uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Akerud, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Schijven, Dick
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Olivier, Jocelien
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Univ Groningen, Dept Behav Physiol, Groningen, Netherlands.;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Gender Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology.
    Gene Expression in Placentas From Nondiabetic Women Giving Birth to Large for Gestational Age Infants2015In: Reproductive Sciences, ISSN 1933-7191, E-ISSN 1933-7205, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 1281-1288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gestational diabetes, obesity, and excessive weight gain are known independent risk factors for the birth of a large for gestational age (LGA) infant. However, only 1 of the 10 infants born LGA is born by mothers with diabetes or obesity. Thus, the aim of the present study was to compare placental gene expression between healthy, nondiabetic mothers (n = 22) giving birth to LGA infants and body mass index-matched mothers (n = 24) giving birth to appropriate for gestational age infants. In the whole gene expression analysis, only 29 genes were found to be differently expressed in LGA placentas. Top upregulated genes included insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1, aminolevulinate synthase 2, and prolactin, whereas top downregulated genes comprised leptin, gametocyte-specific factor 1, and collagen type XVII 1. Two enriched gene networks were identified, namely, (1) lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, and organismal development and (2) cellular development, cellular growth, proliferation, and tumor morphology.

  • 2.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Diderholm, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Jonsson, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Forslund, Anders H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Stridsberg, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Biochemical endocrinology.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Adipokines and their relation to maternal energy substrate production, insulin resistance and fetal size2013In: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, ISSN 0301-2115, E-ISSN 1872-7654, Vol. 168, no 1, p. 26-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The role of adipokines in the regulation of energy substrate production in non-diabetic pregnant women has not been elucidated. We hypothesize that serum concentrations of adiponectin are related to fetal growth via maternal fat mass, insulin resistance and glucose production, and further, that serum levels of leptin are associated with lipolysis and that this also influences fetal growth. Hence, we investigated the relationship between adipokines, energy substrate production, insulin resistance, body composition and fetal weight in non-diabetic pregnant women in late gestation.

    STUDY DESIGN:

    Twenty pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance were investigated at 36 weeks of gestation at Uppsala University Hospital. Levels of adipokines were related to rates of glucose production and lipolysis, maternal body composition, insulin resistance, resting energy expenditure and estimated fetal weights. Rates of glucose production and lipolysis were estimated by stable isotope dilution technique.

    RESULTS:

    Median (range) rate of glucose production was 805 (653-1337)μmol/min and that of glycerol production, reflecting lipolysis, was 214 (110-576)μmol/min. HOMA insulin resistance averaged 1.5±0.75 and estimated fetal weights ranged between 2670 and 4175g (-0.2 to 2.7 SDS). Mean concentration of adiponectin was 7.2±2.5mg/L and median level of leptin was 47.1 (9.9-58.0)μg/L. Adiponectin concentrations (7.2±2.5mg/L) correlated inversely with maternal fat mass, insulin resistance, glucose production and fetal weight, r=-0.50, p<0.035, r=-0.77, p<0.001, r=-0.67, p<0.002, and r=-0.51, p<0.032, respectively. Leptin concentrations correlated with maternal fat mass and insulin resistance, r=0.76, p<0.001 and r=0.73, p<0.001, respectively. There was no correlation between maternal levels of leptin and rate of glucose production or fetal weight. Neither were any correlations found between levels of leptin or adiponectin and maternal lipolysis or resting energy expenditure.

    CONCLUSION:

    The inverse correlations between levels of maternal adiponectin and insulin resistance as well as endogenous glucose production rates indicate that low levels of adiponectin in obese pregnant women may represent one mechanism behind increased fetal size. Maternal levels of leptin are linked to maternal fat mass and its metabolic consequences, but the data indicate that leptin lacks a regulatory role with regard to maternal lipolysis in late pregnancy.

  • 3.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gedeborg, Rolf
    Hesselager, Göran
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Enblad, Per
    Treatment of extreme hyperglycemia monitored with intracerebral microdialysis.2004In: Pediatr Crit Care Med, ISSN 1529-7535, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 89-92Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 4.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Tuvemo, Torsten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Females born large for gestational age have a doubled risk of giving birth to large for gestational age infants2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 358-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To analyse if females born large for gestational age (LGA) have an increased risk to give birth to LGA infants and to study anthropometric characteristics in macrosomic infants of females born LGA.Methods: The investigation was performed as an intergenerational retrospective study of women born between 1973 and 1983, who delivered their first infant between 1989 and 1999. Birth characteristics of 47 783 females, included in the Swedish Birth Register both as newborns and mothers were analysed. LGA was defined as >2 SD in either birth weight or length for gestational age. The infants were divided into three subgroups: born tall only, born heavy only and born both tall and heavy for gestational age. Multiple logistic and linear regression analyses were performed.Results: Females, born LGA with regard to length or weight, had a two-fold (adjusted OR 1.96, 95% Cl 1.54-2.48) increased risk to give birth to an LGA infant. Females, born LGA concerning weight only, had a 2.6 (adjusted OR 2.63, 95%, 1.85-3.75) fold increased risk of having an LGA offspring heavy only and no elevated risk of giving birth to an offspring that was tall only, compared to females born not LGA. In addition, maternal obesity was associated with a 2.5 (adjusted OR 2.56, 95%, 2.20-2.98) fold increased risk of having an LGA newborn, compared to mothers with normal weight.Conclusion: Females, born LGA, have an increased risk to give birth to LGA infants, compared to mothers born not LGA. Maternal overweight increases this risk even further.

  • 5.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Kaijser, Magnus
    Clincial Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Adami, Johanna
    Clincial Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Palme, Mårten
    Department of Economics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    School performance after preterm birth2015In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 106-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An increased risk of poor school performance for children born preterm has been shown in many studies, but whether this increase is attributable to preterm birth per se or to other factors associated with preterm birth has not been resolved. METHODS: We used data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register, the Longitudinal Integration Database for Sickness Insurance and Labor Market Study, the Swedish Multigeneration Register, and the National School Register to link records comprising the Swedish birth cohorts from 1974 through 1991. Linear regression was used to assess the association between gestational duration and school performance, both with and without controlling for parental and socioeconomic factors. In a restricted analysis, we compared siblings only with each other. RESULTS: Preterm birth was strongly and negatively correlated with school performance. The distribution of school grades for children born at 31-33 weeks was on average 3.85 (95% confidence interval = -4.36 to -3.35) centiles lower than for children born at 40 weeks. For births at 22-24 weeks, the corresponding figure was -23.15 (-30.32 to -15.97). When taking confounders into account, the association remained. When restricting the analysis to siblings, however, the association between school performance and preterm birth after week 30 vanished completely, whereas it remained, less pronounced, for preterm birth before 30 weeks of gestation. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that the association between school performance and preterm birth after 30 gestational weeks is attributable to factors other than preterm birth per se.

