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  • 1.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Perna, Andrea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Start-ups as vessels carrying and developing science-based technologies: starting and restarting JonDeTech2016In: Starting up in Business Networks: Why Relationships Matter in Entrepreneurship / [ed] Aaboen, Lise; La Rocca, Antonella; Lind, Frida; Perna, Andrea; Shih, Tommy, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Severinsson, Kristofer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    A proactive approach to the utilization of academic research: The case of Uppsala University's AIMday2016In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 613-621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While most research on university-industry interactions focuses on established collaborations, this paper focuses on those interactions that occur before the emergence of a concrete relationship. Uppsala University, Sweden, applies this 'proactive' approach, based on creating universityindustry cooperation platforms before, or irrespectively of, the creation of commercializable knowledge. This study aims to analyze the structure, processes and effects of proactive approaches to utilize academic research commercially. It focuses on a conference, Academy Industry Meeting day (AIMday) and addresses three main questions: first, how does this mechanism work? Second, why do different actors, such as researchers, small and large companies, participate? Third, what values and concrete effects do they obtain from it? Our case study reflects the perspectives of industry, academia and the administrative units organizing the event. We find that some reasons to participate and values are important to all participants, but that there are also considerable differences.

  • 3.
    Baraldi, Enrico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Severinsson, Kristoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Entrepreneurial Universities Seeking New Ways to Commercialize Science: The case of Uppsala University’s AIMday2011In: Nordic Academy of Management, Stockholm 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Fornstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Sköld, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Stalling Innovation Adoption through the Emergence of Neoconservative Market Structures: Observations from the Energy Sector2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives and theoretical and practical relevance: The expectations on industrial actors in the energy transmission sector to lead and facilitate the transition to renewable energy solutions are building up. When significant financial institutions (such as coalitions of pension funds) are taking serious action to drop investments in coal, oil and gas, to instead invest in sustainable technologies, energy transmission is identified as one of the most central areas, insofar as it sets the limits for how renewable energy sources may interact, and it stakes out the direction for what kind of renewable energy technologies are worth investing in. What remains a question, however, is where the innovative spirit needed to facilitate a transition to renewable energy solutions find its power. Components and subsystems for energy transmission are characterized by extremely high demands on reliability and long product life cycles. Consequently, investing in new technology within this realm is seen as a risky endeavor. And energy transmission has therefore been known to be a market marked by a conservative reflex – a reflex that has worked against radical technological developments within this realm.

    Historically, this conservative reflex has been dealt with through strategic national development programs, through which daring and demanding customers have been integrated in the value-creating processes, for instance. As Fridlund (1999) has shown, this has driven development as well as diffusion/adoption of new products and technologies within this realm. However, the past decades have seen significant shifts in how energy markets are organized – how utility-customers interact with suppliers, and procure and otherwise relate to new technology. The aim of this paper is to explore structural changes within the energy transmission market that appear to be stalling innovation. More specifically, it looks into how changing business models amongst utilities and reorganized value chains in the procurement, construction, deployment, and maintenance of energy transmission infrastructure seem to have fed the conservative reflex integral to this market, and increased the reluctance to adopt new technology. With the analysis centering on how management ideologies and legal-political frameworks have spurred such changes, the paper highlights a set of conservative forces that are seldom mentioned in the debate around the transition to renewables, and that have been overseen in research on non-adoption of innovation – but which call for a re-consideration of dominating innovation and marketing strategies.

    Brief literature mapping and key references: To discuss adoption of energy transmission components and subsystems, the paper draws on research indebted to Rogers’s (1995) work on how diffusion processes are impacted by the ways in which markets are constituted and customers relate to novel offerings (eg, Frambach & Schillewaert 2002, MacVaugh and Schiavone 2010). MacVaugh’s and Schiavone’s (2010) attempt to synthesize existent research on non-adoption of innovation is of particular concern here, with the present analysis dealing with aspects that largely fall outside the ‘integrative model of factors limiting innovation adoption’ they seek to establish, thus extending the understanding of non- adoption encountered there.

