Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
Refine search result
123456 1 - 50 of 300
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Riserus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Influence of a healthy Nordic diet on serum fatty acid composition and associations with blood lipoproteins: results from the NORDIET study2014In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 58, p. 24114-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The fatty acid (FA) composition of serum lipids is related to the quality of dietary fat. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a healthy Nordic diet (ND) on the FA composition of serum cholesterol esters (CE-FA) and assess the associations between changes in the serum CE-FA composition and blood lipoproteins during a controlled dietary intervention.

    Methods: The NORDIET trial was a six-week randomised, controlled, parallel-group dietary intervention study that included 86 adults (53±8 years) with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol LDL-C. Serum CE-FA composition was measured using gas chromatography. Diet history interviews were conducted, and daily intake was assessed using checklists.

    Results: Food and nutrient intake data indicated that there was a reduction in the fat intake from dairy and meat products and an increase in the consumption of fatty fish with the ND, decreasing the levels of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in the diet, slightly decreasing the levels of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and moderately increasing the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Concomitantly, the levels of CE-SFA 14:0, 15:0 and 18:0, but not 16:0, decreased during the ND, and these changes differed from those observed in the control diet group (p<0.01). In contrast, serum 22:6n-3 increased during the ND compared with the control diet (p<0.01). The changes in CE-SFA 14:0, 15:0 and 18:0 during the intervention correlated positively with those in LDL-C, HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C, ApoA1 and ApoB (p<0.01), whereas the changes in CE-PUFA 22:6n-3 were negatively correlated with changes in the corresponding serum lipids.

    Conclusions: The decreased intake of saturated fat and increased intake of n-3 PUFA in a healthy Nordic diet are partly reflected by changes in the serum CE-FA composition, which are associated with an improved serum lipoprotein pattern.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Adamsson, Viola
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Reumark, Anna
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    What is a healthy Nordic diet?: Foods and nutrients in the NORDIET study2012In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 56, p. 18189-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A healthy Nordic diet (ND), a diet based on foods originating from the Nordic countries, improves blood lipid profile and insulin sensitivity and lowers blood pressure and body weight in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Objective: To describe and compare food and nutrient composition of the ND in relation to the intake of a Swedish reference population (SRP) and the recommended intake (RI) and average requirement (AR), as described by the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR). Design: The analyses were based on an estimate of actual food and nutrient intake of 44 men and women (mean age 53 +/- 8 years, BMI 26 +/- 3), representing an intervention arm receiving ND for 6 weeks. Results: The main difference between ND and SRP was the higher intake of plant foods, fish, egg and vegetable fat and a lower intake of meat products, dairy products, sweets and desserts and alcoholic beverages during ND (p<0.001 for all food groups). Intake of cereals and seeds was similar between ND and SRP (p>0.3). The relative intake of protein, fat and carbohydrates during ND was in accordance with RI. Intake of all vitamins and minerals was above AR, whereas sodium intake was below RI. Conclusions: When compared with the food intake of an SRP, ND is primarily a plant-based diet. ND represents a balanced food intake that meets the current RI and AR of NNR 2004 and has a dietary pattern that is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality.

  • 3. Akner, G
    et al.
    Cederholm, T
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Treatment of protein-energy malnutrition in chronic nonmalignant disorders.2001In: Am J Clin Nutr, ISSN 0002-9165, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 6-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Al-Ani, Amer
    et al.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Säff, Maria
    Neander, Gustaf
    Blomfeldt, Richard
    Ekström, Wilhelmina
    Hedström, Margareta
    Low bone mineral density and fat free mass in young and middle-aged patients with a femoral neck fracture2015In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 800-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Reduced bone mineral density (BMD) together with muscle wasting and dysfunction, that is sarcopenia, emerges as a risk factor for hip fracture. The aim of this study was to examine body composition and BMD and their relationship with trauma mechanisms in young and middle-aged patients with femoral neck fracture.

    Materials and methods

    Altogether, 185 patients with femoral neck fracture aged 20–69 were included. BMD, body composition and fat-free mass index (FFMI) were determined by dual-X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and trauma mechanisms were registered.

    Results

    Ninety per cent of the whole study population had a femoral neck BMD below the mean for age. In the young patients (< 50 years), 27% had a Z-score of BMD ≤ −2 SD. More than half of the middle-aged patients (50–69 years) had osteopenia, that is T-score −1 to −2·5, and 35% had osteoporosis, that is T-score < −2·5, at the femoral neck. Patients with low-energy trauma, sport injury or high-energy trauma had a median standardised BMD of 0·702, 0·740 vs. 0·803 g/cm2 (= 0·03), and a median FFMI of 15·9, 17·7 vs. 17·5 kg/m2 (< 0·001), respectively. FFMI < 10th percentile of an age- and gender-matched reference population was observed in one-third.

    Conclusions

    A majority had low BMD at the femoral neck, and one-third had reduced FFMI (i.e. sarcopenia). Patients with fracture following low-energy trauma had significantly lower femoral neck BMD and FFMI than patients with other trauma mechanisms. DXA examination of both BMD and body composition could be of value especially in those with low-energy trauma.

  • 5. Al-Ani, Amer N.
    et al.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Saaf, Maria
    Neander, Gustaf
    Blomfeldt, Richard
    Ekstrom, Wilhelmina
    Hedstrom, Margareta
    Low bone mineral density and fat-free mass in younger patients with a femoral neck fracture2015In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0014-2972, E-ISSN 1365-2362, Vol. 45, no 8, p. 800-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Reduced bone mineral density (BMD) together with muscle wasting and dysfunction, that is sarcopenia, emerges as a risk factor for hip fracture. The aim of this study was to examine body composition and BMD and their relationship with trauma mechanisms in young and middle-aged patients with femoral neck fracture. Materials and methods Altogether, 185 patients with femoral neck fracture aged 20-69 were included. BMD, body composition and fat-free mass index (FFMI) were determined by dual-X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and trauma mechanisms were registered. Results Ninety per cent of the whole study population had a femoral neck BMD below the mean for age. In the young patients (<50years), 27% had a Z-score of BMD-2 SD. More than half of the middle-aged patients (50-69years) had osteopenia, that is T-score -1 to -25, and 35% had osteoporosis, that is T-score<-25, at the femoral neck. Patients with low-energy trauma, sport injury or high-energy trauma had a median standardised BMD of 0702, 0740 vs. 0803g/cm(2) (P=003), and a median FFMI of 159, 177 vs. 175kg/m(2) (P<0001), respectively. FFMI<10th percentile of an age- and gender-matched reference population was observed in one-third. Conclusions A majority had low BMD at the femoral neck, and one-third had reduced FFMI (i.e. sarcopenia). Patients with fracture following low-energy trauma had significantly lower femoral neck BMD and FFMI than patients with other trauma mechanisms. DXA examination of both BMD and body composition could be of value especially in those with low-energy trauma.

  • 6. Al-Ani, Amer N
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Bodil
    Tidermark, Jan
    Norling, Asa
    Ekström, Wilhelmina
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hedström, Margareta
    Early operation on patients with a hip fracture improved the ability to return to independent living. A prospective study of 850 patients.2008In: J Bone Joint Surg Am, ISSN 1535-1386, Vol. 90, no 7, p. 1436-42Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Alsharari, Zayed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Leander, Karin
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Carlsson, Axel
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    de Faire, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hellenius, Mai-Lis
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Marklund, Matti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Association between carbohydrate intake and fatty acids in the de novo lipogenic pathway in serum phospholipids and adipose tissue in a population of Swedish men2020In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 2089-2097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Fatty acid composition in blood and adipose tissue (AT) is a useful biomarker of dietary fat quality. However, circulating saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) have been proposed to also reflect carbohydrate-induced de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) activity. We aimed to test the hypothesis that high carbohydrate intake is related to SFA and MUFA in serum or AT in a Swedish population. Methods Fatty acid composition was measured in serum phospholipids (PL) and AT by gas chromatography in 63-year-old men (n = 299). Carbohydrate and alcohol intake was assessed (validated 7-day food records) in relation to total SFA, 16:0 (palmitate), 16:1 (palmitoleate), and estimated SCD activity (16:1n-7/16:0-ratio) in serum PL and in AT, respectively. Results Total carbohydrate intake was inversely associated with 16:0 in PL (P = 0.005), independently of BMI. Disaccharides were non-linearly (restricted cubic splines) and weakly associated with 16:1 and SCD activity in PL (nonlinear trend,P <= 0.02) but not AT. Carbohydrate intake and SCD expression were not associated (P >= 0.08,n = 81). Alcohol intake was, however, linearly associated with 16:0 in PL (P < 0.001), and with 16:1 (P < 0.001) and SCD activity (P <= 0.005) in both PL and AT. Conclusions Higher carbohydrate intake from sugar-rich foods or beverages was not clearly reflected by higher SFA or SCD activity in serum PL or AT. Alcohol was, however, associated with higher SFA and MUFA.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 8.
    Alsharari, Zayed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Marklund, Matti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Hellenius, Mai-Lis
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Unit, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Laguzzi, Federica
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Unit, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gigante, Bruna
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Unit, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Leander, Karen
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Unit, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    de Faire, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Unit, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Serum Biomarkers of Dietary Fatty Acids are Associated with Abdominal Obesity Measures in a Large Population-based Cohort of Men and Women2015In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 29, no 1 SupplementArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Alsharari, Zayed
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Leander, Karin
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Family Med, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Vikstrom, Max
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Laguzzi, Federica
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gigante, Bruna
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Danderyds Hosp, Div Cardiovasc Med, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    De Faire, Ulf
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hellenius, Mai-Lis
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Cardiol Unit, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Marklund, Matti
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Serum Fatty Acids, Desaturase Activities and Abdominal Obesity - A Population-Based Study of 60-Year Old Men and Women2017In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 1, article id e0170684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abdominal obesity is a key contributor of metabolic disease. Recent trials suggest that dietary fat quality affects abdominal fat content, where palmitic acid and linoleic acid influence abdominal obesity differently, while effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are less studied. Also, fatty acid desaturation may be altered in abdominal obesity. We aimed to investigate cross-sectional associations of serum fatty acids and desaturases with abdominal obesity prevalence in a population-based cohort study. Serum cholesteryl ester fatty acids composition was measured by gas chromatography in 60-year old men (n = 1883) and women (n = 2015). Cross-sectional associations of fatty acids with abdominal obesity prevalence and anthropometric measures (e.g., sagittal abdominal diameter) were evaluated in multivariable-adjusted logistic and linear regression models, respectively. Similar models were employed to investigate relations between desaturase activities (estimated by fatty acid ratios) and abdominal obesity. In logistic regression analyses, palmitic acid, stearoyl-CoA- desaturase and Delta 6-desaturase indices were associated with abdominal obesity; multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for highest versus lowest quartiles were 1.45 (1.19-1.76), 4.06 (3.27-5.05), and 3.07 (2.51-3.75), respectively. Linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, docohexaenoic acid, and Delta 5-desaturase were inversely associated with abdominal obesity; multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals): 0.39 (0.32-0.48), 0.74 (0.61-0.89), 0.76 (0.62-0.93), and 0.40 (0.33-0.49), respectively. Eicosapentaenoic acid was not associated with abdominal obesity. Similar results were obtained from linear regression models evaluating associations with different anthropometric measures. Sex-specific and linear associations were mainly observed for n3-polyunsaturated fatty acids, while associations of the other exposures were generally non-linear and similar across sexes. In accordance with findings from short-term trials, abdominal obesity was more common among individuals with relatively high proportions of palmitic acid, whilst the contrary was true for linoleic acid. Further trials should examine the potential role of linoleic acid and its main dietary source, vegetable oils, in abdominal obesity prevention.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10. Andersson, P
    et al.
    Bratt, J
    Heimburger, M
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Palmblad, J
    Inhibition of neutrophil dependent cytotoxicity for human endothelial cells by ACE inhibitors2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 80, no 5, p. 339-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) have immunomodulating properties and have been suggested to protect against endothelial injury, for example myocardial infarction and reperfusion injury. We tested whether two ACEi (captopril and enalapril), differing in a thiol group, protected human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) from cytotoxicity induced by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in vitro, when cells were activated by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) or the arachidonate derivative lipoxin-A4 (LXA4), using separate cytotoxicity pathways. When 51Cr labelled HUVEC were treated with captopril (0–500 μm) or enalapril (0–100 μm) for 2 h and then activated by TNFα (100 ng/ml) for 24 h, a significant, dose-dependent reduction of 51Cr release was observed. Similarly, captopril reduced 51Cr release when LXA4 (0.1 μm) was used to stimulate PMN for 4 h. Among previously defined mechanisms of significance for the cytotoxic reaction, expression of ICAM-1, but not intracellular Ca2+ changes in PMN or PMN adherence to HUVEC, were reduced by ACEi treatment. Moreover, both ACEi inhibited HUVEC surface expression of TNFα receptor I (but not II). Thus, these ACEi, particularly captopril, interfere with PMN-induced cytotoxicity for endothelial cells by modulating pro-inflammatory surface receptors, which is a novel effect that might be explored for further therapeutic approaches.

