 patients were retrospectively studied. Data on PRx, CPP, and outcome were collected from our database. The first CT scan was classified according to the Marshall classification system. Patients were assigned to "diffuse" (Marshall class: diffuse-1, diffuse-2, and diffuse-3) or "focal" (Marshall class: diffuse-4, evacuated mass lesion, and non-evacuated mass lesion) groups. 2 x 2 tables were constructed calculating the proportions of favorable/unfavorable outcome at different combinations of PRx and CPP. Low PRx was significantly associated with favorable outcome in the combined group (p = 0.002) and the diffuse group (p = 0.04), but not in the focal group (p = 0.06). In the focal group higher CPP values were associated with worse outcome (p = 0.02). In diffuse injury patients with disturbed autoregulation (PRx > 0.1), CPP > 70 mmHg was associated with better outcome (p = 0.03). TBI patients with diffuse injury may differ from those with mass lesions. In the latter higher levels of CPP may be harmful, possibly due to BBB disruption. In TBI patients with diffuse injury and disturbed autoregulation higher levels of CPP may be beneficial.

  • 17.
    Ljunghill Hedberg, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Pauksen, Karlis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lundberg, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases. Uppsala Univ, Infect Dis Sect, Dept Med Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Johansson, Bjorn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine. Uppsala Univ, Sect Rehabil Med, Dept Neurosci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Kayhty, Helena
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Helsinki, Finland..
    Sjölin, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Lower response to early T-cell-dependent vaccination after neurotrauma or neurosurgery in adults2015In: Journal of Infection, ISSN 0163-4453, E-ISSN 1532-2742, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 577-584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recent international guidelines recommend vaccination with a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to reduce the risk of meningitis after neurotrauma with cerebrospinal fluid leak. The antibody response and optimal time point for vaccination have not been established and because the risk of meningitis is at the highest shortly after trauma, early vaccination is preferable. This study aimed to investigate the antibody response and to ensure that central nervous system injury-induced immunodepression did not affect the response to a T-cell-dependent conjugate vaccine when administered shortly after the injury. Methods: So as not to interfere with routine pneumococcal vaccination, a conjugate vaccine against Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) was chosen for the study. Thirty-three patients with basilar skull fracture and 23 patients undergoing transsphenoidal pituitary gland surgery were vaccinated within 10 days after trauma/surgery and 29 control patients at least three weeks after trauma/surgery. Sera were collected pre- and post-vaccination for analysis of anti-Hib concentration. Results: Four patients with post-vaccination target antibody concentration before vaccination were excluded from analysis. In the neurotrauma and neurosurgery groups 10/32 (31%) and 5/20 (25%) patients, respectively, were non-responders compared with 3/29 (10%) in the control group. Log(10) anti-Hib concentrations in the neurotrauma, neurosurgery and control groups were 1.52 +/- 0.15, 1.38 +/- 0.15 and 1.81 +/- 0.12 mu g/ml, respectively. Conclusions: The majority of the patients responded to vaccination. However, the number of responders was significantly decreased and antibody concentration significantly lower in patients vaccinated early after the trauma/surgery. Investigation of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine response in neurotrauma patients is therefore urgent. (C) 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 18.
    Nyberg, Christoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Karlsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Metabolic Pattern of the Acute Phase of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in a Novel Porcine Model: Studies with Cerebral Microdialysis with High Temporal Resolution2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 6, p. e99904-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may produce cerebral ischemia and systemic responses including stress. To study immediate cerebral and systemic changes in response to aneurysm rupture, animal models are needed. Objective: To study early cerebral energy changes in an animal model. Methods: Experimental SAH was induced in 11 pigs by autologous blood injection to the anterior skull base, with simultaneous control of intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor concentrations of glucose, pyruvate and lactate. Results: In nine of the pigs, a pattern of transient ischemia was produced, with a dramatic reduction of cerebral perfusion pressure soon after blood injection, associated with a quick glucose and pyruvate decrease. This was followed by a lactate increase and a delayed pyruvate increase, producing a marked but short elevation of the lactate/pyruvate ratio. Glucose, pyruvate, lactate and lactate/pyruvate ratio thereafter returned toward baseline. The two remaining pigs had a more severe metabolic reaction with glucose and pyruvate rapidly decreasing to undetectable levels while lactate increased and remained elevated, suggesting persisting ischemia. Conclusion: The animal model simulates the conditions of SAH not only by deposition of blood in the basal cisterns, but also creating the transient global ischemic impact of aneurysmal SAH. The metabolic cerebral changes suggest immediate transient substrate failure followed by hypermetabolism of glucose upon reperfusion. The model has features that resemble spontaneous bleeding, and is suitable for future research of the early cerebral and systemic responses to SAH that are difficult to study in humans.