    Method: The study builds on approximately 20 semi-structured interviews circling around the development, diffusion and adoption of new technology, around customer behavior and organization, and how these different aspects have changed over past decades. Directed towards product/system suppliers, intermediaries, customers/users and allied partners in the energy sector, the conservative theme and its associated dynamics emerged through the interpretative work following the interviews.

    Research question and theoretical development: In contrast to MacVaugh and Schiavone’s (2010) integrative model – which outlines, in a rather static way, how factors pertaining to the technology, the social structures and the conditions for learning in the market (may) stand in relation to (non-)adoption on an individual, organizational level and industry/market level – the present study seeks an understanding of a dynamics governed by managerial- ideological and legal-political forces that is restructuring and reconstituting this market: giving rise to new actors, increasing the complexity of intra- and inter-organizational relationships, and fragmenting the interests of the actors involved in the market networks, ultimately making them more reluctant to adopt new technologies.

    Findings: With the value chain of this industry spanning across public/private divides, and customers being characterized by increasing degrees of corporatization and privatization, energy markets have been subject to managerial-ideological and legal-political forces that have fragmented and extended the value chains in similar ways, by 1) preventing customers from being an integrative part of development processes, by 2) pushing customers to specialize and seek out business models that increase the dependence on various sub- contractors with limited innovation gain, and by 3) instituting new intermediaries in the procurement process (eg, centralized innovation purchasing units or Engineering Procurement Construction Companies).

    Conclusion and contribution to the field: Consequently, the potential benefits of an innovation becomes diluted upon several actors with no joint responsibility. Limiting the innovators’ capacity to convince the market to adopt new technology, and stealing lead customers of progressive purchasing power, this severely inhibits development as well as diffusion of innovation. With respect to theoretical contributions, the study introduces fragmented/ dispersed value chains or value networks into the (non-)adoption discourse, and puts the focus on the dynamics driving such fragmentation and dispersion.

    Managerial implications: These findings indicate that suppliers need refined innovation inception strategies that take new purchasing entities with narrow agendas into account, and customers may well have reason to re-assess or formulate specific innovation appropriation strategies. Organizations that have outsourced purchasing, construction and or operating services need to carefully secure systemic innovation need that sub-partners lack knowledge or incitements to attain. 

  • 5.
    Fornstedt, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Sköld, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Stealth Innovation Diffusion: Strategies of hiding the ‘new’ to facilitate innovation diffusion2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Fowler, Nina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Sköld, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Resistance and Accommodation of Project Management: A tale from the Ivory Tower of Academia2012In: 6th Making Projects Critical workshop, Manchester Business School on April 16th-17th 2012, Manchester, UK, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper, drawing on an empirical study of academic researchers pursuing collective research projects in engineering-, natural- and medical sciences, address the dynamics of accommodation and resistance of project management technology such as tools, techniques and taxonomy. We ground our analysis of accommodation and resistance on three interconnected empirical questions. First, we want to question the means to manage, critically dissecting what skills and methods are in use for running complex research projects within university settings. Secondly, we want to question the authority or legitimacy to manage in the sense if, how and in what way project managers/coordinators have or may appropriate necessary legitimacy for applying such obtrusive management techniques such as project management prescribes. Third, we want to question the identity work (of the self and of the collective) of how potentially to mitigate ideas of freedom and independence with efficient coordination through project management.

  • 7.
    Fowler, Nina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Sköld, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    The Projectification of University Research: A study of resistance and accommodation of projectmanagement tools & techniques2015In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 9-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to discuss and critically examine how formal project management (PM) tools and techniques affect the organization of university research.

    Design/methodology/approach - The paper is empirically grounded and explores how university researchers respond to an increasing emphasis on formalized PM methods to manage research work conducted within the university. The empirical material consists of 20 interviews with research staff working with engineering, natural and medical sciences at Uppsala University, Sweden. Describing how PM techniques are increasingly imposed upon the researchers, the paper analyses different modes of relating to the formalized toolsets, and discusses their accommodation and resistance within academia.

