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  • 1.
    Bodin, Örjan
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Alexander, S. M.
    Faculty of Environment, University of Waterloo.
    Baggio, J.
    National Center for Integrated Coastal Research, University of Central Florida.
    Barnes, M. L.
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University.
    Berardo, R.
    School of Environment and Natural Resources, The Ohio State University.
    Cumming, G. S.
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University.
    Dee, L. E.
    Department of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities.
    Fischer, A. P.
    School for Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan.
    Fischer, M.
    Department of Environmental Social Sciences, Eawag;Institute of Political Science, University of Bern.
    Mancilla Garcia, M.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Guerrero, A. M.
    School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland;ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, The University of Queensland.
    Hileman, J.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ingold, K.
    Department of Environmental Social Sciences, Eawag;Institute of Political Science, University of Bern;Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern.
    Matous, P.
    The University of Sydney, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies.
    Morrison, T. H.
    Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Pittman, J.
    School of Planning, University of Waterloo.
    Robins, G.
    Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne;Faculty of Business and Law, Swinburne University.
    Sayles, J. S.
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
    Improving network approaches to the study of complex social–ecological interdependencies2019In: Nature Sustainability, ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 2, no 7, p. 551-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving effective, sustainable environmental governance requires a better understanding of the causes and consequences of the complex patterns of interdependencies connecting people and ecosystems within and across scales. Network approaches for conceptualizing and analysing these interdependencies offer one promising solution. Here, we present two advances we argue are needed to further this area of research: (i) a typology of causal assumptions explicating the causal aims of any given network-centric study of social–ecological interdependencies; (ii) unifying research design considerations that facilitate conceptualizing exactly what is interdependent, through what types of relationships and in relation to what kinds of environmental problems. The latter builds on the appreciation that many environmental problems draw from a set of core challenges that re-occur across contexts. We demonstrate how these advances combine into a comparative heuristic that facilitates leveraging case-specific findings of social–ecological interdependencies to generalizable, yet context-sensitive, theories based on explicit assumptions of causal relationships.

  • 2. Bodin, Örjan
    et al.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Formation and performance of collaborative disaster management networks: Evidence from a Swedish wildfire response2016In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 41, p. 183-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural disasters present a multitude of entangled societal challenges beyond the realms and capacities of single actors. Prior research confirms that effective collaboration is of critical significance to address such complex collective action problems. Yet, studies rarely investigate if patterns of collaboration are appropriately aligned (‘fit’) with how different challenges (tasks) are interdependent, or how levels of fit influence collective action performance. We develop a set of hypotheses specifying what constitutes a good fit between collaborative networks and task interdependency. Using unique empirical data from the response to a major wildfire in Sweden, we examine how individual actors select collaboration partners and tasks during the formation the collaborative crisis response network. Then we test if levels of fit in the established network influence performance. We show that patterns of actor and task interdependency influence the formation of collaborative networks and that a good fit seems to be associated with more effective collaboration. Our data even suggest that a good fit is more important for performance than actors’ prior crisis management experience and level of professionalization. Further, we show that actors only partially engage in actor-task configurations conducive to high performance. Our study probes the limitations of simplified accounts of collaborative disaster management by enabling more precise and theoretically informed empirical inquiries regarding the mechanisms that shape the structure and performance of collaborative networks.

  • 3. Bodin, Örjan
    et al.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Baird, Julia
    Summers, Robert
    Plummer, Ryan
    Working at the "speed of trust": pre-existing and emerging social ties in wildfire responder networks in Sweden and Canada2019In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 2353-2364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The frequency and severity of natural hazards are predicted to increase with climate change. Collaboration among actors across scales and organizational boundaries is essential to address this escalation. Pre-existing social networks are generally considered a catalyst enabling actors to more quickly address collective action problems. However, empirically derived knowledge about if, how, and why pre-established social networks facilitate effective collaborations in addressing natural hazards is scarce. We use survey data from crisis responders of large-scale wildfires in Sweden and Canada to investigate factors that shape actors’ (i) ability and willingness to form new social ties with other actors and (ii) propensity to “activate” pre-existing social ties. Our results show that many new social ties were established in both events, but also that pre-existing ties comprised a considerable proportion (54–82%) of all ties in use. Using exponential random graph models for temporal networks, we demonstrate that two actors that are working with or have previously worked with a common third actor are more likely to activate pre-existing social ties. Further, new social ties tend to be formed around a few central actors, whereas the opposite seems to apply for the activation of pre-existing ties. The extent to which actors consider others’ organizational affiliation, formal role, previous experience, and level of professionalization differs between the cases. We suggest these tie formation and activation differences can be attributed to diverging organizational contexts varying in their reliance upon self-organizing versus command-and-control approaches.

