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  • 1.
    Adolfsson, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Interfaculty Units, Centre for Clinical Research.
    Smide, Bibbi
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Gregeby, Ebba
    Fernström, L
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Implementing empowerment group education in diabetes2004In: Patient Education & counseling, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 319-324Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Reporting systems, reporting rates and completeness of data reported from primary healthcare to a Swedish quality register: The National Diabetes Register2011In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, ISSN 1386-5056, E-ISSN 1872-8243, Vol. 80, no 9, p. 663-668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    The aims of this paper were to study the reporting rate and completeness of data reported from primary healthcare centres (PHCCs) in Sweden to the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR), with a special attention on the relation between these measures and the reporting system used by the PHCCs.

    Method:

    A national survey conducted in Swedish primary healthcare covering the year 2006. A questionnaire was used to collect data from 523 PHCCs. Data on 87,099 adult diabetic patients attending these PHCCs and reported to the NDR were obtained from the register. In Sweden, participation in the NDR is voluntary. The data were reported through the Internet, either online using a web-based system or by direct transmission. The main outcome measures were reporting rate and completeness of reported data.

    Results:

    Of the 523 PHCCs, almost two-thirds had reported <75% of their diabetic patients to the NDR. The lowest reporting rate was found among the largest PHCCs, while the highest was found among small PHCCs (p < 0.001). Reasons given for not reporting data to the NDR were lack of time and lack of personnel resources. Altogether, 73.1% of the PHCCs reported data to the NDR online using a web-based system, 20.5% used direct transmission and 6.3% used both systems. The PHCCs that reported data through direct transmission systems reported almost 70% of their diabetic patients to the NDR, while PHCCs using web-based systems reported 54% of their diabetic patients to the NDR. Adjusted for other factors, using direct transmission increased the reporting rate by 13.0 percentage points. However, the web-based system contributed to a higher completeness of data than the direct transmission system.

    Conclusions:

    A direct transmission system facilitates a high reporting rate to the register at the expense of lower completeness of the reported data.

  • 3.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Diabetes Nursing Research.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Diabetes Nursing Research.
    The Swedish National Survey of the Quality and Organization of Diabetes Care in Primary Healthcare—Swed-QOP2010In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 91-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    To describe the quality and organization of diabetes care in primary healthcare in Sweden regarding resources and ways of working.

    METHOD:

    A questionnaire was used to collect data from all 921 primary healthcare centres (PHCCs) in Sweden. Of these, 74.3% (n=684) responded to the questionnaire covering list size of the PHCCs, number of diabetic patients, personnel resources and ways of working.

    RESULTS:

    The median list size reported from the PHCCs was 9,000 patients, 294 of whom were diabetic patients. The majority (72%) of PHCCs had diabetes-responsible general practitioners (GPs) and almost all (97%) had diabetes specialist nurses (DSNs) with some degree of postgraduate education in diabetes. The PHCCs reported that they used regional/local diabetes guidelines (93%), were engaged in call-recall diabetic reviews by GP(s) (66%) and DSN(s) (89%), checked that patients had participated in the reviews by GP(s) (69%) and DSN(s) (78%), arranged group education programmes (23%) and reported data to a National Diabetes Register (82%).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The presence of diabetes-responsible GP(s) and DSN(s) who use guidelines may contribute to good and equal quality of care. It is, however, necessary to improve the call-recall system and there is an urgent need for all diabetic patients to receive patient education.

  • 4.
    Frid, Hanna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Nydahl, Margaretha
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Agreement between different methods of measuring height in elderly patients2013In: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics (Print), ISSN 0952-3871, E-ISSN 1365-277X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 504-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The present study aimed to examine the agreement between measurements of standing height and self-reported height, height measured with a sliding caliper, and height estimated from either demispan or knee height in elderly patients.