    Findings - One key finding is how the PM formalization is resisted by partial accommodation and containment. This can be described in terms of an enactment of a front-and a backstage of the research organization. At the front-stage, formal PM technology and terminology is used by specially appointed research managers as means of presenting to funding agencies and other external parties. At the backstage, researchers carry out work in more traditional forms.

    Practical implications - The findings indicate a challenge for research to comply with increased PM formalization and secure on-going open-ended research. Second, the paper points toward a risk of young researchers being nudged out into "front-stage" administration with little chance of returning to "backstage" research.

    Originality/value - This paper builds upon a growing area of the critical analysis of PM practice, offering insights into the tension between the values and norms of university research and an on-going formalization of PM in some organizational contexts.

  • 8. Gustafsson, C.
    et al.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Improvisation och intution: Ett Emergensteoretiskt perspektiv regler och regelbrott i industriella sammanhang2010In: Regler (kapitel i bok) / [ed] Claes Gustafsson, Santerus , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Gustafsson, Claes
    et al.
    Royal Inst Technol, Dept Ind Management, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Improvisation – An emergence theory perspective2017In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 177-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper addresses the occurrence of improvisation and intuition within dynamic business environments from an emergence theory perspective. As argued, the dynamics of the so-called red queen principle forces competition towards the verge of the manageable, making improvised and intuitive action and decision-making not a shortcoming but a necessity in a successful business context. Particularly, the paper discusses how we may interpret the highly rationalistic acts and outcomes of planning and plans in such chaotic and uncertain contexts. We draw upon a longitudinal study of large industrial project deliveries incorporating more than 25 such deliveries.

  • 10.
    Hallgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå Univ, Umeå Sch Business & Econ, Umeå, Sweden..
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Coping with lack of authority: Extending research on project governance with a practice approach2017In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 244-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore alternative coping strategies that may compensate for the limitations of weak governance structure in a product development project.

    Design/methodology/approach - The findings are based on a single case study, including interviews and documents, of a product development project that consists of two interlinked projects in a large multinational company.

    Findings - Two distinct procedures are identified to cope and manage effectively when there are weak project governance structures. The first procedure is a horizontal process of operational consensus-seeking where conflicts between projects are negotiated and resolved through communication between independent actors such as two project managers who are at the same hierarchical level within the same organization. The second process is a vertical process of strategic escalation where issues that have failed to be resolved are shifted upwards to a new hierarchical level where a new round of operational consensus-seeking is attempted.

    Research limitations/implications - This paper complements the existing understanding of project governance with a project-as-practice perspective. Based on the findings the authors suggest that project governance needs to be nuanced in its understanding since a too-structured approach may in fact increase tensions in an organization.

    Practical implications - Practical insights include how organizations may work with its project governance structures in order to avoid tensions. The authors suggest that, in particular, politically sensitive situations may be avoided by weak rather than strong governance structures.

    Social implications - The authors find that weak governance structures may be efficient for the organization, but harmful to personnel, who become too focused on the task at hand.

    Originality/value - To the best of the authors' knowledge very little research has been attributed to project governance from a practice approach. Moreover, most attention has been given to strong structures, thereby not examining the positive implications of weak structures.