  • 4.
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden.;IHE Delft Inst Water Educ, Delft, Netherlands..
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Mård, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Burchardt, Steffi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Albin, Cecilia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Bondesson, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden.; Swedish Def Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Breinl, Korbinian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Deegan, Frances M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Fuentes, Diana
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Lopez, Marc Girons
    Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden.;Univ Zurich, Dept Geog, Zurich, Switzerland..
    Granberg, Mikael
    Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Ctr Climate & Safety, Karlstad, Switzerland..
    Nyberg, Lars
    Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Ctr Climate & Safety, Karlstad, Switzerland..
    Nyman, Monika Rydstedt
    Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden.;Karlstad Univ, Ctr Climate & Safety, Karlstad, Switzerland..
    Rhodes, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Troll, Valentin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Mineralogy Petrology and Tectonics. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Young, Stephanie
    Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden.;Swedish Def Univ, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Walch, Colin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden.; Univ Calif Berkeley, Dept Polit Sci, Berkeley, CA USA..
    Parker, Charles F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Ctr Nat Hazards & Disaster Sci CNDS, Uppsala, Sweden..
    An Integrative Research Framework to Unravel the Interplay of Natural Hazards and Vulnerabilities2018In: Earth's Future, ISSN 1384-5160, E-ISSN 2328-4277, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 305-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change, globalization, urbanization, social isolation, and increased interconnectedness between physical, human, and technological systems pose major challenges to disaster risk reduction (DRR). Subsequently, economic losses caused by natural hazards are increasing in many regions of the world, despite scientific progress, persistent policy action, and international cooperation. We argue that these dramatic figures call for novel scientific approaches and new types of data collection to integrate the two main approaches that still dominate the science underpinning DRR: the hazard paradigm and the vulnerability paradigm. Building from these two approaches, here we propose a research framework that specifies the scope of enquiry, concepts, and general relations among phenomena. We then discuss the essential steps to advance systematic empirical research and evidence-based DRR policy action. Plain Language Summary The recent deadly earthquake in Iran-Iraq has been yet another reminder of the topicality of natural hazards, and it has come just after an unprecedented series of catastrophic events, including the extensive flooding in South Asia and the string of devastating hurricanes in the Americas. He we identify three main puzzles in the nexus of natural hazards and vulnerabilities, and demonstrate how novel approaches are needed to solve them with reference to a flood risk example. Specifically, we show how a new research framework can guide systematic data collections to advance the fundamental understanding of socionatural interactions, which is an essential step to improve the development of policies for disaster risk reduction.

  • 5.
    Henry, Adam
    et al.
    University of Arizona.
    Ingold, Karin
    University of Bern.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Weible, Chris
    University of Colorado Denver.
    Policy Change in Comparative Contexts: Applying the Advocacy Coalition Framework Outside of Western Europe and North America2014In: Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, ISSN 1387-6988, E-ISSN 1572-5448, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 299-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The advocacy coalition framework (ACF) is one of the most frequently applied theories of the policy process. Most applications have been in Western Europe and North America. This article provides an overview of the ACF, summarizes existing applications outside of Western Europe and North America, and introduces the special issue that features applications of the ACF in the Philippines, China, India, and Kenya. This article concludes with an argument for the continued application of the ACF outside of Western Europe and North America and a research agenda for overcoming challenges in using the ACF in comparative public policy research.