  • 11. Andersson, Patrik
    et al.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Johansson, Anne-Sofie
    Palmblad, Jan
    Captopril-impaired production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced interleukin-1beta in human monocytes is associated with altered intracellular distribution of nuclear factor-kappaB.2002In: Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, ISSN 0022-2143, E-ISSN 1532-6543, Vol. 140, no 2, p. 103-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Ax, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Garmo, Hans
    Regional Cancer Center , Uppsala University Hospital , Uppsala , Sweden.
    Grundmark, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Becker, Wulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Dietary Patterns and Prostate Cancer Risk: Report from the Population Based ULSAM Cohort Study of Swedish Men2014In: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary pattern analyses have increased the possibilities to detect associations between diet and disease. However, studies on dietary pattern and prostate cancer are scarce. Food intake data in the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men cohort was determined by 7-day food records. Adherence to a modified Mediterranean Diet Score (mMDS) and a low carbohydrate-high protein (LCHP) score were grouped as low, medium, or high in the whole study population (n = 1,044) and in those identified as adequate reporters of energy intake (n = 566), respectively. Prostate cancer risk was analyzed with Cox proportional hazard regression (median follow-up 13years) and competing risk of death was considered. There were no associations between dietary patterns and prostate cancer (n = 133) in the whole study population. Among adequate reporters the mMDS was not associated with prostate cancer (n = 72). The LCHP score was inversely related to prostate cancer in adequate reporters, adjusted hazard ratios; 0.55 (0.32-0.96) for medium and 0.47 (0.21-1.04) for high compared to low adherent participants (P-for-trend 0.04). Risk relations were not attributable to competing risk of death. In this study, a LCHP diet was associated with lower prostate cancer incidence. Relations emerged in adequate reporters, underscoring the importance of high-quality dietary data.

  • 13.
    Ax, Erika Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Grundmark, Birgitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Bill-Axelson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Becker, Wulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Holmberg, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Endocrine Surgery.
    Zethelius, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Garmo, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Dietary Patterns and prostate cancer risk: a population based cohort study in elderly Swedish men2013In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 27, no S1, p. 847.8-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Ax, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Lampa, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Salihovic, Samira
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    van Bavel, Bert
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Lind, P Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Circulating levels of environmental contaminants are associated with dietary patterns in older adults2015In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 75, p. 93-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Food intake contributes substantially to our exposure to environmental contaminants. Still, little is known about our dietary habits' contribution to exposure variability.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess circulating levels of environmental contaminants in relation to predefined dietary patterns in an elderly Swedish population.

    METHODS: Dietary data and serum concentrations of environmental contaminants were obtained from 844 70-year-old Swedish subjects (50% women) in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study. Dietary data from 7-day food records was used to assess adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet, a low carbohydrate-high protein diet and the WHO dietary recommendations. Circulating levels of 6 polychlorinated biphenyl markers, 3 organochlorine pesticides, 1 dioxin and 1 polybrominated diphenyl ether, the metals cadmium, lead, mercury and aluminum and serum levels of bisphenol A and 4 phthalate metabolites were investigated in relation to dietary patterns in multivariate linear regression models.

    RESULTS: A Mediterranean-like diet was positively associated with levels of several polychlorinated biphenyls (118, 126, 153, and 209), trans-nonachlor and mercury. A low carbohydrate-high protein diet was positively associated with polychlorinated biphenyls 118 and 153, trans-nonachlor, hexachlorobenzene and p, p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, mercury and lead. The WHO recommended diet was negatively related to levels of dioxin and lead, and borderline positively to polychlorinated biphenyl 118 and trans-nonachlor.

    CONCLUSION: Dietary patterns were associated in diverse manners with circulating levels of environmental contaminants in this elderly Swedish population. Following the WHO dietary recommendations seems to be associated with a lower burden of environmental contaminants.

  • 15.
    Ax, Erika
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Warensjö-Lemming, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Becker, Wulf
    Andersson, Agneta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Lindroos, Anna Karin
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Fung, Teresa T.
    Dietary patterns in Swedish adults: results from a national dietary survey2016In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 115, no 1, p. 95-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dietary patterns derived by statistical procedures is a way to identify overall dietary habits in specific populations. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise dietary patterns in Swedish adults using data from the national dietary survey Riksmaten adults 2010–11 (952 women, 788 men). Principal component analyses were used and two patterns were identified in both sexes: a healthy pattern loading positively on vegetables, fruits, fish and seafood, and vegetable oils, and negatively on refined bread and fast food, and a Swedish traditional pattern loading positively on potatoes, meat and processed meat, full-fat milk products, sweet bakery products, sweet condiments and margarine. In addition, a light-meal pattern was identified in women with positive loadings on fibre-rich bread, cheese, rice, pasta and food grain dishes, substitute products for meat and dairy products, candies and tea. The healthy pattern was positively correlated to dietary fibre (r 0·51–0·58) and n-3 (r 0·25–0·31) (all P<0·0001), and had a higher nutrient density of folate, vitamin D and Se. The Swedish traditional and the light-meal pattern were positively correlated to added sugar (r 0·20–0·25) and the Swedish traditional also to SFA (r 0·13–0·21) (all P<0·0001); both patterns were in general negatively correlated to micronutrients. Dietary pattern scores were associated with, for example, age, physical activity, education and income. In conclusion, we identified three major dietary patterns among Swedish adults. The patterns can be further used for examining the association between whole diet and health outcomes.

  • 16. Axelsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Rashid Qureshi, Abdul
    Suliman, Mohammed E
    Honda, Hirokazu
    Pecoits-Filho, Roberto
    Heimburger, Olof
    Lindholm, Bengt
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Stenvinkel, Peter
    Truncal fat mass as a contributor to inflammation in end-stage renal disease.2004In: Am J Clin Nutr, ISSN 0002-9165, Vol. 80, no 5, p. 1222-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Bahat, Gulistan
    et al.
    Istanbul Univ, Istanbul Med Sch, Dept Internal Med, Div Geriatr, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Erdogan, Tugba
    Istanbul Univ, Istanbul Med Sch, Dept Internal Med, Div Geriatr, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Ageing, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Paving the way for applying GLIM criteria in clinical practice and research: how to define mild to moderate and severe reduced muscle mass2022In: European Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 1878-7649, E-ISSN 1878-7657, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 611-614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Key summary pointsAim To report grade 1 and grade 2 reduced muscle mass cut-offs for skeletal muscle mass (SMM) adjusted by body mass index (BMI) to increase the applicability of the GLIM criteria. Findings Grade 1 vs. grade 2 low muscle mass (LMM) thresholds were 1.189 and 0.954 kg/BMI vs. 1.049 and 0.823 kg/BMI in males and females, respectively. Message While validation studies are needed to evaluate their predictive ability, our approach presented here seems applicable and the cut-off values acceptable for use until population-specific values in different populations or global generic cut-offs are identified. Purpose Among approaches to adjust skeletal muscle mass (SMM) for body size, adjustment for body mass index (BMI) correlated better with functional measures. To enhance applicability of GLIM criteria, we report grade 1 and grade 2 reduced muscle mass cut-offs for SMM adjusted by BMI. Methods 301 young, healthy adults involving students, patient relatives and staff working in the university hospital were included. SMM was estimated by bio-impedance analysis (BIA). SMM index (BMI) [SMMI(BMI)] was calculated as SMM/BMI. Grade 1 low muscle mass (LMM) was defined as "mean young SMMI(BMI)-one standard deviation" and grade 2 LMM as "mean young SMMI(BMI)-two standard deviations". Results Mean age was 26.5 +/- 4.6 (62.1% male). Grade 1 vs grade 2 LMM thresholds were 1.189 and 0.954 kg/BMI vs 1.049 and 0.823 kg/BMI in males and females, respectively. Conclusion This is the first report identifying stage 1 and stage 2 LMM thresholds for SMMI adjusted by BMI. Studies are needed to evaluate their predictive validity.

  • 18. Barazzoni, R
    et al.
    Deutz, N E P
    Biolo, G
    Bischoff, S
    Boirie, Y
    Cederholm, T
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Cuerda, C
    Delzenne, N
    Leon Sanz, M
    Ljungqvist, O
    Muscaritoli, M
    Pichard, C
    Preiser, J C
    Sbraccia, P
    Singer, P
    Tappy, L
    Thorens, B
    Van Gossum, A
    Vettor, R
    Calder, P C
    Carbohydrates and insulin resistance in clinical nutrition: Recommendations from the ESPEN expert group.2017In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 355-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Growing evidence underscores the important role of glycemic control in health and recovery from illness. Carbohydrate ingestion in the diet or administration in nutritional support is mandatory, but carbohydrate intake can adversely affect major body organs and tissues if resulting plasma glucose becomes too high, too low, or highly variable. Plasma glucose control is especially important for patients with conditions such as diabetes or metabolic stress resulting from critical illness or surgery. These patients are particularly in need of glycemic management to help lessen glycemic variability and its negative health consequences when nutritional support is administered. Here we report on recent findings and emerging trends in the field based on an ESPEN workshop held in Venice, Italy, 8-9 November 2015. Evidence was discussed on pathophysiology, clinical impact, and nutritional recommendations for carbohydrate utilization and management in nutritional support. The main conclusions were: a) excess glucose and fructose availability may exacerbate metabolic complications in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver and can result in negative clinical impact; b) low-glycemic index and high-fiber diets, including specialty products for nutritional support, may provide metabolic and clinical benefits in individuals with obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes; c) in acute conditions such as surgery and critical illness, insulin resistance and elevated circulating glucose levels have a negative impact on patient outcomes and should be prevented through nutritional and/or pharmacological intervention. In such acute settings, efforts should be implemented towards defining optimal plasma glucose targets, avoiding excessive plasma glucose variability, and optimizing glucose control relative to nutritional support.

