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  • 1.
    Batista Borges, João
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hedenstierna laboratory. Univ Sao Paulo, Hosp Clin, Pulm Div Heart Inst InCor, Sao Paulo, Brazil..
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hedenstierna laboratory.
    Hedenstierna, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Hedenstierna laboratory.
    The "normal" ventilated airspaces suffer the most damaging effects of mechanical ventilation2017In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 1057-1058Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Andersson, Jessika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hulthe, Johannes
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Clinically unrecognized myocardial infarction detected at MR imaging may not be associated with atherosclerosis2007In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 245, no 1, p. 103-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate whether there is support for the hypothesis that clinically unrecognized myocardial infarctions (UMIs) detected at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging have an atherosclerotic pathogenesis similar to that of recognized myocardial infarctions (RMIs).

    Materials and Methods: After ethics committee approval and informed consent were obtained, gadolinium-enhanced whole-body MR angiography and late-enhancement MR imaging were performed in 248 randomly chosen 70-year-old subjects (123 women, 125 men). Imaging included the aorta and the carotid, renal, and lower limb arteries to the ankle, but not the coronary arteries. Subjects with myocardial infarction (MI) scars at late-enhancement MR imaging were classified as having RMI (n = 11) (those with a diagnosis of MI at the hospital) or UMI (n = 49) (those without a diagnosis of MI at the hospital). The presence of 50% or higher luminal narrowing in any vessel at whole-body MR angiography was considered to represent significant atherosclerosis. Intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery was measured with ultrasonography. C-reactive protein level was measured, and coronary heart disease risk was estimated. Observers were blinded to any previous results. The chi(2) test analysis of variance, and Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analyses.

    Results: None of the measured parameters differed significantly between the group without MI scars and the UMI group, but parameters were significantly increased in the RMI group (P < .05) compared with those in the group without MI scars. Forty-two of 49 UMIs and nine of 11 RMIs were located within inferolateral segments of the left ventricle.

    Conclusion: MR imaging-detected UMIs might have a different pathogenesis from that of RMIs or may have the same pathogenesis but may manifest at an earlier stage.

  • 3.
    Ekström, Magnus Par
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Fac Med, Resp Med & Allergol, Lund, Sweden.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umea Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Bergstrom, Goran
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Inst Med, Wallenberg Lab,Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Brandberg, John
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Radiol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Engstrom, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malm, Sweden.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin Physiol, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gransbo, Klas
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Lund, Sweden.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Jernberg, Tomas
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lars
    Umea Univ, Unit Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Ulf
    Umea Univ, Unit Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Olin, Anna-Carin
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Sect Occupat & Environm Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Persson, Lennart
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Rosengren, Annika
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Inst Med, Wallenberg Lab,Dept Mol & Clin Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sandelin, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Skold, Magnus
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Resp Med Unit, Dept Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Resp Med Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundstrom, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Resp Med Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Soderberg, Stefan
    Umea Univ, Unit Med, Dept Publ Hlth & Clin Med, Umea, Sweden.
    Tanash, Hanan A.
    Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Resp Med & Allergol, Malmo, Sweden.
    Toren, Kjell
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Occupat & Environm, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ostgren, Carl Johan
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    The association of body mass index, weight gain and central obesity with activity-related breathlessness: the Swedish Cardiopulmonary Bioimage Study2019In: Thorax, ISSN 0040-6376, E-ISSN 1468-3296, Vol. 74, no 10, p. 958-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Breathlessness is common in the population, especially in women and associated with adverse health outcomes. Obesity (body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2) is rapidly increasing globally and its impact on breathlessness is unclear.

    Methods This population-based study aimed primarily to evaluate the association of current BMI and self-reported change in BMI since age 20 with breathlessness (modified Research Council score ≥1) in the middle-aged population. Secondary aims were to evaluate factors that contribute to breathlessness in obesity, including the interaction with spirometric lung volume and sex.