  • 11.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    How do you do? On situating old project sites through practice-based studies: On situating old project sites through practice-based studies2012In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 335-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractPurpose – The purpose of this editorial is to reflect on the growing interest of situated project research. Design/methodology/approach – The editorial is conceptual and relies on published work and the articles included in the special issue.Findings – With this special issue it is found that practice-based studies, also called Projects-as-Practice studies, interested in the everyday activities of project practitioners, are multi-faceted and rich. What may also be seen is that practice-based studies are not yet a coherent area. However, it is more important that practice-based studies allow researchers to understand the organization less as an entity and more as a socially-accomplished task.Research limitations/implications – Several implications for research are offered, including the need for studies that emphasize the small details of organizing, and that practice-based studies are not restricted to a certain methodology but depend on what a particular paper tries to accomplish. Practical implications – With an ever-growing stream of research focusing on projects the guest editors argue that it is about time to look into the details of organizing. This could be accomplished through a number of ways but in this special issue it is proposed that approaching traditional areas with a conscious naivety when asking the questions may do it. For the practitioner, the special issue offers important insights into how things are done in practice, which may be used as a mirror or reflection upon their own practice.Originality/value – This editorial and special issue offer insights for any academic interested in understanding projects differently.Keywords Project management, Research work, Organizations, Situation analysis, Projects as practice, Practice based studies, Situatedness, ContextualisationPaper type Conceptual paper

  • 12.
    Leijon, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Dep. of Industrial Economics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Waters, Rafael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Rehn, Alf
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    On the Physics and Economics of Renewable Electric Energy Sources -- part I utilization2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Leijon, Mats
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Dep. of Industrial Economics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.
    Waters, Rafael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Rehn, Alf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    On the physics of power, energy and economics of renewable electric energy sources - Part I2010In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 1729-1734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental concerns have increasingly led to the installation of Renewable Energy Technologies (RETs) despite the fact that they are recognized as expensive. Innovative efforts within the area are beset with difficulties [1], and they are at risk of producing misdirected or insignificant improvements in terms of the cost effectiveness of total energy conversion systems. This paper investigates how RETs can be evaluated, in terms of economy and engineering solutions, by studying the fundamental physics of renewable energy sources and how it matches with the RETs. This match is described by the "Degree of Utilization". The findings indicate that new innovations should focus on the possible number of full loading hours. RETs that are correctly matched to their energy source generate a higher amount of electric energy and have a higher potential of becoming more competitive. In cases where this aspect has been ignored, leading to relatively small degrees of utilization, it can be understood as an engineering mismatch between installed power, converted energy, and the fundamental physics of the renewable energy sources. Since there is a strong and possibly biased support for so-called mature RETs and already existing solutions, a clarification of how fundamental physical laws affect the cost of investments and payback of investments is needed. The present paper is part I out of II and it focuses on the difference between power and energy and the physics of different energy sources and their utilization.