  • 19.
    Nyberg, Christoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Karlsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Engström, Elisabeth Ronne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    The Early Endocrine Stress Response in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3, article id e0151457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction In patients with severe illness, such as aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a physiologic stress response is triggered. This includes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the very early responses of these systems. Methods A porcine animal model of aneurysmal SAH was used. In this model, blood is injected slowly to the basal cisterns above the anterior skull base until the cerebral perfusion pressure is 0 mm Hg. Sampling was done from blood and urine at -10, +15, +75 and +135 minutes from time of induction of SAH. Analyses of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, aldosterone, catecholamines and chromogranin-A were performed. Results Plasma ACTH, serum cortisol and plasma aldosterone increased in the samples following induction of SAH, and started to decline after 75 minutes. Urine cortisol also increased after SAH. Urine catecholamines and their metabolites were found to increase after SAH. Many samples were however below detection level, not allowing for statistical analysis. Plasma chromogranin-A peaked at 15 minutes after SAH, and thereafter decreased. Conclusions The endocrine stress response after aneurysmal SAH was found to start within 15 minutes in the HPA axis with early peak values of ACTH, cortisol and aldosterone. The fact that the concentrations of the HPA axis hormones decreased 135 minutes after SAH may suggest that a similar pattern exists in SAH patients, thus making it difficult to catch these early peak values. There were also indications of early activation of the sympathetic nervous system, but the small number of valid samples made interpretation difficult.

  • 20.
    Nyberg, Christoffer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Karlsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Predictors of increased cumulative serum levels of the N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide 4 days after acute spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage2014In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 120, no 3, p. 599-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Object. The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is followed by increased intracranial pressure and decreased cerebral blood flow. A major systemic stress reaction follows, presumably to restore cerebral blood flow. However, this reaction can also cause adverse effects, including myocardial abnormalities, which are common and can be serious, and increased levels of natriuretic peptides, especially brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). The association of BNP with fluid and salt balance, vasospasm, brain ischemia, and cardiac injury has been studied but almost exclusively regarding events after admission. Brain natriuretic peptide has also been measured at various time points and analyzed in different ways statistically. The authors approached BNP measurement in a new way; they used the calculated area under the curve (AUC) for the first 4 days to quantitatively measure the BNP load during the first critical part of the disease state. Their rationale was a suspicion that early BNP load is a marker of the severity of the ictus and will influence the subsequent course of the disease by disturbing the fluid and salt balance. Methods. The study included 156 patients with acute spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Mean patient age was 59.8 +/- 11.2 years, and 105 (67%) of the patients were female. An aneurysm was found in 138 patients. A total of 82 aneurysms were treated by endovascular coiling, 50 were treated by surgery, and 6 were untreated. At the time of admission, serum samples were collected for troponin-I analysis and for the N-terminal prohormone of BNP (NT-proBNP); daily thereafter, samples were collected for the NT-proBNP analysis. The cumulative BNP load was calculated as the AUC for NT-proBNP during the first 4 days. The following variables were studied in terms of their influence on the AUC for NT-proBNP: sex, age, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade of SAH, Fisher grade, angiographic result, treatment of aneurysm,'clinical neurological deterioration, verified infections, vasospasm treatment, and 6-month outcome. Results. The AUC for NT-proBNP was larger when variables indicated a more severe SAH. These variables were higher Fisher and World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grades, high levels of troponin-I at admission, an aneurysm, neurological deficits, and infections. The AUC for NT-proBNP was also larger among women, older patients, and patients with poor outcomes. Linear regression showed that the best predicting model for large AUC for NT-proBNP was the combination of the following: female sex, high levels of troponin-I, an aneurysm, neurological deficits, and advanced age. Conclusions. The cumulative BNP load during the first days after SAH can be predicted by variables describing the severity of the disease already known at the time of admission. This information can be used to identify patients at risk for an adverse course of the disease.