    Results We included 13 437 individuals; mean age 57.5 years; 52.5% women; mean BMI 26.8 (SD 4.3); mean BMI increase since age 20 was 5.0 kg/m2; and 1283 (9.6%) reported breathlessness. Obesity was strongly associated with increased breathlessness, OR 3.54 (95% CI, 3.03 to 4.13) independent of age, sex, smoking, airflow obstruction, exercise level and the presence of comorbidities. The association between BMI and breathlessness was modified by lung volume; the increase in breathlessness prevalence with higher BMI was steeper for individuals with lower forced vital capacity (FVC). The higher breathlessness prevalence in obese women than men (27.4% vs 12.5%; p<0.001) was related to their lower FVC. Irrespective of current BMI and confounders, individuals who had increased in BMI since age 20 had more breathlessness.

    Conclusion Breathlessness is independently associated with obesity and with weight gain in adult life, and the association is stronger for individuals with lower lung volumes.

  • 4.
    Hagström, Emil
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Arnlöv, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    Plasma-Parathyroid Hormone Is Associated With Subclinical and Clinical Atherosclerotic Disease in 2 Community-Based Cohorts2014In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 1567-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular risk factors have different impact on different arterial territories. Diseases with elevated circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) such as primary hyperparathyroidism and chronic renal failure have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, predominantly heart or cerebrovascular diseases. However, data on the associations between circulating PTH and peripheral atherosclerosis are limited.

    APPROACH AND RESULTS: Two prospective, community-based studies were used. In 306 men and women, who were 70 years old, from the Prospective investigation of the vasculature in Uppsala seniors (PIVUS) study, cross-sectional relations between PTH and atherosclerotic burden assessed by whole-body magnetic resonance angiography were investigated. In 998 men, who were 71 years old, from the Uppsala longitudinal study of adult men (ULSAM) study, the association between PTH concentration and risk of subsequent nonfatal atherosclerotic disease (excluding coronary or cerebrovascular disease) was investigated. Adjusting for established vascular risk factors, PTH was associated with burden of atherosclerosis (increase in total atherosclerotic score per SD PTH increase: 0.04, 0.003-0.08; P=0.03) in the PIVUS study. During follow-up in the ULSAM study (median 16.7 years), 89 men were diagnosed with nonfatal atherosclerotic disease. In Cox-regression analyses adjusting for established vascular risk factors and mineral metabolism, higher PTH was associated with an increased risk of nonfatal atherosclerotic disease (hazard ratio for 1 SD increase of PTH: 1.55, 1.33-1.88; P<0.0001). Results were similar when including fatal atherosclerotic disease in the outcome.

    CONCLUSIONS: In 2 independent community-based cohorts, PTH was associated to the degree of atherosclerosis and risk of clinically overt atherosclerotic disease, respectively. Our data confirm and extend previous studies supporting a role for PTH in the development of atherosclerotic disease.

  • 5.
    Hansen, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Whole-body screening of atherosclerosis with magnetic resonance angiography.2007In: Topics in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (TMRI), ISSN 0899-3459, E-ISSN 1536-1004, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 329-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA), it is possible to examine the whole arterial tree except intracranial and coronary vessels in a single examination without the risks involved in ionizing radiation or arterial cannulation. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography is well suited for repeated clinical examinations in patients with systemic diseases such as vasculitis or atherosclerosis and can also be used for scientific purposes. On the basis of the WBMRA overview, a possible further development of the WBMRA concept can be to perform further acquisitions at sites with atherosclerotic plaques with higher-resolution scans to determine the degree of stenosis more accurately or to achieve plaque characterization. A total validation of WBMRA compared with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is not possible owing to the hazards of ionizing radiation. Studies have shown a high sensitivity and specificity for the pelvic and lower limb arteries in comparison with DSA. No systematic validation against DSA has been performed for the renal, aortic, and carotid arteries. Various methods have been used, however, for confirmation of vascular abnormalities found on WBMRA such as ultrasonography, dedicated MRA, or DSA, with reasonably high agreement. The WBMRA method has not been studied with regard to prediction of future cardiovascular (CV) events, as have intima media thickness, coronary artery calcium scoring, and the ankle-brachial index. The full usefulness of WBMRA in an epidemiological setting and as a complementary screening tool for assessing CV risk still needs to be validated against future CV events.

