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  • 1. Aalbers, M.
    et al.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Centring Housing in Political Economy2014In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 373-394Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Aalbers, Manuel B.
    et al.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The Housing Question under Capitalist Political Economies2014In: Housing, Theory and Society, ISSN 1403-6096, E-ISSN 1651-2278, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 422-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short article is a reply to four commentaries that were written in response to our paper "Centering Housing in Political Economy". Rather than discussing each of the commentaries separately, we have chosen to distil and discuss four themes that appear important both to the commentators and to us: theory and abstraction; land rent; mortgage securitization; and the role of the state. Our discussion of theory advances the claim that theories and frameworks that take not only the economics of housing but also its politics, history, geography and institutions seriously can in principle be commensurate under the critical realist ontology suggested by two of our commentators. Our discussion of securitization adds to the existing literature on the theorization of the spatial fix and the circuits of capital. Finally, in reconsidering the housing question in political economy, we argue that you cannot today come to grips with the laws of the latter without factoring in on the centrality of the former.

  • 3.
    Ashton, Philip
    et al.
    University of Illinois at Chicago.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    On arbitration, arbitrage and arbitrariness in financial markets and their governance: Unpacking LIBOR and the LIBOR scandal2015In: Economy and Society, ISSN 0308-5147, E-ISSN 1469-5766, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 188-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amongst a series of scandals to hit international financial markets in recent years, that surrounding the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) – a highly influential interest rate benchmark – has attracted particularly intense media scrutiny. This paper seeks to push beyond conventional understandings to unpack critically both LIBOR itself and the scandal involving its manipulation by major international banks. Envisioning LIBOR as a commodity beset by inherent contradictions, the paper mobilizes the tropes of arbitration, arbitrage and arbitrariness to illuminate, respectively: the market-making work performed by LIBOR; its role in enabling the transfer of financial risk, most notably when fraudulently manipulated; and the nature of the regulatory prosecution of such manipulation.

  • 4. Ashton, Philip
    et al.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    On arbitration, arbitrage and arbitrariness in financial markets and their governance: unpacking LIBOR and the LIBOR scandal2015In: Economy and Society, ISSN 0308-5147, E-ISSN 1469-5766, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 188-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amongst a series of scandals to hit international financial markets in recent years, that surrounding the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) - a highly influential interest rate benchmark - has attracted particularly intense media scrutiny. This paper seeks to push beyond conventional understandings to unpack critically both LIBOR itself and the scandal involving its manipulation by major international banks. Envisioning LIBOR as a commodity beset by inherent contradictions, the paper mobilizes the tropes of arbitration, arbitrage and arbitrariness to illuminate, respectively: the market-making work performed by LIBOR; its role in enabling the transfer of financial risk, most notably when fraudulently manipulated; and the nature of the regulatory prosecution of such manipulation.

  • 5. Castree, Noel
    et al.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Banking Spatially on the Future: Capital Switching, Infrastructure, and the Ecological Fix2015In: Annals of the Association of American Geographers, ISSN 0004-5608, E-ISSN 1467-8306, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 378-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the onset of the global economic crisis, financiers and the institutions regulating their behavior have been subject to far-reaching criticism. At the same time, leading geo-scientists have been insisting that future environmental change might be far more profound than previously anticipated. Finance capital has long been a crucial mechanism for melting present solidities into air to create different futures. This article asks what the prospects are for the switching of credit money into green infrastructures-a switching increasingly recognized as necessary for climate change mitigation and (especially) adaptation. Most research into geographies of finance has ignored ecological questions and few contemporary society-nature researchers examine major fixed-capital investments. Unlike those geographers who criticize capitalism without offering feasible alternatives, we take a pragmatic view underpinned by democratic socioenvironmental values and attempt to identify leverage points for meaningful change. This programmatic article identifies reasons and examples to be cautiously hopeful that liquidity can be fixed in less ecologically harmful future infrastructures, thereby addressing crucial extraeconomic challenges for the century ahead.

  • 6.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    A monstrous hybrid: the political economy of housing in early-twenty-first century Sweden2013In: New Political Economy, ISSN 1356-3467, E-ISSN 1469-9923, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 885-911Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the leftist Western political imagination, Sweden continues, for many, to represent a vision of a ‘better’, more egalitarian political-economic model than the neoliberal capitalism that has come to dominate the Anglo-American world in particular; and its housing system is widely regarded as an integral component of this alternative, social-democratic model. The present paper argues that this envisioning of the political economy of Swedish housing is thoroughly outdated. Yet it insists, equally, that the competing envisioning of Swedish housing advanced by prominent scholars within Sweden – of a radically (neo)liberalised domestic housing system – is not accurate either. Rather, Swedish housing in the early twenty-first century constitutes a complex hybrid of legacy regulated elements on the one hand and neoliberalised elements on the other. Recognising this hybridity is essential, the paper submits, to understanding the nature and source of the most pressing issues facing the Swedish housing sector today. The system's hybridity, moreover, is ‘monstrous’ – following Jane Jacobs's coining of the term – in the sense that those issues reveal the pivotal role currently played by the Swedish housing system in the creation, reproduction and intensification of socio-economic inequality.