  • 21.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Borota, Ljubisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Kothimbakam, Raj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Outcome from spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage: results from 2007-2011 and comparison with our previous series2014In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 38-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The management of patients with spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has changed, in part due to interventions now being extended to patients who are older and in a worse clinical condition. This study evaluates the effects of these changes on a complete 5-year patient material.

    Methods

    Demographic data and results from 615 patients with SAH admitted from 2007 to 2011 were put together. Aneurysms were found in 448 patients (72.8%). They were compared with the aneurysm group (n = 676) from a previously published series from our centre (2001-2006). Linear regression was used to determine variables predicting functional outcome in the whole aneurysm group (2001-2011).

    Results

    Patients in the more recent aneurysm group were older, and they were in a worse clinical condition on admission. Regarding younger patients admitted in World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies SAH grading (WFNS) 3, there were fewer with a good outcome. In the whole aneurysm group 2001-2011, outcome was best predicted by age, clinical condition at admission, and the size of the bleeding, and not by treatment mode or localization of aneurysm.

    Conclusion

    It seems important for the outcome that aneurysms are treated early. The clinical course after that depends largely on the condition of the patient on admission rather than on aneurysm treatment method. This, together with the fact that older patients and those in worse condition are now being admitted, increases demands on neurointensive care. Further improvement in patient outcome depends on better understanding of acute brain injury mechanisms and improved neurointensive care as well as rehabilitation measures.

  • 22.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lundström, E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Outcome After Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Measured With the EQ-5D2011In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 3284-3286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The EQ-5D measures quality of life based on self-reported health status in 5 dimensions: mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression. In this study, the EQ-5D was evaluated as an outcome measure for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    METHODS: The EQ-5D was completed in 710 patients 9 months after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Relevant demographic and clinical factors were evaluated as predictors of the 5 outcome dimensions in a series of linear regression models.

    RESULTS: Worse health status in mobility, self-care, and usual activities was predicted by increasing age and by a more severe disease as indicated by the presence of an aneurysm, worse clinical condition at admission, or more blood on the CT scan. Younger age and female gender predicted worse health status regarding anxiety/depression. '

    CONCLUSIONS: The evaluation of the EQ-5D reveals age-related differences in the nature of the challenges faced by these patients.

  • 23.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lundström, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Health-related quality of life at median 12 months after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, measured with EuroQoL-5D2013In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 155, no 4, p. 587-593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    A measurement of quality of life (QoL) should cover the important aspects of daily life and be easy to perform. Ease of performance is especially important for patients with spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), since fatigue and cognitive disabilities are known sequeles. EuroQoL (EQ-5D) is a preference-based instrument measuring QoL, based on self-reported health status in five dimensions: Mobility, Self-Care, Usual Activities, Pain/Discomfort and Anxiety/Depression. In the present study EuroQoL was used in patients with aneurysmal SAH (aSAH) in comparison with a Swedish reference population. We also determined the extent to which demographic characteristics and clinical parameters predicted outcome.

    METHODS:

    Seven hundred fifty-five patients with aSAH were studied after a median 12 months. The proportion of patients in the best QoL category for each dimension was compared with the corresponding proportion in an age matched reference population. Disease severity was measured using the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies' SAH grading system and the Fisher scale. The extent to which demographic and clinical factors predicted outcome was evaluated using linear regression.

    RESULTS:

    Aneurysmal SAH patients generally had a worse QoL compared with the reference population, in all five dimensions of EQ-5D. In the patient population, disease severity predicted worse outcome in all five dimensions. Female gender and surgery as treatment method (in the case of anterior aneurysms) predicted worse outcome in Usual Activities and Anxiety/Depression.