  • 6.
    Hansen, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Söderberg, S.
    Hulthe, J.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Visceral adipose tissue, adiponectin levels and insulin resistance are related to atherosclerosis as assessed by whole-body magnetic resonance angiography in an elderly population2009In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 205, no 1, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The principal aim of this study was to determine whether the amount of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is more related than subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) to atherosclerosis assessed by whole-body MRA (WBMRA). A further objective was to investigate whether traditional risk factors, inflammation, or adipokines could explain the hypothesized relationship between VAT and atherosclerosis. METHODS: Men and women aged 70 were recruited from the general population into the Prospective Investigation of The Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) and 306 of them underwent WBMRA in a clinical 1.5-T scanner. The arterial tree was assessed for degree of stenosis or occlusion and a total atherosclerotic score (TAS) was established. Information on risk factors and BMI and on SAT and VAT, segmented on an axial MR scan was collected. Adiponectin, leptin, and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured in serum. HOMA index was used as a marker of insulin resistance. RESULTS: VAT was related to TAS independently of gender, total obesity (BMI), amount of SAT, hsCRP and also to the traditional risk factors included in the Framingham risk score (FRS) in an elderly population. Adiponectin or the HOMA insulin resistance, but not leptin or VAT, together with FRS was significantly related to TAS in a multiple censored regression model. CONCLUSION: Adiponectin attenuated the relationship between VAT and TAS, suggesting that adiponectin and insulin resistance is an important link between visceral adiposity and atherosclerosis.

  • 7.
    Hansen, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    A total atherosclerotic score for whole-body MRA and its relation to traditional cardiovascular risk factors2008In: European Radiology, ISSN 0938-7994, E-ISSN 1432-1084, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 1174-1180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to create a scoring system for whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA) that allows estimation of atherosclerotic induced luminal narrowing, and determine whether the traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors included in the Framingham risk score (FRS) were related to this total atherosclerotic score (TAS) in an elderly population. A group of 306 subjects, aged 70, were recruited from the general population and underwent WBMRA in a 1.5-T scanner. Three-dimensional sequences were acquired after administration of one i.v. injection of 40 ml gadodiamide. The arterial tree was divided into five territories (carotid, aorta, renal, upper and lower leg) comprising 26 vessel segments, and assessed according to its degree of stenosis or occlusion. FRS correlated to TAS (r=0.30, P < 0.0001), as well as to the atherosclerotic score for the five individual territories. Of the parameters included in the FRS, male gender (P < 0.0001), systolic blood pressure (P=0.0002), cigarette pack-years (P=0.0008) and HDL cholesterol (P=0.008) contributed to the significance. A scoring system for WBMRA was created. The significant relation towards traditional CV risk factors indicates that the proposed scoring system could be of value for assessing atherosclerotically induced luminal narrowing.

  • 8.
    Hansen, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Total atherosclerotic burden measured by magnetic resonance imaging is related to five-year decline in cognitive function2018In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 373-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore whether total atherosclerotic burden is related to future decline in performance on cognitive tests.

    Methods: The total atherosclerotic burden (TAS) was assessed by whole‐body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA) in 305 subjects at age 70 in the study Prospective Investigation of Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS). The mini‐mental state examination (MMSE) and trail making tests (TMT) A and B were evaluated at ages 75 and 80 in 190 of those subjects. No subject with a diagnosis of dementia was included in the sample.