    Methods

    Fifty-five patients (mean age 79 years) at a Swedish hospital were included in this observational study. The participants' heights were evaluated as the standing height, self-reported height, height measured in a recumbent position with a sliding caliper, and height estimated from the demispan or knee height.

    Results

    The measurements made with a sliding caliper in the recumbent position agreed most closely with the standing height. Ninety-five percent of the individuals' differences from standing height were within an interval of +1.1 to −4.8 cm (limits of agreement). Self-reported height and height estimated from knee height differed relatively strongly from standing height. The limits of agreement were +5.2 to −9.8 cm and +9.4 to −6.2 cm, respectively. The widest distribution of differences was found in the height estimated from the demispan, with limits of agreements from +11.2 to −9.3 cm.

    Conclusions

    When measuring the height of patients who find it difficult to stand upright, a sliding caliper should be the method of choice, and the second choice should be self-reported height or the height estimated from knee height. Estimating height from the demispan should be the method of last resort.

  • 5.
    Gusdal, Annelie K.
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Box 325,Drottninggatan 12, SE-63105 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Josefsson, Karin
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Box 325,Drottninggatan 12, SE-63105 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Vastmanland Cty Hosp, Dept Primary Hlth Care, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Martin, Lene
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Box 325,Drottninggatan 12, SE-63105 Eskilstuna, Sweden.;City Univ London, Sch Hlth Sci, London EC1V 0HB, England..
    Informal Caregivers' Experiences and Needs When Caring for a Relative With Heart Failure An Interview Study2016In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 31, no 4, p. E1-E8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Informal caregivers play an important role for persons with heart failure in strengthening medication adherence, encouraging self-care, and identifying deterioration in health status. Caring for a relative with heart failure can affect informal caregivers' well-being and cause caregiver burden. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore informal caregivers' experiences and needs when caring for a relative with heart failure living in their own home. Methods: The study has a qualitative design with an inductive approach. Interviews were conducted with 14 informal caregivers. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Two themes emerged: "living in a changed existence" and "struggling and sharing with healthcare." The first theme describes informal caregivers' experiences, needs, and ways of moving forward when living in a changed existence with their relative. Informal caregivers were responsible for the functioning of everyday life, which challenged earlier established roles and lifestyle. They experienced an ever-present uncertainty related to the relative's impending sudden deterioration and to lack of knowledge about the condition. Incongruence was expressed between their own and their relative's understanding and acceptance of the heart failure condition. They also expressed being at peace with their relative and managed to restore new strength and motivation to care. The second theme describes informal caregivers' experiences, needs, and ways in which they handled the healthcare. They felt counted upon but not accounted for, as their care was taken for granted while their need to be seen and acknowledged by healthcare professionals was not met. Informal caregivers experienced an ever-present uncertainty regarding their lack of involvement with healthcare. The lack of involvement with healthcare had a negative impact on the relationship between informal caregivers and their relative due to the mutual loss of important information about changes in medication regimens and the relative's symptoms and well-being. Another cause of negative impact was the lack of opportunity to talk with healthcare professionals about the emotional and relational consequences of heart failure. Healthcare professionals had provided them neither with knowledge on heart failure nor with information on support groups in the municipality. Informal caregivers captured their own mandate through acting as deputies for their relative and claiming their rights of involvement in their relative's healthcare. They also felt confident despite difficult circumstances. The direct access to the medical clinic was a source of relief and they appreciated the contacts with the registered nurses specialized in heart failure. Informal caregivers' own initiatives to participate in meetings were positively received by healthcare professionals. Conclusions: Informal caregivers' daily life involves decisive changes that are experienced as burdensome. They handled their new situations using different strategies to preserve a sense of "self" and of "us." Informal caregivers express a need for more involvement with healthcare professionals, which may facilitate informal caregivers' situation and improve the dyadic congruence in the relation with their relative.