    CONCLUSION:

    The nature of the sequeles after SAH depends on severity of disease, gender and treatment method. These factors should be more emphasised in planning rehabilitation.

  • 24.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Popek, Edith
    Symptomatic colloid cysts in the third ventricle of monozygotic twins2015In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 120, no 1, p. 59-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this case report we describe colloid cysts in the third ventricles of monozygotic twin sisters. They were 26 years old when their condition was discovered. One woman was admitted to us on an emergency basis, with signs of high intracranial pressure such as unconsciousness and extension posturing. Her sister was also brought to the hospital since she had a history of attacks of headache. They were both operated with removal of the colloid cysts, and the clinical courses are described in the case report. In reviewing the literature another 30 familial cases were found. Of these were two pairs of monozygotic and one pair of dizygotic twins.

  • 25.
    Rostami, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Engquist, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Howells, Timothy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Johnson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Pelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Early low cerebral blood flow and high cerebral lactate: prediction of delayed cerebral ischemia in subarachnoid hemorrhage2018In: Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0022-3085, E-ISSN 1933-0693, Vol. 128, no 6, p. 1762-1770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is one of the major contributors to poor outcome. It is crucial to be able to detect early signs of DCI to prevent its occurrence. The objective of this study was to determine if low cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements and pathological microdialysis parameters measured at the bedside can be observed early in patients with SAH who later developed DCI. METHODS The authors included 30 patients with severe SAH. The CBF measurements were performed at Day 0-3 after disease onset, using bedside xenon-CT. Interstitial glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, and glutamate were measured using microdialysis. RESULTS Nine of 30 patients developed DCI. Patients with DCI showed significantly lower global and regional CBF, and lactate was significantly increased in these patients. A high lactate/pyruvate ratio was also detected in patients with DCI. CONCLUSIONS Early low CBF measurements and a high lactate and lactate/pyruvate ratio may be early warning signs of the risk of developing DCI. The clinical value of these findings needs to be confirmed in larger studies.

  • 26.
    Rostami, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Engquist, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Howells, Timothy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Pelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    The Correlation between Cerebral Blood Flow Measured by Bedside Xenon-CT and Brain Chemistry Monitored by Microdialysis in the Acute Phase following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage2017In: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 8, article id 369Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cerebral microdialysis (MD) may be used in patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to detect focal cerebral ischemia. The cerebral MD catheter is usually placed in the right frontal lobe and monitors the area surrounding the catheter. This generates the concern that a fall in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and ischemic events distant to the catheter may not be detected. We aimed to investigate if there is a difference in the association between the MD parameters and CBF measured around the MD catheter compared to global cortical CBF and to CBF in the vascular territories following SAH in the early acute phase. MD catheter was placed in the right frontal lobe of 30 SAH patients, and interstitial glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, and lactate/pyruvate ratio were measured hourly. CBF measurements were performed during day 0-3 after SAH. Global cortical CBF correlated strongly with CBF around the microdialysis catheter (CBF-MD) (r = 0.911, p ≤ 0.001). This was also the case for the anterior, middle, and posterior vascular territories in the right hemisphere. A significant negative correlation was seen between lactate and CBF-MD (r = -0.468, p = 0.009). The same relationship was observed between lactate and CBF in anterior vascular territory but not in the middle and posterior vascular territories. In conclusion, global CBF 0-3 days after severe SAH correlated strongly with CBF-MD. High lactate level was associated with low global CBF and low regional CBF in the right anterior vascular territory, when the MD catheter was placed in the right frontal lobe.