    Results: MMSE did not change during the 5 years of follow‐up, while TMT A and B increased by 4 and 7 s, respectively. TAS at age 70 was significantly related to the individual change in TMT B (P<0·0001) between age 75 and 80, when adjusted for sex, education level, TMT B at age 75 and Framingham score at age 70. No such relationship was seen for the change in TMT A (P = 0·10). The relationship between TAS and the change in MMSE was of borderline significance (P = 0·025).

    Conclusion: A relationship was found between the total atherosclerotic burden and future decline in performance on TMT B, highlighting a role of global atherosclerosis in the cognitive decline seen during ageing.

  • 9.
    Hansen, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Sörensen, Jens
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lymph nodes as a potential pitfall in carotid plaque imaging with FDG-PET/CT2011In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 215, no 1, p. 247-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hansen, Tomas
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    The Prevalence and Quantification of Atherosclerosis in an Elderly Population Assessed by Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography2007In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 649-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective-The principal aim of the present study was to explore the feasibility of using whole-body magnetic resonance angiography to assess atherosclerosis in different vascular territories in a cohort of elderly. Methods and Results-Three hundred six 70-year-old subjects (145 women, 161 men) recruited from a population-based cohort study (Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors, ie, the PIVUS study) underwent 1.5-T whole-body magnetic resonance angiography with gadodiamide. The arteries were divided into 26 segments. In total, 7956 vessel segments were evaluated with 7900 segments (99.3%) possible to evaluate. Of these, 7186 segments (91%) were normal. Luminal narrowing of ≥50% was observed in 9 (1.5%) of the renal arteries, 12 (1.8%) of the carotid arteries, in 31 segments (1.1%) of the pelvic/upper leg territories, and in 136 segments (6.2%) of territories in the lower leg. Approximately one-third of the sample had no vascular abnormalities, one-third had stenoses of <50%, and the remainder had stenoses ≥50% or occlusions. Six subjects (2%) had aortic aneurysms. In subjects without evident vascular disease, 26% had significant vascular abnormalities. Conclusions-Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography performed with a clinical scanner can be used for quantifying atherosclerosis in different vascular territories in a single examination in an elderly population.

  • 11. Håkansson, A
    et al.
    Rantatalo, M
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wanhainen, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Vascular Surgery.
    Patient specific biomodel of the whole aorta: the importance of calcified plaque removal2011In: VASA, ISSN 0301-1526, E-ISSN 1664-2872, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 453-459Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The use of anatomical models produced by 3D printing technique (rapid prototyping, RP) is gaining increased acceptance as a complementary tool for planning complex surgical interventions. This paper describes a method for creating a patient specific replica of the whole aorta.

    METHODS: Computed tomography angiography (CTA) DICOM-data was converted to a three-dimensional computer aided design-model (CAD) of the inner wall of the aorta representing the lumen where the calcified plaque contribution was removed in a multi-step editing-manoeuvre. The edited CAD-model was used for creating a physical plaster model of the true lumen in a 3D-printer. Elastic and transparent silicon was applied onto the plaster model, which was then removed leaving a silicon replica of the aorta.

    RESULTS: The median (interquartile range) difference between diameters obtained from CTA- and RP plaster-model at 19 predefined locations was 0.5 mm (1 mm) which corresponds to a relative median difference of 4.6% (7.0%). The average wall thickness of the silicone model was 3.5 mm. The elasticity property and performance during intervention was good with an acceptable transparency.

    CONCLUSIONS: The integration of RP-techniques with CAD based reconstruction of 3D-medical imaging data provides the needed tools for making a truly patient specific replica of the whole aorta with high accuracy. Plaque removal postprocessing is necessary to obtain a true inner wall configuration.

  • 12.
    Järhult, Susann J
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Astra Zeneca, R&D, Mölndal.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Brachial artery hyperemic blood flow velocity in relation to established indices of vascular function and global atherosclerosis2012In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 227-233Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Systolic to diastolic blood flow velocity (SDFV) ratio in the Brachial artery recently proved to be related to cardiovascular risk and Carotid atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that the SDFV ratio was related to established markers of vascular function and global atherosclerosis. 