  • 14.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Being in Technology2009In: Feelings and Business: Essays in honor of Claes Gustafsson (kapitel i bok), Stockholm: Santerus , 2009, p. 201-219Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Building corporate utopia through ideological fantasy: The case of the IT consultancy company of Illuminati Inc2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Den begåvade Herr Brown - en mindre exakt tankefigur för projektledning2011In: Finsk tidskrift : kultur, ekonomi, politik, ISSN 0015-248X, no 7-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Engineering Improvisation – the case of Wärtsilä2007In: Aesthetics & Management / [ed] Sjöstrand, Gustafsson & Guillet de Monthoux, Palgrave Macmillan, 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Kommersialiserat förnuft: Hur arbetar ni med kvalitet? (kapitel i bok)2010In: Regler / [ed] Claes Gustafsson, Santerus , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Planering: Om projekt som produkt eller process2011In: Våra villkor i verkligheten / [ed] Broniewicz E & Polesie T, BAS Förlag , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Kungl. Tekniska högskolan, Institutionen för industriell ekonomi och organisation.
    Produktion till varje pris: om planering och improvisation i anläggningsprojekt2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Regarding Technology and Organization: Essays in Honour of Joan Woodward2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 255-257Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Re-inserting hardware into the equation2009In: konferens, NFF, Turku, Finland, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Teknik i organisationen -  Om betydelsen av objekt och materialitet för organisering2006In: Organisationen – teorier om ordning och oordning / [ed] Rehn, A. & Kärreman, D., Liber, 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    The little engine that could – on the managing qualities of technology2005In: Actor-Network Theory and Organizing / [ed] Czarniawska & Hernes, Liber, 2005Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    The vanishing collectable: on economy, honor and The "English garden"2011In: Management & Organizational History, ISSN 1744-9359, E-ISSN 1744-9367, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 209-222Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    The Vanishing Organization2009In: konferens, EGOS Colloquium Barcelona, Spain, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Brännback, Malin
    Åbo Akademu.
    Carsrud, Alan
    Rehn, Alf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Challenging the myths of entrepreneurship?2013In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Eriksson-Zetterqvist, Ulla
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Technology & Management2013In: Management - an advanced introduction / [ed] Styre A, Strannegård L, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Guve, B.
    Seeing is believing - findings from a beautiful organizational failure within the transnational education business2010In: The 28th Standing Conference on Organizational SymbolisimSCOS Conference, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå Universitet, Umeå Handelshögskola.
    On the positive side of boundaries: The case of global product development2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Rehn, Alf
    Feelings and Business: essays in honor of Claes Gustafsson, bok2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Rehn, Alf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Åbo Akademi.
    George Bataille's Shoulders And Other Parts Of The Body Of Knowledge2011In: On the Shoulders of Giants / [ed] Jensen T & Wilson T, Studentlitteratur, 2011, p. 25-37Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Rehn, Alf
    Åbo Akademi, Finland.
    Leadership and the 'right to respect': on honour and shame in emotionally charged management settings2011In: European Journal of International Management, ISSN 1751-6757, E-ISSN 1751-6765, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 62-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Honour, as a concept, is at times seen as implicit in leadership and the working of peer groups, but has rarely been explicitly discussed in management studies. This paper presents honour as a key category in socio-moral contexts, and discusses how it and related concepts, such as respect, shame and pride, affect leadership contexts. We argue, through a discussion on honour as it has been studied in, for example, sociology and anthropology, that studies thereof can be a promising avenue for developing the way in which complex leadership settings and exchanges are analysed.

  • 34.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Rehn, Alf
    Pride and prejudice at the project site - on social feeling in situations of complex collaboration2010In: Paper presented at MPC5 2010, Bristol, England: konferensbidrag, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Rehn, Alf
    Towards a theory of project  failure2007In: International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy, ISSN 1478-1484, E-ISSN 1741-8135, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 246-254Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Sköld, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Fornstedt, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    STALLING INNOVATION ADOPTION THROUGH THE EMERGENCE OF NEOCONSERVATIVE MARKET STRUCTURES – OBSERVATIONS FROM THE ENERGY SECTOR2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Sköld, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Fowler, Nina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Dealing with the projectification of academic research – Practices of resistance andaccommodation in scientific laboratories2013In: On practive and knowledge eruptions, 2013, p. 108-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dealing with the projectification of academic research– Practices of resistance and accommodation in scientificlaboratoriesLeading and managing knowledge intensive firmsthat are populated by scientists and engineers, has longbeen conceived as a major challenge (Etzioni, 1964). It isgenerally assumed that such high-level knowledge workersare badly suited for traditional means of control, morelikely to respond to normative measures and unobtrusivetechniques. Looking at the dominant form of managementcontrol system within government funded researchin Sweden, this paper explores the role of the projectas a tool/technique that has emerged as somewhat of auniversal remedy supposed to respond to the challengesinvolved in leading high-level knowledge work.By consequence, it seems, project managementmethods and techniques are unequivocally called for tostructure, guide and control research efforts. Researchersare being forced to appropriate and use PM methodologiesin order to become viable for funding as well as inreporting procedures, and in the handling of the researchon a daily basis. We thus appear to be witnessing a projectificationof academic research, which is manifested inapplication frameworks, in the taxonomies guiding theresearch efforts, and in the daily coordination and reportingof activities undertaken.Our interest lies in exploring the workings of thisdisciplinary regime, and the potential conflict it entailsbetween researchers perceiving themselves and theirresearch activities as being involved, on the one hand,in a process whereby value unfolds in independent andspontaneous ways, and, on the other, in a process of mostinstrumental and tightly controlled value-creation. Howthese kinds of conflicts are being handled, and how thestrategies emerging in response to such a regime appearsto affect how the research activities are played out, is thefocal point of this paper.