  • 7.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Against (the idea of) financial markets2015In: Geoforum, ISSN 0016-7185, E-ISSN 1872-9398, Vol. 66, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The difference between bank-based and market-based financial systems is a longstanding and influential conceptual staple of the interdisciplinary literature on finance. This dualistic model has been subjected to wide-ranging critiques over the past decade. Yet, while those critiques productively problematize the relationship between banks and markets presumed by the model, they fail to address the underlying distinction between banks and markets that is also presumed by the model. This article questions that distinction. It argues that financial markets are best understood not as places or platforms where banks and other financial actors come to interact - and thus as essentially separate from banks - but, instead, as, in large part, their interaction; as constituted by it. The article further argues for the political as well as scholarly importance of reconfiguring our ideas of what financial markets are. The idea of markets as separate, reified phenomena not only underpins the scholarly model of bank- and market-based financial systems - it does political work in the wider world, with the appeal to financial markets or, more nebulously, "the market" to rationalize and justify political decision-making having become a commonplace of contemporary public policy discourse. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Anaemic geographies of financialisation2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Anaemic geographies of financialisation2012In: New Political Economy, ISSN 1356-3467, E-ISSN 1469-9923, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 271-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper offers a critique of the increasingly prevalent argument that the late twentieth century saw a ‘financialisation’ of capitalism anchored in the USA, the UK, and other leading Western economies. The objective of the paper is not to claim that there has been no such structural mutation, but that the studies which allegedly demonstrate this mutation are compromised by the anaemic geographies that structure and animate them. Such studies, the paper argues, fetishise the national scale and, in doing so, offer a restricted and potentially misleading reading of trends such as, most notably, historic growth in the share of corporate profits accruing to ‘finance’ within individual countries. Examining empirical data for the UK, but explicitly incorporating the international perspective typically missing from existing studies of financialisation, the paper points to the vital role of international expansion by UK financial institutions in growing the financial sector's share of profits. Whether so-called ‘financialisation’ has also contributed to this growth remains, the paper submits, open to question.

  • 10.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Banking Across Boundaries: Placing Finance in Capitalism2013Book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Banking and competition in exceptional times2013In: Seattle University Law Review, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 563-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Article has two main aims: to provide a critical consideration of this contemporary antitrust “revival” from an explicitly political–economic perspective and to point toward some theoretical resources that might facilitate such an assessment.Part II looks backward at the evolution and application of competition law in the banking sector over the relatively longue durée. In this Part, I invoke the concept of “exception” to understand how antitrust policy has developed, and my chief interlocutors are the perhaps unlikely figures of Giorgio Agamben and Karl Marx. Part III looks forward and considers the central question around which the recent resurgence of interest in antitrust ultimately revolves: can (and should) antitrust law help in tackling the TBTF problem? The tentative conclusion is that unless we are prepared to fundamentally rethink the purpose of competition law—and in relation to this, the nature of capitalist competition itself— then the answer must be no. This is not because (as some commentators have argued) TBTF is not an antitrust issue. Rather, it is because antitrust theory and practice are today thoroughly economized, whereas the competition between large banks appears to be largely non-economic. In making this argument, I appeal not to Agamben and Marx, but to Paul Baran and Paul Sweezy, and most directly of all to the theorist whose name this symposium bears, Adolf Berle.

