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  • 1.
    Agarwal, Prasoon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Collier, Paul
    Fritz, Markus Hsi-Yang
    Benes, Vladimir
    Wiklund, Helena Jernberg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Singh, Umashankar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Neuro-Oncology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    CGGBP1 mitigates cytosine methylation at repetitive DNA sequences2015In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 16, article id 390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: CGGBP1 is a repetitive DNA-binding transcription regulator with target sites at CpG-rich sequences such as CGG repeats and Alu-SINEs and L1-LINEs. The role of CGGBP1 as a possible mediator of CpG methylation however remains unknown. At CpG-rich sequences cytosine methylation is a major mechanism of transcriptional repression. Concordantly, gene-rich regions typically carry lower levels of CpG methylation than the repetitive elements. It is well known that at interspersed repeats Alu-SINEs and L1-LINEs high levels of CpG methylation constitute a transcriptional silencing and retrotransposon inactivating mechanism. Results: Here, we have studied genome-wide CpG methylation with or without CGGBP1-depletion. By high throughput sequencing of bisulfite-treated genomic DNA we have identified CGGBP1 to be a negative regulator of CpG methylation at repetitive DNA sequences. In addition, we have studied CpG methylation alterations on Alu and L1 retrotransposons in CGGBP1-depleted cells using a novel bisulfite-treatment and high throughput sequencing approach. Conclusions: The results clearly show that CGGBP1 is a possible bidirectional regulator of CpG methylation at Alus, and acts as a repressor of methylation at L1 retrotransposons.

  • 2.
    Agarwal, Prasoon
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Enroth, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Genomics.
    Teichmann, Martin
    Institut Européen de Chimie et Biologie (IECB), Université de Bordeaux 2, rue , Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac, France..
    Jernberg Wiklund, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Hematology and Immunology.
    Smit, Arian
    Institute for Systems Biology, 401 Terry Avenue North, Seattle, WA 98109-5234, USA.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Singh, Umashankar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Growth signals employ CGGBP1 to suppress transcription of Alu-SINEs2016In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 15, no 12, p. 1558-1571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CGGBP1 (CGG triplet repeat-binding protein 1) regulates cell proliferation, stress response,cytokinesis, telomeric integrity and transcription. It could affect these processes by modulatingtarget gene expression under different conditions. Identification of CGGBP1-target genes andtheir regulation could reveal how a transcription regulator affects such diverse cellular processes.Here we describe the mechanisms of differential gene expression regulation by CGGBP1 inquiescent or growing cells. By studying global gene expression patterns and genome-wide DNAbindingpatterns of CGGBP1, we show that a possible mechanism through which it affects theexpression of RNA Pol II-transcribed genes in trans depends on Alu RNA. We also show that itregulates Alu transcription in cis by binding to Alu promoter. Our results also indicate thatpotential phosphorylation of CGGBP1 upon growth stimulation facilitates its nuclear retention,Alu-binding and dislodging of RNA Pol III therefrom. These findings provide insights into howAlu transcription is regulated in response to growth signals.

  • 3.
    Põlajeva, Jelena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Swartling, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Jiang, Yiwen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Singh, Umashankar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Pietras, Kristian
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet.
    Uhrbom, Lene
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Roswall, Pernilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    miRNA-21 is developmentally regulated in mouse brain and is co-expressed with SOX2 in glioma2012In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 12, p. 378-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and their role during tumor development have been studied in greatdetail during the last decade, albeit their expression pattern and regulation during normaldevelopment are however not so well established. Previous studies have shown that miRNAsare differentially expressed in solid human tumors. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)signaling is known to be involved in normal development of the brain as well as in malignantprimary brain tumors, gliomas, but the complete mechanism is still lacking. We decided toinvestigate the expression of the oncogenic miR-21 during normal mouse development andglioma, focusing on PDGF signaling as a potential regulator of miR-21.

    Methods

    We generated mouse glioma using the RCAS/tv-a system for driving PDGF-BB expression ina cell-specific manner. Expression of miR-21 in mouse cell cultures and mouse brain wereassessed using Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry andWestern blot analysis were used to investigate SOX2 expression. LNA-modified siRNA wasused for irreversible depletion of miR-21. For inhibition of PDGF signaling Gleevec(imatinib mesylate), Rapamycin and U0126, as well as siRNA were used. Statisticalsignificance was calculated using double-sided unpaired Student´s t-test.

    Results

    We identified miR-21 to be highly expressed during embryonic and newborn braindevelopment followed by a gradual decrease until undetectable at postnatal day 7 (P7), thiscorrelated with SOX2 expression. Furthermore, miR-21 and SOX2 showed up-regulation andoverlapping expression pattern in RCAS/tv-a generated mouse brain tumor specimens. Uponirreversible depletion of miR-21 the expression of SOX2 was strongly diminished in bothmouse primary glioma cultures and human glioma cell lines. Interestingly, in normalfibroblasts the expression of miR-21 was induced by PDGF-BB, and inhibition of PDGFsignaling in mouse glioma primary cultures resulted in suppression of miR-21 suggesting thatmiR-21 is indeed regulated by PDGF signaling.