  • 6.
    Jenkins-Smith, Hank C.
    et al.
    University of Oklahoma.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Weible, Christopher M.
    University of Colorado Denver.
    Sabatier, Paul A.
    University of California Davis.
    The Advocacy Coalition Framework: Foundations, Evolution and Future Challenges2014In: Theories of the Policy Process / [ed] Paul Sabatier & Chris Weible, Boulder: Westview Press, 2014, 3, p. 183-223Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Koivisto, Jenni
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Centre for Climate and Safety & Centre for Natural Disaster Science (CNDS).
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Uppsala University, Department of Government & Centre for Natural Disaster Science (CNDS).
    A policymaking perspective on disaster risk reduction in Mozambique2017In: Environmental hazards, ISSN 1464-2867, E-ISSN 1878-5697, Vol. 3, p. 210-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academics and practitioners alike emphasise that public policy plays a key role to support efforts to reduce disaster risks and to buffer the impacts of natural hazards when they occur. This involves developing public policies to promote disaster risk reduction (DRR). However, the public policy dimension has only recently begun to receive attention in empirical research on DRR. Processes of policy change are discussed, yet less often studied, and more empirical research is needed to advance the understanding of the conditions for DRR policy change. Combining insights from adaptation research and public policy theory, this study investigates the long-term development of DRR policy in Mozambique as perceived by multiple stakeholders. The study identifies barriers and enabling factors influencing the DRR policy process over time. Using data from 37 semi-structured interviews, the study finds six main enabling factors supporting DRR policy change. Among the most important enabling factors are past disasters and broad stakeholder involvement. The study also unveils several barriers to DRR policy change, including resource insufficiency and lack of coordination among stakeholders. The study concludes with suggestions for integrating DRR and policy process research and lessons for policymaking in support of DRR over time.

  • 8.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Advocacy coalitions in crisis resolution: understanding policy dispute in the european volcanic ash cloud crisis2013In: Public Administration, ISSN 0033-3298, E-ISSN 1467-9299, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 964-979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disruptive crises are generally conducive to policy conflict between multiple stakeholders. Following the potentially adversarial nature of crisis resolution, there is a need for theoretical approaches to advance the understanding of the political context in which such disputes evolve. This article explains how the advocacy coalition framework (ACF) can be applied as a theoretical basis for understanding the development and effects of policy conflicts in crisis resolution. Illustrating the ACF as a tool for descriptive policy analysis in this context, the article conducts a case study of the European response to the 2010 volcanic ash cloud crisis, focusing on the nature of the policy subsystem, the role of scientific information, competing crisis narratives, exploitation of resources and venues, and policy change. The concluding section identifies a set of theoretical implications and specifies how the framework can be used by practitioners to mitigate the effects of policy conflicts on crisis resolution.

  • 9.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Bonding and Bridging Relationships in Collaborative Forums Responding to Weather Warnings2018In: Weather, Climate, and Society, ISSN 1948-8327, E-ISSN 1948-8335, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 521-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative forums involving multiple stakeholders responding to natural hazards are prevalent, yet there is little conclusive evidence of how stakeholders exchange information across such forums and how different patterns of information exchange influence forum goals. This study analyzes information exchange among representatives of 51 organizations across 50 collaborative forums in response to weather warnings in Sweden, 2011-15. Using coded transcripts from forum meetings, the study estimates exponential random graph models to document the prevalence of network configurations of organizations across these forums. The results show that actors avoid engaging in information exchanges within closed subgroups and that no specific type or organization was particularly active in exchanging information. The study suggests that the forum structures are consistent with short-term operational goals as well as the long-term objective of these forums to sustain collaboration over time. The study discusses potential explanations for these patterns and implications for forum performance in relation to natural hazards management.