     

    Methods

    Established markers of endothelial function in forearm resistance vessels, flow-mediated vasodilation and arterial stiffness were assessed in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study including 1016 individuals aged 70. Whole body magnetic resonance angiography was performed in a random 306 of the participants. Atherosclerotic lesions were summarized in a total atherosclerotic score (TAS). Before and during hyperemia of the Brachial artery, systolic and diastolic blood flow velocities were measured by Doppler.

     

    Results

    The SDFV ratio was positively related to endothelium-independent vasodilatation, while inverse relations to flow-mediated dilation, common carotid artery distensibility and the stroke volume to pulse pressure ratio were found. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and total peripheral resistance index were not significantly related to the SDFV ratio.

    The SDFV ratio (p=0.015) and the blood flow increase during hyperemia (p= 0.020) were both significantly related to TAS after gender adjustment. When adjusted for the Framingham risk score, both the SDFV ratio (p= 0.057) and blood flow increase (p= 0.078) lost somewhat in significance.

     

    Conclusion

    The SDFV ratio was related to established markers of both vasodilation and arterial compliance, and to global atherosclerosis. Future larger studies have to evaluate if the SDFV ratio is related to global atherosclerosis independently of traditional risk factors.

  • 13.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Andersson, Jessika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Internal Medicine.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Atherosclerosis measured by whole body magnetic resonance angiography and carotid artery ultrasound is related to arterial compliance, but not to endothelium-dependent vasodilation: the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study2009In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 321-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Arterial compliance and endothelium-dependent vasodilation are two characteristics of the vessel wall. In the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study, we studied the relationships between arterial compliance and endothelium-dependent vasodilation versus atherosclerosis as measured with two imaging modalities. METHODS: In the population-based PIVUS study (1016 subjects aged 70), arterial compliance was determined by ultrasound in the carotid artery and the stroke volume to pulse pressure ratio by echocardiography, while endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by the invasive forearm technique with acetylcholine and brachial artery ultrasound. Intima-media thickness was evaluated by ultrasound in the carotid artery (n = 954). Stenosis in the carotid, aorta, renal, upper and lower leg arteries were determined by magnetic resonance angiography in a random subsample of 306 subjects. RESULTS: After adjustments for gender, Framingham risk score, obesity, myocardial infarction and stroke, distensibility in the carotid artery and the stroke volume to pulse pressure ratio were both significantly related to a weighted index of stenosis in the five arterial territories evaluated by magnetic resonance angiography (p<0.02 for both). Distensibility in the carotid artery (P = 0.021), but not the stroke volume to pulse pressure ratio (P = 0.08), was also significantly related to intima-media thickness. CONCLUSION: In the elderly population, atherosclerosis is mainly related to arterial compliance, but not to endothelium-dependent vasodilation in peripheral conduit or resistance vessels.

  • 14.
    Lind, Lars
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Simon, Tabassome
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Kotti, Salma
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Machecourt, Jacques
    Ninio, Ewa
    Tedgui, Alain
    Danchin, Nicolas
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Mallat, Ziad
    Circulating levels of secretory- and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 activities: relation to atherosclerotic plaques and future all-cause mortality2012In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 33, no 23, p. 2946-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    Secretory- and lipoprotein-associated phospholipases A2 (sPLA2 and Lp-PLA2) are enzymes both suggested to be of importance for atherosclerosis. We investigated relationships between the activities of these enzymes in the circulation and atherosclerosis as well as future clinical events.