  • 19.
    Barazzoni, Rocco
    et al.
    Univ Trieste, Dept Med Surg & Hlth Sci, Internal Med, Trieste, Italy;Azienda Sanit Univ Integrata Trieste ASUITS, Trieste, Italy.
    Bischoff, Stephan
    Univ Hohenheim, Dept Nutr Med, Stuttgart, Germany.
    Boirie, Yves
    Univ Clermont Auvergne, UNH, INRA, Unite Nutr Humaine,CRNH Auvergne, Clermont Ferrand, France;CHU Clermont Ferrand, Serv Nutr Clin, Clermont Ferrand, France.
    Busetto, Luca
    Univ Padua, Dept Med, Padua, Italy;Padova Univ Hosp, Ctr Study & Integrated Management Obes EASO COM, Padua, Italy.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Dicker, Dror
    Hasharon Hosp, Rabin Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, Petah Tiqwa, Israel;Hasharon Hosp, Rabin Med Ctr, Obes Clin, Petah Tiqwa, Israel;Tel Aviv Univ, Sackler Fac Med, Tel Aviv, Israel.
    Toplak, Hermann
    Med Univ Graz, Dept Med, Graz, Austria.
    Van Gossum, Andre
    Free Univ Brussels, Hop Erasme, Dept Gastroenterol, Clin Intestinal Dis & Nutr Support, Brussels, Belgium.
    Yumuk, Volkan
    Istanbul Univ, Cerrahpasa Med Fac, Div Endocrinol Metab & Diabet, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Vettor, Roberto
    Univ Padua, Dept Med, Padua, Italy;Padova Univ Hosp, Ctr Study & Integrated Management Obes EASO COM, Padua, Italy.
    Sarcopenic Obesity: Time to Meet the Challenge2018In: Obesity Facts, ISSN 1662-4025, E-ISSN 1662-4033, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 294-305Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide due to increasingly pervasive obesogenic lifestyle changes. Obesity poses unprecedented individual, social, and multidisciplinary medical challenges by increasing the risk for metabolic diseases, chronic organ failures, and cancer as well as complication rates in the presence of acute disease conditions. Whereas reducing excess adiposity remains the fundamental pathogenic treatment for obese individuals, complex metabolic and lifestyle abnormalities as well as weight reduction therapies per se may also compromise the ability to preserve muscle function and mass, especially when chronic disease co-exists with obesity. Emerging evidence indicates that low muscle mass and quality have a strong negative prognostic impact in obese individuals and may lead to frailty, disability, and increased morbidity and mortality. Awareness of the importance of skeletal muscle maintenance in obesity is however low among clinicians and scientists. The term 'sarcopenic obesity' has been proposed to identify obesity with low skeletal muscle function and mass, but its utilization is largely limited to the aging patient population, and consensus on its definition and diagnostic criteria remains insufficient. Knowledge on prevalence of sarcopenic obesity in various clinical conditions and patient subgroups, on its clinical impacts in patient risk stratification, and on effective prevention and treatment strategies remain therefore dramatically inadequate. In particular, optimal dietary options and medical nutritional support strategies to preserve muscle mass in obese individuals remain largely undefined. The European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) and the European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO) recognize and indicate obesity with altered body composition due to low skeletal muscle function and mass (sarcopenic obesity) as a scientific and clinical priority for researchers and clinicians. ESPEN and EASO therefore call for coordinated action aimed at reaching consensus on its definition, diagnostic criteria, and optimal treatment with particular regard to nutritional therapy. We are convinced that achievement of these goals has a strong potential to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality in the rapidly increasing obese patient population.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20.
    Barazzoni, Rocco
    et al.
    Univ Trieste, Dept Med Surg & Hlth Sci, Internal Med, Trieste, Italy.;Azienda Sanit Univ Integrata Trieste ASUITS, Trieste, Italy..
    Bischoff, Stephan C.
    Univ Hohenheim, Dept Nutr Med, Stuttgart, Germany..
    Boirie, Yves
    Univ Clermont Auvergne, INRA, UNH, CRNH Auvergne, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France.;CHU Clermont Ferrand, Serv Nutr Clin, F-63000 Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Busetto, Luca
    Univ Padua, Dept Med, Padua, Italy.;Padova Univ Hosp, Ctr Study & Integrated Management Obes EASO COM, Padua, Italy..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Dicker, Dror
    Tel Aviv Univ, Rabin Med Ctr, Internal Med Dept, Hasharon Hosp,Sackler Fac Med, Tel Aviv, Israel.;Tel Aviv Univ, Rabin Med Ctr, Obes Clin, Hasharon Hosp,Sackler Fac Med, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    Toplak, Hermann
    Med Univ Graz, Dept Med, Graz, Austria..
    Van Gossum, Andre
    Free Univ Brussels, Dept Gastroenterol, Clin Intestinal Dis & Nutr Support, Hop Erasme, Brussels, Belgium..
    Yumuk, Volkan
    Istanbul Univ, Div Endocrinol Metab & Diabet, Cerrahpasa Med Fac, Istanbul, Turkey..
    Vettor, Roberto
    Univ Padua, Dept Med, Padua, Italy.;Padova Univ Hosp, Ctr Study & Integrated Management Obes EASO COM, Padua, Italy..
    Sarcopenic obesity: Time to meet the challenge2018In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 1787-1793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide due to increasingly pervasive obesogenic lifestyle changes. Obesity poses unprecedented individual, social and multi-disciplinary medical challenges by increasing the risk for metabolic diseases, chronic organ failures and cancer, as well as complication rates in the presence of acute disease conditions. Whereas reducing excess adiposity remains the fundamental pathogenetic treatment for obese individuals, complex metabolic and lifestyle abnormalities as well as weight-reduction therapies per se may also compromise the ability to preserve muscle function and mass, especially when chronic disease co-exists with obesity. Emerging evidence indicates that low muscle mass and quality have a strong negative prognostic impact in obese individuals and may lead to frailty, disability and increased morbidity and mortality. Awareness of the importance of skeletal muscle maintenance in obesity is however low among clinicians and scientists. The term "sarcopenic obesity" has been proposed to identify obesity with low skeletal muscle function and mass, but its utilization is largely limited to the aging patient population, and consensus on its definition and diagnostic criteria remains insufficient. Knowledge on prevalence of sarcopenic obesity in various clinical conditions and patient subgroups, on its clinical impacts in patient risk stratification and on effective prevention and treatment strategies remain therefore dramatically inadequate. In particular, optimal dietary options and medical nutritional support strategies to preserve muscle mass in obese individuals remain largely undefined. The European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) and the European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO) recognize and indicate obesity with altered body composition due to low skeletal muscle function and mass (sarcopenic obesity) as a scientific and clinical priority for researchers and clinicians. ESPEN and EASO therefore call for coordinated action aimed at reaching consensus on its definition, diagnostic criteria and optimal treatment with particular regard to nutritional therapy. We are convinced that achievement of these goals has strong potential to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality in the rapidly increasing obese patient population. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  • 21. Barazzoni, Rocco
    et al.
    Bischoff, Stephan C.
    Busetto, Luca
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Chourdakis, Michael
    Cuerda, Cristina
    Delzenne, Nathalie
    Genton, Laurence
    Schneider, Stephane
    Singer, Pierre
    Boirie, Yves
    Nutritional management of individuals with obesity and COVID-19: ESPEN expert statements and practical guidance2022In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 2869-2886Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemics has created unprecedented challenges and threats to patients and healthcare systems worldwide. Acute respiratory complications that require intensive care unit (ICU) management are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in COVID-19 patients. Among other important risk factors for severe COVID-19 outcomes, obesity has emerged along with undernutrition-malnutrition as a strong predictor of disease risk and severity. Obesity-related excessive body fat may lead to respiratory, metabolic and immune derangements potentially favoring the onset of COVID-19 complications. In addition, patients with obesity may be at risk for loss of skeletal muscle mass, reflecting a state of hidden malnutrition with a strong negative health impact in all clinical settings. Also importantly, obesity is commonly associated with micronutrient deficiencies that directly influence immune function and infection risk. Finally, the pandemic-related lockdown, deleterious lifestyle changes and other numerous psychosocial consequences may worsen eating behaviors, sedentarity, body weight regulation, ultimately leading to further increments of obesity-associated metabolic complications with loss of skeletal muscle mass and higher non-communicable disease risk. Therefore, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies should be routinely included in the management of COVID-19 patients in the presence of obesity; lockdown-induced health risks should also be specifically monitored and prevented in this population. In the current document, the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) aims at providing clinical practice guidance for nutritional management of COVID-19 patients with obesity in various clinical settings.

  • 22.
    Barazzoni, Rocco
    et al.
    Univ Trieste, Dept Med Surg & Hlth Sci, Internal Med, Trieste, Italy.;Azienda Sanit Univ Integrata Trieste ASUITS, Trieste, Italy.;Univ Trieste, Dept Med Surg & Hlth Sci, Str Fiume 447, I-34149 Trieste, Italy..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zanetti, Michela
    Univ Trieste, Dept Med Surg & Hlth Sci, Internal Med, Trieste, Italy.;Azienda Sanit Univ Integrata Trieste ASUITS, Trieste, Italy..
    Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan
    Univ Trieste, Dept Med Surg & Hlth Sci, Internal Med, Trieste, Italy.;Azienda Sanit Univ Integrata Trieste ASUITS, Trieste, Italy..
    Defining and diagnosing sarcopenia: Is the glass now half full?2023In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 143, article id 155558Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low muscle mass and function exert a substantial negative impact on quality of life, health and ultimately survival, but their definition, identification and combination to define sarcopenia have suffered from lack of universal consensus. Methodological issues have also contributed to incomplete agreement, as different approaches, techniques and potential surrogate measures inevitably lead to partly different conclusions. As a consequence: 1) awareness of sarcopenia and implementation of diagnostic procedures in clinical practice have been limited; 2) patient identification and evaluation of therapeutic strategies is largely incomplete. Significant progress has however recently occurred after major diagnostic algorithms have been developed, with common features and promising perspectives for growing consensus. At the same time, the need for further refinement of the sarcopenia concept has emerged, to address its increasingly recognized clinical heterogeneity. This includes potential differential underlying mechanisms and clinical features for age-and disease-driven sarcopenia, and the emerging challenge of sarcopenia in persons with obesity. Here, we will review existing algorithms to diagnose sarcopenia, and major open methodological issues to assess skeletal muscle mass and function under different clinical conditions, in order to highlight similarities and differences. Potential for consensus on sarcopenia diagnosis as well as emerging new challenges will be discussed.