  • 10.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Collaborative Governance Regimes2016In: Public Administration, ISSN 0033-3298, E-ISSN 1467-9299, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 1157-1159Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Complexity theory and collaborative crisis governance in Sweden2015In: Handbook on Complexity and Public Policy / [ed] Robert Geyer and Paul Cairney, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, p. 332-348Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Crisis and Policy Reformcraft: Advocacy Coalitions and Crisis-induced Change in Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation consists of three interrelated essays examining the role of crisis events in Swedish nuclear energy policymaking. The study takes stock of the idea of ‘crisis exceptionalism’ raised in the literature, which postulates that crisis events provide openings for major policy change. In an effort to explain crisis-induced outcomes in Swedish nuclear energy policy, each essay explores and develops theoretical assumptions derived from the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF). The introduction discusses the ACF and other theoretical perspectives accentuating the role of crisis in policymaking and identifies three explanations for crisis-induced policy outcomes: minority coalition mobilization, learning, and strategic action. Essay I analyzes the nature and development of the Swedish nuclear energy subsystem. The results contradict the ACF assumption that corporatist systems nurture narrow subsystems and small advocacy coalitions, but corroborate the assumption that advocacy coalitions remain stable over time. While this analysis identifies temporary openings in policymaking venues and in the advocacy coalition structure, it is argued that these developments did not affect crisis policymaking. Essay II seeks to explain the decision to initiate a referendum on nuclear power following the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. Internal government documents and other historical records indicate that strategic considerations superseded learning as the primary explanation in this case. Essay III conducts an in-depth examination of Swedish policymaking in the aftermath of the 1986 Chernobyl accident in an effort to explain the government’s decision not to accelerate the nuclear power phaseout. Recently disclosed government documents show that minority coalition mobilization was insufficient to explain this decision. In this case, rational learning and strategic action provided a better explanation. The main theoretical contribution derived from the three essays is to posit the intensity and breadth of political conflict, strategic action, and analogical reasoning as key factors affecting the propensity for crisis-induced policy change.

    List of papers
    1. Belief Coalition Formation and Stability in Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy, 1970-1991
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Belief Coalition Formation and Stability in Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy, 1970-1991
    In: An Advocacy Coalition Lens on Environmental PolicyChapter in book (Other academic) In progress
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95700 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-04-13 Created: 2007-04-13Bibliographically approved
    2. External shocks and policy change: Three Mile Island and Swedish nuclear energy policy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>External shocks and policy change: Three Mile Island and Swedish nuclear energy policy
    2005 (English)In: Journal of European Public Policy, ISSN 1350-1763, E-ISSN 1466-4429, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1041-1059Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95701 (URN)
    Available from: 2007-04-13 Created: 2007-04-13 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
    3. The Politics of Crisis Policymaking: Chernobyl and Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Politics of Crisis Policymaking: Chernobyl and Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy
    2008 (English)In: Policy Studies Journal, ISSN 0190-292X, E-ISSN 1541-0072, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 257-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Public policy scholars often accentuate the key role of crises in explaining policy change; however, much empirical work still remains to be done in order to explain crisis-induced policy outcomes. This article explores the prediction of the Advocacy Coalition Framework that stable coalitions and impediments to learning reduce the likelihood for policy change after a crisis. Strategic action is emphasized as a supplementary variable focusing on the role of political motivations in post-crisis policymaking. Sweden's decision not to accelerate the nuclear power phaseout following the 1986 Chernobyl disaster provides a case study to assess the utility of these explanations. Findings corroborate theoretical expectations about stable minority coalitions, cast doubts over the presumed rigidity of policy core beliefs, and emphasize strategic action and cognitive heuristics as important motivations for policy choice. The article concludes by outlining three sector-specific variables (ideological salience, level of conflict, and previous crisis experiences) that add to the explanation of crisis-induced policy outcomes.