  • 6.
    Gusdal, Annelie K.
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Box 325,Drottninggatan 12, SE-63105 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Josefsson, Karin
    Univ Boras, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Boras, Sweden..
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Vastmanland Cty Hosp, Dept Primary Hlth Care, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Martin, Lene
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Box 325,Drottninggatan 12, SE-63105 Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Nurses' attitudes toward family importance in heart failure care2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 256-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Support from the family positively affects self-management, patient outcomes and the incidence of hospitalizations among patients with heart failure. To involve family members in heart failure care is thus valuable for the patients. Registered nurses frequently meet family members of patients with heart failure and the quality of these encounters is likely to be influenced by the attitudes registered nurses hold toward families. Aims: To explore registered nurses' attitudes toward the importance of families' involvement in heart failure nursing care and to identify factors that predict the most supportive attitudes. Methods: Cross-sectional, multicentre web-survey study. A sample of 303 registered nurses from 47 hospitals and 30 primary health care centres completed the instrument Families' Importance in Nursing Care - Nurses' Attitudes. Results: Overall, registered nurses were supportive of families' involvement. Nonetheless, attitudes toward inviting families to actively take part in heart failure nursing care and involve families in planning of care were less supportive. Factors predicting the most supportive attitudes were to work in a primary health care centre, a heart failure clinic, a workplace with a general approach toward families, to have a postgraduate specialization, education in cardiac and/or heart failure nursing care, and a competence to work with families. Conclusions: Experienced registered nurses in heart failure nursing care can be encouraged to mentor their younger and less experienced colleagues to strengthen their supportive attitudes toward families. Registered nurses who have designated consultation time with patients and families, as in a nurse-led heart failure clinic, may have the most favourable condition for implementing a more supportive approach to families.

  • 7.
    Gusdal, Annelie K.
    et al.
    Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Eskilstuna, Sweden..
    Josefsson, Karin
    Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Eskilstuna, Sweden.;Univ Boras, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Boras, Sweden..
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Västmanland Cty Hosp, Dept Primary Hlth Care, Västeras, Sweden..
    Martin, Lene
    Mälardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Eskilstuna, Sweden.;City Univ London, Sch Hlth Sci, London, England..
    Registered Nurses' Perceptions about the Situation of Family Caregivers to Patients with Heart Failure: A Focus Group Interview Study2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 8, article id e0160302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Heart failure is a growing public health problem associated with poor quality of life and significant morbidity and mortality. The majority of heart failure care is provided by family caregivers, and is associated with caregiver burden and reduced quality of life. Research emphasizes that future nursing interventions should recognize the importance of involving family caregivers to achieve optimal outcomes. Aims The aims of this study are to explore registered nurses' perceptions about the situation of family caregivers to patients with heart failure, and registered nurses' interventions, in order to improve family caregivers' situation. Methods The study has a qualitative design with an inductive approach. Six focus group interviews were held with 23 registered nurses in three hospitals and three primary health care centres. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results Two content areas were identified by the a priori study aims. Four categories and nine subcategories emerged in the analysis process. The content area "Family caregivers' situation" includes two categories: "To be unburdened" and "To comprehend the heart failure condition and its consequences". The content area "Interventions to improve family caregivers' situation" includes two categories: "Individualized support and information" and "Bridging contact". Conclusions Registered nurses perceive family caregivers' situation as burdensome, characterized by worry and uncertainty. In the PHCCs, the continuity and security of an RN as a permanent health care contact was considered an important and sustainable intervention to better care for family caregivers' worry and uncertainty. In the nurse-led heart failure clinics in hospitals, registered nurses can provide family caregivers with the opportunity of involvement in their relative's health care and address congruence and relationship quality within the family through the use of "Shared care" and or Family-centred care. Registered nurses consider it necessary to have a coordinated individual care plan as a basis for collaboration between the county council and the municipality.