  • 27.
    Rostami, Elham
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Engquist, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Johnson, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Howells, Timothy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nilsson, Pelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lewén, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Monitoring of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism Bedside in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - A Xenon-CT and Microdialysis Study2014In: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 5, article id 89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cerebral ischemia is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although 70% of the patients show angiographic vasospasm only 30% develop symptomatic vasospasm defined as delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Early detection and management of reversible ischemia is of critical importance in patients with SAH. Using a bedside Xenon enhanced computerized tomography (Xenon-CT) scanner makes it possible to measure quantitative regional Cerebral blood flow (CBF) bedside in the neurointensive care setting and intracerebral microdialysis (MD) is a method that offers the possibility to monitor the metabolic state of the brain continuously. Here, we present results from nine SAH patients with both MD monitoring and bedside Xenon-CT measurements. CBF measurements were performed within the first 72 h following bleeding. Six out of nine patients developed DCI at a later stage. Five out of six patients who developed DCI had initial global CBF below 26 ml/100 g/min whereas one had 53 ml/100 g/min. The three patients who did not develop clinical vasospasm all had initial global CBF above 27 ml/100 g/min. High lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio was associated with lower CBF values in the area surrounding the catheter. Five out of nine patients had L/P ratio ≥25 and four of these patients had CBF ≤ 22 ml/100 g/min. These preliminary results suggest that patients with initially low global CBF on Xenon-CT may be more likely to develop DCI. Initially low global CBF was accompanied with metabolic disturbances determined by the MD. Most importantly, pathological findings on the Xenon-CT and MD could be observed before any clinical signs of DCI. Combining bedside Xenon-CT and MD was found to be useful and feasible. Further studies are needed to evaluate if DCI can be detected before any other signs of DCI to prevent progress to infarction.

  • 28.
    Vlachogiannis, Pavlos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Khalil, F.
    Karolinska Inst, Neurosci..
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Interleukin-6 levels in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in patients with severe spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage2017In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, ISSN 0271-678X, E-ISSN 1559-7016, Vol. 37, p. 496-496Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Vlachogiannis, Pavlos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Khalil, Fattema
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Interleukin-6 Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Plasma in Patients with Severe Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage2019In: World Neurosurgery, ISSN 1878-8750, E-ISSN 1878-8769, Vol. 122, p. E612-E618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory processes play a key role in the pathophysiology of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This study evaluated whether different temporal patterns of intrathecal and systemic inflammation could be identified in the acute phase after SAH. The intensity of the inflammation was also assessed in clinical subgroups. METHODS: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples were collected at days 1, 4, and 10 after ictus in 44 patients with severe SAH. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) was analyzed by a routine monoclonal antibody-based method. Median IL-6 values for each day were calculated. Day 4 IL-6 values were compared in dichotomized groups (age, sex, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies [WFNS] grade, Fisher scale grade, outcome, vasospasm, central nervous system infection and systemic infections). RESULTS: CSF IL-6 levels were significantly elevated from day 1 to days 4 and 10, whereas plasma IL-6 showed a different trend at lower levels. Median CSF IL-6 concentrations for days 1, 4, and 10 were 876.5, 3361, and 1567 ng/L, whereas plasma was 26, 27.5, and 15.9 ng/L, respectively. No significant differences in CSF concentrations were observed between the subgroups, with the most prominent one being in day 4 IL-6 in the WFNS subgroups (grades 1-3 vs. 4-5, 1158.5 vs. 5538 ng/L; P = 0.056). Patients with systemic infection had significantly higher plasma IL-6 concentrations than patients without infection (31 vs. 16.05 ng/L, respectively; P = 0.028). CONCLUSIONS: Distinctly different inflammatory patterns could be seen intrathecally compared with the systemic circulation. In plasma, a significant difference in the intensity of the inflammation was seen in cases with systemic infection. No other subgroup showed statistically significant differences.

  • 30.
    Wallmark, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lundström, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Attention Deficits After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Measured Using the Test of Variables of Attention2015In: Stroke, ISSN 0039-2499, E-ISSN 1524-4628, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 1374-1376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess attention deficits in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage using the test of variables of attention (TOVA). This is a computer-based continuous performance test providing objective measures of attention. We also compared the TOVA results with the attention and concentration domains of Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Montreal cognitive assessment, 2 examiner-administrated neuropsychological instruments.

    METHODS:

    Nineteen patients with moderate to good recovery (Glasgow outcome scale, 4-5) were assessed using the TOVA, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, and Montreal cognitive assessment. The measurements were done when the patients visited the hospital for a routine magnetic resonance imaging control of the aneurysm.