    Keywords
    Advocacy Coalition Framework, Coalition mobilization, Crisis, Learning, Nuclear power, Policy change
    National Category
    Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-95702 (URN)10.1111/j.1541-0072.2008.00265.x (DOI)000254954300005 ()
    Available from: 2007-04-13 Created: 2007-04-13 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
  • 13.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Crisis Management Abroad: The Brolin Kidnap2000Book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Crisis Management in Transitional Democracies2002In: Government and Opposition, ISSN 0017-257X, E-ISSN 1477-7053, Vol. 37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Swedish National Defence College.
    Do Advocacy Coalitions Matter?: Crisis and Change in Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy2010In: Journal of public administration research and theory, ISSN 1053-1858, E-ISSN 1477-9803, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 309-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study applies the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) to developments in Swedish nuclear energy policy in the 1970s and 80s. In an effort to contribute to the refinement and debate regarding the generalizability of ACF theory, the objective is to assess the utility of ACF assumptions when applied in this case. The study explores hypotheses about advocacy coalition stability and examines the motivations explaining policy change in the wake of the 1979 Three Mile Island accident and the 1986 Chernobyl disaster. Utilizing different sources of data, the study confirms patterns of coalition stability and shows that interests and political learning were important in explaining policy change in this case. Theoretical implications derived from this study call for further specification of basic ACF concepts (external perturbations, dominant coalitions, and skillful exploitation) and posit the intensity and breadth of political conflict and strategic action as critical factors contributing to the explanation of policy change in contested policy areas.

  • 16.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Does Adaptive Capacity Influence Service Delivery?: Evidence from Swedish Emergency Management Collaborations2015In: Public Management Review, ISSN 1471-9037, E-ISSN 1471-9045, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 718-735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between adaptive capacity and collaborative performance is a central issue within public management research but has rarely been subjected to systematic empirical testing. Using survey data on emergency preparedness collaborations in Swedish municipalities (N = 263), this article investigates the relationship between three adaptive capacity variables – diversity, interaction, and learning – and outcomes in terms of goal attainment, risk analysis, and public satisfaction with rescue services. The findings suggest a positive relationship between the number of collaboration partners and goal attainment, while learning and accessibility of collaboration venues were unassociated with service delivery variables.

  • 17.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Explaining Mobilization and Performance of Collaborations in Routine Emergency Management2016In: Administration & Society, ISSN 0095-3997, E-ISSN 1552-3039, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 135-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers as well as practitioners often elevate collaborative governance as a necessary condition for effective responses to extreme events. This research has a dominating focus on large-scale catastrophes and disasters, whereas little attention is devoted to less serious emergencies. Another void concerns performance measurement. Addressing these gaps, this study investigates plausible explanations for collaborative activity and outcomes in response to extreme winter conditions in Sweden. Analysis of a survey of Swedish public managers suggests that, in this case, collaborative action is associated with preparatory actions and disruptions affecting other organizations. The analysis generates conflicting findings regarding underlying explanations for collaborative outcomes.

  • 18.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    External shocks and policy change: Three Mile Island and Swedish nuclear energy policy2005In: Journal of European Public Policy, ISSN 1350-1763, E-ISSN 1466-4429, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 1041-1059Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Networking and Crisis Management Capacity: A Nested Analysis of Local-Level Collaboration in Sweden2018In: American Review of Public Administration, ISSN 0275-0740, E-ISSN 1552-3357, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 232-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of how actors collaborate across organizational boundaries to prepare for and respond to extreme events have traditionally focused on describing network structure whereas fewer studies empirically investigate how network relationships influence crisis management capacities. Using survey data on crisis management work in Swedish municipalities, this study considers how the number of collaboration partners and venues for collaboration (networking) influence organizational goal attainment. Given managerial costs associated with increasingly complex collaboration networks, the study explores the diminishing returns hypothesis, which predicts a positive relationship between networking and goal attainment up to a certain point when payoffs do not increase. Results support a nonlinear relationship; networking at low levels had a positive effect on goal attainment whereas no relationship was found at moderate or high levels. To identify characteristics of collaboration conducive to performance, the study undertakes a comparative case study of two low-residual cases where the relationship between networking and performance follow the predicted nonlinear curve and one deviant case where high levels of networking had a positive effect on performance. The cases show that stable interpersonal relationships, clarification of the terms of collaboration, shared problem perceptions, and coordination of joint decision making constitute important assembly mechanisms for overcoming collective action problems.