  • 12.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Book review: Rachel Weber 2015: From Boom to Bubble: How Finance Built the New Chicago. Chicago: University of Chicago Press2016In: International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, ISSN 0309-1317, E-ISSN 1468-2427, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 1066-1067Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Book Review Symposium: Philip Mirowski's 'Never Let a Serious Crisis Go to Waste: How Neoliberalism Survived the Financial Meltdown'2013In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Christophers on Peck: Constructions of neoliberal reason2011In: Environment & Planning. D, Society and Space, ISSN 0263-7758, E-ISSN 1472-3433, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 757-759Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Competition, Law, and the Power of (Imagined) Geography: Market Definition and the Emergence of Too-Big-to-Fail Banking in the United States2014In: Economic Geography, ISSN 0013-0095, E-ISSN 1944-8287, Vol. 90, no 4, p. 429-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the role of antitrust (or competition) law in the recent historical evolution of the U. S. commercial banking sector. A core component of antitrust law is the calculative practice of market definition, which involves identifying not only the product or service attributes of a market but also, pointedly, its geographic extent. Geographic market definition-and the geographic knowledges it furnishes-is the focus of the article. It argues that these legal market maps ("the law's markets," that is to say) materially shape on-the-ground market and competitive realities. The article develops this argument through a study of the recent history of U. S. antitrust theory and practice in regard to commercial banking. It claims that the particular nature of the geographic models created through this practice is pivotal to explaining the history of evolution of that sector in the final decades of the twentieth century-and most especially, large-scale industry consolidation at the national scale. In the process, the article aims to contribute not only to financial geography but also to three relatively-underdeveloped economicgeographic literatures: on the implication of geographic knowledges in political-economic change; on the geographies of markets; and on the role of the law in economic-geographic transformation.

  • 16.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Complexity, finance, and progress in human geography2009In: Progress in Human Geography, ISSN 0309-1325, E-ISSN 1477-0288, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 807-824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reviews recent commentary on and interpretations of the ongoing financial 'crisis' unfolding in many western economies. It finds that a central theme of these readings is the twofold argument that modern finance is too complex, and that this complexity is responsible for the crisis. The paper, inspired both by the economist John Galbraith and by the geographer David Harvey, argues against this widespread ascription and scapegoating of complexity. It does so as part of a wider argument that progress in human geography can be fostered through demystification of modern money and finance.

  • 17.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Constructing and deconstructing markets: making space for capital2015In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 47, no 9, p. 1859-1865Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Credit, where credit's due: Response to "Follow the thing: credit"2011In: Environment & Planning. D, Society and Space, ISSN 0263-7758, E-ISSN 1472-3433, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1089-1091Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Cultural Industries and the (Geographical) Political Economy of the Media2015In: Mediated Geographies and Geographies of Media, Springer, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Enframing creativity: Power, geographical knowledges and the media economy2007In: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, ISSN 0020-2754, E-ISSN 1475-5661, Vol. 32, p. 235-247Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Envisioning media power: on capital and geographies of television2009Book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Financial crises2015In: The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Political Geography, Wiley-Blackwell, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Follow the thing: money2011In: Environment & Planning. D, Society and Space, ISSN 0263-7758, E-ISSN 1472-3433, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 1068-1084Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an attempt to resist and surmount the mystifications of commodity fetishism, scholars have gone to great lengths to trace the social and spatial pathways of various physical, consumable commodities. By contrast, there have been relatively limited efforts to similarly defetishise what Marx called the “god of commodities”—money—and there has been no systematic, theoretically informed consideration of what the defetishisation of money might actually entail. From an explicitly Marxian perspective this paper aims to make a modest contribution in such a direction. It has two central objectives: to demonstrate why money merits defetishisation and to explore, at a largely theoretical level, how such an exercise might proceed, what primary challenges it would confront, and where the main opportunities for progress are likely to lie.

  • 24.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    For real: land as capital and commodity2016In: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, ISSN 0020-2754, E-ISSN 1475-5661, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 134-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the aim of helping to revivify a stalled geographical literature on the place of land in capitalist political economies, this article presents a critique of the popular idea that land can be usefully conceptualised as a fictitious' form of capital or commodity. The critique is based primarily on a close and critical consideration of the grounds on which the identifiers and theorists of such fictitiousness - Marx/Harvey in the case of capital, Polanyi in the case of the commodity - distinguished it from real' variants. Those grounds, the article argues, are tenuous. And, far from disabling us, treating land as no more or less real than other forms of capital and commodity can empower us in productively revisiting and centring the question of land's political economy - a crucial undertaking in a world where the materiality of land to social relations is writ increasingly large.

  • 25.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    From financialization to finance: For ‘de-financialization’2015In: Dialogues in Human Geography, ISSN 2043-8206, E-ISSN 2043-8214, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 229-232Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this response to the commentaries, I extend my critique in a new direction, arguing that work on financialization has had the perverse effect of black boxing ‘finance’ and crucial dimensions thereof. In developing this argument, I draw explicitly on, while seeking to generalize from, incisive observations contained in the commentaries. In doing so, I argue that it is important to address limits to financialization—political limits—not identified and addressed in the original article.