    RESULTS:

    TOVA performance was pathological in 58%. The dominating pattern was a worsening of performance in the second half of the test, commonly a failing to react to correct stimuli. We found no correlation between TOVA and the performance in concentration and attention domains of Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Montreal cognitive assessment.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Attention deficits, measured by the TOVA, were common after subarachnoid hemorrhage. This should be further studied to improve outcome.

  • 31.
    Wallmark, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lundström, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Predicting return to work after subarachnoid hemorrhage using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA)2016In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 158, no 2, p. 233-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Returning to work is a major issue for patients having had an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). It is important, at an early stage, to identify the patients that are unlikely to return to work. The objective of this study was to assess the predictive value of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) at 6 months after ictus on return to work at 12 months. In this prospective study were 96 patients with SAH included in the acute phase. Cognitive functions were assessed at 6 months using the MoCA and return to work at 12 months. The predictive value of MoCA on return to work was analyzed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve as well as logistic regression. Of those that had work before the SAH, 52 % were working at 12 months after the ictus. These patients had scored significantly better on MoCA at 6 months (p = 0.01). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.75. By using a cut-off on MoCA of < 27, 68 % of the patients could be correctly classified as returned/not returned to work. Adding data from the acute phase to the MoCA in a logistic regression model increased the percentage of patients correctly classified as returned/not returned to work by 2 %. Returning to work is a major issue for SAH patients. It is important to identify factors that may interfere with a patient's ability to return to work, and address these issues appropriately. In our study, estimating cognitive functions at 6 months after SAH using the MoCA alone allowed us to predict return to work correctly in 68 % of the cases. We feel that this provides useful information in planning rehabilitation, but that other post-SAH symptoms have to be considered as well.

  • 32.
    Wallmark, Svante
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Lundström, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Prevalence of spasticity after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage2014In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 23-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The prevalence of spasticity after stroke is approximately 20%. There is, so far, little information in the literature on the development of spasticity after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of spasticity after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and to identify possible risk factors in the acute phase. Methods: A total of 87 patients were assessed for spasticity with the Modified Ashworth Scale after 6 months. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to evaluate risk factors. Results: Spasticity was present after 6 months in 19 (22%) of the patients, but was treated pharmacologically in only 1 case. Worse clinical status at admission carried a high risk for spasticity (odds ratio (OR) 10.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.4-43.2), followed by the presence of infection (OR 7.4; 95% CI 1.6-33.8) and vasospasm (OR 4.8; 95% CI 1.2-19.0) during the intensive care phase. Conclusion: Spasticity after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage occurred with the same prevalence as after other stroke. Risk factors for spasticity were worse clinical condition at admission and the occurrence of infection and vasospasm during the intensive care period. Pharmacological treatment was not commonly used.

  • 33.
    Widén, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Eriksson, Britt-Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Westman, Gabriel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Infectious Diseases.
    Ventriculostomy-related infections in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients - a retrospective study of incidence, etiology, and antimicrobial therapy2017In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 159, no 2, p. 317-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was performed to investigate the incidence and etiology of ventriculostomy-related infections (VRIs) in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to assess adherence to local clinical guidelines regarding empirical antimicrobial therapy and diagnostic routines. A total of 191 consecutive SAH patients treated in the neuro-intensive care unit of Uppsala University Hospital between 2010 and 2013 were included retrospectively. Information regarding cerebrospinal fluid samples, bacterial cultures, ventriculostomy treatment, patient characteristics, and antibiotic treatment were collected from electronic patient records. Eleven patients developed VRI, resulting in an incidence of 5.8% per patient, 5.4% per ventriculostomy catheter, and 4.1 per 1000 catheter days. Coagulase-negative staphylococci caused nine cases of VRI and Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus caused one each. Empirical VRI therapy was initiated on 97 occasions in 81 subjects (42.4%). Out of the 11 patients with VRI, four did not receive empirical antibiotic therapy before the positive culture result. The clinical actions performed after analysis of CSF samples were in line with the action suggested by the local guidelines in 307 out of 592 cases (51.9%). The incidence of VRI in our cohort was comparable to what has previously been reported. Coagulase-negative staphylococci was the most common agent. Our study demonstrates the difficulty in diagnosing VRI in SAH patients. Improved adherence to clinical guidelines could to some extent reduce the use of empirical antibiotic treatment, but better diagnostic methods and routines are needed.