  • 8.
    Gusdal, Annelie K.
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Box 325,Drottninggatan 12, SE-63105 Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Karin
    Univ Boras, Fac Caring Sci Work Life & Social Welf, Boras, Sweden.
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Vastmanland Cty Hosp, Dept Primary Hlth Care, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Martin, Lene
    Malardalen Univ, Sch Hlth Care & Social Welf, Box 325,Drottninggatan 12, SE-63105 Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Family Health Conversations Conducted by Telephone in Heart Failure Nursing Care: A Feasibility Study2018In: SAGE OPEN NURSING, ISSN 2377-9608, Vol. 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Registered nurses (RNs) in heart failure (HF) nursing care have a key role in providing family support, which positively affects the outcome for the patient. Telephone interventions conducted by RNs have been reported to be successful in HF nursing care, but Family Health Conversations (FamHCs) involving the patient and the family, have not previously been tested. The purpose of the current study was to explore the experiences and feasibility of nurse-led FamHCs conducted by telephone with patients and their family caregivers. A single-group intervention study with a pretest-posttest design was conducted in three regional hospitals that had a nurse-led HF clinic. Five RNs, eight patients, and eight family caregivers participated. Three FamHCs were conducted by telephone with each family every 2 weeks. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through semistructured interviews and questionnaires. FamHCs improved the nurse-family relationships and relationships within the families and provided RNs with new knowledge about the families. FamHCs conducted by telephone were considered to be feasible for both families and RNs, although RNs preferred fewer and shorter FamHCs. The RNs preferred meeting face-to-face with the families as nonverbal communication between the family members could be missed because of lack of visual input. On the other hand, RNs appreciated to focus entirely on the conversation without the need to perform illness-related routine checks. In conclusion, the advantages of FamHCs conducted by telephone outweighed the disadvantages. Visual contact, provided by video telephony, and a shorter version of the tested FamHC would facilitate the use in HF nursing care.

  • 9.
    Husdal, Rebecka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Karlsson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Jansson, Stefan
    Jerden, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Steen, Lars
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Svensson, Ann-Marie
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Resources and organisation in primary health care are associated with HbA1c level: A nationwide study of 230958 people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.2018In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To examine the association between personnel resources and organisational features of primary health care centres (PHCCs) and individual HbA1c level in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

    METHODS: People with T2DM attending 846 PHCCs (n=230958) were included in this cross-sectional study based on PHCC-level data from a questionnaire sent to PHCCs in 2013 and individual-level clinical data from 2013 for people with T2DM reported in the Swedish National Diabetes Register, linked to individual-level data on socio-economic status and comorbidities. Data were analysed using a generalized estimating equations linear regression models.

    RESULTS: After adjusting for PHCC- and individual-level confounding factors, personnel resources associated with lower individual HbA1c level were mean credits of diabetes-specific education among registered nurses (RNs) (-0.02mmol/mol for each additional credit; P<0.001) and length of regular visits to RNs (-0.19mmol/mol for each additional 15min; P<0.001). Organisational features associated with HbA1c level were having a diabetes team (-0.18mmol/mol; P<0.01) and providing group education (-0.20mmol/mol; P<0.01).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this large sample, PHCC personnel resources and organisational features were associated with lower HbA1c level in people with T2DM.

  • 10.
    Husdal, Rebecka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Jansson, Stefan
    Jerdén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Steen, Lars
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Resource allocation and organisational features in Swedish primary diabetes care: Changes from 2006 to 20132017In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To compare the resource allocation and organisational features in Swedish primary diabetes care for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) between 2006 and 2013.

    METHODS: Using a repeated cross-sectional study design, questionnaires covering personnel resources and organisational features for patients with T2DM in 2006 and 2013 were sent to all Swedish primary health care centres (PHCCs) during the following year. In total, 684 (74.3%) PHCCs responded in 2006 and 880 (76.4%) in 2013.