    Methods and results

    The population-based Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study included 1016 randomly selected subjects, all aged 70. The prevalence of carotid artery plaques was recorded by ultrasound (n= 954), and arterial stenosis was assessed by whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA, n= 302). Secretory-associated phospholipase A2 [odds ratio 1.23 for 1 SD increase, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-1.44, P= 0.007], but not Lp-PLA2 (P= 0.26), activity was significantly related to carotid atherosclerosis and to the amount of stenosis at WBMRA (P= 0.006) following adjustment for multiple risk factors (waist circumference, serum triglycerides, body mass index, C-reactive protein, high density lipoprotein-C, low density lipoprotein-C, triglycerides, GFR, fasting glucose, blood pressure, statin use, and exercise habits). Secretory-associated phospholipase A2 [hazard ratio (HR) 1.45 for 1 SD increase, 95% CI: 1.15-1.84, P= 0.001], but not Lp-PLA2 (HR 0.95, P= 0.55), activity was a significant risk factor for all-cause mortality (114 had died) during 7.0 years follow-up after adjustment for the risk factors described above. In a sample of 1029 post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients (French registry of Acute ST-elevation and non-ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction), sPLA2 (adjusted HR 1.32 for 1 unit increase, 95% CI: 1.02-1.71, P= 0.036), but not Lp-PLA2 (HR 1.03, P= 0.90), activity predicted death or recurrent MI during 1-year follow-up (n= 136 cases).

    Conclusion

    sPLA2 activity was related to atherosclerosis and predicted all-cause mortality in a sample of elderly subjects, as well as death or MI in post-MI patients.

  • 15.
    Lundberg, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology. AstraZeneca R&D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    The relationship between carotid intima-media thickness and global atherosclerosis2014In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 457-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between (i) carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) at baseline as well as (ii) change in CIMT over 5 years (ΔCIMT) and atherosclerotically induced luminal narrowing in non-coronary arterial territories assessed by whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA).

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    In subgroups of the Prospective Investigation of Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study, US measurements of CIMT in the common carotid arteries were analysed at 70 and 75 years and ΔCIMT was calculated (n = 272). WBMRA, assessing arterial stenosis in five different territories by which also a total atherosclerotic score (TAS) was calculated, was performed at 70 years (n = 306).

    RESULTS:

    Carotid intima-media thickness in the carotid artery at baseline was correlated with TAS (P = 0·0001) when adjusted to a set of traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, as well as to stenosis in two of the different investigated territories (aorta and lower leg, P = 0·013 and P = 0·004), but there was no significant correlation between ΔCIMT and TAS (P = 0·41).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    In the present study, CIMT, but not ΔCIMT over 5 years, in the carotid artery was related to overall stenoses in the body, as assessed by WBMRA. These findings support CIMT as a general marker for atherosclerosis.

  • 16.
    Lundberg, Christina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ebeling Barbier, Charlotte
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Total atherosclerotic burden by whole body magnetic resonance angiography predicts major adverse cardiovascular events2013In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 228, no 1, p. 148-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between the Total Atherosclerotic Score (TAS), a measurement of the overall atherosclerotic burden of the arterial tree by whole body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA), and the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), defined as cardiac death, myocardial infarction, stroke and/or coronary revascularization, assuming that TAS predicts MACE.

    METHODS AND RESULTS:

    305 randomly selected 70 year-old subjects (47% women) underwent WBMRA. Their atherosclerotic burden was evaluated and TAS > 0, that is atherosclerotic changes, were found in 68% of subjects. During follow-up (mean 4.8 years), MACE occurred in 25 subjects (8.2%). Adjusting for multiple risk factors, TAS was associated with MACE (OR 8.86 for any degree of vessel lumen abnormality, 95%CI 1.14-69.11, p = 0.037). In addition, TAS improved discrimination and reclassification when added to the Framingham risk score (FRS), and ROC (Receiver Operator Curve) increased from 0.681 to 0.750 (p = 0.0421).

    CONCLUSION:

    In a population-based sample of 70 year old men and women WBMRA, with TAS, predicted MACE independently of major cardiovascular risk factors.

  • 17.
    Mirza, Majd A I
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Larsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Larsson, Tobias E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Relationship between circulating FGF23 and total body atherosclerosis in the community2009In: Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, ISSN 0931-0509, E-ISSN 1460-2385, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 3125-3131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) is a regulator of mineral metabolism and has been suggested to play a role in vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Data on the association between FGF23 and atherosclerosis, both in CKD and in the community, is limited. METHODS: The total body atherosclerosis score (AS) was determined by a magnetic resonance imaging-based angiography in 306 elderly men and women, representing a subsample of the community-based PIVUS cohort. Subjects were divided into three categories based on AS: AS = 0, low AS and high AS. Serum FGF23 was measured using a two-site monoclonal antibody ELISA. RESULTS: In continuous and multi-category regression models, higher FGF23 was associated with a significant increase in the odds of having a high AS (OR 1.43, CI 1.06-1.92 to OR 3.01, CI 1.52-5.99). This association was stronger in individuals with eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (n = 27), reaching a nearly 6-fold increase in the odds for a high AS in the upper FGF23 tertile (OR 5.64, CI 2.78-11.5). We found weaker support for a relationship between FGF23 and the presence of atherosclerosis as subjects in the highest FGF23 tertile had an increased risk for an AS > 0 in crude models (OR 1.93, CI 1.05-3.55), but this was not statistically significant in adjusted (OR 1.42, CI 0.74-1.72) models. CONCLUSIONS: We provide novel evidence supporting an association between serum FGF23 and total body atherosclerosis in the community. Additional studies are warranted to determine the prospective relationship between FGF23 and atherosclerosis, and whether FGF23 is a modifiable cardiovascular risk factor.

  • 18.
    Smekal, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Sandler, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Forensic Medicine.
    Rubertsson, Sten
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Comparison of computed tomography and autopsy in detection of injuries after unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitation2013In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 84, no 3, p. 357-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    Computed tomography (CT) has been suggested as an aid or even a replacement for autopsy. The aim of this trial was to study the conformity of the two methods in finding injuries in non-surviving patients after unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    METHODS:

    In this prospective study, 31 patients were submitted to a CT prior to autopsy after unsuccessful resuscitation attempts. Pathological findings were noted by both the radiologist and the pathologists in a specified protocol. The pathologists and radiologist were blinded from each other's results.

    RESULTS:

    CT and autopsy revealed rib fractures in 22 and 24 patients respectively (kappa=0.83). In 8 patients, CT revealed more rib fractures than autopsy; and in 12 patients, autopsy revealed more rib fractures than CT. In 7 patients, neither method showed any rib fractures. The mean difference between the two methods in detecting rib fractures was 0.16 (S.D.: ±3.174, limits of agreement: -6.19 to 6.51). The kappa value for sternal fractures was 0.49. A total of 260 pathological findings were noted by CT and 244 by autopsy. The average patient showed a median of 9 injuries (every fracture counted as one injury), independent of the method used in detecting the injuries.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    There was a strong concordance between the two methods in finding rib fractures but not sternal fractures and these results support the concept of CT as a valuable complement to autopsy in detecting rib fractures after unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitation but not as a replacement. Other injuries did not show the same concordance.

  • 19.
    Tizon, Xavier
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis.
    Lin, Qingfen
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Borgefors, Gunilla
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Centre for Image Analysis. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Frimmel, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Scientific Computing.
    Identification of the main arterial branches by whole-body contrast-enhanced MRA in elderly subjects using limited user interaction and fast marching2007In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 25, p. 806-814Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Torkzad, Michael R.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Wikström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bergman, Antonina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Bjerner, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    The Clinical Perspective on Value of 3D, Thin Slice T2-Weighted Images in 3T Pelvic MRI for Tumors2012In: Current Medical Imaging Reviews, ISSN 1573-4056, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 76-81(6)Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pelvic imaging is undergoing rapid changes due to increased use of 3-Tesla (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI). One of the advantages of 3T could be the possibility for thin section 3-dimensional (3D) imaging which could improve accuracy and at the same time reduce the need for multi-planar imaging needed for conventional T2 imaging (TSE). In the following text we review the advantages of 3D thin section imaging for assessment of pelvic tumors.

  • 21.
    Wikström, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Lower extremity artery stenosis distribution in an unselected elderly population and its relation to a reduced ankle-brachial index2009In: Journal of vascular surgery, ISSN 0741-5214, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 330-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the distribution and degree of symmetry of lower extremity artery stenoses in an unselected elderly population and its relation to a reduced ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. METHODS: This was a population-based study set in a university hospital comprising 306 randomly selected 70-year-old individuals participating in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study. Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and bilateral ABI measurements were performed in each participant. The prevalence of stenosis >/=50% was evaluated in nine different arterial segments in both legs: common iliac artery (CIA), external iliac artery (EIA), common femoral artery (CFA), superficial femoral artery (SFA), popliteal artery (PA), tibioperoneal trunk (TPTr), anterior tibial artery (ATA), posterior tibial artery (PTA), and peroneal artery. The relations between the prevalences of stenosis in different arterial segments in the right and left leg were assessed. An evaluation was made of the relation between a >/=50% stenosis and an ABI <0.9 in the different segments. RESULTS: The prevalence of stenosis was 0% to 21%. In all segments, a stenosis was more commonly found in one of the legs only than in both legs. The prevalence of >/=50% stenosis in the right leg only, left leg only, and both legs was 0.3%, 0.7%, and 0% in the CIA; 0.3%, 1.0%, and 0.7% in the EIA; 0%, 0%, and 0% in the CFA; 2.0%, 1.3%, and 0.7% in the SFA; 0.7%, 0.7%, and 0.3% in the PA; 1.0%, 0.7%, and 0% in the TPTr; 5.6%, 6.3%, and 8.6% in the ATA; 0.7%, 1.7%, and 0% in the peroneal artery; and in 2.0%, 2.7%, and 3.4% in the PTA. When the legs were compared, a significant correlation was found for the presence of a >/=50% stenosis in the EIA, SFA, PA, ATA, and PTA. Seventeen participants showed ABI <0.9. In logistic regression analysis with ABI <0.9 as dependent variable, stenosis in SFA, ATA, and PTA were the major independent variables to explain a low ABI in both of the legs. CONCLUSIONS: The distribution of stenosis differs substantially when legs are compared. Despite this difference, stenosis in SFA, ATA, and PTA was the major determinant of a low ABI in both of the legs.

  • 22.
    Wikström, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Hansen, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Radiology.
    Ankle brachial index <0.9 underestimates the prevalence of peripheral artery occlusive disease assessed with whole-body magnetic resonance angiography in the elderly2008In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 143-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA) permits noninvasive vascular assessment, which can be utilized in epidemiological studies. PURPOSE: To assess the relation between a low ankle brachial index (ABI) and high-grade stenoses in the pelvic and leg arteries in the elderly. MATERIAL AND METHODS: WBMRA was performed in a population sample of 306 subjects aged 70 years. The arteries below the aortic bifurcation were graded after the most severe stenosis according to one of three grades: 0-49% stenosis, 50-99% stenosis, or occlusion. ABI was calculated for each side. RESULTS: There were assessable WBMRA and ABI examinations in 268 (right side), 265 (left side), and 258 cases (both sides). At least one > or =50% stenosis was found in 19% (right side), 23% (left side), and 28% (on at least one side) of the cases. The corresponding prevalences for ABI <0.9 were 4.5%, 4.2%, and 6.6%. An ABI cut-off value of 0.9 resulted in a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 20%, 99%, 83%, and 84% on the right side, and 15%, 99%, 82%, and 80% on the left side, respectively, for the presence of a > or =50% stenosis in the pelvic or leg arteries. CONCLUSION: An ABI <0.9 underestimates the prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in the general elderly population.

1 - 22 of 22
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