  • 38.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Ulfvengren, Pernilla
    KTH.
    Pineiro, Erik
    KTH.
    Guve, Bertil
    KTH.
    Training for Clinic-Centered Innovation – the Swedish example of the Clinical Innovation Fellowship2010In: Innovation Driven research Education / [ed] von Holst, KTH Förlag , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39. Palm, Kristina
    et al.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    A project as a workplace Observations from project managers in four R&D and project-intensive companies2015In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 828-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Projects and project management work present what would seem to be a paradox. Although business and industrial companies regard projects as strategic vehicles for innovation and growth, it is doubtful whether project managers are seen as a similarly strategic asset, due to their working environment. This article, which is based on interviews conducted at four major Scandinavian companies, describes several empirical cases of a project as a workplace. In line with previous research we observe a challenging and in many cases exposed situation for many project managers. Our main finding is that a considerable part of what makes up a non-sustainable project work environment stems from the imbalance of power that exists between permanent and temporary organisational forms. The article concludes that a process of "deprojectification" of project employees, i.e. making the distinction between line and project work less distinct in organisations may actually lead to more sustainable project work.

  • 40.
    Persson-Fischier, Ulrika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Gebert Persson, Sabine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Elbe, Jörgen
    DMOs as cargo cults?: A (provocative) perspective on destination management2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Rehn, Alf
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management. Åbo Akademi.
    Brännback, Malin
    Stockholms Universitet.
    Carsrud, Alan
    Åbo Akademi.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Challenging the myths of entrepreneurship?2013In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 25, no 7-8, p. 543-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship studies started out as a young field, one where a mix ofeconomists, psychologists, geographers and the occasional anthropologist cametogether to study the wonder and weirdness that is entrepreneurship, in a widerange of fashions and with few a priori assumptions to hold it back. Today, someof this eclecticism lives on in the field, but at the same time we have seen that thefield has matured and its popularity has led to the field becoming increasinglyinstitutionalized – and thereby beset by an increasing number of assumptions,even myths. Consequently, this special issue queries some of the assumptions andpotential myths that flourish in the field, inquiring critically into the constitution ofentrepreneurship as a field of research – all in order to develop the same. Withoutoccasions where a field can question even its most deeply held beliefs, we are atrisk of becoming ideologically rather than analytically constituted, which is whywe in this special issue wanted to create a space for the kind of critical yet creativeplay that e.g. Sarasvathy (2004) has encourages the field to engage with.

  • 42.
    Rehn, Alf
    et al.
    Dept of Business Administration, Åbo Akademi University, Åbo, Finland.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Muddling through in innovation: On incremental failure in developing an engine2012In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 807-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers often use Lindblom's concept of “muddling through” to explain how complex and incremental processes can lead to satisfactory results even without the systematic application of “management”. However, this tendency to look for positive outcomes from muddling might be limiting, as this tends to ignore muddling that ends in failure. This article aims to extend the work following Lindblom by studying the failure of an innovation in engine technology. The key argument is that by paying more attention to failures, business research can develop a more complete theory of muddling through, and this article uses the case of how a new engine for lawnmowers incrementally failed to become an innovation as an illustration. In this, the term “sliding” is introduced to clarify the role of incrementalism in the processual study of business failure.