    RESULTS: Compared with 2006, the median list size had decreased in 2013 (p<0.001), whereas the median number of listed patients with T2DM had increased (p<0.001). Time devoted to patients with T2DM and diabetes-specific education levels for registered nurses (RNs) had increased, and more PHCCs had in-house psychologists (all p<0.001). The use of follow-up systems and medical check-ups had increased (all p<0.05). Individual counselling was more often based on patients' needs, while arrangement of group-based education remained low. Patient participation in setting treatment targets mainly remained low.

    CONCLUSIONS: Even though the diabetes-specific educational level among RNs increased, the arrangement of group-based education and patient participation in setting treatment targets remained low. These results are of concern and should be prioritised as key features in the care of patients with T2DM.

  • 11.
    Husdal, Rebecka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Sci, Falun, Sweden..
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Hosp Vastmanland, Dept Primary Hlth Care, Reg Vastmanland, Vasteras, Sweden..
    Organisation of diabetes care is associated with systolic blood pressure level: a cross-sectional study of 230,958 people with type 2 diabetes2017In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, no S1, p. S298-S299, article id 657Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Husdal, Rebecka
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Leksell, Janeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Örebro Univ, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Sch Med Sci, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jerdén, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Dalarna Univ, Sch Educ Hlth & Social Studies, Falun, Sweden.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Steen, Lars
    Sörmland Cty Council, Drug & Therapeut Comm, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Wallman, Thorne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centrum för klinisk forskning i Sörmland (CKFD). Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Svensson, Ann-Marie
    Natl Diabet Register, Ctr Registers, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Associations between quality of work features in primary health care and glycaemic control in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus: A nationwide survey.2019In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 176-186, article id S1751-9918(18)30277-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To describe and analyse the associations between primary health care centres’ (PHCCs’) quality of work (QOW) and individual HbA1c levels in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

    Methods: This cross-sectional study invited all 1152 Swedish PHCCs to answer a questionnaire addressing QOW conditions. Clinical, socio-economic and comorbidity data for 230,958 people with T2DM were linked to data on QOW conditions for 846 (73.4%) PHCCs.

    Results: Of the participants, 56% had controlled (≤52 mmol/mol), 31.9% intermediate (53–69 mmol/mol), and 12.1% uncontrolled (≥70 mmol/mol) HbA1c. An explanatory factor analysis identified seven QOW features. The features having a call-recall system, having individualized treatment plans, PHCCs’ results always on the agenda, and having a follow-up strategy combined with taking responsibility of outcomes/results were associated with lower HbA1c levels in the controlled group (all < 0.05). For people with intermediate or uncontrolled HbA1c, having individualized treatment plans was the only QOW feature that was significantly associated with a lower HbA1c level (< 0.05).

    Conclusions: This nationwide study adds important knowledge regarding associations between QOW in real life clinical practice and HbA1c levels. PHCCs’ QOW may mainly only benefit people with controlled HbA1c and more effective QOW strategies are needed to support people with uncontrolled HbA1c.

  • 13.
    Söderström, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Adolfsson, Eva T.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hakansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Div Nutr Epidemiol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    A high energy intake from dietary fat among middle-aged and older adults is associated with increased risk of malnutrition 10 years later2015In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 114, no 6, p. 915-923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A higher fat content in the diet could be an advantage for preventing malnutrition among older adults. However, there is sparse scientific evidence to determine the optimal fat intake among older adults. This prospective cohort study examined whether a high energy intake of dietary fat among middle-aged and older adults is associated with the risk of malnutrition 10 years later. The study population comprised 725 Swedish men and women aged 53-80 years who had completed a questionnaire about dietary intake and lifestyle factors in 1997 (baseline) and whose nutritional status was assessed when admitted to the hospital in 2008-2009 (follow-up). At the follow-up, 383 (52.8 %) participants were identified as being at risk of malnutrition and fifty-two (7.2 %) were identified as malnourished. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to analyse the association between previous dietary fat intake and nutritional status later in life. Contrary to what was expected, a high energy intake from total fat, saturated fat and monounsaturated fat among middle-aged and older adults increased the risk of exhibiting malnutrition 10 years later. However, this applied only to individuals with a BMI<25 kg/m(2) at the baseline. In conclusion, these findings suggest that preventive actions to counteract malnutrition in older adults should focus on limiting the intake of total fat in the diet by reducing consumption of food with a high content of saturated and monounsaturated fat.