    Conclusions

    Our data show that miR-21 and SOX2 are tightly regulated already during embryogenesisand define a distinct population with putative tumor cell of origin characteristics. We believethat miR-21 is a mediator of PDGF-driven brain tumors, which suggests miR-21 as apromising target for treatment of glioma.

  • 4.
    Singh, Umashankar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Maturi, Varun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jones, Rhiannon E
    Department of Pathology; School of Medicine; Cardiff University; Cardiff, UK.
    Paulsson, Ylva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Baird, Duncan M
    Department of Pathology; School of Medicine; Cardiff University; Cardiff, UK.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    CGGBP1 phosphorylation constitutes a telomere-protection signal2014In: Cell Cycle, ISSN 1538-4101, E-ISSN 1551-4005, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 96-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The shelterin proteins are required for telomere integrity. Shelterin dysfunction can lead to initiation of unwarranted DNA damage and repair pathways at chromosomal termini. Interestingly, many shelterin accessory proteins are involved in DNA damage signaling and repair. We demonstrate here that in normal human fibroblasts, telomeric ends are protected by phosphorylation of CGG triplet repeat-binding protein 1 (CGGBP1) at serine 164 (S164). We show that serine 164 is a major phosphorylation site on CGGBP1 with important functions. We provide evidence that one of the kinases that can phosphorylate S164 CGGBP1 is ATR. Overexpression of S164A phospho-deficient CGGBP1 exerted a dominant-negative effect, causing telomeric dysfunction, accelerated telomere shortening, enhanced fusion of telomeres, and crisis. However, overexpression of wild-type or phospho-mimicking S164E CGGBP1 did not cause these effects. This telomere damage was associated with reduced binding of the shelterin protein POT1 to telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that CGGBP1 phosphorylation at S164 is a novel telomere protection signal, which can affect telomere-protective function of the shelterin complex.

  • 5.
    Singh, Umashankar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Maturi, Varun
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Westermark, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Cancer and Vascular Biology.
    Evidence for multiple forms and modifications of human POT12013In: DNA Repair, ISSN 1568-7864, E-ISSN 1568-7856, Vol. 12, no 11, p. 876-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human POT1, a widely studied telomere protector protein is perceived to be expressed as a single 70 kDa form. A survey of the literature as well as different commercially available antibodies against POT1 suggests occurrence of multiple forms of POT1. Knowledge about possible various forms of an important protein like POT1 is necessary for our understanding about its function. We have discovered that POT1 exists in at least three consistently occurring forms; 90,70 and 45 kDa. The unexpected molecular weights of POT1 seem to be associated with SUMO1 and ubiquitin conjugation; the latter occurring at a double lysine residue at 289-KK-290. We also present evidence that the relative abundance of the different POT1 forms can be altered by experimental modulation of POT1 nuclear localization. We thus present strong evidence that there are post-translational modifications of POT1 that can affect its molecular weight as well as intracellular localization and function.

  • 6.
    Singh, Umashankar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Sun, Tong
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Looman, Camilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Heuchel, Rainer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research.
    Elliott, Rosemary W.
    Freichel, Marc
    Meissner, Marcel
    Flockerzi, Veit
    Fundele, Reinald
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Animal Development and Genetics.
    Expression and Function of the Gene Encoding the Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channel β3-Subunit in the Mouse Placenta2007In: Placenta, ISSN 0143-4004, E-ISSN 1532-3102, Vol. 28, no 5-6, p. 412-420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCC) exist in most excitable cells and their properly regulated activity is essential for critical biological processes as many of these are sensitive to cellular Ca(2+) ion concentration. The ancillary cytoplasmic Ca(2+) channel beta subunits (CACNB) modulate Ca(2+) channel function and are required to enhance the number of functional channels in the plasma membrane. There are four genes encoding CACNB subunits and the gene encoding CACNB3 is over expressed in hyperplastic placentas of mouse interspecies hybrids. To determine the role of CACNB3 in the mouse placenta, we performed an expression and function analysis. Our results show that Cacnb3 exhibits specific spatial and temporal expression in the mouse placenta. Deletion of Cacnb3 does not produce a strong placental phenotype, which may be due to expression of other CACNB subunit encoding genes; however, sporadic occurrence of a labyrinthine architecture phenotype, characterized by reduced density of fetal blood vessels and decrease in pericyte number, could be observed. Down-regulation of Cacnb3 expression did not rescue placental hyperplasia in a model of interspecies hybrid placentas, which indicates that up-regulation in the hyperplastic placentas is a downstream event.

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