  • 6.
    Chiavaroli, Valentina
    et al.
    Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Cutfield, Wayne S
    Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Derraik, José G. B.
    Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Pan, Zengxiang
    Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Ngo, Sherry
    Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Sheppard, Allan
    Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Craigie, Susan
    Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Stone, Peter
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Sadler, Lynn
    National Women's Health, Auckland District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Infants born large-for-gestational-age display slower growth in early infancy, but no epigenetic changes at birth2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 14540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We evaluated the growth patterns of infants born large-for-gestational-age (LGA) from birth to age 1 year compared to those born appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA). In addition, we investigated possible epigenetic changes associated with being born LGA. Seventy-one newborns were classified by birth weight as AGA (10(th)-90(th) percentile; n = 42) or LGA (>90(th) percentile; n = 29). Post-natal follow-up until age 1 year was performed with clinical assessments at 3, 6, and 12 months. Genome-wide DNA methylation was analysed on umbilical tissue in 19 AGA and 27 LGA infants. At birth, LGA infants had greater weight (p < 0.0001), length (p < 0.0001), ponderal index (p = 0.020), as well as greater head (p < 0.0001), chest (p = 0.044), and abdominal (p = 0.007) circumferences than AGA newborns. LGA infants were still larger at the age of 3 months, but by age 6 months there were no more differences between groups, due to higher length and weight increments in AGA infants between 0 and 6 months (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.002, respectively). Genome-wide analysis showed no epigenetic differences between LGA and AGA infants. Overall, LGA infants had slower growth in early infancy, being anthropometrically similar to AGA infants by 6 months of age. In addition, differences between AGA and LGA newborns were not associated with epigenetic changes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Derraik, Jose G. B.
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland 1, New Zealand..
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Diderholm, Barbro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Obesity rates in two generations of Swedish women entering pregnancy, and associated obesity risk among adult daughters2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 16692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined changes in obesity rates in two generations of Swedish women entering pregnancy, and assessed the effects of maternal body mass index (BMI) on the risk of overweight or obesity among adult daughters. This study covered an intergenerational retrospective cohort of 26,561 Swedish mothers and their 26,561 first-born daughters. There was a 4-fold increase in obesity rates, which rose from 3.1% among women entering pregnancy in 1982-1988 to 12.3% among their daughters in 2000-2008 (p < 0.0001) when entering pregnancy. The greater the maternal BMI, the greater the odds of overweight and/or obesity among daughters. Underweight mothers had half the odds of having an overweight or obese daughter in comparison to mothers of normal BMI (p < 0.0001). In contrast, the odds ratio of obese mothers having obese daughters was 3.94 (p < 0.0001). This study showed a strong association between maternal obesity and the risk of obesity among their first-born daughters. In addition, we observed a considerable increase in obesity rates across generations in mother-daughter pairs of Swedish women entering pregnancy. Thus, it is important to have preventative strategies in place to halt the worsening intergenerational cycle of obesity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Derraik, Jose G. B.
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Private Bag 92019,Victoria St West, Auckland 1142, New Zealand..
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Cutfield, Wayne S.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Private Bag 92019,Victoria St West, Auckland 1142, New Zealand..
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Association Between Preterm Birth and Lower Adult Height in Women2017In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 185, no 1, p. 48-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined whether being born preterm was associated with changes in adult anthropometry in women. We assessed data on 201,382 women (born in 1973-1988) from the Swedish Birth Register. The mean age was 26.0 years. Of the women in our cohort, 663 were born very preterm (< 32 weeks of gestation), 8,247 were born moderately preterm (at least 32 weeks but < 37 weeks), and 192,472 were born at term (37-41 weeks). Subgroup analyses were carried out among siblings and also after adjustment for maternal anthropometric data. Statistical tests were 2-sided. Decreasing gestational age was associated with lower height (-1.1 mm per week of gestation; P < 0.0001), so that women who were born very preterm were on average 12 mm shorter than women who were born moderately preterm (P < 0.0001) and 17 mm shorter than women born at term (P < 0.0001). Compared with women who were born at term, those who were born very preterm had 2.9 times higher odds of short stature (< 155.4 cm), and those born moderately preterm had 1.43 times higher odds. Subgroup analyses showed no differences between women born moderately preterm and those born at term but accentuated differences from women born very preterm. Among siblings (n = 2,388), very preterm women were 23 mm shorter than those born at term (P = 0.003), with a 20-mm difference observed in subgroup analyses (n = 27,395) that were adjusted for maternal stature (P < 0.001). A shorter final height was associated with decreasing gestational age, and this association was particularly marked in women born very preterm.

  • 9.
    Derraik, Jose G. B.
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Cutfield, Wayne S.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Body Mass Index, Overweight, and Obesity in Swedish Women Born Post-term2016In: Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, ISSN 0269-5022, E-ISSN 1365-3016, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 320-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThere is increasing evidence that post-term birth (42 weeks of gestation) is associated with adverse long-term outcomes. We assessed whether women born post-term displayed increased risk of overweight and obesity in adulthood. MethodsData were collected at first antenatal visit (similar to 10-12 weeks of gestation) on singleton Swedish women aged 18 years in 1991-2009 (mean age 26.1 years), who were born post-term (n = 27 153) or at term (37-41 weeks of gestation; n = 184 245). Study outcomes were evaluated for continuous associations with gestational age. Stratified analyses were carried out comparing women born post-term or at term. Analyses were also run with a 2-week buffer between groups to account for possible errors in gestational age estimation, comparing women born very post-term (43 weeks of gestation; n = 5761) to those born within a narrower term window (38-40 weeks of gestation; n = 130 110). ResultsIncreasing gestational age was associated with greater adult weight and body mass index (BMI). Stratified analyses showed that women born post-term were 0.5 kg heavier and had BMI 0.2 kg/m(2) greater than those born at term. Differences were more marked between women born very post-term (43 weeks) vs. a narrower term group (38-40 weeks): 1.0 kg and 0.3 kg/m(2). The adjusted relative risks of overweight/obesity and obesity in women born very post-term were 1.13 and 1.12 times higher, respectively, than in those born at term. ConclusionsPost-term birth is associated with greater BMI and increased risk of overweight and obesity in adulthood, particularly among women born 43 weeks of gestation.