  • 20.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Paradigms and Unintended Consequences: New Public Management Reform and Emergency Planning in Swedish Local Government2015In: Policy Paradigms in Theory and Practice: Discourses, Ideas and Anomalies in Public Policy Dynamics / [ed] John Hogan, Michael Howlett, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 141-163Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Shifting Resources and Venues Producing Policy Change in Contested Subsystems: A Case Study of Swedish Signals Intelligence Policy2011In: Policy Studies Journal, ISSN 0190-292X, E-ISSN 1541-0072, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 461-484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade and across countries, changes in national intelligence policies have spurred wide-spread political opposition and public protest. Instances of intelligence policy change warrant close academic attention to cast light on the dynamics of policymaking in contested policy areas. In an effort to contribute to further development of a theory of policy change within the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF), this article analyzes the adoption of legislation in Sweden to expand the mandate for signals intelligence gathering. Three explanatory variables are derived from the ACF to explain policy change in this case: shifts in advocacy coalition membership, distribution of coalition resources, and access to policy venues. Whereas shifts in coalition membership were unrelated to policy change in this case, the case-study lends partial support to the role of resource distribution and policy venues. To promote the progress of an ACF theory of policy change, the study concludes by drawing two theoretical implications: (i) introducing hierarchical classification of coalition resources and (ii) identification of revised policy narratives and exploitative policy entrepreneurship as causal mechanisms linking external shocks to venue shifts and policy change.

  • 22.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Kursk Submarine Accident: Coping with Value Complexity and Credibility Loss in Crisis2001In: Crisis Management in Russia, Överstyrelsen för Civil Beredskap (The Swedish Agency for Civil Emergency Planning) , 2001Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Politics of Crisis Policymaking: Chernobyl and Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy2008In: Policy Studies Journal, ISSN 0190-292X, E-ISSN 1541-0072, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 257-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public policy scholars often accentuate the key role of crises in explaining policy change; however, much empirical work still remains to be done in order to explain crisis-induced policy outcomes. This article explores the prediction of the Advocacy Coalition Framework that stable coalitions and impediments to learning reduce the likelihood for policy change after a crisis. Strategic action is emphasized as a supplementary variable focusing on the role of political motivations in post-crisis policymaking. Sweden's decision not to accelerate the nuclear power phaseout following the 1986 Chernobyl disaster provides a case study to assess the utility of these explanations. Findings corroborate theoretical expectations about stable minority coalitions, cast doubts over the presumed rigidity of policy core beliefs, and emphasize strategic action and cognitive heuristics as important motivations for policy choice. The article concludes by outlining three sector-specific variables (ideological salience, level of conflict, and previous crisis experiences) that add to the explanation of crisis-induced policy outcomes.

  • 24.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Uncertainty, Accountability, and the Conduct of Postcrisis Inquiries2011In: Ethics and Crisis Management / [ed] Lina Svedin, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Understanding the Political Context of Nuclear Energy Policy Change in Sweden2014In: Studying public policy: An international approach / [ed] Michael Hill, Bristol: The Policy Press , 2014, 1, p. 55-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Uppsala Univ, Ctr Nat Disaster Sci, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Baekkeskov, Erik
    Univ Melbourne, Sch Social & Polit Sci, Publ Policy, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Political drivers of epidemic response: foreign healthcare workers and the 2014 Ebola outbreak2018In: Disasters. The Journal of Disaster Studies, Policy and Management, ISSN 0361-3666, E-ISSN 1467-7717, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 41-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study demonstrates that countries responded quite differently to calls for healthcare workers (HCWs) during the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014. Using a new dataset on the scale and timing of national pledges and the deployment of HCWs to states experiencing outbreaks of the virus disease (principally, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone), it shows that few foreign nations deployed HCWs early, some made pledges but then fulfilled them slowly, and most sent no HCWs at all. To aid understanding of such national responses, the paper reviews five theoretical perspectives that offer potentially competing or complementary explanations of foreign government medical assistance for international public health emergencies. The study systematically validates that countries varied greatly in whether and when they addressed HCW deployment needs during the Ebola crisis of 2014, and offers suggestions for a theory-driven inquiry to elucidate the logics of foreign interventions in critical infectious disease epidemics.