  • 23.
    Barazzoni, Rocco
    et al.
    Univ Trieste, Dept Med Surg & Hlth Sci, Str Fiume 447, I-34149 Trieste, Italy..
    Jensen, Gordon L.
    Univ Vermont, Larner Coll Med, Dept Med, Deans Off, Burlington, VT USA..
    Correia, Maria Isabel T. D.
    Univ Fed Minas Gerais, Med Sch, Dept Surg, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil..
    Gonzalez, Maria Cristina
    Univ Catolica Pelotas, Postgrad Program Hlth & Behav, Pelotas, RS, Brazil..
    Higashiguchi, Takashi
    Yonaha Okanoue Hosp, Kuwana, Japan..
    Shi, Han Ping
    Capital Med Univ, Beijing Shijitan Hosp, Dept Gastrointestinal Surg, Key Lab Canc FSMP State Market Regulat, Beijing, Peoples R China.;Capital Med Univ, Beijing Shijitan Hosp, Dept Clin Nutr, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Bischoff, Stephan C.
    Univ Hohenheim, Dept Nutr Med, Stuttgart, Germany..
    Boirie, Yves
    Univ Clermont Auvergne, Clin Nutr Dept, Unite Nutr Humaine, CRNH Auvergne,INRAE,CHU Clermont Ferrand, Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Carrasco, Fernando
    Univ Chile, Fac Med, Nutr & Bariatr Surg Ctr, Dept Nutr,Clin Las Condes, Santiago, Chile..
    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso
    Hosp Univ Ramon y Cajal IRYCIS, Serv Geriatria, Madrid, Spain..
    Fuchs-Tarlovsky, Vanessa
    Hosp Gen Mexico City, Clin Nutr Dept, Ciudad De Mexico, Mexico..
    Fukushima, Ryoji
    Teikyo Univ, Teikyo Heisei Univ, Sch Med Hlth & Dietet, Dept Surg, Tokyo, Japan..
    Heymsfield, Steve
    Louisiana State Univ, Pennington Biomed Res Ctr, Baton Rouge, LA 70808 USA..
    Mourtzakis, Marina
    Univ Waterloo, Dept Kinesiol & Hlth Sci, Waterloo, ON, Canada..
    Muscaritoli, Maurizio
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Dept Translat & Precis Med, Rome, Italy..
    Norman, Kristina
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Freie Univ Berlin, Humboldt Univ Berlin, Dept Geriatr & Med Gerontol,Berlin Inst Hlth, Berlin, Germany.;German Inst Human Nutr Potsdam Rehbrucke, Dept Nutr & Gerontol, Nuthetal, Germany..
    Nyulasi, Ibolya
    Alfred Hosp, Nutr Dept, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.;La Trobe Univ, Dept Dietet Nutr & Sport, Bundoora, Vic, Australia.;Monash Univ, Cent Clin Sch, Dept Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia..
    Pisprasert, Veeradej
    Khon Kaen Univ, Fac Med, Dept Med, Khon Kaen, Thailand..
    Prado, Carla
    Univ Alberta, Dept Agr Food & Nutr Sci, Human Nutr Res Unit, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    de van der Schuren, Marian
    HAN Univ Appl Sci, Sch Allied Hlth, Dept Nutr Dietet & Lifestyle, Nijmegen, Netherlands.;Wageningen Univ & Res Human Nutr & Hlth, Wageningen, Netherlands..
    Yoshida, Sadao
    Chuzan Hosp, Dept Rehabil, Okinawa City, Okinawa, Japan..
    Yu, Yanchun
    Chinese Acad Med Sci, Peking Union Med Coll Hosp, Dept Gen Surg, Beijing, Peoples R China..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Inflammat & Ageing, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Compher, Charlene
    Univ Penn, Sch Nursing, Dept Biobehav Hlth Sci, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA..
    Guidance for assessment of the muscle mass phenotypic criterion for the Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) diagnosis of malnutrition2022In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 1425-1433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) provides consensus criteria for the diagnosis of malnutrition that can be widely applied. The GLIM approach is based on the assessment of three phenotypic (weight loss, low body mass index, and low skeletal muscle mass) and two etiologic (low food intake and presence of disease with systemic inflammation) criteria, with diagnosis confirmed by any combination of one phenotypic and one etiologic criterion fulfilled. Assessment of muscle mass is less commonly performed than other phenotypic malnutrition criteria, and its interpretation may be less straightforward, particularly in settings that lack access to skilled clinical nutrition practitioners and/or to body composition methodologies. In order to promote the widespread assessment of skeletal muscle mass as an integral part of the GLIM diagnosis of malnutrition, the GLIM consortium appointed a working group to provide consensus-based guidance on assessment of skeletal muscle mass. When such methods and skills are available, quantitative assessment of muscle mass should be measured or estimated using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, computerized tomography, or bioelectrical impedance analysis. For settings where these resources are not available, then the use of anthropometric measures and physical examination are also endorsed. Validated ethnic-and sex-specific cutoff values for each measurement and tool are recommended when available. Measurement of skeletal muscle function is not advised as surrogate measurement of muscle mass. However, once malnutrition is diagnosed, skeletal muscle function should be investigated as a relevant component of sarcopenia and for complete nutrition assessment of persons with malnutrition. (c) 2022 Elsevier Ltd. and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. All rights reserved.

  • 24. Bauer, Juergen
    et al.
    Biolo, Gianni
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cesari, Matteo
    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J.
    Morley, John E.
    Phillips, Stuart
    Sieber, Cornel
    Stehle, Peter
    Teta, Daniel
    Visvanathan, Renuka
    Volpi, Elena
    Boirie, Yves
    Evidence-Based Recommendations for Optimal Dietary Protein Intake in Older People: A Position Paper From the PROT-AGE Study Group2013In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 542-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New evidence shows that older adults need more dietary protein than do younger adults to support good health, promote recovery from illness, and maintain functionality. Older people need to make up for age-related changes in protein metabolism, such as high splanchnic extraction and declining anabolic responses to ingested protein. They also need more protein to offset inflammatory and catabolic conditions associated with chronic and acute diseases that occur commonly with aging. With the goal of developing updated, evidence-based recommendations for optimal protein intake by older people, the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS), in cooperation with other scientific organizations, appointed an international study group to review dietary protein needs with aging (PROT-AGE Study Group). To help older people (>65 years) maintain and regain lean body mass and function, the PROT-AGE study group recommends average daily intake at least in the range of 1.0 to 1.2 g protein per kilogram of body weight per day. Both endurance-and resistance-type exercises are recommended at individualized levels that are safe and tolerated, and higher protein intake (ie, >= 1.2 g/kg body weight/d) is advised for those who are exercising and otherwise active. Most older adults who have acute or chronic diseases need even more dietary protein (ie, 1.2-1.5 g/kg body weight/d). Older people with severe kidney disease (ie, estimated GFR <30 mL/min/1.73m(2)), but who are not on dialysis, are an exception to this rule; these individuals may need to limit protein intake. Protein quality, timing of ingestion, and intake of other nutritional supplements may be relevant, but evidence is not yet sufficient to support specific recommendations. Older people are vulnerable to losses in physical function capacity, and such losses predict loss of independence, falls, and even mortality. Thus, future studies aimed at pinpointing optimal protein intake in specific populations of older people need to include measures of physical function.

  • 25.
    Bauer, Juergen M.
    et al.
    Heidelberg Univ, Ctr Geriatr Med, Agaples Bethanien Krankenhaus Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Mikusova, Lucia
    Danone Nutricia Res, Nutricia Adv Med Nutr, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Verlaan, Sjors
    Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, VU, Dept Internal Med,Sect Gerontol & Geriatr, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Bautmans, Ivan
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Frailty Ageing Res Grp FRIA, Brussels, Belgium.
    Brandt, Kirsten
    Newcastle Univ, Inst Ageing, Sch Agr Food & Rural Dev, Human Nutr Res Ctr, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.
    Donini, Lorenzo M.
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Dept Expt Med, Sect Med Pathophysiol Endocrinol & Human Nutr, Rome, Italy.
    Maggio, Marcello
    Univ Parma, Sect Geriatr, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Parma, Italy.
    Mets, Tony
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Frailty Ageing Res Grp FRIA, Brussels, Belgium.
    Wijers, Sander L. J.
    Danone Nutricia Res, Nutricia Adv Med Nutr, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Garthoff, Jossie A.
    Danone Food Safety Ctr, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Luiking, Yvette
    Danone Nutricia Res, Nutricia Adv Med Nutr, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Sieber, Cornel
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Safety and tolerability of 6-month supplementation with a vitamin D, calcium and leucine-enriched whey protein medical nutrition drink in sarcopenic older adults2020In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 1501-1514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Safety and tolerability of prolonged supplementation with a vitamin D, calcium and leucine-enriched whey protein medical nutrition drink (WP-MND) was evaluated in sarcopenic older adults.

    Methods A 13-week double-blinded, randomized, isocaloric placebo-controlled trial (PROVIDE study;n = 380) was extended with a voluntary 13-week open-label extension (OLE). OLE participants were randomized to receive daily 1 or 2 servings of WP-MND (21 g protein, 3 g leucine, 10 mu g vitD and 500 mg calcium per serving). Gastro-intestinal tolerability, kidney function and serum levels of calcidiol, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcium were evaluated at week 0, 13 and 26.

    Results and discussion In response to the high daily protein intake (median1.5; IQR: 1.3, 1.7 g/kg BW/day), the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) increased in the test group during the RCT (p = 0.013). The same trend was observed for those participants with moderate chronic kidney disease. During OLE no eGFR change was observed in any of the groups. Serum calcidiol and calcium reached a plateau after 13-week WP-MND supplementation. As expected, PTH significantly changed in the opposite direction, decreasing during RCT in the test group (T vs C:p < 0.001) and during OLE in former control groups. During RCT, 20/366 participants with normal baseline calcidiol reached levels >= 100 nmol/L (T:n = 18; C:n = 2) and 6 developed albumin-corrected calcium levels > 2.55 mmol/L (T:n = 3; C:n = 3), without associated adverse events.