  • 10.
    Derraik, Jose G. B.
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland 1, New Zealand..
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Cutfield, Wayne S.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland 1, New Zealand..
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Maternal Height and Preterm Birth: A Study on 192,432 Swedish Women2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 4, article id e0154304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There is increasing evidence that lower maternal stature is associated with shorter gestational length in the offspring. We examined the association between maternal height and the likelihood of delivering preterm babies in a large and homogeneous cohort of Swedish women. Methods This study covers antenatal data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register on 192,432 women (aged 26.0 years on average) born at term, from singleton pregnancies, and of Nordic ethnicity. Continuous associations between women's heights and the likelihood of preterm birth in the offspring were evaluated. Stratified analyses were also carried out, separating women into different height categories. Results Every cm decrease in maternal stature was associated with 0.2 days shortening of gestational age in the offspring (p<0.0001) and increasing odds of having a child born preterm (OR 1.03), very preterm (OR 1.03), or extremely preterm (OR 1.04). Besides, odds of all categories of preterm birth were highest among the shortest women but lowest among the tallest mothers. Specifically, women of short stature (<= 155 cm or <=-2.0 SDS below the population mean) had greater odds of having preterm (OR 1.65) or very preterm (OR 1.47) infants than women of average stature (-0.5 to 0.5 SDS). When compared to women of tall stature (>= 19 cm), mothers of short stature had even greater odds of giving birth to preterm (OR 2.07) or very preterm (OR 2.16) infants. Conclusions Among Swedish women, decreasing height was associated with a progressive increase in the odds of having an infant born preterm. Maternal short stature is a likely contributing factor to idiopathic preterm births worldwide, possibly due to maternal anatomical constraints.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 11.
    Derraik, Jose G. B.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research. Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Pasupathy, D.
    Kings Coll London, Sch Life Course Sci, Dept Women & Childrens Hlth, London, England.
    McCowan, L. M. E.
    Univ Auckland, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Auckland, New Zealand;Natl Womens Hosp, Auckland Dist Hlth Board, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Poston, L.
    Kings Coll London, Sch Life Course Sci, Dept Women & Childrens Hlth, London, England.
    Taylor, R. S.
    Univ Auckland, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Simpson, N. A. B.
    Univ Leeds, Leeds Inst Biomed & Clin Sci, Sect Obstet & Gynaecol, Leeds, W Yorkshire, England.
    Dekker, G. A.
    Univ Adelaide, Adelaide Med Sch, Robinson Res Inst, Discipline Obstet & Gynaecol, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Myers, J.
    Univ Manchester, Maternal & Fetal Heath Res Ctr, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Vieira, M. C.
    Kings Coll London, Sch Life Course Sci, Dept Women & Childrens Hlth, London, England.
    Cutfield, W. S.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Paternal contributions to large-for-gestational-age term babies: findings from a multicenter prospective cohort study2019In: Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, ISSN 2040-1744, E-ISSN 2040-1752, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 529-535, article id PII S2040174419000035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assessed whether paternal demographic, anthropometric and clinical factors influence the risk of an infant being born large-for-gestational-age (LGA). We examined the data on 3659 fathers of term offspring (including 662 LGA infants) born to primiparous women from Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE). LGA was defined as birth weight >90th centile as per INTERGROWTH 21st standards, with reference group being infants <= 90th centile. Associations between paternal factors and likelihood of an LGA infant were examined using univariable and multivariable models. Men who fathered LGA babies were 180 g heavier at birth (P<0.001) and were more likely to have been born macrosomic (P<0.001) than those whose infants were not LGA. Fathers of LGA infants were 2.1 cm taller (P<0.001), 2.8 kg heavier (P<0.001) and had similar body mass index (BMI). In multivariable models, increasing paternal birth weight and height were independently associated with greater odds of having an LGA infant, irrespective of maternal factors. One unit increase in paternal BMI was associated with 2.9% greater odds of having an LGA boy but not girl; however, this association disappeared after adjustment for maternal BMI. There were no associations between paternal demographic factors or clinical history and infant LGA. In conclusion, fathers who were heavier at birth and were taller were more likely to have an LGA infant, but maternal BMI had a dominant influence on LGA.

  • 12.
    Derraik, José G B
    et al.
    Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Jonsson, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Cutfield, Wayne S
    Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    First-borns have greater BMI and are more likely to be overweight or obese: a study of sibling pairs among 26 812 Swedish women2016In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 78-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A number of large studies have shown phenotypic differences between first-borns and later-borns among adult men. In this study, we aimed to assess whether birth order was associated with height and BMI in a large cohort of Swedish women.

    METHODS: Information was obtained from antenatal clinic records from the Swedish National Birth Register over 20 years (1991-2009). Maternal anthropometric data early in pregnancy (at approximately 10-12 weeks of gestation) were analysed on 13 406 pairs of sisters who were either first-born or second-born (n=26 812).

    RESULTS: Early in pregnancy, first-born women were of BMI that was 0.57 kg/m(2) (2.4%) greater than their second-born sisters (p<0.0001). In addition, first-borns had greater odds of being overweight (OR 1.29; p<0.0001) or obese (OR 1.40; p<0.0001) than second-borns. First-borns were also negligibly taller (+1.2 mm) than their second-born sisters. Of note, there was a considerable increase in BMI over the 18-year period covered by this study, with an increment of 0.11 kg/m(2) per year (p<0.0001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Our study corroborates other large studies on men, and the steady reduction in family size may contribute to the observed increase in adult BMI worldwide.

  • 13.
    Derraik, José G B
    et al.
    Institute for Natural Sciences, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand.
    de Bock, Martin
    Paediatric Endocrinology, Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Ruffell, Chris
    Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club (ESAFC), Auckland, New Zealand.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Cutfield, Wayne
    Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    The obesity pandemic, the diabetes ‘tsunami’, and the lackof adequate sports grounds for children in Auckland, New Zealand2011In: Journal of the New Zealand Medical Association, ISSN 1175 8716, Vol. 124, no 1338Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Diderholm, Barbro
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Energy substrate production in infants born small for gestational age2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate energy substrate production and its hormonal regulation in infants born small for gestational age.

    Methods: Eleven infants, aged 24.4 ± 5.3 hour, were studied following a fast of 4.0 ± 0.6 hour. Gestational age was 35.4 ± 2.8 weeks and birth weight 1804 ± 472 g (<−2 SD). Rates of glucose production and lipolysis were analyzed using [6,6-2H2]-glucose and [2-13C]-glycerol.

    Results: Plasma levels of glucose and glycerol were 4.1 ± 1.1 mmol . L−1 and 224 ± 79 μmol . L−1, respectively. Glucose appearance averaged 30.3 ± 8.2 and glucose production rate 21.1 ± 6.1 μmol . kg−1 . minutes−1. Glycerol production rate was 5.6 ± 1.6 μmol . kg−1 . minutes−1, correlating strongly to birth weight (r = 0.904, p < 0.001). Of the glycerol produced, 55 ± 22% was converted to glucose, corresponding to 8 ± 3% of the glucose production.