  • 34.
    Zetterling, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Edén Engström, Britt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hallberg, Lena
    Hillered, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Enblad, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Karlsson, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone dynamics in the acute phase of subarachnoid haemorrhage2011In: British Journal of Neurosurgery, ISSN 0268-8697, E-ISSN 1360-046X, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 684-692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. An adequate response of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is important for survival and recovery after a severe disease. The hypothalamus and the pituitary glands are at risk of damage after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). A better understanding of the hormonal changes would be valuable for optimising care in the acute phase of SAH. Patients. Fifty-five patients with spontaneous SAH were evaluated regarding morning concentrations of serum (S)-cortisol and P-adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) 7 days after the bleeding. In a subgroup of 20 patients, the diurnal changes of S-cortisol and P-ACTH were studied and urine (U)-cortisol was measured. The relationships of hormone concentrations to clinical and radiological parameters and to outcome were assessed. Results. S-cortisol and P-ACTH were elevated the day of SAH. S-cortisol concentrations below reference range were uncommon. Early global cerebral oedema was associated with higher S-cortisol concentrations at admission and a worse World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) and Reaction Level Scale 85 grade. Global cerebral oedema was shown to be a predictor of S-cortisol at admittance. Patients in better WFNS grade displayed higher U-cortisol. All patients showed diurnal variations of S-cortisol and P-ACTH. A reversed diurnal variation of S-cortisol was more frequently found in mechanically ventilated patients. Periods of suppressed P-ACTH associated with S-cortisol peaks occurred especially in periods of secondary brain ischaemia. Conclusion. There was an HPA response acutely after SAH with an increase in P-ACTH and S-cortisol. Higher U-cortisol in patients in a better clinical grade may indicate a more robust response of the HPA system. Global cerebral oedema was associated with higher S-cortisol at admission and was a predictor of S-cortisol concentrations. Global cerebral oedema may be the result of the stress response initiated by the brain injury. Periods of suppressed P-ACTH occurred particularly in periods of brain ischaemia, indicating a possible connection between brain ischaemia and ACTH suppression.

  • 35.
    Zetterling, Maria
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Engström, Britt Edén
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Arnardottir, Steinunn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Somatotropic and thyroid hormones in the acute phase of subarachnoid haemorrhage2013In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 155, no 11, p. 2053-2062Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Somatotropic and thyroid hormones are probably important for the recovery after acute brain injury. Still, the dynamics of these hormones after spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is not well described. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between somatotropic and thyroid hormones and clinical factors after SAH. Twenty patients with spontaneous SAH were included prospectively. Serum concentrations of TSH, fT4, T3, IGF-1 and GH were measured once a day for 7 days after SAH. Hormone patterns and serum concentrations were compared to the severity of SAH, neurological condition at admission, clinical course and outcome of the patients. During the first week after SAH, all patients showed increased GH and IGF-1 concentrations. In the whole group, concentrations of TSH increased, whereas T3 and fT4 decreased. There were no relations of serum concentrations of IGF-1 or GH to clinical condition at admission, clinical course or outcome of the patients. Half of the patients showed low T3 serum concentrations. A complicated course was associated with a deeper fall in TSH and T3 concentrations. There were negative correlations for mean concentrations of TSH and T3 versus WFNS grade and a positive correlation for T3 versus GOS after 6 months, indicating that low concentrations of TSH and T3 were connected to worse SAH grade and poor outcome. All patients showed increased GH and IGF-1 concentrations irrespective of the grade of SAH or clinical course. Patients with a complicated clinical course showed a more pronounced fall in TSH and T3 concentrations and low serum T3 concentrations were related to a more serious SAH and poor patient outcome. These results need to be studied further and they may contribute to the accumulated knowledge needed to understand the complex mechanisms influencing the unpredictable clinical course after SAH.

1 - 35 of 35
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