  • 26.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    From Marx to market and back again: Performing the economy2014In: Geoforum, ISSN 0016-7185, E-ISSN 1872-9398, Vol. 57, p. 12-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues for a more constructive dialogue between political-economic and other heterodox economic approaches to capitalist markets. Arguing that political economists' suspicion of "techno-cultural" approaches is overstated, and drawing closely on the work of David Harvey, the article explores the potential for one particular such approach - that which emphasizes the "performativity" of markets to contribute towards one particular variant of political economy: the classical political economy of Marx.

  • 27.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Games and prizes in the economic (and geographical?) performance of markets: Nobel, Shapley and Roth2012In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 2542-2545Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Genres of the credit economy: mediating value in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain2010In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 2033-2034Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Geographical knowledges and neoliberal tensions: compulsory land purchase in the context of contemporary urban redevelopment2010In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 856-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The author examines the materialization of geographical knowledges in relation to the ongoing neoliberalization of urban space where the latter is based on processes of compulsory land purchase. The specific context for the study is two recently planned commercial redevelopments for the south London borough of Croydon in the United Kingdom, and the arguments mustered in support of these proposals. The author identifies and discusses three principal sets of geographical knowledges, which he examines under the headings symbolic, biopolitical, and scalar. In each case, he shows that the knowledges have strong modernist overtones. The paper seeks both to understand and contextualize these historical connections, and to consider the contemporary political work performed by the knowledges in question.

  • 30.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Geographies of finance I: Historical geographies of the crisis-ridden present2014In: Progress in Human Geography, ISSN 0309-1325, E-ISSN 1477-0288, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 285-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At a time of ongoing crisis and transformation in financial relations, structures and processes, it would be all too easy to limit our geographical explorations of finance to the narrow temporal window of the early-twenty-first-century here-and-now. Fortunately, recent years have seen the publication of a number of studies that examine geographies of finance in a much wider array of historical contexts. This article reports on the findings of such studies. Reading them in the light of Foucault's injunction to write histories explicitly of the present, it argues that they provide an essential historical-geographical foundation for understanding the more immediate geographies of contemporary - and perhaps future - financial worlds.

  • 31.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Geographies of finance I: Historical geographies of the crisis-ridden present2014In: Progress in Human Geography, ISSN 0309-1325, E-ISSN 1477-0288, no 38, p. 285-293Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Geographies of finance II: Crisis, space and political-economic transformation2015In: Progress in Human Geography, ISSN 0309-1325, E-ISSN 1477-0288, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 205-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global financial and more widely economic crisis which began in 2007–2008 has been a crisis indelibly of political economy. This fact has led scholars of finance ‘back’ to political economy, where geographers’ interest in finance first materialized in the 1980s. In this light, this article reviews recent work on the geographical political economy of the crisis, highlighting such work’s main themes, contributions and lacunae. It shows that this work has been powerfully influenced by developments in geographical political economy, and by the latter’s engagement with alternative intellectual traditions, over the past three decades. But it argues also that the attempt to theorize and document the place of finance within geographical political economy remains very much an ongoing project.

  • 33.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Geographies of finance III: Regulation and 'after-crisis' financial futures2016In: Progress in Human Geography, ISSN 0309-1325, E-ISSN 1477-0288, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 138-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are now not far short of a decade on from the start of the global financial crisis. By most reckonings, those regions most directly affected by the crisis, and most people living therein, are still struggling to recover from and to come to terms with that crisis. But there already exists a burgeoning literature on the next great financial crisis: on, that is to say, what has - or, more pointedly, has not - been done to prevent such a reoccurrence, to limit its likelihood, or to restrict its potential scope. This literature, and in particular its discussion of financial (re) regulation, is the subject of this article. Through a critical reading of the literature the article argues that positive (re) regulation has been inhibited by the power of the financial sector to stymie meaningful reform, and that this power assumes highly material geographical configurations. The article also emphasizes the profound influence of economic ideas on financial policy-making. One idea that perhaps needs thorough critical reconsideration, the article concludes, is that of financial regulation itself.

  • 34.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    How accounting for risk constitutes finance as a productive activity2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Intergenerational Inequality?: Labour, Capital, and Housing Through the Ages2018In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 101-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the relevance of generational relations to emerging patterns of inequality in advanced capitalist societies, with a particular focus on inequalities related to housing wealth. At its heart is a critique of the increasingly prevalent argument that generational difference is a crucial axis of inequality today. It argues that while contemporary capitalist societies are certainly characterized by marked inequalities between generations and that the latter are manifested inter alia in housing ownership, understanding such inequalities principally in generational terms is problematic because they reflect deeper, more fundamental, structural inequalities and should therefore be conceptualized as such. The article suggests that the principal significance of generational relations to contemporary inequality dynamics actually concerns economic transfers rather than differences between generations. Within-family transfers of wealth, especially housing-related wealth, from older generations to younger ones tend to reproduce pronounced, structurally generated existing patterns of intra-generational inequality.