  • 14.
    Söderström, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Adolfsson, Eva Thors
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Saletti, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Nutritional status predicts preterm death in older people: a prospective cohort study2014In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 354-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & aims: There is an association between malnutrition and mortality. However, it is uncertain whether this association is independent of confounders. The aim of the present study was to examine whether nutritional status, defined according to the three categories in the full Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) instrument, is an independent predictor of preterm death in people 65 years and older. Methods: This prospective cohort study included individuals aged >= 65 years who were admitted to hospital between March 2008 and May 2009 and followed-up after 50 months (n = 1767). Nutritional status was assessed with the MNA, and possible risk factors associated with malnutrition were recorded during participants hospital stay. Main outcome measure was overall survival. Results: Based on the MNA definitions, 628 (35.5%) were well-nourished, 973 (55.1%) were at risk of malnutrition, and 166 (9.4%) of the participants were malnourished at baseline. During the follow-up period 655 (37.1%) participants died. At follow-up, the survival rates were 75.2% for well-nourished participants, 60.0% for those at risk of malnutrition, and 33.7% for malnourished participants (p < 0.001). After adjusting for confounders the hazard ratios (95% CI) for all-cause mortality were 1.56 (1.18-2.07) in the group at risk of malnutrition and 3.71 (2.28-6.04) in the malnourished group. Conclusions: Nutritional status defined according to the three categories in the full MNA independently predicts preterm death in people aged 65 years and older. These findings are clinically important and emphasise the usefulness of the MNA for screening of nutritional status.

  • 15.
    Söderström, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Malnutrition is associated with increased mortality in older adults regardless of the cause of death2017In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 117, no 4, p. 532-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malnutrition predicts preterm death, but whether this is valid irrespective of the cause of death is unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether malnutrition is associated with cause-specific mortality in older adults. This cohort study was conducted in Sweden and included 1767 individuals aged >= 65 years admitted to hospital in 2008-2009. On the basis of the Mini Nutritional Assessment instrument, nutritional risk was assessed as well nourished (score 24-30), at risk of malnutrition (score 17-23.5) or malnourished (score < 17). Cause of death was classified according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, into twenty different causes of death. Data were analysed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. At baseline, 55.1% were at risk of malnutrition, and 9.4% of the participants were malnourished. During a median follow-up of 5.1 years, 839 participants (47.5%) died. The multiple Cox regression model identified significant associations (hazard ratio (HR)) between malnutrition and risk of malnutrition, respectively, and death due to neoplasms (HR 2.43 and 1.32); mental or behavioural disorders (HR 5.73 and 5.44); diseases of the nervous (HR 4.39 and 2.08), circulatory (HR 1.95 and 1.57) or respiratory system (HR 2.19 and 1.49); and symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified (HR 2.23 and 1.43). Malnutrition and risk of malnutrition are associated with increased mortality regardless of the cause of death, which emphasises the need for nutritional screening to identify older adults who may require nutritional support in order to avoid preterm death.

  • 16.
    Söderström, Lisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Thors-Adolfsson, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Frid, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Saletti, Anja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Bergkvist, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Mealtime habits and meal provision are associated with malnutrition among elderly patients admitted to hospital2013In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 281-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & aims: Large-scale studies performed in hospitals with the validated Mini Nutritional Assessment tool (MNA) are scarce. However, factors associated with malnutrition are important for identifying individuals at risk. The aims of the present study were to estimate the prevalence of malnutrition and to examine the association between mealtime habits, meal provision, and malnutrition among elderly patients admitted to hospital.