    Conclusions: Even though the infants could produce energy substrates, lipolysis was reduced and the glucose production was in the low end of the normal range compared with infants born appropriate for gestational age. The correlation between glycerol production and birth weight indicates that lipolysis depends on the amount of stored fat. Data on insulin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 support the view that insulin sensitivity in these infants is reduced in the liver but increased peripherally.

  • 15.
    Fadl, Helena
    et al.
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Örebro, Sweden.
    Saeedi, Maryam
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Örebro, Sweden.
    Montgomery, Scott
    Örebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, Örebro, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Clin Epidemiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden; UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London, England.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Univ Hosp Örebro, Clin Epidemiol & Biostat, Örebro, Sweden.
    Schwarcz, Erik
    Örebro Univ Hosp, Sch Med Hlth & Sci, Dept Internal Med, Örebro, Sweden.
    Berntorp, Kerstin
    Lund Univ, Dept Endocrinol, Skane Univ Hosp, Clin Res Ctr Malmö, Lund, Sweden.
    Sengpiel, Verena
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Storck-Lindholm, Elisabeth
    Söder Sjukhuset, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Strevens, Helena
    Lund Univ, Skåne Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Clin Res Ctr Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Brismar-Wendel, Sophia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci, Danderyd Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Persson, Martina
    Sachsska Childrens & Youth Hosp, Dept Paediat, Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Örebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Ursing, Carina
    Söder Sjukhuset, Dept Endocrinol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ryen, Linda
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Ctr Hlth Care Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Petersson, Kerstin
    Umeå Univ, Dept Clin Sci Obstet & Gynaecol, Umeå, Sweden.
    Wennerholm, Ulla-Britt
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Inst Clin Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hilden, Karin
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Örebro, Sweden.
    Simmons, David
    Western Sydney Univ, Macarthur Clin Sch, Campbelltown, NSW, Australia; Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Örebro, Sweden.
    Changing diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes in Sweden-a stepped wedge national cluster randomised controlled trial-the CDC4G study protocol2019In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The optimal criteria to diagnose gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remain contested. The Swedish National Board of Health introduced the 2013 WHO criteria in 2015 as a recommendation for initiation of treatment for hyperglycaemia during pregnancy. With variation in GDM screening and diagnostic practice across the country, it was agreed that the shift to new guidelines should be in a scientific and structured way. The aim of the Changing Diagnostic Criteria for Gestational Diabetes (CDC4G) in Sweden (www.cdc4g.se/en) is to evaluate the clinical and health economic impacts of changing diagnostic criteria for GDM in Sweden and to create a prospective cohort to compare the many long-term outcomes in mother and baby under the old and new diagnostic approaches.

    Methods: This is a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial, comparing pregnancy outcomes before and after the switch in GDM criteria across 11 centres in a randomised manner. The trial includes all pregnant women screened for GDM across the participating centres during January–December 2018, approximately two thirds of all pregnancies in Sweden in a year. Women with pre-existing diabetes will be excluded. Data will be collected through the national Swedish Pregnancy register and for follow up studies other health registers will be included.

    Discussion: The stepped wedge RCT was chosen to be the best study design for evaluating the shift from old to new diagnostic criteria of GDM in Sweden. The national quality registers provide data on the whole pregnant population and gives a possibility for follow up studies of both mother and child. The health economic analysis from the study will give a solid evidence base for future changes in order to improve immediate pregnancy, as well as long term, outcomes for mother and child.

    Trial registration: CDC4G is listed on the ISRCTN registry with study ID ISRCTN41918550 (15/12/2017)

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 16.
    Grundvig Nylund, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Blom Johansson: Speech-Language Pathology.
    Gonzalez Lindh, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Research and Development, Gävleborg. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Blom Johansson: Speech-Language Pathology.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Thernström Blomqvist, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Parents experiences of feeding their extremely preterm children during the first 2‐3 years – A qualitative study2019In: ACTA PAEDIATRICAArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 17. Johnsson, Inger W
    et al.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Females with a high birth weight have increased risk of offspring macrosomia and obesity, but not of gestational diabetesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim This study investigated how maternal birth weight was related to offspring birth weight, as well as to risk of obesity in pregnancy and gestational diabetes.

    Methods The cohort (N= 305 893) comprises females born term and singleton in Sweden 1973-1995, studied at the time of their first pregnancy. Information regarding their birth weight, BMI and complications during pregnancy was retrieved from the Swedish Medical Birth Register in addition to data on their mothers and offspring.

    Results A maternal birth weight between 2-3 SDS was associated with a more than threefold increased risk of having an offspring with a birth weight between 2-3 SDS, OR 3.83 (3.44-4.26), or >3 SDS, OR 3.55 (2.54-4.97). Corresponding ORs for a maternal birth weight >3 SDS were 5.38 (4.12-7.01) and 6.98 (3.57-13.65), respectively. Risk of obesity in pregnancy was also related to maternal birth weight with OR 1.52 (1.42-1.63) for a birth weight corresponding to 2-3 SDS and 2.06 (1.71-2.49) for a birth weight >3 SDS. The risk of gestational diabetes was increased in females with a low (<2 SDS) birth weight, OR 2.49 (2.00-3.12), but not in those with a high birth weight.

    Conclusion Being born with a high birth weight was associated with increased risk of offspring macrosomia and obesity during pregnancy. The risks were most pronounced for subjects with a very high birth weight. A low, but not a high birth weight was associated with increased risk of gestational diabetes.

  • 18.
    Johnsson, Inger W
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Haglund, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH).
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    A high birth weight is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity2015In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 77-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The association between low birth weight and adult disease is well known. Less is known on long-term effects of high birth weight.

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate whether a high birth weight increases risk for adult metabolic disease.

    METHODS: Swedish term single births, 1973-1982 (n = 759 999), were studied to age 27.5-37.5 years using Swedish national registers. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated in relation to birth weight for type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension and dyslipidaemia.

    RESULTS: Men with birth weights between 2 and 3 standard deviation score (SDS) had a 1.9-fold increased risk (HR 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25-2.90) of type 2 diabetes, whereas those with birth weights above 3 SDS had a 5.4-fold increased risk (HR 5.44, 95% CI 2.70-10.96) compared to men with birth weights between -2 and 2 SDS. The corresponding HRs for women were 0.60 (95% CI 0.40-0.91) and 1.71 (95% CI 0.85-3.43) for birth weights 2-3 SDS and >3 SDS, respectively. Men with birth weights between 2 and 3 SDS had a 1.5-fold increased risk (HR 1.47, 95% CI 1.22-1.77) of obesity. The corresponding risk for women was 1.3-fold increased (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.19-1.46). For men and women with birth weights above 3 SDS, the risks of adult obesity were higher, HR 2.46 (95% CI 1.63-3.71) and HR 1.85 (95% CI 1.44-2.37), respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS: A high birth weight, particularly very high, increases the risk of type 2 diabetes in male young adults. The risk of obesity increases with increasing birth weight in both genders.