  • 27.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Evolutionary Dynamics of Crisis Preparedness Collaboration: Resources, Turbulence and Network Change in Swedish Municipalities2014In: Risks, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, ISSN 1944-4079, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 134-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Societal responses to climate change risks and hazards increasingly involve interorganizational collaboration across policy areas, sectors, and levels of government. Different views exist in the literature regarding changes in such collaborative arrangements; whereas some argue that maintaining stability of collaborative networks is a precursor for effective crisis management, others maintain that network adaptation is necessary to cope with complex risks and rude surprises. This controversy turns the spotlight on the more fundamental question of what influences changes in collaborative networks in this area. Using survey data on municipality managers in Sweden, this study presents evidence of a dramatic increase in annual change of interorganizational ties while the total magnitude of ties to different types of actors has essentially remained constant over time. To explain these developments, the study builds from resource dependency theory (RDT) and explores the relationship between resources, environmental turbulence, and network change. The findings suggest that RDT has limited explanatory value in this case; no association was found between resources, turbulence, and network change. An alternative hypothesis is introduced suggesting that changes in networking strategies are a function of outside pressure to collaborate and uncertainty about collaborative practices and the benefits of collaboration, which feed an experimental approach to networking.

  • 28.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Bynander, Fredrik
    Parker, Charles F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    't Hart, Paul
    Managing Crisis Collaboratively: Prospects and Problems: A SystematicLiterature Review2018In: Perspectives on Public Management and Governance, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 257-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Effective interorganizational collaboration is a pivotal ingredient of any community or nation’s capacity to prepare for and bounce back from disruptive crisis events. The booming research field of collaborative public management (CPM) has been yielding important insights into such collaboration that as yet await transfer to the study of crisis management (CM). Also, we argue that the general CPM literature has not sufficiently addressed the distinctive collaboration challenges involved in coping with crises. This article bridges this twofold gap. Based on a systematic review of prior research in collaborative CM, this study identifies dominant areas of theoretical emphasis, methodological practices, and patterns of empirical enquiry. The article highlights areas where CPM research has potential to further inform the understanding of collaborative CM, including performance, success factors, managerial skills, and learning. The article then identifies five properties associated with CM—uncertainty, leadership, magnitude, costs, and urgency—which deserve further analysis to advance the understanding of the application of CPM principles and strategies. We conclude with outlining a research agenda and offering a set of testable propositions aimed at investigating the likelihood of effective collaboration in different types of crises and as expected in different CM paradigms.

  • 29.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government. Swedish National Defence College.
    Hansén, Dan
    Swedish National Defence College.
    Converging under pressure?: Counterterrorism policy developments in the  European union member states2010In: Public Administration, ISSN 0033-3298, E-ISSN 1467-9299, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 190-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses counterterrorism policy convergence among the 27 European Union (EU) member states between 2000 and 2006. While considerable academic interest has been devoted to the common European Union policy in response to terrorism after September 11, few studies have compared counterterrorism policy-making at the member state level. This gap raises the question whether the institutional framework of European counterterrorism policy-making has stimulated convergence of national policies. Data on five policy instruments for counterterrorism show that the aggregated implementation rate increased by almost 55 per cent in this period, which indicates a trend towards policy divergence within the EU as a whole. However, the findings also reveal significant variation in the level and pace of policy instrument implementation. One potentially important variable explaining national policy developments is the degree of political pressure from the EU on member states, while EU membership accession and national counterterrorism policy legacies were less important factors.