    Methods: This cross-sectional study included patients aged ≥ 65 years admitted to internal medicine, surgical or orthopaedic wards. The MNA was used for their nutritional assessment, and factors potentially associated with malnutrition were recorded.

    Results: Of 1771 patients (mean age 78 years), 35.5% were well-nourished, 55.1% were at risk of malnutrition and 9.4% were malnourished. Overnight fasts exceeding 11 hours, fewer than four eating episodes a day, and not cooking independently were associated with both malnutrition and risk of malnutrition.

    Conclusions: The risk of malnutrition was high among elderly patients admitted to hospital, whereas the proportion with fully developed malnutrition was lower than expected. A long overnight fast, few eating episodes, and not cooking independently were associated with an increased risk of malnutrition. Knowledge of these factors when providing care to the elderly may assist health-care professionals to prevent malnutrition.

  • 17.
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Diabetes Nursing Research.
    Smide, Bibbi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Diabetes Nursing Research.
    Does patient education facilitate diabetic patients’ possibilities to reach national treatment targets?: A national survey in Swedish primary health care2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 91-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To describe how patient education is arranged in Swedish primary healthcare (PHC) and to assess whether the type of patient education and individual goal setting have an impact on diabetic patients’ possibilities of reaching national treatment targets.

    Design

    A Swedish national survey.

    Setting

    Swedish PHC.

    Subjects

    Data from 485 primary healthcare centres (PHCCs) and 91 637 diabetic patients reported by the PHCCs to the National Diabetes Register in 2006.

    Main outcome measures

    Description of how patient education is arranged, HbA1c, body mass index, cholesterol, blood pressure, and physical activity.

    Results

    Of the PHCCs that reported how they performed the individual counselling, 50% reported checklist-driven counselling and 8% individualized counselling based on patients’ needs. A total of 105 PHCCs reported that they arranged group education. Of these, 67% used pre-planned programmes and 9% individualized the programme to the patients’ needs. The majority of PHCCs (96%) reported that they set individual goals (HbA1c, blood pressure, lipids, and lifestyle). A minority of the PHCCs (27%) reported that the patients were involved in the final decision concerning their goals. Individual goal-setting facilitated patients’ possibilities of reaching treatment targets. Goal-setting, list size of PHCCs, and personnel resources explained a variance of 2.1–5.7%. Neither individual counselling (checklist-driven or individualized to patients’ needs) nor group education had an impact on patients’ possibilities of reaching the targets.

    Conclusion

    The current study indicates that improvement is needed in patient education in PHC to facilitate diabetic patients’ possibilities of reaching national treatment targets.

  • 18.
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Walker-Engström, Marie-Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Centre for Clinical Research, County of Västmanland.
    Smide, Bibbi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Wikblad, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Patient education in type 2 diabetes: A randomized controlled 1-year follow-up study2007In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 341-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of empowerment group education on type 2 diabetes patients’ confidence in diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy, satisfaction with daily life, BMI and glycaemic control compared with the impact of routine diabetes care on the same factors at a 1-year follow-up. In this randomized controlled trial, conducted at 7 primary care centres in central Sweden, 101 patients were randomly assigned either to empowerment group education (intervention group) or to routine diabetes care (control group). Out of these, 42 patients in the intervention group and 46 in the control group completed the 1-year follow-up. Before the intervention and at the 1-year follow-up, the patients answered a 27-item questionnaire, and weight, BMI and HbA1c were measured. The questionnaire comprised three domains: confidence in diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy and satisfaction with daily life. At 1-year follow-up, the level of confidence in diabetes knowledge was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group (p<0.05). No significant differences were found in self-efficacy, satisfaction with daily life, BMI and HbA1c between the intervention and control group.

    The empowerment group education did improve patients’ confidence in diabetes knowledge with maintained glycaemic control despite the progressive nature of the disease.

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