  • 19.
    Johnsson, Inger W
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Naessén, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Gynecological endocrinology.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    High birth weight was associated with increased radial artery intima thickness but not with other investigated cardiovascular risk factors in adulthood2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 12, p. 2152-2157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study investigated whether a high birth weight was associated with increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease when Swedish adults reached 34-40.

    METHODS: We studied 27 subjects born at Uppsala University Hospital in 1975-1979, weighing at least 4500 g, and compared them with 27 controls selected by the Swedish National Board of Welfare with birth weights within ±1 standard deviations scores and similar ages and gender. The study included body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, lipid profile, haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), C-reactive protein (CRP) and high-frequency ultrasound measurements of intima-media thickness, intima thickness (IT) and intima:media ratio of the carotid and radial arteries.

    RESULTS: Subjects with a high birth weight did not differ from controls with regard to BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, high-sensitivity CRP, HbA1c or carotid artery wall dimensions. However, their radial artery intima thickness was 37% greater than the control group and their intima:media ratio was 44% higher.

    CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that a high birth weight was associated with increased radial artery intima thickness, but not with other investigated cardiovascular risk factors, at 34-40 years of age. The clinical implications of these findings should be investigated further, especially in subjects born with a very high birth weight.

  • 20.
    Lindström, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Bergman, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Born small for gestational age and moderate preterm; implications on postnatal growthIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today we lack knowledge if size at birth and gestational age interacts regarding postnatal growth pattern in children born at 32 gestational weeks or later.

    This population-based cohort study comprised 41,669 children born in gestational weeks 32-40 in Uppsala County, Sweden, between 2000 and 2015. We applied a generalized least squares model including anthropometric measurements at 1.5, 3, 4 and 5 years. We calculated estimated mean height, weight and BMI for children born in week 32+0, 35+0 or 40+0 with birthweight 50th percentile (standardized appropriate for gestational age, sAGA) or 3rd percentile (standardized small for gestational age, sSGA).

    Compared with children born sAGA at gestational week 40+0, those born sAGA week 32+0 or 35+0 had comparable estimated mean height, weight and BMI after 3 years of age. Making the same comparison, those born sSGA week 32+0 or 35+0 were shorter and lighter with lower estimated mean BMI throughout the whole follow-up period.

    Our findings suggest that being born SGA and moderate preterm is associated with short stature and low BMI during the first five years of life. The association seemed stronger the shorter gestational age at birth.

  • 21.
    Lindström, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Bergman, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Growth patterns during early childhood in children born small for gestational age and moderate preterm2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 11578Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today we lack knowledge if size at birth and gestational age interacts regarding postnatal growth pattern in children born at 32 gestational weeks or later.

    This population-based cohort study comprised 41,669 children born in gestational weeks 32-40 in Uppsala County, Sweden, between 2000 and 2015. We applied a generalized least squares model including anthropometric measurements at 1.5, 3, 4 and 5 years. We calculated estimated mean height, weight and BMI for children born in week 32+0, 35+0 or 40+0 with birthweight 50th percentile (standardized appropriate for gestational age, sAGA) or 3rd percentile (standardized small for gestational age, sSGA).

    Compared with children born sAGA at gestational week 40+0, those born sAGA week 32+0 or 35+0 had comparable estimated mean height, weight and BMI after 3 years of age. Making the same comparison, those born sSGA week 32+0 or 35+0 were shorter and lighter with lower estimated mean BMI throughout the whole follow-up period.

    Our findings suggest that being born SGA and moderate preterm is associated with short stature and low BMI during the first five years of life. The association seemed stronger the shorter gestational age at birth.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Lindström, Linda
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Wikström, Anna-Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Clinical Obstetrics.
    Bergman, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Mulic-Lutvica, Ajlana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Obstetrics and Reproductive Health Research.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Postnatal growth in children born small for gestational age with and without smoking mother2019In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 85, no 7, p. 961-966Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Maternal smoking impairs fetal growth; however, if postnatal growth differs between children born small for gestational age (SGA) with smoking and non-smoking mother is unknown.

    Methods: Cohort-study of term born children born appropriate for gestational age with non-smoking mother (AGA-NS, n=30,561), SGA (birthweight <10th percentile) with smoking mother (SGA-S, n=171) or SGA with non-smoking mother (SGA-NS, n=1761). Means of height and weight measurements, collected at birth, 1.5, 3, 4 and 5 years, were compared using a generalized linear mixed effect model. Relative risks of short stature (<10th percentile) were expressed as adjusted risk ratios (aRR).

    Results: At birth, children born SGA-S were shorter than SGA-NS, but they did not differ in weight. At 1.5 years, SGA-S had reached the same height as SGA-NS. At 5 years, SGA-S were 1.1 cm taller and 1.2 kg heavier than SGA-NS. Compared with AGA-NS, SGA-S did not have increased risk of short stature at 1.5 or 5 years, while SGA-NS had increased risk of short stature at both ages; aRRs 3.0 (95% CI 2.6;3.4) and 2.3 (95% CI 2.0;2.7), respectively.

    Conclusions: Children born SGA-S have a more rapid catch-up growth than SGA-NS. This may have consequences for metabolic and cardiovascular health in children with smoking mothers.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Maessen, Sarah E.
    et al.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Cutfield, Wayne S.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Derraik, Jose G. B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Maternal smoking early in pregnancy is associated with increased risk of short stature and obesity in adult daughters2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 4290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We assessed anthropometry in 22,421 adult daughters in association with their mothers' tobacco smoking early in pregnancy (at their first antenatal visit) in Sweden, particularly their risk of short stature and obesity. Adult daughters were grouped by maternal smoking levels during pregnancy: Nonsmokers (58.5%), Light smokers (24.1%; smoked 1-9 cigarettes/day), and Heavier smokers (17.4%; smoked >= 10 cigarettes/day). Anthropometry was recorded on the adult daughters at approximately 26.0 years of age. Obesity was defined as BMI >= 30 kg/m(2), and short stature as height more than two standard deviations below the population mean. Daughters whose mothers were Light and Heavier smokers in early pregnancy were 0.8 cm and 1.0cm shorter, 2.3 kg and 2.6 kg heavier, and had BMI 0.84 kg/m(2) and 1.15 kg/m(2) greater, respectively, than daughters of Non-smokers. The adjusted relative risk of short stature was 55% higher in women born to smokers, irrespectively of smoking levels. Maternal smoking had a dose-dependent association with obesity risk, with offspring of Heavier smokers 61% and of Light smokers 37% more likely to be obese than the daughters of Non-smokers. In conclusion, maternal smoking in pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of short stature and obesity in their adult daughters.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 24.
    Serapio, Solveig
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Second Trimester Maternal Leptin Levels Are Associated with Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain but not Birth Weight of the Infant2019In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 92, no 2, p. 106-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity is increasing among the pregnant population. Leptin has an important role in the regulation of energy balance and hunger. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between maternal leptin levels with maternal obesity, gestational weight gain (GWG), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the leptin gene, and the age-adjusted birth weight of the child.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Maternal leptin levels (n = 740) and SNPs (n = 504) were analyzed in blood samples taken within the Uppsala Biobank of Pregnant women at pregnancy weeks 16-19.