  • 30.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Jenkins-Smith, Hank
    Weible, Chris
    Ingold, Karin
    The Advocacy Coalition Framework:: An Overview of the Research Program2017In: Theories of the Policy Process / [ed] Chris Weible, Boulder: Westview Press, 2017, 4, p. 135-171Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "A comprehensive primer to the major contemporary theoretical frameworks used in policy process research written by leading public policy scholars"--

  • 31.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Karlstad Universitet.
    Do Floods Drive Crisis Mitigation Policy?: Evidence from Swedish Municipalities2015In: Geografiska Annaler. Series A, Physical Geography, ISSN 0435-3676, E-ISSN 1468-0459, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 109-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well established that continuous development of local-level mitigation policy plans and actions increases the chances of effective responses to natural hazards. What is less well known is how and why policy development, including the scope and pace of changes in municipality crisis mitigation programs, varies across local-level crisis mitigation systems. Using survey data on municipality hazard mitigation policy in Sweden, this study documents patterns of policy development and explores candidate explanations. Special attention is devoted to floods, which present local managers with opportunities to learn and adjust local mitigation policies. To investigate floods along with other hazards as potential drivers for local mitigation policy, the study examines three approaches to policy development: external shocks, transformation without disruption, and regional diffusion. Overall, in this case, the transformation without disruption model and the regional diffusion model do better than the external shocks model. Important precursors of policy development include collaboration, learning and diffusion effects from events and policy adoption in nearby municipalities. The study demonstrates the value of a broader analytical approach to policy development, which takes into account the interplay between events, collaborative management, and learning.

  • 32.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Olofsson, Kristin
    The Politics of Hydraulic Fracturing in Sweden2016In: Mapping the Political Landscapes of Hydraulic Fracturing / [ed] Weible, C.; Heikkila, T.; Ingold, K.; Fischer, M., Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 147-175Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Parker, Charles
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Public Policy Dimension of Resilience in Natural Disaster Management: Sweden’s Gudrun and Per Storms2014In: Disaster and Development: Examining Global Issues and Cases / [ed] Naim Kapucu, Kuotsai Tom Liou, Switzerland: Springer, 2014, p. 235-253Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter conducts an analysis of learning and policy change as a basis for building resilience to extreme events. Influenced by policy process theory and based on a comparative case-study of two storms in Sweden (Gudrun in 2005 and Per in 2007), the analysis poses three empirical questions: What policy beliefs changed as the result of storm Gudrun and did those changes result in any revision of policy programs? Did the observed changes positively impact the response to storm Per? And, what factors may shed light on the processes of policy change and implementation that took place in between these events? The concluding section discusses the importance of policy process analysis and the conditions related to institutionalizing experience as a basis for resilience.

  • 34.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    et al.
    Swedish National Defence College.
    Weible, Christopher M.
    University of Colorado, Denver.
    The Logic of Policy Change after Crisis: Proximity and Subsystem Interaction2010In: Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy, ISSN 1944-4079, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 1-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What mechanisms link external events to policy change in a policy subsystem? This paper responds to this question by offering a nuanced re-conceptualization of external events and by identifying the mechanisms that link disruptive crises to policy change. Building from the tenets of the advocacy coalition framework and a synthesis of the crisis management and policy change literatures, this paper (1) introduces the concept of policy and geographical proximity as a means to show how different types of crises alter the incentives for policy action within policy subsystems; (2) discusses an integrated set of proposals on how geographical and policy proximity affects the prospects of change in a policy subsystem; and (3) presents hypothesized scenarios outlining plausible intervening pathways linking a crisis to changes as contingent on policy subsystem structures.

  • 35.
    Weible, Christopher M.
    et al.
    School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    The Advocacy Coalition Framework: Coalitions, Learning, and Policy Change2012In: Routledge Handbook of Public Policy / [ed] Eduardo Araral, Scott Fritzen, Michael Howlett, M Ramesh, Xun Wu, London: Routledge, 2012, p. 125-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Weible, Christopher
    et al.
    School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado Denver.
    Sabatier, Paul
    Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California Davis.
    Jenkins-Smith, Hank
    Department of Political Science, University of Oklahoma.
    Nohrstedt, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Henry, Adam
    Division of Public Administration, West Virginia University.
    deLeon, Peter
    School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado Denver.
    A Quarter Century of the Advocacy Coalition Framework: An Introduction to the Special Issue2011In: Policy Studies Journal, ISSN 0190-292X, E-ISSN 1541-0072, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 349-360Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 36 of 36
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