    Conclusion A 6 months intervention with up to 2 servings of WP-MND did neither result in kidney function deterioration nor symptoms of vitamin D or calcium toxicity. The product was overall well tolerated.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 26.
    Bauer, Juergen M.
    et al.
    Carl von Ossietzky Univ Oldenburg, Dept Geriatr Med, D-26133 Oldenburg, Germany..
    Verlaan, Sjors
    Nutricia Adv Med Nutr, Nutricia Res, Utrecht, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, Sect Gerontol & Geriatr, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Bautmans, Ivan
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Frailty Ageing Res Grp FRIA, Brussels, Belgium..
    Brandt, Kirsten
    Newcastle Univ, Inst Ageing, Sch Agr Food & Rural Dev, Human Nutr Res Ctr, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Donini, Lorenzo M.
    Univ Roma La Sapienza, Sect Med Pathophysiol Endocrinol & Human Nutr, Dept Expt Med, I-00185 Rome, Italy..
    Maggio, Marcello
    Univ Parma, Univ Hosp, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Sect Geriatr,Movement Disorders & Prevent Disabil, I-43100 Parma, Italy.;Univ Parma, Univ Hosp, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Sect Geriatr,Food Sci Unit, I-43100 Parma, Italy.;Univ Parma, Univ Hosp, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Sect Geriatr,Endocrinol Aging Unit, I-43100 Parma, Italy..
    McMurdo, Marion E. T.
    Univ Dundee, Ninewells Hosp & Med Sch, Ninewells Hosp, Ageing & Hlth, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland..
    Mets, Tony
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Frailty Ageing Res Grp FRIA, Brussels, Belgium..
    Seal, Chris
    Newcastle Univ, Inst Ageing, Sch Agr Food & Rural Dev, Human Nutr Res Ctr, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Wijers, Sander L.
    Nutricia Adv Med Nutr, Nutricia Res, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Ceda, Gian Paolo
    Univ Parma, Univ Hosp, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Sect Geriatr,Movement Disorders & Prevent Disabil, I-43100 Parma, Italy.;Univ Parma, Univ Hosp, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Sect Geriatr,Food Sci Unit, I-43100 Parma, Italy.;Univ Parma, Univ Hosp, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Sect Geriatr,Endocrinol Aging Unit, I-43100 Parma, Italy..
    De Vito, Giuseppe
    Univ Coll Dublin, Inst Sport & Hlth, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Donders, Gilbert
    Femicare, Clin Res Women, Tienen, Belgium..
    Drey, Michael
    Klinikum Univ Munchen LMU, Schwerpunkt Akutgeriatrie, Med Klin & Poliklin 4, Munich, Germany..
    Greig, Carolyn
    Univ Birmingham, Sch Sport Exercise & Rehabil Sci, Birmingham, W Midlands, England.;Univ Birmingham, Ctr Musculoskeletal Ageing Res, Birmingham, W Midlands, England..
    Holmbäck, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Narici, Marco
    Univ Nottingham, Royal Derby Hosp, MRC ARUK Ctr Musculoskeletal Ageing Res, Fac Med, Derby, England..
    McPhee, Jamie
    Manchester Metropolitan Univ, Sch Healthcare Sci, All Saints, Manchester M15 6BH, Lancs, England..
    Poggiogalle, Eleonora
    Univ Roma La Sapienza, Sect Med Pathophysiol Endocrinol & Human Nutr, Dept Expt Med, I-00185 Rome, Italy..
    Power, Dermot
    Mater Misericordiae Univ Hosp, Dept Med Older Persons, Dublin, Ireland.;Univ Coll Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland..
    Scafoglieri, Aldo
    Vrije Univ Brussel, Frailty Ageing Res Grp FRIA, Brussels, Belgium..
    Schultz, Ralf
    St Marien Hosp, Clin Geriatr, Cologne, Germany..
    Sieber, Cornel C.
    Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Inst Biomed Ageing, Nurnberg, Germany..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Effects of a Vitamin D and Leucine-Enriched Whey Protein Nutritional Supplement on Measures of Sarcopenia in Older Adults, the PROVIDE Study: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial2015In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 740-747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Age-related losses of muscle mass, strength, and function (sarcopenia) pose significant threats to physical performance, independence, and quality of life. Nutritional supplementation could positively influence aspects of sarcopenia and thereby prevent mobility disability. Objective: To test the hypothesis that a specific oral nutritional supplement can result in improvements in measures of sarcopenia. Design: A multicenter, randomized, controlled, double-blind, 2 parallel-group trial among 380 sarcopenic primarily independent-living older adults with Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB; 0-12) scores between 4 and 9, and a low skeletal muscle mass index. The active group (n = 184) received a vitamin D and leucine-enriched whey protein nutritional supplement to consume twice daily for 13 weeks. The control group (n = 196) received an iso-caloric control product to consume twice daily for 13 weeks. Primary outcomes of handgrip strength and SPPB score, and secondary outcomes of chair-stand test, gait speed, balance score, and appendicular muscle mass (by DXA) were measured at baseline, week 7, and week 13 of the intervention. Results: Handgrip strength and SPPB improved in both groups without significant between-group differences. The active group improved more in the chair-stand test compared with the control group, between-group effect (95% confidence interval): -1.01 seconds (-1.77 to -0.19), P = .018. The active group gained more appendicular muscle mass than the control group, between-group effect: 0.17 kg (0.004-0.338), P = .045. Conclusions: This 13-week intervention of a vitamin D and leucine-enriched whey protein oral nutritional supplement resulted in improvements in muscle mass and lower-extremity function among sarcopenic older adults. This study shows proof-of-principle that specific nutritional supplementation alone might benefit geriatric patients, especially relevant for those who are unable to exercise. These results warrant further investigations into the role of a specific nutritional supplement as part of a multimodal approach to prevent adverse outcomes among older adults at risk for disability.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27.
    Bendavid, Itai
    et al.
    Tel Aviv Univ, Sackler Sch Med, Beilinson Hosp, Rabin Med Ctr,Dept Gen Intens Care, Tel Aviv, Israel.;Tel Aviv Univ, Sackler Sch Med, Beilinson Hosp, Rabin Med Ctr,Inst Nutr Res, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    Lobo, Dileep N.
    Nottingham Univ Hosp NHS Trust, Nottingham Biomed Res Ctr, Natl Inst Hlth Res NIHR, Gastrointestinal Surg,Nottingham Digest Dis Ctr, Nottingham NG7 2UH, England.;Univ Nottingham, Queens Med Ctr, Nottingham NG7 2UH, England.;Univ Nottingham, Queens Med Ctr, Sch Life Sci, MRC Versus Arthrit Ctr Musculoskeletal Ageing Res, Nottingham NG7 2UH, England..
    Barazzoni, Rocco
    Univ Trieste, Dept Med Surg & Hlth Sci, Trieste, Italy..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Ageing, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Coeffier, Moise
    Rouen Univ Hosp, Dept Nutr, CIC1404, Rouen, France.;Normandie Univ, UNIROUEN, Inserm UMR1073, Rouen, France..
    de van der Schueren, Marian
    HAN Univ Appl Sci, Dept Nutr & Dietet, Sch Allied Hlth, Nijmegen, Netherlands..
    Fontaine, Eric
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, LBFA, INSERM U1055, Grenoble, France..
    Hiesmayr, Michael
    Med Univ Vienna, Div Cardiac Thorac Vasc Anesthesia & Intens Care, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria..
    Laviano, Alessandro
    Sapienza Univ, Dept Translat & Precis Med, Rome, Italy..
    Pichard, Claude
    Geneva Univ Hosp, Clin Nutr, Rue Gabrielle Perret Gentil 4, CH-12111 Geneva 4, Switzerland..
    Singer, Pierre
    Tel Aviv Univ, Sackler Sch Med, Beilinson Hosp, Rabin Med Ctr,Dept Gen Intens Care, Tel Aviv, Israel.;Tel Aviv Univ, Sackler Sch Med, Beilinson Hosp, Rabin Med Ctr,Inst Nutr Res, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    The centenary of the Harris-Benedict equations: How to assess energy requirements best? Recommendations from the ESPEN expert group2021In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 690-701Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background & aims: The year 2019 marked the centenary of the publication of the Harris and Benedict equations for estimation of energy expenditure. In October 2019 a Scientific Symposium was organized by the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) in Vienna, Austria, to celebrate this historical landmark, looking at what is currently known about the estimation and measurement of energy expenditure.

    Methods: Current evidence was discussed during the symposium, including the scientific basis and clinical knowledge, and is summarized here to assist with the estimation and measurement of energy requirements that later translate into energy prescription.

    Results: In most clinical settings, the majority of predictive equations have low to moderate performance, with the best generally reaching an accuracy of no more than 70%, and often lead to large errors in estimating the true needs of patients. Generally speaking, the addition of body composition measurements did not add to the accuracy of predictive equations. Indirect calorimetry is the most reliable method to measure energy expenditure and guide energy prescription, but carries inherent limitations, greatly restricting its use in real life clinical practice.

    Conclusions: While the limitations of predictive equations are clear, their use is still the mainstay in clinical practice. It is imperative to recognize specific patient populations for whom a specific equation should be preferred. When available, the use of indirect calorimetry is advised in a variety of clinical settings, aiming to avoid under-as well as overfeeding.

  • 28. Biolo, G
    et al.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Muscaritoli, M
    Muscle contractile and metabolic dysfunction is a common feature of sarcopenia of ageing and chronic disease: From sarcopenic obesity to cachexia2014In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 737-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant body tissue accounting for many physiological functions. However, muscle mass and functions are not routinely assessed. Sarcopenia is defined as skeletal muscle loss and dysfunction in aging and chronic diseases. Inactivity, inflammation, age-related factors, anorexia and unbalanced nutrition affect changes in skeletal muscle. Mechanisms are difficult to distinguish in individual subjects due to the multifactorial character of the condition. Sarcopenia includes both muscle loss and dysfunction which induce contractile impairment and metabolic and endocrine abnormalities, affecting whole-body metabolism and immune/inflammatory response. There are different metabolic trajectories for muscle loss versus fat changes in aging and chronic diseases. Appetite regulation and physical activity affect energy balance and changes in body fat mass. Appetite regulation by inflammatory mediators is poorly understood. In some patients, inflammation induces anorexia and fat loss in combination with sarcopenia. In others, appetite is maintained, despite activation of systemic inflammation, leading to sarcopenia with normal or increased BMI. Inactivity contributes to sarcopenia and increased fat tissue in aging and diseases. At the end of the metabolic trajectories, cachexia and sarcopenic obesity are paradigms of the two patient categories. Pre-cachexia and cachexia are observed in patients with cancer, chronic heart failure or liver cirrhosis. Sarcopenic obesity and sarcopenia with normal/increased BMI are observed in rheumatoid arthritis, breast cancer patients with adjuvant chemotherapy and in most of patients with COPD or chronic kidney disease. In these conditions, sarcopenia is a powerful prognostic factor for morbidity and mortality, independent of BMI.

  • 29. Bischoff, Stephan C
    et al.
    Boirie, Yves
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Chourdakis, Michael
    Cuerda, Cristina
    Delzenne, Nathalie M
    Deutz, Nicolaas E
    Fouque, Denis
    Genton, Laurence
    Gil, Carmen
    Koletzko, Berthold
    Leon-Sanz, Miguel
    Shamir, Raanan
    Singer, Joelle
    Singer, Pierre
    Stroebele-Benschop, Nanette
    Thorell, Anders
    Weimann, Arved
    Barazzoni, Rocco
    Towards a multidisciplinary approach to understand and manage obesity and related diseases2017In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 917-938, article id S0261-5614(16)31323-1Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overnutrition and sedentary lifestyle result in overweight or obesity defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair health. According to the WHO, the worldwide prevalence of obesity nearly doubled between 1980 and 2008. In 2008, over 50% of both men and women in the WHO European Region were overweight, and approximately 23% of women and 20% of men were obese. Comprehensive diagnostic and therapeutic approaches should include nutritional treatment to favor the best metabolic and nutritional outcome, as well as to induce potential disease-specific benefits from selected nutritional regimens. Obesity is usually accompanied by an increased muscle mass. This might explain why obesity, under particular circumstances such as cancer or high age, might have protective effects, a phenomenon named the 'obesity paradox'. However, loss of muscle mass or function can also occur, which is associated with poor prognosis and termed 'sarcopenic obesity'. Therefore, treatment recommendations may need to be individualized and adapted to co-morbidities. Since obesity is a chronic systemic disease it requires a multidisciplinary approach, both at the level of prevention and therapy including weight loss and maintenance. In the present personal review and position paper, authors from different disciplines including endocrinology, gastroenterology, nephrology, pediatrics, surgery, geriatrics, intensive care medicine, psychology and psychiatry, sports medicine and rheumatology, both at the basic science and clinical level, present their view on the topic and underline the necessity to provide a multidisciplinary approach, to address this epidemic.