  • 36.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Intervention - Mad World?: On the Social Construction of Economic Value2013In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330, no 3 JuneArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Is finance productive (and other important questions)?: A response to Block, Blyth, and Engelen2014In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 256-261Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Is finance productive (and other important questions)?: A response to Block, Blyth, and Engelen2014In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, no 46, p. 256-261Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Liquidated: an ethnography of Wall Street2010In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 506-508Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Making finance productive2011In: Economy and Society, ISSN 0308-5147, E-ISSN 1469-5766, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 112-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Western governments' response to ongoing economic crisis has demonstrated that the financial services sector is seen to perform a critical and productive function in today's capitalist economies. This paper explores how this politically potent perception of productiveness has come to achieve the hegemony that it now enjoys. A principal forum for the 'making' of finance sector productiveness, it shows, has been the tradition of national accounting and its reporting of key economic metrics such as gross domestic product. By placing different activities on different sides of a pivotal 'production boundary', national income statisticians effectively dictate what counts as productive - as adding value to the economy - and what does not. Finance's contemporary representation as productive is predicated, the paper shows, on a long and contested history of boundary negotiation.

  • 41.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Media geography's dualities2007In: Cultural Geographies, ISSN 1474-4740, E-ISSN 1477-0881, Vol. 14, p. 156-161Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Monopolizing Neoliberalism Away2015In: AntiopodeFoundation.orgArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Monopolizing Neoliberalism Away2015In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Neoliberalizing Keynes?2016In: Dialogues in Human Geography, ISSN 2043-8206, E-ISSN 2043-8214, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 158-161Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mann's article makes a large number of brave and substantial claims about Keynes and Keynesian reason' in the context of contemporary capitalism and Left politics. But this depth and breadth makes the article problematic as well as significant, for the simple reason that Mann is unable to fully substantiate all of the claims in question. This commentary critically considers one such claim, concerning the relation between Keynes, Keynesianism, and neoliberalism.

  • 45.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    On the Performativity of Pill Pricing: Theory and Reality in the Economics of Global Pharmaceuticalization2014In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 1054-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One often-highlighted contemporary phenomenon in the pharmaceuticals industry is the use of "tiered pricing", where essential medicines are sold more cheaply in low-income than high-income countries to widen access. With economists having for decades championed the applicability of such pricing to pharmaceuticals, this could be interpreted as a textbook case of "economic performativity"-the economic world increasingly conforming to economic models. In reality, however, tiered pharmaceutical pricing remains rare. Yet this article nonetheless urges retention of the performativity concept, albeit suitably reworked. For, insofar as the industry demonstrates nominal commitment to the model and to the social principles associated with it, it performs valuable political work. Moreover, it does help perform the pharmaceutical economy, by reproducing it in its existing form: repeatedly questioning the model's workability, Western manufacturers are able to continue to avoid putting it widely into practice and, in the process, jeopardizing the profits generated by conventional pricing.

  • 46.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    On voodoo economics:  theorising relations of property, value and contemporary capitalism2010In: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, ISSN 0020-2754, E-ISSN 1475-5661, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 94-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reflects on how we can productively theorise the contemporary treatment of property, by a range of different economic agents, as a locus for the attempted creation of economic value. Its argument is that the theorisation offered by David Harvey (1982) in The limits to capital has a continued and arguably even heightened relevance in the present-day context, but that this theorisation can be embellished with insights from the sociology of finance, particularly in regard to the power of representation. This argument is developed with reference to two parallel empirical ‘stories’ from early twenty-first century capitalism: the economist Hernando de Soto’s influential thesis about the ‘mystery of capital’ and his related policy ideas; and the attempts of western-based financiers to extract profit from companies with significant real estate assets by separating those property assets from the operational side of the businesses in question.

  • 47.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Petals not thorns: Competition policy and finance2016In: Controlling Capital: Public and Private Regulation of Financial Market / [ed] Nicholas Dorn, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016, p. 58-73Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Petals not thorns: Competition policy and finance2016In: Controlling Capital: Public and Private Regulation of Financial Markets / [ed] Nicholas Dorn, Routledge, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Review of Economic geography: a contemporary introduction by N. Coe, P. Kelly and H. Yeung2008In: Progress in Human Geography, ISSN 0309-1325, E-ISSN 1477-0288, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 589-591Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Christophers, Brett
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Review of Geographies of Media and Communication by Paul Adams2011In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 93, no 2, p. 185-186Article, book review (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 81
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