  • 43.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Leijon, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Rehn, Alf
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Waters, Rafael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    On the Physics and Economics of Renewable Electric Energy Sources -- part II engineering2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Sköld, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Fornstedt, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Dilution of innovation utility, reinforcing the reluctance towards the new: An upstream supplier perspective on a fragmented electricity industry2018In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 116, p. 220-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper inquires into how a reorganization of the value chain running from client-utilities to equipment suppliers within the electricity industry has altered the conditions for diffusing/adopting technological in- novation. Through an interview-based qualitative case study of the development and diffusion of high-voltage switchgear, it provides a supplier perspective on how the downstream capacity to recognize and assess the potential value of innovations has fared in the face of downsized utility organizations, seeking to cut costs through aggressive outsourcing of engineering, procurement and construction activities. Highlighting how re- lations between end-clients and upstream suppliers – following a strategic orientation towards activities con- sidered to be core – increasingly have become mediated by consultants and project-based contractors, the narrative analysis first suggests that this has stolen the industry of important inter-organizational learning processes. This in ways that have reduced the ‘absorptive capacity’ of the utilities sector. Second, the analysis suggests that the contractual form that has come to dominate infrastructure projects further works to de-in- centivize the adoption of new technology, by diluting the perceived utility of innovation across the array of actors populating the value chain. Thirdly, the paper calls for renewed policy measures to deal with this re- inforced reluctance towards the new.

  • 45.
    Sköld, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Fornstedt, Helena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    The emergence of neoconservative market structures in the energy transmission industry: Rejecting innovation, in the ruins of mutual domestic development collaborations2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expectations on industrial actors in the energy transmission sector to lead and facilitate the transition to renewable energy solutions are building up. When significant financial institutions (such as coalitions of pension funds) are taking serious action to drop investments in coal, oil and gas, to instead invest in sustainable technologies, energy transmission is identified as one of the most central areas, insofar as it sets the limits for how renewable energy sources may interact, and it stakes out the direction for what kind of renewable energy technologies are worth investing in. What remains a question, however, is where the innovative spirit needed to facilitate a transition to renewable energy solutions find its power. Components and subsystems for energy transmission are characterized by extremely high demands on reliability and long product life cycles. Consequently, investing in new technology within this realm is seen as a risky endeavor. And energy transmission has therefore been known to be a market marked by a conservative reflex – a reflex that has worked against radical technological developments within this realm.

    Historically, this conservative reflex has been dealt with through strategic national development programs, through which daring and demanding customers – often state utilities in domestic markets – have been integrated in the value-creating processes, for instance. As Fridlund (1999) has shown, this has driven development as well as diffusion/ adoption of new products and technologies within this realm. However, the past decades have seen significant shifts in how energy markets are organized – how utility-customers interact with suppliers, and procure and otherwise relate to new technology.

    The aim of this paper is to explore and discuss how structural changes within the energy industry have altered the conditions for diffusing new technological applications, made intimate collaborations in the ‘home’ market impossible, and mobilized a set of forces that appear to be stalling innovation adoption in important market segments. The analysis presented in the paper adds to a discussion of how free market ideology paired with managerial initiatives assumed to increase competition/competitiveness and innovation/ innovativeness within these industrial domains have lead to more complex modes of interaction, which appear to be threatening the perceived innovation gain in the adopting environment/client network. Whereas prior research into client–supplier relationships in the energy sector (see e.g., Berggren et al. 2001) has highlighted how increased complexity and organizational fragmentation (on part of both suppliers and clients) impacts the management of large scale projects and the incentives for implementing new innovative solutions during the execution of turn-key deliveries, the present analysis provides a more detailed account of how technology is perceived to be evaluated and procured within this industry, mainly from a supplier’s perspective. The article suggests that the increasingly market-based relations, paired with managerial strategies to increase competition and innovativeness within the utilities sector, have opened up the value chain to more disparate value creating logics, and entertained an industry/market dynamics that has diluted the incentives to adopt new technology; this by distributing the innovation utility over a broader range of actors, and institutional, organizational and business-related logics.

  • 46. Ulfvengren, P.
    et al.
    Gauve, B.
    Lindahl, Marcus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Pineiro, E.
    Training for clinic-centred innovation: The Swedish example of The Clinical Fellowship, kapitel i bok2010In: Innovation driven research education: Volume 1: an introduction / [ed] von Holst, Nguyen & Wikander, Kth Royal Institute of Technology , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 46 of 46
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