    RESULTS: Maternal leptin levels differed significantly between body mass index (BMI) groups. Normal weight women had the lowest median leptin levels and levels increased with each BMI group. Leptin SNP genotype was not associated with leptin levels or BMI. There was also no association between maternal leptin levels and age-adjusted birth weight of the child except for a negative association between leptin levels and birth weight in the morbid obese group.

    DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: Maternal BMI was identified as the best positive explanatory factor for maternal leptin levels. Leptin was a strong positive explanatory factor for GWG. Birth weight of children of uncomplicated pregnancies was, however, dependent on maternal height, BMI, GWG, and parity but not leptin levels, except for in morbid obese women where a negative association between maternal leptin levels and birth weight was found. We speculate that this indicates altered placental function, not manifested in pregnancy complication. We conclude that maternal leptin levels do not affect the birth weight of the child more than BMI, GWG, and parity.

  • 25.
    Sjostrom, Elisabeth Stoltz
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ohlund, Inger
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Engstrom, Eva
    Institute of Clinical Sciences, Section for the Health of Women and Children, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fellman, Vineta
    Department of Paediatrics, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden.
    Hellstrom, Ann
    Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kallen, Karin
    Center of Reproductive Epidemiology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Norman, Mikael
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention & Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Olhager, Elisabeth
    Department of Paediatrics, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Domellof, Magnus
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nutrient intakes independently affect growth in extremely preterm infants: results from a population-based study2013In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 11, p. 1067-1074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimTo explore associations between energy and macronutrient intakes and early growth in extremely low gestational age (ELGA) infants. MethodsRetrospective population-based study of all ELGA infants (<27weeks) born in Sweden during 2004-2007. Detailed data on nutrition and anthropometric measurements from birth to 70days of postnatal age were retrieved from hospital records. ResultsStudy infants (n=531) had a meanSD gestational age of 25.3 +/- 1.1weeks and a birth weight of 765 +/- 170g. Between 0 and 70days, average daily energy and protein intakes were 120 +/- 11kcal/kg and 3.2 +/- 0.4g/kg, respectively. During this period, standard deviation scores for weight, length and head circumference decreased by 1.4, 2.3 and 0.7, respectively. Taking gestational age, baseline anthropometrics and severity of illness into account, lower energy intake correlated with lower gain in weight (r=+0.315, p<0.001), length (r=+0.215, p<0.001) and head circumference (r=+0.218, p<0.001). Protein intake predicted growth in all anthropometric outcomes, and fat intake was positively associated with head circumference growth. ConclusionExtremely low gestational age infants received considerably less energy and protein than recommended and showed postnatal growth failure. Nutrient intakes were independent predictors of growth even after adjusting for severity of illness. These findings suggest that optimized energy and macronutrient intakes may prevent early growth failure in these infants.

  • 26.
    Sjöström, Elisabeth Stoltz
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University.
    Öhlund, Inger
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University.
    Intakes of Micronutrients are Associated with Early Growth in Extremely Preterm Infants - A Population-Based Study.2016In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 885-892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to describe micronutrient intakes and explore possible correlations to growth during the first 70 days of life in extremely preterm infants.

    METHODS: Retrospective population-based study including extremely preterm infants (<27 weeks) born in Sweden during 2004-2007. Detailed nutritional and growth data were derived from hospital records.

    RESULTS: Included infants (n = 531), had a mean gestational age of 25 weeks+2 days and a mean birth weight of 765 g. Estimated and adjusted intakes of calcium, phosphorus magnesium, zinc, copper, selenium, vitamin D and folate were lower than estimated requirements while intakes of iron, vitamin K and several water-soluble vitamins were higher than estimated requirements. High iron intakes were explained by blood transfusions. During the first 70 days of life, taking macronutrient intakes and severity of illness into account, folate intakes were positively associated with weight (p = 0.001) and length gain (p = 0.003) and iron intake was negatively associated with length gain (p = 0.006).

    CONCLUSIONS: Intakes of several micronutrients were inconsistent with recommendations. Even when considering macronutrient intakes and severity of illness, several micronutrients were independent predictors of early growth. Low intake of folate was associated with poor growth of weight and length growth. Further, high iron supply was associated with poor length and head circumference growth. Optimized early micronutrient supply may improve early growth in extremely preterm infants.