  • 30. Bischoff, Stephan C
    et al.
    Singer, Pierre
    Koller, Michael
    Barazzoni, Rocco
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    van Gossum, André
    Standard operating procedures for ESPEN guidelines and consensus papers2015In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1043-1051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ESPEN Guideline standard operating procedures (SOP) is based on the methodology provided by the Association of Scientific Medical Societies of Germany (AWMF), the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN), and the Centre for Evidence-based Medicine at the University of Oxford. The SOP is valid and obligatory for all future ESPEN-sponsored guideline projects aiming to generate high-quality guidelines on a regular basis. The SOP aims to facilitate the preparation of guideline projects, to streamline the consensus process, to ensure quality and transparency, and to facilitate the dissemination and publication of ESPEN guidelines. To achieve this goal, the ESPEN Guidelines Editorial board (GEB) has been established headed by two chairmen. The GEB will support and supervise the guideline processes and is responsible for the strategic planning of ESPEN guideline activities. Key elements of the SOP are the generation of well-built clinical questions according to the PICO system, a systemic literature search, a classification of the selected literature according to the SIGN evidence levels providing an evidence table, and a clear and straight-forward consensus procedure consisting of online voting's and a consensus conference. Only experts who meet the obligation to disclosure any potential conflict of interests and who are not employed by the Industry can participate in the guideline process. All recommendations will be graded according to the SIGN grading and novel outcome models besides biomedical endpoints. This approach will further extent the leadership of ESPEN in creating up-to-date and suitable for implementation guidelines and in sharing knowledge on malnutrition and clinical nutrition.

  • 31.
    Bjermo, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Iggman, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm , Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Kullberg, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Dahlman, Ingrid
    Johansson, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Persson, Lena
    Berglund, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Pulkki, Kari
    Basu, Samar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.
    Uusitupa, Matti
    Rudling, Mats
    Arner, Peter
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Ahlström, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Effects of n-6 PUFAs compared with SFAs on liver fat, lipoproteins, and inflammation in abdominal obesity: a randomized controlled trial2012In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 1003-1012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Replacing SFAs with vegetable PUFAs has cardiometabolic benefits, but the effects on liver fat are unknown. Increased dietary n-6 PUFAs have, however, also been proposed to promote inflammation-a yet unproven theory.

    OBJECTIVE:

    We investigated the effects of PUFAs on liver fat, systemic inflammation, and metabolic disorders.

    DESIGN:

    We randomly assigned 67 abdominally obese subjects (15% had type 2 diabetes) to a 10-wk isocaloric diet high in vegetable n-6 PUFA (PUFA diet) or SFA mainly from butter (SFA diet), without altering the macronutrient intake. Liver fat was assessed by MRI and magnetic resonance proton (1H) spectroscopy (MRS). Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type-9 (PCSK9, a hepatic LDL-receptor regulator), inflammation, and adipose tissue expression of inflammatory and lipogenic genes were determined.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 61 subjects completed the study. Body weight modestly increased but was not different between groups. Liver fat was lower during the PUFA diet than during the SFA diet [between-group difference in relative change from baseline; 16% (MRI; P < 0.001), 34% (MRS; P = 0.02)]. PCSK9 (P = 0.001), TNF receptor-2 (P < 0.01), and IL-1 receptor antagonist (P = 0.02) concentrations were lower during the PUFA diet, whereas insulin (P = 0.06) tended to be higher during the SFA diet. In compliant subjects (defined as change in serum linoleic acid), insulin, total/HDL-cholesterol ratio, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides were lower during the PUFA diet than during the SFA diet (P < 0.05). Adipose tissue gene expression was unchanged.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Compared with SFA intake, n-6 PUFAs reduce liver fat and modestly improve metabolic status, without weight loss. A high n-6 PUFA intake does not cause any signs of inflammation or oxidative stress. Downregulation of PCSK9 could be a novel mechanism behind the cholesterol-lowering effects of PUFAs.

  • 32.
    Borda, Miguel German
    et al.
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Ctr Age Related Med SESAM, N-4011 Stavanger, Norway.;Pontificia Univ Javeriana, Ageing Inst, Med Sch, Semillero Neurociencias & Envejecimiento, Bogota 110231, Colombia.;Karolinska Inst, Div Clin Geriatr, Ctr Alzheimer Res, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Samuelsson, Jessica
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Inflammat & Aging, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Baldera, Jonathan Patricio
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Ctr Age Related Med SESAM, N-4011 Stavanger, Norway.;Univ Autonoma Santo Domingo, Escuela Estadist, Santo Domingo 10103, Dominican Rep..
    Perez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises
    Inst Nacl Geriatria, Direcc Invest, Mexico City 10200, Mexico.;Univ Anahuac Mexico Campus Norte, Fac Ciencias Salud, Ctr Invest Ciencias Salud CICSA, Huixquilucan 52786, Mexico..
    Barreto, George E.
    Univ Limerick, Dept Biol Sci, Limerick V94PH61, Ireland..
    Zettergren, Anna
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Kern, Silke
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Psychiat Cognit & Old Age Psychiat, SE-43141 Mölndal, Sweden..
    Ryden, Lina
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Publ Hlth & Caring Sci Clin Nutr & Metab, S-62167 Uppsala, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Inflammat & Aging, S-14186 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gonzalez-Lara, Mariana
    Dalhousie Univ, Fac Hlth, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada..
    Salazar-Londono, Salomon
    Pontificia Univ Javeriana, Ageing Inst, Med Sch, Semillero Neurociencias & Envejecimiento, Bogota 110231, Colombia..
    Duque, Gustavo
    McGill Univ, Dr Joseph Kaufmann Chair Geriatr Med, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ H3A 2B4, Canada.;McGill Univ, Bone Muscle & Gerosci Grp, Res Inst, Hlth Ctr, Montreal, PQ H4A 3J1, Canada..
    Skoog, Ingmar
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Neurosci & Physiol, Sahlgrenska Acad, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.;Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Psychiat Cognit & Old Age Psychiat, SE-43141 Mölndal, Sweden..
    Aarsland, Dag
    Stavanger Univ Hosp, Ctr Age Related Med SESAM, N-4011 Stavanger, Norway.;Kings Coll London, Dept Old Age Psychiat, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, London SE1 9RT, England..
    Nutrient Intake and Its Association with Appendicular Total Lean Mass and Muscle Function and Strength in Older Adults: A Population-Based Study2024In: Nutrients, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 16, no 4, article id 568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment options for sarcopenia are currently limited, and primarily rely on two main therapeutic approaches: resistance-based physical activity and dietary interventions. However, details about specific nutrients in the diet or supplementation are unclear. We aim to investigate the relationship between nutrient intake and lean mass, function, and strength. Data were derived from the Gothenburg H70 birth cohort study in Sweden, including 719,70-year-olds born in 1944 (54.1% females). For independent variables, the diet history method (face-to-face interviews) was used to estimate habitual food intake during the preceding three months. Dependent variables were gait speed (muscle performance), hand grip strength (muscle strength), and the appendicular lean soft tissue index (ALSTI). Linear regression analyses were performed to analyze the relationship between the dependent variables and each of the covariates. Several nutrients were positively associated with ALSTI, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (DHA, EPA), selenium, zinc, riboflavin, niacin equivalent, vitamin B12, vitamin D, iron, and protein. After correction for multiple comparisons, there were no remaining correlations with handgrip and gait speed. Findings of positive correlations for some nutrients with lean mass suggest a role for these nutrients in maintaining muscle volume. These results can be used to inform clinical trials to expand the preventive strategies and treatment options for individuals at risk of muscle loss and sarcopenia.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 33.
    Bruyere, O.
    et al.
    Univ Liege, Dept Publ Hlth Epidemiol & Hlth Econ, Liege, Belgium.;Univ Liege, Support Unit Epidemiol & Biostat, Liege, Belgium..
    Beaudart, C.
    Univ Liege, Dept Publ Hlth Epidemiol & Hlth Econ, Liege, Belgium.;Univ Liege, Support Unit Epidemiol & Biostat, Liege, Belgium..
    Reginster, J. -Y
    Univ Liege, Dept Publ Hlth Epidemiol & Hlth Econ, Liege, Belgium.; Univ Liege, Support Unit Epidemiol & Biostat, Liege, Belgium.
    Buckinx, F.
    Univ Liege, Dept Publ Hlth Epidemiol & Hlth Econ, Liege, Belgium.;Univ Liege, Support Unit Epidemiol & Biostat, Liege, Belgium..
    Schoene, D.
    Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Inst Biomed Aging, Nurnberg, Germany..
    Hirani, V.
    Univ Sydney, Concord Hosp, Ctr Educ & Res Ageing, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia..
    Cooper, C.
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Kanis, J. A.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Rizzoli, R.
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Rehabil & Geriatr, Geneva, Switzerland..
    McCloskey, E.
    Univ Sheffield, Ctr Metab Bone Dis, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cruz-Jentoft, A.
    Hosp Univ Ramon y Cajal, Dept Geriatr, Madrid, Spain..
    Freiberger, E.
    Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Inst Biomed Aging, Nurnberg, Germany..
    Assessment of muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance in clinical practice: An international survey2016In: European Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 1878-7649, E-ISSN 1878-7657, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 243-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several tools are available for the assessment of muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance in clinical research. However, few data are available on the usage of these tools in clinical practice.

    Methods: This study aimed to assess their usage by means of a large online international survey. Since sarcopenia is a specific condition where the assessment of muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance is important, the survey also assessed the tools used for the diagnosis of this geriatric syndrome.

    Results: The survey was completed by 255 clinicians from 55 countries across 5 continents. Among these clinicians with geriatrics, rheumatology and endocrinology as major fields of interest, 53.3% assess muscle mass in daily practice, 54.5% muscle strength and 71.4% physical performance. However, the tools used are very different and no single tool is used by all clinicians. The tools and the cut-off values used by clinicians to diagnose sarcopenia are also heterogeneous.

    Conclusion: Because some tools used for the assessment of muscle mass, muscle strength or physical performance in daily practice are less validated than others, a greater awareness from the clinicians of the importance of using appropriate tools is needed.

  • 34.
    Bruyere, Olivier
    et al.
    Univ Liege, Dept Publ Hlth Epidemiol & Hlth Econ, CHU Sart Tilman, Bat B23, B-4000 Liege, Belgium..
    Buckinx, Fanny
    Univ Liege, Dept Publ Hlth Epidemiol & Hlth Econ, CHU Sart Tilman, Bat B23, B-4000 Liege, Belgium..
    Beaudart, Charlotte
    Univ Liege, Dept Publ Hlth Epidemiol & Hlth Econ, CHU Sart Tilman, Bat B23, B-4000 Liege, Belgium..
    Reginster, Jean-Yves
    Univ Liege, Dept Publ Hlth Epidemiol & Hlth Econ, CHU Sart Tilman, Bat B23, B-4000 Liege, Belgium..
    Bauer, Juergen
    Heidelberg Univ, Agaples Bethanien Hosp, Ctr Geriatr Med, Heidelberg, Germany..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cherubini, Antonio
    IRCCS INRCA, Geriatr & Geriatr Emergency Care, Ancona, Italy..
    Cooper, Cyrus
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton, Hants, England..
    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso Jose
    Hosp Univ Ramon & Cajal IRYCIS, Serv Geriatria, Madrid, Spain..
    Landi, Francesco
    Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, Sch Med, Dept Geriatr Neurosci & Orthoped, Rome, Italy..
    Maggi, Stefania
    CNR, Neurosci Inst, Padua, Italy..
    Rizzoli, Rene
    Geneva Univ Hosp & Fac Med, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Sayer, Avan Aihie
    Newcastle Univ, Newcastle Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, NIHR Newcastle Biomed Res Ctr, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England. Newcastle Univ, Fac Med Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Sieber, Cornel
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg, Nurnberg, Germany..
    Vellas, Bruno
    Ctr Hosp Univ Toulouse, Dept Med Interne & Gerontol Clin, Gerontopole Toulouse, Toulouse, France..
    Cesari, Matteo
    Ctr Hosp Univ Toulouse, Dept Med Interne & Gerontol Clin, Gerontopole Toulouse, Toulouse, France..
    How clinical practitioners assess frailty in their daily practice: an international survey2017In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 905-912Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Various operational definitions have been proposed to assess the frailty condition among older individuals. Our objective was to assess how practitioners measure the geriatric syndrome of frailty in their daily routine.

    Methods: An online survey was sent to national geriatric societies affiliated to the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) and to members of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO).

    Results: A total of 388 clinicians from 44 countries answered to the survey. Most of them were medical doctors (93%), and their primary field of practice was geriatrics (83%). Two hundred and five clinicians (52.8%) always assessed frailty in their daily practice, 38.1% reported to "sometimes" measure it, and 9.1% never assess it. A substantial proportion of clinicians (64.9%) diagnose frailty using more than one instrument. The most widely used tool was the gait speed test, adopted by 43.8% of the clinicians, followed by clinical frailty scale (34.3%), the SPPB test (30.2%), the frailty phenotype (26.8%) and the frailty index (16.8%).

    Conclusion: A variety of tools is used to assess frailty of older patients in clinical practice highlighting the need for standardisation and guidelines.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 35.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Olsson, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Karlström, Brita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Reply to WB Grant2017In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 700-701Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Byberg, Liisa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Olsson, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Karlström, Brita
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical pharmacogenomics and osteoporosis.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Kilander, Lena
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Reply to Y Mao and H Yu.2017In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 698-699Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Campenfeldt, Pierre
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Solna, Sweden.;Swedish Armed Forces, Def Inspectorate Med & Environm Hlth, Tegeluddsvagen 100, SE-10785 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Al-Ani, Amer
    Orthoped Clin, Praktikertjanst AB, Vallingby, Sweden..
    Ekstrom, Wilhelmina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Solna, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Acute & Repair Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Zeraati, Babak
    Stockholm Nursing Home, Dept Geriatr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Greve, Katarina
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Solna, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Funct Perioperat Med & Intens Care PMI, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Inflammat & Ageing, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hedstrom, Margareta
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol, Solna, Sweden.;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Reconstruct Orthoped, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Function, sarcopenia and osteoporosis 10 years after a femoral neck fracture in patients younger than 70 years2022In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 1496-1503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose: A femoral neck fracture (FNF) may have long-term effects on the patient's func-tion, also in patients younger than 70 years. These long-term effects are not well described, since most studies have short follow-ups. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical outcome by performance -based functional tests, hand grip strength, and hip function in different subgroups. The secondary aim was to study surgical complications, bone mineral density (BMD) and occurrence of sarcopenia 10 years after a FNF. Patients and methods: A prospective multicenter study with a 10-year follow-up of patients aged 20- 69 years with a FNF treated with internal fixation (IF). Five-times sit-to-stand test (5TSST), 4-m walking speed test, hand grip strength (HGS) and Harris Hip Score (HHS) were performed.A radiographic examination of the hip was performed and re-operations were registered. Bone min-eral density (BMD) at the hip, spine and total body composition were assessed with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Present sarcopenia was determined by the combination of reduced functional per-formance and low fat-free mass index (FFMI).Results: A total of 58 patients were included. 5TSTS was normal in 45% of the patients and old age was associated with poorer performance ( p < 0.001). 76% of the study population had a normal speed gait and likewise, old age ( p = 0.005) and walking aids ( p = 0.001) were associated with poor performance. HGS was normal in 82% of the men and 64% of the women. HHS showed that 85% had a good/excellent function. A major re-operation was performed in 34% of the patients with displaced FNF and in 20% of patients with non-displaced FNF. 74% displayed osteopenia and 12% osteoporosis. 17% of the men and 38% of the women had sarcopenia.Interpretation: The majority of patients less than 70 years of age with a FNF treated with IF, had normal functional tests, muscle strength and a good hip function ten years post-operatively. However, one in ten had osteoporosis, and one third was sarcopenic which indicate the importance of encouraging regular muscle preserving resistance training after hip fracture.(c) 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ )

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 38.
    Cappellari, Gianluca Gortan
    et al.
    Univ Trieste, Dept Med Sci, Trieste, Italy..
    Guillet, Christelle
    Univ Clermont Auvergne, INRA, CRNH, CHU Clermont Ferrand, Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Poggiogalle, Eleonora
    Sapienza Univ, Rome, Italy..
    Pomar, Maria D. Ballesteros
    Complejo Asistencial Univ Leon, Leon, Spain..
    Batsis, John A.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Boirie, Yves
    Univ Clermont Auvergne, INRA, CRNH, CHU Clermont Ferrand, Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Breton, Irene
    Hosp Gen Univ Gregorio Maranon, Madrid, Spain..
    Frara, Stefano
    Univ Vita Salute, IRCCS Osped San Raffaele, Milan, Italy..
    Genton, Laurence
    Univ Hosp Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland..
    Gepner, Yftach
    Tel Aviv Univ, Tel Aviv, Israel..
    Gonzalez, Maria Cristina
    Catholic Univ Pelotas UCPEL, Pelotas, RS, Brazil. Pennington Biomed Res Ctr, Baton Rouge, LA USA. Univ Freiburg, Inst Evidence Med, Med Ctr, Freiburg, Germany..
    Heyms, Steven B.
    Kiesswetter, Eva
    Institute for Evidence in Medicine, Medical Center & Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
    Laviano, Alessandro
    Sapienza Univ, Rome, Italy..
    Prado, Carla M.
    Santini, Ferruccio
    Serlie, Mireille J.
    Siervo, Mario
    Villareal, Dennis T.
    Volkert, Dorothee
    Voortman, Trudy
    Weijs, Peter J. M.
    Zamboni, Mauro
    Bischoff, Stephan C.
    Busetto, Luca
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Barazzoni, Rocco
    Univ Trieste, Dept Med Sci, Trieste, Italy..
    Donini, Lorenzo M.
    Sapienza Univ, Rome, Italy.;Sapienza Univ, Dept Expt Med, Ple Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome, Italy..
    Panel, SOGLI Expert
    Sarcopenic obesity research perspectives outlined by the sarcopenic obesity global leadership initiative (SOGLI): Proceedings from the SOGLI consortium meeting in rome November 20222023In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 687-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) and the European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO) launched the Sarcopenic Obesity Global Leadership Initiative (SOGLI) to reach expert consensus on a definition and diagnostic criteria for Sarcopenic Obesity (SO).The present paper describes the proceeding of the Sarcopenic Obesity Global Leadership Initiative (SOGLI) meeting that was held on November 25th and 26th, 2022 in Rome, Italy. This consortium involved the participation of 50 researchers from different geographic regions and countries.The document outlines an agenda advocated by the SOGLI expert panel regarding the pathophysiology, screening, diagnosis, staging and treatment of SO that needs to be prioritized for future research in the field.

  • 39.
    Cardenas, Diana
    et al.
    Inst Gustave Roussy, Nutr Unit, Villejuif, France..
    Correia, M. Isabel T. D.
    Univ Fed Med, Eterna Rede Mater Dei & Hosp Semper, Med Sch, Surg Dept, Belo Horizonte, Brazil..
    Hardy, Gil
    Ipanema Res Trust, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Gramlich, Leah
    Univ Alberta, Dept Med, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Surg Dept, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Van Ginkel-Res, Annemieke
    European Federat Assoc Dietitians EFAD, Naarden, Netherlands..
    Remijnse, Wineke
    European Federat Assoc Dietitians EFAD, Naarden, Netherlands..
    Barrocas, Albert
    Tulane Sch Med, Dept Surg, New Orleans, LA USA..
    Gautier, Juan B. Ochoa
    Hunterdon Med Ctr, ICU, Flemington, NJ USA..
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Surg, Örebro, Sweden..
    Ungpinitpong, Winnai
    Surin Hosp, Surg Dept, Surin, Thailand..
    Barazzoni, Rocco
    Univ Trieste, Osped Cattinara, Dept Med Technol & Translat Sci, Trieste, Italy..
    International Declaration on the Human Right to Nutritional Care: A global commitment to recognize nutrition care as a human right2023In: Nutrition in clinical practice, ISSN 0884-5336, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 946-958Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Cardenas, Diana
    et al.
    Inst Gustave Roussy, Nutr Unit, Villejuif, France..
    Correia, M. Isabel T. D.
    Univ Fed Med, Med Sch, Surg Dept, Eterna Rede Mater & Hosp Semper, Belo Horizonte, Brazil..
    Hardy, Gil
    Ipanema Res Trust, Auckland, New Zealand..
    Gramlich, Leah
    Univ Alberta, Dept Med, Edmonton, AB, Canada..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Van Ginkel-Res, Annemieke
    European Federat Assoc Dietitians EFAD, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Remijnse, Wineke
    European Federat Assoc Dietitians EFAD, Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Barrocas, Albert
    Tulane Sch Med, Dept Surg, New Orleans, LA USA..
    Gautier, Juan B. Ochoa
    Hunterdon Med Ctr, Flemington, NJ USA..
    Ljungqvist, Olle
    Örebro Univ, Sch Med Sci, Dept Surg, Örebro, Sweden..
    Ungpinitpong, Winnai
    Surin Hosp, Surg Dept, Surin, Thailand..
    Barazzoni, Rocco
    Univ Trieste, Osped Cattinara, Dept Med Technol & Translat Sci, Trieste, Italy..
    The international declaration on the human right to nutritional care: A global commitment to recognize nutritional care as a human right2023In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 909-918Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Access to nutritional care is frequently limited or denied to patients with disease-related malnutrition (DRM), to those with the inability to adequately feed themselves or to maintain their optimal healthy nutritional status which goes against the fundamental human right to food and health care. That is why the International Working Group for Patient's Right to nutritional care is committed to promote a human rights based approach (HRBA) in the field of clinical nutrition. Our group proposed to unite efforts by launching a global call to action against disease-related malnutrition through The International Declaration on the Human Right to Nutritional Care signed in the city of Vienna during the 44th ESPEN congress on September 5th 2022. The Vienna Declaration is a non-legally binding document that sets a shared vision and five principles for implementation of actions that would promote the access to nutritional care. Implementation programs of the Vienna Declaration should be promoted, based on international normative frameworks as The United Nations (UN) 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Rome Declaration of the Second International Conference on Nutrition and the Working Plan of the Decade of Action on Nutrition 2016-2025. In this paper, we present the general background of the Vienna Declaration, we set out an international normative framework for implementation programs, and shed a light on the progress made by some clinical nutrition societies.

    Through the Vienna Declaration, the global clinical nutrition network is highly motivated to appeal to public authorities, international governmental and non-governmental organizations and other scientific healthcare societies on the importance of optimal nutritional care for all patients.

  • 41. Carlsson, P
    et al.
    Tidermark, J
    Ponzer, S
    Söderqvist, A
    Cederholm, T
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Food habits and appetite of elderly women at the time of a femoral neck fracture and after nutritional and anabolic support.2005In: J Hum Nutr Diet, ISSN 0952-3871, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 117-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Carrero, Juan J.
    et al.
    Huang, Xiaoyan
    Jimenez-Moleon, Jose
    Lindholm, Bengt
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Arnlov, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Riserus, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Sjögren, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Mediterranean Diet, Kidney Function, And Mortality In Men With Chronic Kidney Disease2013In: Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation, ISSN 0931-0509, E-ISSN 1460-2385, Vol. 28, no S1, p. 8-8Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Cawthon, Peggy M.
    et al.
    Calif Pacific Med Ctr, Res Inst, 550 16th St,Second Floor, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.;Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, San Francisco, CA USA..
    Visser, Marjolein
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Fac Sci, Dept Hlth Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Amsterdam Publ Hlth Res Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Arai, Hidenori
    Natl Ctr Geriatr & Gerontol, Obu, Aichi, Japan..
    Avila-Funes, Jose A.
    Inst Nacl Ciencias Med & Nutr Salvador Zubiran, Dept Geriatr, Mexico City, DF, Mexico..
    Barazzoni, Rocco
    Univ Trieste, Dept Med Surg & Hlth Sci, Trieste, Italy..
    Bhasin, Shalender
    Harvard Med Sch, Bostin Claude D Pepper Older Amer Independence Ct, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Binder, Ellen
    Barnes Jewish Hosp, Siteman Canc Ctr, St Louis, MO 63110 USA.;Washington Univ, Sch Med, Div Geriatr & Nutr Sci, St Louis, MO USA..
    Bruyère, Olivier
    Univ Liege, World Hlth Org Collaborating Ctr Publ Hlth Aspect, Div Publ Hlth Epidemiol & Hlth Econ, Liege, Belgium..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Theme Inflammat & Ageing, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chen, Liang-Kung
    Natl Yang Ming Chiao Tung Univ, Ctr Hlth Longev & Aging Sci, Taipei, Taiwan.;Taipei Vet Generfranal Hosp, Ctr Geriatr & Gerontol, Taipei, Taiwan.;Taipei Municipal Gan Dau Hosp, Taipei Vet Gen Hosp, Taipei, Taiwan..
    Cooper, Cyrus
    Univ Southampton, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiol Unit, Southampton, Hants, England.;Univ Oxford, Dept Epidemiol, Oxford, England..
    Duque, Gustavo
    McGill Univ Hlth Ctr, Res Inst, Montreal, PQ, Canada.;McGill Univ, Dept Med, Div Geriatr Med, Montreal, PQ, Canada..
    Fielding, Roger A.
    Tufts Univ, Nutr Exercise Physiol & Sarcopenia Lab, Jean Mayer US Dept Agr Human Nutr, Res Ctr Aging, Boston, MA 02111 USA..
    Guralnik, Jack
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA..
    Kiel, Douglas P.
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Dept Med, Hinda & Arthur Marcus Inst Aging Res, Hebrew SeniorLife, Boston, MA 02215 USA.;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Kirk, Ben
    Univ Melbourne, Australian Inst Musculoskeletal Sci AIMSS, St Albans, Vic, Australia.;Western Hlth, St Albans, Vic, Australia.;Univ Melbourne, Dept Med, Western Hlth, St Albans, Vic, Australia..
    Landi, Francesco
    Fdn Policlin Univ Agostino Gemelli IRCCS, I-00168 Rome, Italy..
    Sayer, Avan A.
    Newcastle Upon Tyne Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, AGE Res Grp, NIHR Newcastle Biomed Res Ctr, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England.;Newcastle Univ, Fac Med Sci, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England..
    Von Haehling, Stephan
    Univ Med Gottingen UMG, Dept Cardiol & Pneumol, Gottingen, Germany.;German Ctr Cardiovasc Res DZHK, Partner Site Gottingen, Gottingen, Germany..
    Woo, Jean
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Fac Med, Dept Med & Therapeut, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.;Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Fac Med, Ctr Nutr Studies, Hong Kong, Peoples R China..
    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J.
    Hosp Univ Ramon y Cajal IRYCIS, Serv Geriatria, Madrid, Spain..
    Defining terms commonly used in sarcopenia research: a glossary proposed by the Global Leadership in Sarcopenia (GLIS) Steering Committee2022In: European Geriatric Medicine, ISSN 1878-7649, E-ISSN 1878-7657, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1239-1244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods

    The aim of this paper is to define terms commonly related to sarcopenia to enable standardization of these terms in research and clinical settings. The Global Leadership Initiative in Sarcopenia (GLIS) aims to bring together leading investigators in sarcopenia research to develop a single definition that can be utilized worldwide; work on a global definition of sarcopenia is ongoing. The first step of GLIS is to develop the common terminology, or a glossary, that will facilitate agreement on a global definition of sarcopenia as well as interpretation of clinical and research findings.

    Results

    Several terms that are commonly used in sarcopenia research are defined, including self-reported measures of function and ability; objective physical performance tests; and measures related to muscle function and size.

    Conclusion

    As new methods and technologies are developed, these definitions may be expanded or refined over time. Our goal is to promote this common language to describe sarcopenia and its components in clinical and research settings in order to increase clinical awareness and research interest in this important condition. We hope that the use of common terminology in sarcopenia research will increase understanding of the concept and improve communication around this important age-related condition.

    Key summary points

    Aim

    The aim of this paper is to define terms commonly related to sarcopenia to enable standardization of these terms in research and clinical settings.

    Findings

    This paper provides definitions for commonly used terminology in sarcopenia in both clinical and research settings. As new methods and technologies are developed, this terminology may be expanded or refined over time.

    Message

    We hope that the use of common terminology in sarcopenia research will increase understanding of the concept and improve communication around this important age-related condition. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 44.
    Cederholm, T
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    [Malnutrition in the elderly--a challenge for health services]2001In: Lakartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 98, no 11, p. 1228-30Article in journal (Other scientific)
  • 45.
    Cederholm, T
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Treatment of protein-energy malnutrition in chronic disorders in the elderly.2002In: Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol, ISSN 1121-421X, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 247-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Cederholm, T
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Jensen, Gordon L.
    Univ Vermont, Coll Med, Deans Off, Burlington, VT USA.;Univ Vermont, Coll Med, Dept Med, Burlington, VT 05405 USA..
    To Create a Consensus on Malnutrition Diagnostic Criteria: A Report From the Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) Meeting at the ESPEN Congress 20162017In: JPEN - Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, ISSN 0148-6071, E-ISSN 1941-2444, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 311-314Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) Congress in Copenhagen, Denmark (September 2016), representatives of the 4 largest global parenteral and enteral nutrition (PEN) societies from Europe (ESPEN), the United States (American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition [ASPEN]), Asia (Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Society of Asia [PENSA]), and Latin America (Latin American Federation of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition [FELANPE]) and from national PEN societies around the world met to continue the conversation on how to diagnose malnutrition that started during the Clinical Nutrition Week, Austin, Texas (February 2016). Current thinking on diagnostic approaches was shared; ESPEN suggested a grading approach that could encompass various types of signs, symptoms, and etiologies to support diagnosis. ASPEN emphasized where the parties agree; that is, that the 3 major published approaches (ESPEN, ASPEN-Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and Subjective Global Assessment [SGA]) all propose weight loss as a key indicator for malnutrition. FELANPE suggested that the anticipated consensus approach needs to prioritize a diagnostic method that is available for everybody since resources differ globally. PENSA highlighted that body mass index varies by ethnicity/race and that sarcopenia/muscle mass evaluation is important for the diagnosis of malnutrition. A Core Working Committee of the Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition has been established (comprising 2 representatives each from the 4 largest PEN societies) that will lead consensus development in collaboration with a larger working group with broad global representation, using e-mail, telephone conferences, and face-to-face meetings during the upcoming ASPEN and ESPEN congresses. Transparency and external input will be sought. Objectives include (1) consensus development around evidence-based criteria for broad application, (2) promotion of global dissemination of the consensus criteria, and (3) seeking adoption by the World Health Organization and the International Classification of Diseases.

  • 47.
    Cederholm, T
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Medicinska vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Larsson, J
    Ericsson, O
    Myrbäck, K E
    Hellgren, U
    [Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea--a growing problem in geriatric care]2001In: Lakartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 98, no 8, p. 833-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Cederholm, T
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Rothenberg, Elisabet
    Hjärtkliniken, Institutionen för medicin, - Stockholm, Sweden - , Sweden..
    Matens betydelse för åldrande och livslängd - Matens sammansättning, oxidativ stress och vikt är viktiga faktorer2016In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 113, article id DZPZArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Fett av bra kvalitet och i rätt mängd är viktigt i hälsosam kost2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, no 34/35, p. 1371-1372Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.
    Fettkvalitet och hjärtsjukdom i omstridd meta-analys2014In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 111, p. CW3R-Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det är svårt att koppla hälsoeffekter till enskilda näringsämnen. Även fettsyror verkar, liksom andra näringsämnen, i ett metabolt samspel.

    I en metaanalys har fettintagets relation till hjärtsjukdom studerats. En svaghet med analysen är att studier med olika kvalitet och design har blandats.

    Dagens kostrekommendationer har bidragit till att hjärt–kärldödligheten halverats och att medellivslängden ökat med 7–10 år på ca 30 år.

    En kost baserad på vegetabiliska (icke-tropiska) oljor, komplexa kolhydrater, fisk och ljust kött är förenad med långsiktig hälsa.

123456 1 - 50 of 300
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf