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  • 1.
    Andersson, Roger
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Delft Univ Technol, Fac Architecture & Built Environm, OTB Res Built Environm, Delft, Netherlands.
    Economic decline and residential segregation: a Swedish study with focus on Malmö2016In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 748-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Economic crises are often associated with increasing levels of income segregation and income polarization. Poor neighborhoods generally hit more severely, with unemployment levels increasing and income levels dropping more than in better-off neighborhoods. In this article, we study the correlation between economic recession and income segregation in Malmö, Sweden, with focus on development in the regions' poorest neighborhoods. We compare and contrast these areas' development during a period of economic crisis (1990–1995) with development during a period characterized by relative economic stability. Our findings  suggest that (1) income segregation and income polarization indeed increased during the period of economic crisis; (2) neighborhoods that were already poor before the crisis fared worse than the region in general; and (3) this development was due to both in situ changes and to residential sorting, where the differences in income and employment status between people moving into a neighborhood, those moving out, and those who remained in place were greater during the period of recession compared to the more stable period.

  • 2.
    Bergström, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Ethnic clustering and family ties -: do ethnic minorities move near extended family?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bergström, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Ethnic segregation in Sweden: Different situation, similar explanations2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Bergström, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Neighbourhood effects on residential mobility?: An analysis of intra-city moving patterns in Stockholm2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Bergström, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The Impact of Residential Mobility on Measurements of Neighbourhood Effects: Neighbourhood Effects - Theory and Evidence2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bergström, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    van Ham, Maarten
    University of St Andrews.
    Manley, David
    University of St Andrews.
    Neighbourhood reproduction through neighbourhood choice2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7. Galster, George
    et al.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Measuring Neighbourhood Effects Non-experimentally: How Much Do Alternative Methods Matter?2013In: Housing Studies, ISSN 0267-3037, E-ISSN 1466-1810, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 473-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European research attempting to quantify neighbourhood effects has relied almost exclusively on analyses of observational data. No consensus has emerged, perhaps because a variety of statistical procedures have been employed. We investigate this by exploring the degree to which alternative, non-experimental statistical methods yield different estimates of the relationship between neighbourhood income mix and individual work income when applied to the same longitudinal database. We find that results are highly sensitive to the statistical approach employed. Methods controlling for geographic selection bias generally reduce the negative association between low-income neighbours and individual earnings, but substantial differences across models remain. Controlling for both selection and endogeneity produces larger associations and evidence of non-linearity, something that is hidden in models only controlling for selection. All methods suffer shortcomings, so we argue for multi-method investigations to identify robust findings, with instrumental variables and fixed effects on non-mover samples being preferred. In our case, we find a substantial neighbourhood effect, regardless of the method employed.

  • 8.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Compositional or Contextual Effects?: Neighbourhoods and Teenage Parenthood in Stockholm, Sweden2014In: Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie, ISSN 0023-2653, E-ISSN 1861-891X, Vol. 66, p. 67-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selection bias constitutes a major problem in neighbourhood effect research but perhaps especially so for studies of effects on teenage birth rates. Results from both the U.S. and Europe are highly inconsistent: where some find substantial effects and others no effects. This inconsistency in combination with the clear correlations between neighbourhood environment and teenage birth rates where teenage mothers and mothers-to-be are overrepresented in low SES neighbourhoods makes it unclear if and to what extent neighbourhoods exerts a causal influence on teenage birth rates or whether correlations are mere reflections of differences in choices on the housing markets. This study adds to the (mainly American and British) body of literature on neighbourhood effects on teenage birth but focuses on a context-Stockholm, Sweden-where teenage birth rates are substantially lower. It offers a discussion on the potential impacts of selection bias on estimates of neighbourhood effects on teenage birth rates and empirically tests the existence of such neighbourhood effects. To account for selection bias I use a random effects model with a Mundlak correction (a hybrid model), a model that corrects for selection similarly to a fixed-effects model but also allows the inclusion of fixed parameters. The hybrid model produces coefficients that are substantially smaller compared to an OLS model that does not control for selection; selection thus biases results upwards. The neighbourhood effects estimated by the hybrid model are so small that they can be ignored.

  • 9.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Compositional or contextual effects?: Neighbourhoods and teenage parenthood in Stockholm, Sweden2014In: Soziale Kontexte und soziale Mechanismen / [ed] Jürgen Friedrichs and Alexandra Nonnenmacher, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10. Hedman, Lina
    Ethnic clustering: moving near countrymen or moving near family?2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Ethnic clustering: moving near countrymen or moving near family?2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Moving Near Family?: The Influence of Extended Family on Neighbourhood Choice in an Intra-urban Context2013In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 32-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social ties are among the most important factors explaining destination choices on the international or national scale but much less is known about their role in short-distance mobility. In this paper, I analyse how the presence of extended family in a neighbourhood affects destination choices on a local housing market the city of Uppsala, Sweden. I employ a probit model to investigate who is more likely to move to neighbourhoods where extended family members reside, followed by a conditional logit model that tests the importance of the presence of family in relation to other neighbourhood characteristics. Results show that the presence of family is indeed a strong determinant for neighbourhood choice and that non-Western immigrants, middle-aged adults, individuals with low socio-economic status, and individuals who have previously resided in the neighbourhood are most likely to move near family.

  • 13.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Neighborhoods, Neighborhood Effects, and Residential Mobility: A Holistic View and Future Directions2014In: Strengthening Communities with Neighborhood Data / [ed] G. Thomas Kingsley, Claudia J Coulton & Kathryn S. Pettit, The Urban Institute Press , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Residential Mobility and Neighbourhood Effects: A Holistic Approach2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of studies estimating neighbourhood effects has increased rapidly during the last two decades. Although results from these studies vary, a majority find at least small effects. But to what extent can we trust these estimates? Neighbourhood effect studies face many serious methodological challenges, of which some are related to the fact that people move. The mobility of individuals may cause neighbourhoods to change over time, result in exposure times that are too short and seriously bias estimates. These methodological problems have not been given enough attention in the neighbourhood effect literature: no study controls for them all, and implications of mobility are rarely included in theoretical discussions of neighbourhood effects.

    In a comprehensive summary and five different papers, I argue that the two scholarly fields of residential mobility and neighbourhood effect studies are intrinsically connected and that any arbitrary separation between the two is both conceptually problematic and risks leading to erroneous conclusions. Studies of neighbourhood effects must address the problems caused by mobility, before it can be convincingly argued that results actually show neighbourhood effects. To do this, longitudinal data are necessary. Furthermore, the connection between the two fields may also have implications for studies of residential mobility.

    List of papers
    1. The Impact of Residential Mobility on Measurements of Neighbourhood Effects
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Impact of Residential Mobility on Measurements of Neighbourhood Effects
    2011 (English)In: Housing Studies, ISSN 0267-3037, E-ISSN 1466-1810, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 501-519Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Neighbourhoods and cities are dynamic; their characteristics and relative positions change over time due to constant moves in and out. However, neighbourhood effect theory and most attempts to quantitatively estimate neighbourhood effects seem to treat neighbourhoods as if they were static. This paper argues that such a view is not only strange but may also result in biased estimates. Four methodological challenges are highlighted that are directly related to mobility: (1) measures of exposure time; (2) neighbourhood change; (3) selection bias; and (4) endogeneity. These are all topics worthy of scholarly interest in themselves, but also challenges that all neighbourhood effect studies must address to convincingly argue that their results are indicative of causal relationships-results of neighbourhood transmission mechanisms-and not just statistical correlations. The paper discusses how and to what extent these challenges have been met by the quantitative neighbourhood effect literature and gives directions to future research. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]   Copyright of Housing Studies is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Oxfordshire: Taylor & Francis (Routledge), 2011
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159183 (URN)10.1080/02673037.2011.559753 (DOI)000290684600002 ()
    Available from: 2011-09-23 Created: 2011-09-23 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    2. Understanding neighbourhood effects: selection bias and residential mobility
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding neighbourhood effects: selection bias and residential mobility
    2011 (English)In: Neighbourhood Effects Research: New Perspectives / [ed] Maarten van Ham, David Manley, Nick Bailey, Ludi Simpson, Duncan Maclennan, Dordrecht ;: Springer, 2011, p. 79-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Dordrecht ;: Springer, 2011
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-165132 (URN)94-007-2308-3 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2012-01-03 Created: 2012-01-03 Last updated: 2016-04-22Bibliographically approved
    3. Neighbourhood choice and neighbourhood reproduction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neighbourhood choice and neighbourhood reproduction
    2011 (English)In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 1381-1399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Although we know a lot about why households choose certain dwellings, we know relatively little about the mechanisms behind their choice of neighbourhood. Most studies of neighbourhood choice focus only on one or two dimensions of neighbourhoods: typically poverty and ethnicity. In this paper we argue that neighbourhoods have multiple dimensions and that models of neighbourhood choice should take these dimensions into account. We propose the use of a conditional logit model. From this approach we can gain insight into the interaction between individual and neighbourhood characteristics which lead to the choice of a particular neighbourhood over alternative destinations. We use Swedish register data to model neighbourhood choice for all households which moved in the city of Uppsala between 1997 and 2006. Our results show that neighbourhood sorting is a highly structured process where households are very likely to choose neighbourhoods where the neighbourhood population matches their own characteristics. We find that income is the most important driver of the sorting process, although ethnicity and other demographic and socioeconomic characteristics play important roles as well.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Pion, 2011
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159186 (URN)10.1068/a43453 (DOI)000293770100010 ()
    Available from: 2011-09-23 Created: 2011-09-23 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
    4. Moving Near Family?: The Influence of Extended Family on Neighbourhood Choice in an Intra-urban Context
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moving Near Family?: The Influence of Extended Family on Neighbourhood Choice in an Intra-urban Context
    2013 (English)In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 32-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Social ties are among the most important factors explaining destination choices on the international or national scale but much less is known about their role in short-distance mobility. In this paper, I analyse how the presence of extended family in a neighbourhood affects destination choices on a local housing market the city of Uppsala, Sweden. I employ a probit model to investigate who is more likely to move to neighbourhoods where extended family members reside, followed by a conditional logit model that tests the importance of the presence of family in relation to other neighbourhood characteristics. Results show that the presence of family is indeed a strong determinant for neighbourhood choice and that non-Western immigrants, middle-aged adults, individuals with low socio-economic status, and individuals who have previously resided in the neighbourhood are most likely to move near family.

    Keywords
    family, social networks, residential mobility, neighbourhood choice, conditional logit
    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-189120 (URN)10.1002/psp.1703 (DOI)000311406500004 ()
    Available from: 2012-12-25 Created: 2012-12-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
    5. Neighbourhood Income Sorting and the Effects of Neighbourhood Income Mix on Income: A Holistic Empirical Exploration
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neighbourhood Income Sorting and the Effects of Neighbourhood Income Mix on Income: A Holistic Empirical Exploration
    2013 (English)In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 107-127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    An econometric model is specified in which an individual’s income and the income mix of the neighbourhood in which the individual resides are endogenous, thus providing a holistic model of phenomena that previously have been fragmented into neighbourhood effects and neighbourhood selection literatures. To overcome the biases from selection and endogeneity, the parameters of this model are estimated using instrumental variables in a fixed-effect panel analysis employing annual data on 90 438 working-age males in Stockholm over the 1995–2006 period. Evidence is found of both neighbourhood effects and neighbourhood selection, but more importantly, it is found that the magnitudes of these effects are substantially altered when taking selection and endogeneity biases into account, compared with when only controlling for selection. When taking endogeneity into account, the apparent impact of neighbourhood income mix on individual income is magnified and the effect of individual income on the percentage of high income in the neighbourhood is magnified.

    National Category
    Social Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-181572 (URN)10.1177/0042098012452320 (DOI)000312548000008 ()
    Available from: 2012-09-26 Created: 2012-09-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
  • 15.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    The Impact of Residential Mobility on Measurements of Neighbourhood Effects2011In: Housing Studies, ISSN 0267-3037, E-ISSN 1466-1810, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 501-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neighbourhoods and cities are dynamic; their characteristics and relative positions change over time due to constant moves in and out. However, neighbourhood effect theory and most attempts to quantitatively estimate neighbourhood effects seem to treat neighbourhoods as if they were static. This paper argues that such a view is not only strange but may also result in biased estimates. Four methodological challenges are highlighted that are directly related to mobility: (1) measures of exposure time; (2) neighbourhood change; (3) selection bias; and (4) endogeneity. These are all topics worthy of scholarly interest in themselves, but also challenges that all neighbourhood effect studies must address to convincingly argue that their results are indicative of causal relationships-results of neighbourhood transmission mechanisms-and not just statistical correlations. The paper discusses how and to what extent these challenges have been met by the quantitative neighbourhood effect literature and gives directions to future research. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]   Copyright of Housing Studies is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract.

  • 16.
    Hedman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Andersson, Roger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Etnisk segregation och inkomstsegregation i Sveriges tio största arbetsmarknadsregioner 1990–20102015In: Mångfaldens dilemman: Boendesegregation och områdespolitik / [ed] Roger Andersson, Bo Bengtsson & Gunnar Myrberg, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2015, 1, p. 15-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Hedman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Galster, George
    Wayne State University, Detroit, USA.
    Neighbourhood Income Sorting and the Effects of Neighbourhood Income Mix on Income: A Holistic Empirical Exploration2013In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 107-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An econometric model is specified in which an individual’s income and the income mix of the neighbourhood in which the individual resides are endogenous, thus providing a holistic model of phenomena that previously have been fragmented into neighbourhood effects and neighbourhood selection literatures. To overcome the biases from selection and endogeneity, the parameters of this model are estimated using instrumental variables in a fixed-effect panel analysis employing annual data on 90 438 working-age males in Stockholm over the 1995–2006 period. Evidence is found of both neighbourhood effects and neighbourhood selection, but more importantly, it is found that the magnitudes of these effects are substantially altered when taking selection and endogeneity biases into account, compared with when only controlling for selection. When taking endogeneity into account, the apparent impact of neighbourhood income mix on individual income is magnified and the effect of individual income on the percentage of high income in the neighbourhood is magnified.

  • 18.
    Hedman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Holmqvist, Emma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Producing and Reproducing Ethnic Residential Segregation: Is 'White flight' enouhg to capture the mobility motives of natives?2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Hedman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Manley, David
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences.
    van Ham, Maarten
    Delft University of Technology, OTB Research Institute for the Built Environment, The Netherlands .
    Östh, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Cumulative Exposure to Disadvantage and the Intergenerational Transmission of Neighbourhood Effects2012Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Hedman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Manley, David
    van Ham, Maarten
    Östh, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Cumulative exposure to disadvantage and the intergenerational transmission of neighbourhood effects2015In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 195-215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of neighbourhood effects typically investigate the instantaneous effect of point-in-time measures of neighbourhood poverty on individual outcomes. It has been suggested that it is not solely the current neighbourhood, but also the neighbourhood history of an individual that is important in determining an individual's outcomes. Using a population of parental home-leavers in Stockholm, Sweden, this study investigates the effects of two temporal dimensions of exposure to neighbourhood environments on personal income later in life: the parental neighbourhood at the time of leaving the home and the cumulative exposure to poverty neighbourhoods in the subsequent 17 years. Using unique longitudinal Swedish register data and bespoke individual neighbourhoods, we are the first to employ a hybrid model, which combines both random and fixed effects approaches in a study of neighbourhood effects. We find independent and non-trivial effects on income of the parental neighbourhood and cumulative exposure to poverty concentration neighbourhoods.

  • 21.
    Hedman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    van Ham, Maarten
    Delft University of Technology, Delft.
    Understanding neighbourhood effects: selection bias and residential mobility2011In: Neighbourhood Effects Research: New Perspectives / [ed] Maarten van Ham, David Manley, Nick Bailey, Ludi Simpson, Duncan Maclennan, Dordrecht ;: Springer, 2011, p. 79-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Hedman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    van Ham, Maarten
    Delft University of Technology, OTB Research Institute for the Built Environment, The Netherlands .
    Manley, David
    University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK.
    Neighbourhood choice and neighbourhood reproduction2011In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 1381-1399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although we know a lot about why households choose certain dwellings, we know relatively little about the mechanisms behind their choice of neighbourhood. Most studies of neighbourhood choice focus only on one or two dimensions of neighbourhoods: typically poverty and ethnicity. In this paper we argue that neighbourhoods have multiple dimensions and that models of neighbourhood choice should take these dimensions into account. We propose the use of a conditional logit model. From this approach we can gain insight into the interaction between individual and neighbourhood characteristics which lead to the choice of a particular neighbourhood over alternative destinations. We use Swedish register data to model neighbourhood choice for all households which moved in the city of Uppsala between 1997 and 2006. Our results show that neighbourhood sorting is a highly structured process where households are very likely to choose neighbourhoods where the neighbourhood population matches their own characteristics. We find that income is the most important driver of the sorting process, although ethnicity and other demographic and socioeconomic characteristics play important roles as well.

  • 23.
    Hedman, Lina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Vilkama, Katja
    University of Helsinki.
    Brattbakk, Ingar
    UiO University of Oslo.
    White flight in the Nordic countries?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Kauppinen, Timo
    et al.
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, POB 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland.
    Skifter Andersen, Hans
    Aalborg Univ, Danish Bldg Res Inst, DK-2450 Copenhagen SV, Denmark.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    DETERMINANTS OF IMMIGRANTS’ ENTRY TO HOMEOWNERSHIP IN THREE NORDIC CAPITAL CITY REGIONS2015In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 97, no 4, p. 343-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent of homeownership among immigrants may be seen as an indicator of integration and as a determinant of ethnic residential segregation. Studies have shown differences in the determinants of homeownership between immigrants and natives, indicating that variation in homeownership is not only a function of differences in economic resources. These studies have largely focused on Anglo-American contexts, using mostly cross-sectional data. We apply survival analysis methods to analyse the determinants of entry to homeownership in the capital regions of three Nordic countries - Denmark, Finland and Sweden - utilizing longitudinal individual-level register-based datasets. We find that differences in entry to homeownership between natives and different immigrant groups cannot be explained by differences in socio-economic background factors. We also find differences in the effects of these factors. Effects of income are generally weaker among non-Western immigrants and immigrants are less responsive to changes in household composition. The share of non-Western immigrants in the neighbourhood is only weakly related to entry to homeownership, while immigrants and natives living in public rental housing tend to be slightly less inclined to move to homeownership. Weaker income effects among immigrants, weak effects of ethnic segregation and the importance of the public rental sector differentiate our results from earlier findings. Weaker income effects may indicate that uncertainty about the future also affects middle-income immigrants. Differences between the three contexts in housing markets and policies do not seem to matter much, although the results indicate that difficult access to the private rental sector may push immigrants to homeownership.

  • 25.
    Kelly, Melissa
    et al.
    Univ Free State, Dept Sociol, POB 339, ZA-9300 Bloemfontein, South Africa.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Delft Univ Technol, OTB Res Built Environm, Fac Architecture & Built Environm, NL-2600 GA Delft, Netherlands.
    Between Opportunity and Constraint: Understanding the Onward Migration of Highly Educated Iranian Refugees from Sweden2016In: Journal of International Migration and Integration, ISSN 1488-3473, E-ISSN 1874-6365, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 649-667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 1980s and early 1990s, more than 50,000 Iranian refugees moved to Sweden. The Swedish state attended to their immediate needs, providing housing, language training, and other types of support. Moreover, these migrants had almost immediate access to all the benefits of the Swedish welfare state including affordable healthcare, unemployment insurance, and free education up to and including the tertiary level. Despite the opportunities available to them in Sweden, many Iranian refugees have faced challenges, especially when trying to secure meaningful work. One of the strategies they have used to overcome barriers to entering the labor market is to leave Sweden for onward destinations which are seen as having relatively more to offer. This study explores the onward migration of Iranians from Sweden by way of a two-step mixed methods approach: in the first step, population register data is used to determine how onward migrants differ from those Iranians who stay in Sweden. In the second step, information from life history interviews conducted with onward migrants in London and Toronto is used to understand what motivates individuals to leave Sweden. Overall, the study finds that highly educated Iranians who have struggled to find employment in Sweden are the most likely to move on. Their precise motivations for doing so, however, are nuanced and complex and relate to more than just economic factors.

  • 26.
    Kelly, Melissa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Onward migration of Iranians from Sweden2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Magnusson Turner, Lena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Linking integration and housing career: A longitudinal analysis of some immigrant groups in Sweden2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28. Turner, Lena Magnusson
    et al.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Linking Integration and Housing Career: A Longitudinal Analysis of Immigrant Groups in Sweden2014In: Housing Studies, ISSN 0267-3037, E-ISSN 1466-1810, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 270-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the extent to which immigrant groups are integrated in the Stockholm region through an analysis of their housing careers. Housing conditions are linked to many important life course events, as well as to the resources and preferences of each individual family. Housing conditions influence integration, but factors related to integration can also be a cause of housing conditions. In the study, we take a truly longitudinal approach to housing careers by exploring differences in the timing of career-related events between several immigrant groups and native Swedes. The objective of the study is to explore whether the housing careers of immigrant groups follow family and work careers in a similar way as the native population. The data are derived from a longitudinal individual-level register-based data-set maintained by Statistics Sweden. The analysis is carried out by way of survival analysis. Our results confirm that there are substantial ethnic differences in housing careers that cannot be attributed to family composition or career. Our results also highlight three important factors that reduce the differences between native Swedes and immigrants groups in the tendency to enter homeownership: university degree, type of municipality and duration of stay in Sweden.

  • 29. van Ham, Maarten
    et al.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Manley, David
    Coulter, Rory
    Östh, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Intergenerational transmission of neighbourhood poverty: an analysis of neighbourhood histories of individuals2014In: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, ISSN 0020-2754, E-ISSN 1475-5661, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 402-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent to which socioeconomic (dis) advantage is transmitted between generations is receiving increasing attention from academics and policymakers. However, few studies have investigated whether there is a spatial dimension to this intergenerational transmission of (dis) advantage. Drawing on the concept of neighbourhood biographies, this study contends that there are links between the places individuals live with their parents and their subsequent neighbourhood experiences as independent adults. Using individual-level register data tracking the whole Stockholm population from 1990 to 2008, and bespoke neighbourhoods, this study is the first to use sequencing techniques to construct individual neighbourhood histories. Through visualisation methods and ordered logit models, we demonstrate that the socioeconomic composition of the neighbourhood children lived in before they left the parental home is strongly related to the status of the neighbourhood they live in 5, 12 and 18 years later. Children living with their parents in high poverty concentration neighbourhoods are very likely to end up in similar neighbourhoods much later in life. The parental neighbourhood is also important in predicting the cumulative exposure to poverty concentration neighbourhoods over a long period of early adulthood. Ethnic minorities were found to have the longest cumulative exposure to poverty concentration neighbourhoods. These findings imply that for some groups, disadvantage is both inherited and highly persistent.

  • 30.
    van Ham, Maarten
    et al.
    Delft University of Technology, Delft and The Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), Bonn.
    Hedman, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
    Manley, David
    University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences, UK.
    Coulter, Rory
    University of St Andrews.
    Östh, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Intergenerational Transmission of Neighbourhood Poverty in Sweden: An Innovative Analysis of Individual Neighbourhoods Histories2012Report (Other academic)
1 - 30 of 30
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