  • 27.
    Skudder-Hill, Loren
    et al.
    Jiangsu Univ, Sch Clin Med, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Lundgren, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Cutfield, Wayne S.
    Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, A Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand.
    Derraik, Jose G. B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden;Univ Auckland, Liggins Inst, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand;Univ Auckland, A Better Start Natl Sci Challenge, Auckland, New Zealand;Zhejiang Univ, Sch Med, Childrens Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, Peoples R China.
    Preterm Birth is Associated With Increased Blood Pressure in Young Adult Women2019In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 8, no 12, article id e012274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background-While there is some evidence of elevated blood pressure later in life in preterm survivors, data on adult women are still lacking. Thus, we assessed the associations between preterm birth and blood pressure in young adult women. Methods and Results-We studied 5232 young adult women who volunteered for military service in Sweden between 1990 and 2007. Anthropometric and clinic blood pressure data were collected during the medical examination at the time of conscription. There was a progressive decline in systolic and diastolic blood pressures, as well as in mean arterial pressure, with increasing gestational age. Women born preterm had an adjusted increase in systolic blood pressure of 3.8 mm Hg (95% CI, 2.5-5.1; P<0.0001) and mean arterial pressure of 1.9 mm Hg (95% CI, 0.9-2.8; P 0.0001) compared with young women born at term. Rates of systolic hypertension were also considerably higher in young women born preterm (14.0% versus 8.1%, P<0.0001), as were rates of isolated systolic hypertension. The adjusted relative risk of systolic hypertension in women born preterm was 1.72 (95% CI, 1.26-2.34; P<0.001) that of women born at term or post-term, but there was no significant difference in the risk of diastolic hypertension (adjusted relative risk, 1.60; 95% CI, 0.49-5.20). Conclusions-Young adult women born preterm display elevated systolic blood pressure and an increased risk of hypertension compared with peers born at term or post-term.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 28.
    Späth, Cornelia
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, Umea, Sweden..
    Sjöström, Elisabeth Stoltz
    Umea Univ, Dept Food & Nutr, Umea, Sweden..
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ågren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, Umea, Sweden..
    Sodium supply influences plasma sodium concentration and the risks of hyper- and hyponatremia in extremely preterm infants2017In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 455-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Hyper- and hyponatremia occur frequently in extremely preterm infants. Our purpose was to investigate plasma sodium (P-Na) concentrations, the incidence of hyper and hyponatremia, and the impact of possible predisposing factors in extremely preterm infants. METHODS: In this observational study, we analyzed data from the EXtremely PREterm (< 27wk.) infants in Sweden Study (EXPRESS, n = 707). Detailed nutritional, laboratory, and weight data were collected retrospectively from patient records. RESULTS: Mean +/- SD P-Na increased from 135.5 +/- 3.0 at birth to 144.3 +/- 6.1 mmol/l at a postnatal age of 3 d and decreased thereafter. Fifty percent of infants had hypernatremia (P-Na > 145 mmol/l) during the first week of life while 79% displayed hyponatremia (P-Na < 135 mmol/l) during week 2. Initially, the main sodium sources were blood products and saline injections/infusions, gradually shifting to parenteral and enteral nutrition towards the end of the first week. The major deter, minant of P-Na and the risks of hyper- and hyponatremia was sodium supply. Fluid volume provision was associated with postnatal weight change but not with P-Na. CONCLUSION: The supply of sodium, rather than fluid volume, is the major factor determining P-Na concentrations and the risks of hyper- and hyponatremia.

  • 29.
    Stenlid, Maria Halldin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Forslund, Anders H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Döblen, U v
    Nordström, A
    Brown, RM
    Eklund, C
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Glucose Production, Lipolysis and Energy Expenditure in an Infantwith Deficiency of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex2014In: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism (JPEM), ISSN 0334-018X, E-ISSN 2191-0251Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Stenlid, Maria Halldin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Forslund, Anders H
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    von Döbeln, Ulrika
    Centre for Inherited Metabolic Disease, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Energy substrate metabolism in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency2014In: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism (JPEM), ISSN 0334-018X, E-ISSN 2191-0251, Vol. 27, no 11-12, p. 1059-1064Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) deficiency is an inherited disorder of carbohydrate metabolism, resulting in lactic acidosis and neurological dysfunction. In order to provide energy for the brain, a ketogenic diet has been tried. Both the disorder and the ketogenic therapy may influence energy production. The aim of the study was to assess hepatic glucose production, lipolysis and resting energy expenditure (REE) in an infant, given a ketogenic diet due to neonatal onset of the disease. Lipolysis and glucose production were determined for two consecutive time periods by constant-rate infusions of [1,1,2,3,3-2H5]-glycerol and [6,6-2H2]-glucose. The boy had been fasting for 2.5 h at the start of the sampling periods. REE was estimated by indirect calorimetry. Rates of glucose production and lipolysis were increased compared with those of term neonates. REE corresponded to 60% of normal values. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was increased, indicating a predominance of glucose oxidation. Blood lactate was within the normal range. Several mechanisms may underlie the increased rates of glucose production and lipolysis. A ketogenic diet will result in a low insulin secretion and reduced peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity, leading to increased production of glucose and decreased peripheral glucose uptake. Surprisingly, RQ was high, indicating active glucose oxidation, which may reflect a residual enzyme activity, sufficient during rest. Considering this, a strict ketogenic diet might not be the optimal choice for patients with PDH deficiency. We propose an individualised diet for this group of patients aiming at the highest glucose intake that each patient will tolerate without elevated lactate levels.

  • 31.
    Söderström, Fanny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Normann, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Holmström, Gerd
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Larsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Sindelar, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Ågren, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Reduced rate of retinopathy of prematurity after implementing lower oxygen saturation targets.2019In: Journal of Perinatology, ISSN 0743-8346, E-ISSN 1476-5543, Vol. 39, p. 409-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate an implementation of lower oxygen saturation targets with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) as primary outcome, in infants at the lowest extreme of prematurity.

    Study design: Retrospective cohort including infants born at 22-25 weeks of gestation in 2005-2015 (n = 325), comparing high (87-93%) and low (85-90%) targets; infants transferred early were excluded from the main analysis to avoid bias.

    Results: Overall survival was 76% in high saturation era, and 69% in low saturation era (p = .17). Treatment-requiring ROP was less common in low saturation group (14% vs 28%, p < .05) with the most prominent difference in the most immature infants. Including deceased infants in the analysis, necrotizing enterocolitis was more frequent in low saturation era (21% vs 10%, p < .05).

    Conclusions: Implementing lower saturation targets resulted in a halved incidence of treatment-requiring ROP; the most immature infants seem to benefit the most. An association between lower oxygenation and necrotizing enterocolitis cannot be excluded.

  • 32.
    Wackernagel, Dirk
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Department of Pediatrics, Mälarsjukhuset Hospital, 63349 Eskilstuna, Sweden;Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Huddinge, 14186 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brückner, Albrecht
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Department of Pediatrics, Mälarsjukhuset Hospital, 63349 Eskilstuna, Sweden;Department of Pediatrics, Marien-Hospital, 58452 Witten, Germany.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Computer-aided nutrition - Effects on nutrition and growth in preterm infants < 32 weeks gestation2015In: Clinical Nutrition ESPEN, ISSN 2405-4577, Vol. 10, no 6, p. e234-e241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & aims

    Preterm infants are often discharged from the NICU with suboptimal growth. The aim of our intervention study was to determine if a computer-aided nutrition calculation program could help to optimise the nutrition and secondary improve the growth of preterm infants.

    Methods

    Intake of macro- and micronutrients and anthropometric data was collected in 78 preterm infants with GA ≤32+0 from birth to postnatal week 7. The nutrition of 43 preterm infants was ordinated with help of the program Nutrium™​ (IG). Before the introduction of the program 35 consecutive preterm infants served as control group (CG). Their data were collected in retrospect.

    Results

    Amino acid, carbohydrate, fluid intake and total energy intake were statistically different at all time points. Fatty acid intake was statistically different expect for week 2 and 4. Similar differences were found for magnesium, calcium and phosphorus, zinc, copper and selenium. In contrast vitamin intake was higher in the control group.

    At birth there were no differences between the groups with respect to anthropometric data. Weight, length and head circumference (HC) SDS decreased in both groups from birth to day 28 of life (CG −1.2 SDS; −1.2 SDS; −0.8 SDS vs IG −0.9 SDS; −0.8 SDS; −0.4 SDS). The infants in the CG showed until discharge a partial catch-up but remained below birth SDS for weight and length (−0.5 SDS; −0.9 SDS). In the IG, infants reached birth values for weight and length (−0.1 SDS; 0 SDS). For HC both groups showed similar values at the time point for birth and discharge (CG +0.3 SDS vs IG +0.5 SDS).

    Conclusion

    By using a computer-aided nutrition calculation program better postnatal growth was achieved. Nutritional intake was increased in respect to nearly all micro- and macronutrients. There were no adverse effects. In contrast there was a tendency of decreased incidence of BPD, infection rate and PDA.

  • 33.
    Wahlström Johnsson, Inger
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Paediatric Inflammation Research.
    High birth weight was not associated with altered body composition or impaired glucose tolerance in adulthood2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 12, p. 2208-2213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To investigate whether a high birth weight was associated with an increased proportion of body fat or with impaired glucose tolerance in adulthood.

    Methods Our cohort comprised 27 subjects with birth weights of 4,500 g or more, and 27 controls with birth weights within ±1 SDS, born at Uppsala University Hospital 1975-1979. The subjects were 34-40 years old at the time of study.

    Anthropometric data was collected, and data on body composition was obtained by air plethysmography and bioimpedance and was estimated with a three compartment model. Indirect calorimetry, blood sampling for fasting insulin and glucose as well as a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test were also performed. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using homeostasis model assessment 2 (HOMA2) and Matsuda index. Areas under the curves were calculated for insulin and glucose.

    Results There were no differences in body mass index, body composition or insulin sensitivity between subjects with a high birth weight and controls.

    Conclusion Adult subjects, born with a moderately high birth weight, did not differ from those with birth weights within ±1 SDS regarding body composition or glucose tolerance

  • 34.
    Westin, Vera
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stoltz Sjöström, Elisabeth
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Norman, Mikael
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Perioperative nutrition in extremely preterm infants undergoing surgical treatment for patent ductus arteriosus is suboptimal2014In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 3, p. 282-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To evaluate perioperative nutrition in extremely preterm infants undergoing surgery for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA).

    METHODS: This is a population-based study of extremely preterm infants born in Sweden during 2004-2007 and operated on for PDA. Data on perioperative nutrition were obtained from hospital records. All enteral and parenteral nutrients and blood products were used to calculate daily nutritional intakes, starting 3 days before and ending 3 days after surgery. Data are mean (95% confidence intervals).

    RESULTS: Study infants (n = 140) had a mean gestational age (GA) of 24.8 weeks, and mean birth weight was 723 g. Energy and macronutrient intakes were below minimal requirements before, during and after PDA surgery. On the day of surgery, energy intake was 78 (74-81) kcal/kg/day, protein 2.9 (2.7-3.2) g/kg/day, fat 2.5 (2.3-2.7) g/kg/day and carbohydrate intake 10.7 (10.2-11.2) g/kg/day. Nutrition did not vary in relation to GA, but infants operated early (0-6 days after birth) received poorer nutrition than infants operated at older age. Fluid intake was 164 (159-169) mL/kg/day, and it did not vary during the week of surgery.

    CONCLUSION: Perioperative nutrition in extremely preterm infants undergoing PDA surgery in Sweden is suboptimal and needs to be improved. The significance of malnutrition for outcome after PDA surgery remains unclear and requires further investigation.

  • 35.
    Zamir, I.
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci Pediat, Umea, Sweden..
    Sjöström, E. Stoltz
    Umea Univ, Dept Food & Nutr, Umea, Sweden..
    Abrahamsson, T.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Div Pediat, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Hallberg, B.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neonatol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Pupp, I.
    Lund Univ, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Pediat, Lund, Sweden..
    Stjernkvist, K.
    Lund Univ, Dept Psychol, Lund, Sweden..
    Serenius, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatrics.
    Domellöf, M.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci Pediat, Umea, Sweden..
    Early-life hyperglycemia in extremely preterm infants affects neurodevelopment at 6 years of age2016In: European Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0340-6199, E-ISSN 1432-1076, Vol. 175, no 11, p. 1440-1440Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Zamir, Itay
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Tornevi, Andreas
    Umea Univ, Div Occupat & Environm Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Abrahamsson, Thomas
    Linkoping Univ, Div Pediat, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Ahlsson, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Perinatal, Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiology Research.
    Engström, Eva
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Pediat, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hallberg, Boubou
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, CLINTEC Dept Neonatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansen-Pupp, Ingrid
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Pediat, Lund, Sweden.
    Sjöström, Elisabeth Stoltz
    Umea Univ, Dept Food & Nutr, Umea, Sweden.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umea Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Pediat, SE-90187 Umea, Sweden.
    Hyperglycemia in Extremely Preterm Infants Insulin Treatment, Mortality and Nutrient Intakes2018In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 2213-5766, Vol. 200, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To explore the prevalence of hyperglycemia and the associations between nutritional intakes, hyperglycemia, insulin treatment, and mortality in extremely preterm infants. Study design Prospectively collected data from the Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden Study (EXPRESS) was used in this study and included 580 infants born <27 gestational weeks during 2004-2007. Available glucose measurements (n = 9850) as well as insulin treatment and nutritional data were obtained retrospectively from hospital records for the first 28 postnatal days as well as 28- and 70-day mortality data. Results Daily prevalence of hyperglycemia >180 mg/dL (10 mmol/L) of up to 30% was observed during the first 2 postnatal weeks, followed by a slow decrease in its occurrence thereafter. Generalized additive model analysis showed that increasing parenteral carbohydrate supply with 1 g/kg/day was associated with a 1.6% increase in glucose concentration (P < .001). Hyperglycemia was associated with more than double the 28-day mortality risk (P< .01). In a logistic regression model, insulin treatment was associated with lower 28- and 70-day mortality when given to infants with hyperglycemia irrespective of the duration of the hyperglycemic episode (P< .05). Conclusions Hyperglycemia is common in extremely preterm infants throughout the first postnatal month. Glucose infusions seem to have only a minimal impact on glucose concentrations. In the EXPRESS cohort, insulin treatment was associated with lower mortality in infants with hyperglycemia. Current practices of hyperglycemia treatment in extremely preterm infants should be reevaluated and assessed in randomized controlled clinical trials.

1 - 36 of 36
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf